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Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion => Election What-ifs? => Topic started by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 27, 2008, 10:44:00 pm



Title: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 27, 2008, 10:44:00 pm
Since I have now completed my TR Wins in 1912 timeline, I shall be moving on to write a timeline on what would happen if President John F. Kennedy survived his 1963 assassination attempt.  I hope to have the first update ready by Monday.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Marokai Backbeat on December 27, 2008, 10:49:31 pm
I look forward to it, :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Dodger Blue on December 28, 2008, 12:12:35 am
Good luck Ben. Should be interesting.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on December 28, 2008, 08:54:08 am
AWESOME!!!!!!!
That being said, if you need any help on anything (in particular senate and congressional issues) i would love to help, as my grandpa was quite active at the time as an advisor to Kennedy and later Johnson on veterans issues.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: defe07 on December 28, 2008, 02:25:33 pm
I would love to help as well. Seeing that I have written on this subject many times in the past, as you well know. If you can find a place for me, I would love to help.

I never knew you liked to do threads on JFK. ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 29, 2008, 05:44:03 pm
A dream day had turned into a nightmare.  In two separate hotel rooms in Dallas, the President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, and the Governor of Texas, John Bowden Connally fight for their lives following a shooting while the President, Governor, Vice President Johnson, Senator Yarborough and their families ride through Dallas.

In the late hours of the evening, word leaks out that Governor Connally, despite the best efforts of his doctors, had died from bullet wounds to the arms, chest, and legs.  A distraught Vice President Johnson openly weeps at the loss of one of his closest and oldest friends.  No word is sent about the President, other than that he is in critical condition, and hovering between life and death.

All across the country, business grinds to a halt as people await news on their fallen leader.  In the late afternoon of the next day, it is reported that the President, although alive, was in weak condition, and would return to the White House to rest.

On November 26, the President is seen returning to the White House, appearing worn and haggard.  In a statement to the press, the President jokes about the assassination attempt, attributing his wounds to his forgetting to duck.   He announces that he will spend the next several weeks recovering, and will most likely return for his State of the Union address.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on December 29, 2008, 05:57:25 pm
I have trouble believing Kennedy would be joking after John Connally's death. Besides that this seems like a good start.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Scam of God on December 30, 2008, 10:48:56 pm
Are we to assume, then, that Oswald's bullet struck Kennedy somewhere other than his head?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 30, 2008, 10:54:23 pm
Are we to assume, then, that Oswald's bullet struck Kennedy somewhere other than his head?

That bullet actually missed Kennedy completely.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Scam of God on December 30, 2008, 11:02:55 pm
Are we to assume, then, that Oswald's bullet struck Kennedy somewhere other than his head?

That bullet actually missed Kennedy completely.


Where was he wounded, then?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 30, 2008, 11:04:39 pm
Are we to assume, then, that Oswald's bullet struck Kennedy somewhere other than his head?

That bullet actually missed Kennedy completely.


Where was he wounded, then?

He was wounded in the hip and arm.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Scam of God on December 30, 2008, 11:05:05 pm
Are we to assume, then, that Oswald's bullet struck Kennedy somewhere other than his head?

That bullet actually missed Kennedy completely.


Where was he wounded, then?

He was wounded in the hip and arm.

Gotchya. :D

[/derailment]


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Dodger Blue on December 31, 2008, 12:08:08 am
Can't wait for the next installment.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 01, 2009, 01:40:08 am
On January 8, 1964, President Kennedy, for the first time since the assassination attempt, appears before Congress.  He starts off by paying tribute to the late Governor Connally, calling him “A truly great American.”  He asks the Congress to pass his Civil Rights Act, which had been bottled up in the Rules Committee by Chairman Howard Smith (D-VA), since before the assassination attempt.  “It is an unholy calumny that some Americans, because of the accident of birth, are not able to seek the fullest opportunities that the good Lord has offered to them.”

The day following the speech, the President gathers a meeting of top Congressional leaders in the House and Senate, as well as Vice President Johnson, to discuss how to get the Act out of Smith’s committee.  At the suggestion of Congressman Emmanuel Celler (D-NY), the House would be presented with a petition to discharge the bill from the Committee. Only if a majority of members signed the discharge petition would the bill move directly to the House floor without consideration by Smith's committee.  Despite reservations about the effectiveness of the petition, Kennedy tells Celler to introduce it.

For several weeks, the petition languishes in Congress, with some members refusing to go against typical procedure and sign the petition.  However, after an intense lobbying campaign by Vice President Johnson, as well as massive letter writing campaign by constituents, Congressman begin signing on.  In order to avoid the embarrassment of the petition, Smith agrees to discharge the Act on February 19.  On March 1, by a vote of 290-130, the Act passes, and is sent to the Senate.

Following the Senate vote, Kennedy meets with Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT), to try and find a way to avoid the Act being bottled up in the Judiciary Committee.  After several days, Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), comes up with a novel solution.  Instead of initially waiving a second reading of the bill, which would have led sent it immediately to Judiciary, Mansfield would give the Act a second reading, which he did on March 27.

Mansfield proposed that, in the absence of precedent for instances when a second reading did not immediately follow the first, that the bill bypass the Judiciary Committee and immediately be sent to the Senate floor for debate.  Despite several Southerners wanting to filibuster the motion, Senator Richard Russell (D-GA), decides to let the Act come to the floor, which it does on April 8.

As long expected, the South filibusters, with Senator Russell declaring, “We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our states.”  The longest speech of the filibuster is given by Senator A. Willis Robertson (D-VA), who speaks for 19 hours and 28 minutes.

On the June 25, Senators Everett Dirksen (R-IL), Thomas Kuchel (R-CA), Humphrey, and Mansfield introduce a substitute bill, hoping to attract enough Republican votes to end the filibuster.  The strategy works, and on July 8, after a 13 hour speech by Senator John McClellan (D-AR), the Senate agrees to grant cloture, by a vote of 70-30, the first time cloture had ever been imposed on a civil rights bill.  Three days later, by a vote of 72-28, the Senate passes the Civil Rights Act of 1964; it is passed by the House on July 9, and the next day, in a grand ceremony, President Kennedy signs the legislation.  During the ceremony, though, Vice President Johnson remarks to an aide that, “We have lost the South for a generation.”

With the legislation finally passed, President Kennedy begins, in earnest, his campaign for reelection.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on January 01, 2009, 12:11:04 pm
Good timeline so far. I'm just wondering what you are going to do as far as LBJ being VP? A lot of folks think that he would have dropped him, and the popularity boost from the assassination attempt would have given him the leverage to drop him. His closest aides said that he was thinking Terry Sanford, governor of NC and a symbol of the new south.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 01, 2009, 03:10:11 pm
Interesting and well detailed installment on the ATL Passage of the Civil Rights Act for TTL. It does sound like more of a backlash might develop in favor of Goldwater in the election(He'll still probably loose but not as bad as in OTL). Assuming that Goldwater is the GOP Nominee, do him an JFK make good on there series of town hall debates that is rumored they had planned in OTL? This, added with information being released about JFK's other women and the medical issues might tip the election in Goldwater's favor. Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on January 01, 2009, 06:17:58 pm
I guess it's the risk we run in a free society and forum.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 01, 2009, 09:25:03 pm
The Democratic Nomination

On March 17th, President Kennedy announces that he will seek a second term in 1964.  He says that he hopes to have the Vice President run again, but that he will let Johnson make his own plans.  Three days later, Vice President Johnson addresses the press, “On November 21, 1963, I was resolved to seek a second term as Vice President.  However, following the death of my good friend, Governor Connally, I have decided to not seek a second term as Vice President.  I will, however, campaign very hard for the President, and I hope he is reelected.”

Following Johnson’s announcement, Kennedy begins searching for a new Vice President.  With the conventional wisdom being that Kennedy would need a Southerner, the Kennedy short list includes only members from Confederate and border states.  By early July, the President’s shortlist has been narrowed down to three people: Senators Ralph Yarborough of Texas and George Smathers of Florida, and Governor Terry Sanford of North Carolina.  After conferring with Vice President Johnson, Kennedy decides to select Senator Smathers, making the decision public on July 24, one month before the Democratic Convention begins in Atlantic City.

The Convention opens with a moving tribute to Governor Connally, delivered by a very emotional Vice President Johnson.  The convention nominates Kennedy and Smathers by acclamation, and Kennedy, in a rousing address, promises a victory in November.

The Republican Nomination

As the election season opened, the Republicans faced a looming civil war between the liberal and conservative factions of their party.  Following the announcement of former Vice President Nixon that he would not seek the nomination, several candidates from both sides declare for the nomination, with the frontrunners seemingly being Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York, representing the liberals, and Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona standing for the conservatives.

The first primary, in New Hampshire, goes to Governor Rockefeller by a substantial margin, as expected.  The next primary, on April 7 in Wisconsin, goes to Senator Goldwater by a narrow margin.  On April 14, Goldwater scores a major victory in Illinois, and then rolls off consecutive wins in New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Texas, Indiana, Ohio, Nebraska, and West Virginia, before finally losing in Oregon.  The defeat comes too late, and Goldwater has the nomination wrapped up by that point.  On May 19, after losing in the Maryland primary, Rockefeller ends the active stage of his campaign, and focuses on securing delegates at the convention in San Francisco.

At the convention, Rockefeller insists on a roll call vote, despite Goldwater having more than enough delegates to win the nomination.  Midway through the vote, however, Rockefeller concedes, and Goldwater is nominated by acclamation.  He selects Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania, a Rockefeller supporter, as his running mate.

The General Election

Throughout the campaign, both candidates maintain a very positive attitude.  The two friends debate each other in numerous televised, town hall debates, which are evenly split between the two candidates.  The final debate, held on October 25, is held on Air Force 1, in one of the most watched broadcasts of the year.

During the campaign, Kennedy appeared to have maintained a solid lead, and on election night, he is reelected by a comfortable margin.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1964&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;10;6&AK=2;3;5&AZ=2;5;5&AR=2;6;5&CA=1;40;5&CO=2;6;5&CT=1;8;5&DE=1;3;5&DC=1;3;8&FL=1;14;5&GA=2;12;6&HI=1;4;6&ID=2;4;5&IL=1;26;5&IN=2;13;5&IA=2;9;5&KS=2;7;5&KY=2;9;5&LA=2;10;5&ME=1;4;5&MD=1;10;6&MA=1;14;7&MI=1;21;5&MN=1;10;5&MS=2;7;8&MO=1;12;5&MT=2;4;5&NE=2;5;5&NV=2;3;5&NH=2;4;5&NJ=1;17;5&NM=2;4;5&NY=1;43;5&NC=2;13;4&ND=2;4;5&OH=1;26;5&OK=2;8;5&OR=1;6;5&PA=1;29;5&RI=1;4;7&SC=2;8;6&SD=2;4;5&TN=2;11;4&TX=2;25;4&UT=2;4;5&VT=1;3;5&VA=1;12;5&WA=1;9;5&WV=1;7;5&WI=1;12;5&WY=2;3;5)
John Kennedy/George Smathers: 54% PV, 337 EV
Barry Goldwater/William Scranton: 44% PV, 201 EV
Others: 2% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

Despite Kennedy’s landslide, the Democrats suffer minor losses in the House, owing to their already strong majority.  In the Senate, they maintain their previous numbers.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1964&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=0;3;6&AZ=2;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=2;55;9&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;3&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;8&FL=1;27;3&GA=0;15;5&HI=2;4;3&ID=0;4;6&IL=0;21;5&IN=1;11;3&IA=0;7;4&KS=0;6;6&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;9&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=1;6;3&MO=1;11;3&MT=1;3;3&NV=2;5;9&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;15;3&NM=1;5;9&NY=2;31;3&NC=0;15;5&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;20;3&OK=1;7;3&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;21;3&RI=1;4;3&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=1;11;3&TX=1;34;3&UT=1;5;3&VT=2;3;3&VA=1;13;3&WA=1;11;3&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=1;3;3&ME=1;2;3&ME1=1;1;3&ME2=1;1;3&NE=2;2;3&NE1=2;1;3&NE2=2;1;3&NE3=2;1;3)
Democrats: 64 (-)
Republicans: 36 (-)

House Results
Democrats: 250 (-9)
Republicans: 185 (+9)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President North Carolina Yankee on January 01, 2009, 11:01:44 pm
Another masterpiece from the great Ben Constantine? We shall see. It looks very good so far.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 01, 2009, 11:15:39 pm
Another masterpiece from the great Ben Constantine? We shall see. It looks very good so far.

It's actually Constine, and thank you :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Lief 🐋 on January 01, 2009, 11:23:51 pm
It's good, but how do you have a presidential debate on an airplane?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 01, 2009, 11:32:00 pm
Great Installment on the election, I think the results were very probable, and i think we can say a GOP victory in 68. Does Reagan still give "The Speech" in TTL? Can't wait to see what you have in store for us soon...Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 01, 2009, 11:43:08 pm
It's good, but how do you have a presidential debate on an airplane?

I read about it in a book on Goldwater, so I included it.

Great Installment on the election, I think the results were very probable, and i think we can say a GOP victory in 68. Does Reagan still give "The Speech" in TTL? Can't wait to see what you have in store for us soon...Keep it comming

Reagan does indeed give his famed speech, and he campaigns very hard for Senator Goldwater.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President North Carolina Yankee on January 02, 2009, 01:33:17 am
Another masterpiece from the great Ben Constantine? We shall see. It looks very good so far.

It's actually Constine, and thank you :)

I knew that. Its just whenever I see your Display name I think of Ben Franklin and Constantine the Great. This is one of those cases where my brain and my fingers are not on the same wavelength.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 02, 2009, 01:35:39 am
Another masterpiece from the great Ben Constantine? We shall see. It looks very good so far.

It's actually Constine, and thank you :)

I knew that. Its just whenever I see your Display name I think of Ben Franklin and Constantine the Great. This is one of those cases where my brain and my fingers are not on the same wavelength.

Ah, of course.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 02, 2009, 07:16:43 pm
So when can we expect the next installment?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on January 02, 2009, 08:54:21 pm
Very well thought out. Here's a few things I like, and some I don't
1-Smathers makes a whole lot of sense. Anti-communist, southern, and a Kennedy supporter. I would have liked to see Sanford, but Smathers is good too.
2-Johnson withdrawing on his own sounds a little sketchy. It does sound like Bobby and other Kennedy allies persuaded him to do it.
3-Texas going to Goldwater after Dallas!!!!??????!!!!! I can see the south and inner-west, but not Texas.
Besides that, fantastic update!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Хahar 🤔 on January 03, 2009, 02:37:23 pm
Drop Johnson? No, certainly not. Johnson had ambition, too.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 03, 2009, 11:23:02 pm
LBJ was going to seek another term, but Connally's death had a major impact on him, and he just couldn't go again.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 04, 2009, 04:02:52 pm
(http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb-media/99/1899-004-5293D7E2.jpg)
The Second Term of John F. Kennedy

“This country demands action, and it demands action now!  I am asking Congress to pass the complete legislative package that I am sending them, so that we may achieve our Great Society!”

The first piece of legislation Kennedy sends to Congress in the Voting Rights Act of 1965.  Written by Attorney General Bobby Kennedy, and introduced into the Senate by Senator Ralph Yarborough (D-TX), the Act would outlaw the practice of requiring otherwise qualified voters to pass literacy tests in order to register to vote, a principal means by which southern states had prevented African-Americans from exercising the franchise.  It would also establish federal oversight of elections administration.

From the beginning, it became clear that the South intended to filibuster the legislation.  Deciding against utilizing the tactic used to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Kennedy asks Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT), to allow the South to filibuster, while working behind the scenes to gain Republican support.  On March 23, Mansfield decides he has enough votes, and calls for cloture.  By a vote of 69-31, cloture is achieved, and on March 30, by a vote of 67-33, the Senate passes the Voting Rights Act.

When the VRA reaches the House, though, it encounters even more difficulty, as Congressman Smith bottles it up in the Rules Committee.  By early June, the VRA had been in the Committee for 2 months, with no action being taken.  Finally, on June 12, the VRA is reported out, and is passed by the House on June 29, 320-115.  It is signed by President Kennedy on July 1.

The next piece of legislation on Kennedy’s agenda is the Economic Opportunity Act of 1965.  Written by Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), the EOA would be implemented by the Office of Economic Opportunity, and include social programs to promote the health, education, and general welfare of the poor.  The EOA faces little opposition in either House, and is signed by Kennedy on August 6.

When Congress returned in September, it was presented with two pieces of legislation for education: the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, and the Higher Education Act of 1965.  The Elementary and Secondary Education Act would fund primary and secondary education for professional development, instructional materials, resources to support educational programs, and parental involvement promotion.  Written by Francis Keppel, the U.S. Commissioner of Education, the ESEA faced little opposition, and was signed by President Kennedy on December 9.

The Higher Education Act of 1965 also written by Keppel, would increase federal money given to universities, created scholarships, give low-interest loans for students, and establish a National Teachers Corps.  Like the ESEA, the HEA faced little opposition, and was signed by President Kennedy on January 7.

In his State of the Union Address in 1966, President Kennedy announces a massive troop escalation in Vietnam, in order to, “Put an end to the Communist threat to South Vietnam and ensure that the North Vietnamese adhere to the treaties which they have signed.”  Not mentioned by Kennedy, though, is any attempt to move into North Vietnam.  Acting on the advise of military officials, as well as Senator Richard B. Russell (D-GA), Chairman of the Armed Services Committee, Kennedy makes the decision that a ceasefire similar to the one in Korea was the best possible outcome.

Not everyone, however, approves of the decision.  Senator Henry M. Jackson (D-WA) calls it, “A sellout to the South Vietnamese, as well as all the American soldiers who have worked to prevent the spread of Communism.”  Senator John Tower (R-TX) chides the President for, “Doing what was politically expedient, instead of doing what was right.”  However, Kennedy defends his decision on national television, saying that it was the best conceivable result.

That statement is challenged by General William Westmoreland, the chief leader of troops in Vietnam.  In a speech on February 10, 1966, Westmoreland criticizes Kennedy’s leadership, and asks Congress to give him more troops.  Three days later, Kennedy fires Westmoreland, replacing him with Maxwell D. Taylor, a Kennedy ally.

The Westmoreland firing raises hell amongst Republicans and hawkish Democrats, with the Congress actually passing a resolution condemning Kennedy for the decision.  Kennedy stands by his choice, though, and the fighting in Vietnam continues under new leadership.

In early April, Kennedy submits to Congress two amendments to the Social Security Act, establishing Medicare and Medicaid.  Medicare would serve as government-funded health care for the elderly, while Medicaid would be government-funded health care for the poor.  Despite charges from some conservatives that Medicare and Medicaid amounted to socialism, the Congress passes both amendments easily, and the first cards are given to former President Harry Truman and his wife Bess at the Truman Library.

On June 4, Justice Hugo L. Black dies of a stroke at his home in Washington, DC.  To replace him, Kennedy follows through on a previous statement and appoints William H. Hastie to replace Black.  Hastie, the first African-American ever nominated to the Supreme Court, faces intense opposition from Southerners, including James Eastland (D-MS), Chairman of the Judiciary Committee.  After more than two months of grueling hearings, Hastie is finally confirmed by the Senate, 78-22, and becomes the first African-American Justice on the Supreme Court.

The Congressional Elections

As expected during the final election of a two term Presidency, the opposition makes gains in Congress, with the GOP picking up several Senate seats, and a fair chunk of House seats.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=1;3;3&AZ=0;10;5&AR=1;6;3&CA=0;55;5&CO=2;9;3&CT=0;7;5&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;8&FL=0;27;5&GA=1;15;3&HI=0;4;5&ID=2;4;3&IL=2;21;9&IN=0;11;5&IA=2;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=0;10;5&MA=2;12;3&MI=2;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=1;6;3&MO=0;11;5&MT=2;3;9&NV=0;5;5&NH=1;4;3&NJ=2;15;3&NM=1;5;3&NY=0;31;5&NC=1;15;3&ND=0;3;6&OH=0;20;5&OK=1;7;3&OR=2;7;9&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=3;8;3&SD=2;3;3&TN=2;11;9&TX=2;34;3&UT=0;5;7&VT=0;3;5&VA=1;13;3&WA=0;11;5&WV=1;5;3&WI=0;10;4&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;3&ME1=2;1;3&ME2=2;1;3&NE=2;2;3&NE1=2;1;3&NE2=2;1;3&NE3=2;1;3)
Democrats: 60 (-4)
Republicans: 40 (+4)

House Results
Democrats: 238 (-12)
Republicans: 197 (+12)

Green equals one GOP and one Democratic hold.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 04, 2009, 06:08:55 pm
Interesting situation, you have arising here...I am assuming we don't see as much Anti-war and Civil Rights protests did in otl? Hmm, the Westmoreland firing does seem as if it's going to have some major ripples down the road...the general might take a swing in at the GOP nomination in TTL? If George Smathers does become the nominee, he may very well be able to win back some of the Southern States in a Carteresque faction, assuming Scoop's fighting Democrats manage to be kept in line. I like where TTL is going and Keep it comming.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: PBrunsel on January 04, 2009, 11:03:04 pm
The firing of General Westmoreland is an interesting twist in this story. Will the general pull a MacArthur and run for president in 1968? 


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: The Mikado on January 04, 2009, 11:11:45 pm
Drop Johnson? No, certainly not. Johnson had ambition, too.

And a heart condition.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 05, 2009, 12:39:12 am
Good scenario. What of Bobby Kennedy and Ted Kennedy? I'd like to see theirlives without JFK's assassination.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 05, 2009, 06:26:49 pm
As President Kennedy enters the final two years of his term, his approval ratings stand at an all time low, hovering in the mid 40’s.  This is mostly attributed to the situation in Vietnam.  Despite the massive troop increase, the North Vietnamese refused to allow for a ceasefire, despite failing to inflict any sort of damage to the American troops.

Many members of Congress begin calling for a decisive blow in the war.  Senator Henry M. Jackson (D-WA), says that, “We have an opportunity to win this war now.  With one fell swoop, we can end the threat of North Vietnam permanently.”  Senator John Tower (R-TX) says, “The President is putting his poll numbers ahead of national security.”  Despite the increased pressure, Kennedy does nothing to troop levels.

In a speech on January 29, 1967, President Kennedy boasts that wages were the highest in history, unemployment was at a 13-year low, and corporate profits and farm incomes were greater than ever.  Following the speech, he sends the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967; written by his brother, Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA), the ADEA would prohibit employment discrimination against persons 40 years of age or older.  It would also set standards for pensions and benefits provided by employers, and requires that information about the needs of older workers be provided to the general public.  This legislation, like many of Kennedy’s key programs, passes with little opposition, and is signed into law on May 1, 1967.

On June 5, President Kennedy is confronted with a foreign affairs crisis, when Israel launches a pre-emptive attack against the Egyptian air force. Jordan, which had signed a mutual defence treaty with Egypt on May 30, responds by attacking western Jerusalem and Netanya.  Despite calls from Senators such as Henry Jackson, Hubert Humphrey, John Tower, and other hawks, President Kennedy does not respond immediately, allowing Israel to take its own path.

On June 8, Israel captures the Sinai by sending infantry units to Ras-Sudar on the western coast of the peninsula. Sharm El-Sheikh, at its southern tip, had already been taken a day earlier by units of the Israeli Navy.  By June 10, following the capture of the Golan Heights, Israel signs a ceasefire.  During the fighting, Israel had seized the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula, the West Bank of the Jordan River (including East Jerusalem), and the Golan Heights.  During peace negotiations, Israel votes to return the Sinai to Egypt and the Golan Heights to Syria in return for peace agreements. The Golans would be demilitarized and special arrangement would be negotiated for the Straits of Tiran. The government also resolved to open negotiations with King Hussein of Jordan regarding the Eastern border.  Despite the favorable result, Kennedy is still criticized for his failure to send in troops to help Israel.

On June 29, Chief Justice Earl Warren and Justice Tom Clark both announce their retirement from the Supreme Court.  To replace him, President Kennedy nominates David L. Bazelon of the DC Court of Appeals.  Bazelon is confirmed without any controversy.  Clark is replaced by his fellow Texan John Robert Brown.

On 14 July, 1967, the voters in the United Kingdom give a major boost to incumbent Prime Minister Harold Wilson and his Labour Party, giving Labour a gain of 54 seats, giving him a majority of 102 seats.

In September, though, Kennedy asks Congress to pass the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1968.  The INA would abolish the national-origin quotas that had been in place in the United States since the Immigration Act of 1924.  Strongly supported by liberal Democrats and Republicans, it passes the House on October 17, by a vote of 280-129; on December 12 it passes the Senate, 68-32, and is signed by President Kennedy.

In early February, Kennedy asks Congress to pass legislation increasing funding for NASA, saying that it was possible to reach the moon by the end of 1968.  Congress, however, refuses to pass the spending bill, instead making cuts to the NASA budget, overriding Kennedy’s veto on April 25.

On April 4, 1968, in Tennessee, the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated by James Earl Ray.  Following King’s death, Kennedy gives a speech on national television, mourning that slain leader, and ending any possible threat of riots throughout the country.  King’s funeral is Alabama is attended by the President, Vice President, every member of the Cabinet, House and Senate Leaders, and several Presidential candidates, preparing for the campaign.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Хahar 🤔 on January 05, 2009, 06:44:18 pm
Drop Johnson? No, certainly not. Johnson had ambition, too.

And a heart condition.

The heart condition wouldn't get in his way, methinks. He had to be President.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 05, 2009, 08:32:45 pm
The Democratic Nomination

With it being taken for granted that Vice President Smathers would seek reelection, the major question was who, if anyone, would run against him.  Early attention centered around Senator Henry M. Jackson, of Washington.  A prominent hawk who enjoyed support in every major Democratic constituency, Jackson was considered a premier choice to run for President.  On January 17, Jackson announces that he will indeed seek the nomination.  On February 2, Senator William Proxmire of Wisconsin announces that he will seek the nomination, with support from the small, dovish wing of his party.

On March 12, the first primary of the year is held in New Hampshire.  As expected, Vice President Smathers wins an easy victory, garnering 61% of the vote.  Senator Proxmire finishes second, with 23%, and Senator Jackson gets 16%.  On April 2, in Wisconsin, Senator Proxmire wins 67% in his home state, with 23% going to Smathers, and 10% going to Jackson.  Three weeks later, Smathers wins 70% in Pennsylvania, Jackson wins 21%, and Proxmire wins 9%.  On April 30, Smathers wins 72% in Massachusetts, with Jackson getting 23%, and 5% going to Proxmire.  Smathers continues his winning streak on May 7, taking Washington DC, Indiana, and Ohio by large margins.  Jackson drops out following those primaries, and endorses Smathers.  On May 14, Smathers wins Nebraska and West Virginia; he wins Florida and Oregon on May 28; on June 4 he wins California, New Jersey and South Dakota, and ends the primary season with a win in Illinois.

Entering the Convention, Smathers already holds a majority of delegates.  However, Proxmire insists on a roll call vote, which ends with him only winning in Wisconsin.  Smathers selects Senator Jackson as his running mate, much to the anger of the dovish wing of the party.  Smathers and Jackson both give rousing speeches, and march on to the November election.

The Republican Nomination

Following Goldwater’s defeat in 1964, the GOP looked to the moderate wing of the Party, and the first candidate to declare is moderate Nelson Rockefeller, who failed to gain the nomination in 1964.  Shortly after Rockefeller’s announcement, Senator John Tower of Texas, a conservative, announces his bid for the nomination.  An attempt to draft Richard Nixon fails, and on February 23, Nixon endorses Tower for the nomination.

Rockefeller, as expected, wins the New Hampshire primary by a large margin; Tower responds by winning Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, before Rockefeller takes Massachusetts and DC.  Tower responds by winning Indiana, Ohio, Nebraska, West Virginia, Florida, Oregon, and California, ending with a Rockefeller victory in New Jersey; Tower ends the primaries with a win in Illinois.

The RNC opens in Miami without a clear nominee.  The first ballot shows a slight lead for Tower, with Rockefeller in second.
Senator John Tower (TX): 623 votes
Governor Nelson Rockefeller (NY): 600 votes
Governor George Romney (MI): 74 votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (CA): 35 votes
 Senator Hiram Fong (HI): 1 vote

Shortly before the second vote, Tower makes Rockefeller an offer: if Rockefeller withdraws, then Tower will let him name the Vice President.  Rockefeller accepts, Tower wins the nomination, and Rockefeller supporter Governor Spiro Agnew of Maryland is named the VP nominee.

The General Election

As the campaign gets underway, the race is dead even between Smathers and Tower.  The race changes, though, on September 5, when General William Westmoreland, angry at both candidates for their perceived dovish views on Vietnam, announces his candidacy for President, as the nominee of the American Independent Party, running with Governor Lester Maddox of Georgia as his Vice President.

Westmoreland’s entry into the race radically alters the dynamics of the campaign.  Running to the right of Tower, Westmoreland appears to have thrown the election to Smathers.  During the debates, Westmoreland pounds both candidates on national defense, and jumps in the polls, garnering nearly 25% in early October.  However, Westmoreland is hit hard by the media on his running mate’s segregationist past.  Westmoreland, however, states that his running mate should not effect voter’s views on him, which gets him hit even harder by the media.

On election day, Tower pulls out an extremely narrow victory, with Westmoreland taking a significant chunk of the vote, despite not winning any states.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1968&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;10;5&AK=2;3;4&AZ=2;5;4&AR=1;6;3&CA=2;40;4&CO=2;6;4&CT=1;8;4&DE=2;3;4&DC=1;3;8&FL=1;14;5&GA=2;12;3&HI=1;4;5&ID=2;4;5&IL=1;26;4&IN=2;13;4&IA=2;9;4&KS=2;7;4&KY=2;9;4&LA=2;10;4&ME=2;4;4&MD=1;10;4&MA=1;14;5&MI=1;21;4&MN=1;10;4&MS=2;7;5&MO=2;12;4&MT=2;4;4&NE=2;5;4&NV=2;3;4&NH=2;4;4&NJ=2;17;4&NM=2;4;4&NY=1;43;4&NC=1;13;3&ND=2;4;5&OH=2;26;4&OK=2;8;4&OR=2;6;4&PA=1;29;4&RI=1;4;5&SC=2;8;4&SD=2;4;5&TN=2;11;4&TX=2;25;4&UT=2;4;4&VT=2;3;4&VA=2;12;4&WA=1;9;4&WV=1;7;4&WI=2;12;4&WY=2;3;4)
John Tower/Spiro Agnew: 41.7% PV, 317 EV
George Smathers/Henry Jackson: 41.1% PV, 221 EV
William Westmoreland/Lester Maddox: 16.1% PV, 0 EV
Others: 1.1% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

Despite the close Presidential race, the Republicans make major gains in the Senate; in the House, however, their gains are much smaller.
Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=1;3;3&AZ=2;10;9&AR=1;6;3&CA=2;55;3&CO=2;9;3&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;5&DC=0;3;8&FL=1;27;3&GA=1;15;3&HI=1;4;3&ID=1;4;3&IL=2;21;3&IN=2;11;9&IA=1;7;9&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=2;10;9&MA=0;12;6&MI=0;17;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=2;11;9&MT=0;3;5&NV=1;5;3&NH=2;4;3&NJ=0;15;5&NM=0;5;4&NY=2;31;3&NC=1;15;3&ND=2;3;3&OH=2;20;9&OK=2;7;9&OR=2;7;9&PA=2;21;9&RI=0;4;5&SC=1;8;3&SD=1;3;3&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;34;6&UT=2;5;3&VT=2;3;3&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;11;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=1;10;3&WY=0;3;6&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;5&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;6&NE1=0;1;6&NE2=0;1;6&NE3=0;1;7)
Democrats: 53 (-7)
Republicans: 47 (+7)

House Results
Democrats: 232 (-6)
Republicans: 203 (+6)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 05, 2009, 11:11:50 pm
Great last two installment...I would think Westmoreland's third party run would split the conservative vote esp in the South with Tower, enough so to possibly shift the election to the house? I guess not, It is interesting to see what position the Democrats will take in OTL esp if Support the war Tower in OTL does a Johnsonesque escalation of the war. Perhaps this will allow former Attorney General Bobby Kennedy(Does he still go for the New York Senate seat?) or Mass Senator Teddy Kennedy to run an "We told you so" campaign in '72 or '76 as leader of the growing peace wing? Also picking Agnew is a powder keg waiting to happen, so itll be interesting to see who he nominates if Agnew resigns. Btw what is Tower's stance going to be on the Negative Income Tax and can he bring up enough clout in Congress to get it passed?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 10, 2009, 02:57:33 pm
Great last two installment...I would think Westmoreland's third party run would split the conservative vote esp in the South with Tower, enough so to possibly shift the election to the house? I guess not, It is interesting to see what position the Democrats will take in OTL esp if Support the war Tower in OTL does a Johnsonesque escalation of the war. Perhaps this will allow former Attorney General Bobby Kennedy(Does he still go for the New York Senate seat?) or Mass Senator Teddy Kennedy to run an "We told you so" campaign in '72 or '76 as leader of the growing peace wing? Also picking Agnew is a powder keg waiting to happen, so itll be interesting to see who he nominates if Agnew resigns. Btw what is Tower's stance going to be on the Negative Income Tax and can he bring up enough clout in Congress to get it passed?

Any answers for some of the questions I posted a few day's ago? and how's the next installment coming along? lol


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 10, 2009, 03:30:45 pm
Great last two installment...I would think Westmoreland's third party run would split the conservative vote esp in the South with Tower, enough so to possibly shift the election to the house? I guess not, It is interesting to see what position the Democrats will take in OTL esp if Support the war Tower in OTL does a Johnsonesque escalation of the war. Perhaps this will allow former Attorney General Bobby Kennedy(Does he still go for the New York Senate seat?) or Mass Senator Teddy Kennedy to run an "We told you so" campaign in '72 or '76 as leader of the growing peace wing? Also picking Agnew is a powder keg waiting to happen, so itll be interesting to see who he nominates if Agnew resigns. Btw what is Tower's stance going to be on the Negative Income Tax and can he bring up enough clout in Congress to get it passed?

Any answers for some of the questions I posted a few day's ago? and how's the next installment coming along? lol

My apologies :)  An update will appear in the next several minutes.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 10, 2009, 03:38:17 pm
(http://img132.imageshack.us/img132/4903/presidentjohntowerbeneu1.jpg)
The First Term of John Tower

In his Inaugural Address, continuing on the themes of his campaign, Tower promises for a strong military, including victory in Vietnam.  Tower promises for a bipartisan administration, and his Cabinet reflects that.

Secretary of State: William P. Rogers (R-NY)
Secretary of Treasury: George P. Shultz (R-NY)
Secretary of Defense: Olin E. Teague (D-TX)
Attorney General: Richard Kleindienst (R-AZ)
Postmaster General: Winton M. Blount (R-AL)
Secretary of the Interior: Don Samuelson (R-ID)
Secretary of Agriculture: Robert Docking (D-KS)
Secretary of Commerce: Elliot Richardson (R-MA)
Secretary of Labor: James D. Hodgson (R-MN)
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Caspar Weinberger (R-CA)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Frank E. Curran (D-CA)
Secretary of Transportation: John A. Volpe (R-MA)

Upon taking office, one of Tower’s first actions is to call for a massive troop increase in Vietnam.  He also asks Congress to pass a military pay raise, in an attempt to draw more people into the military.  He does, however, reject a suggestion from hawks such as the recently reelected Barry Goldwater (R-AZ) for a draft, saying it would only have a negative impact on the morale of soldiers.

In deciding to focus on the military, Tower decides to cut spending on numerous domestic programs, including NASA.  The decision, however, raises hell amongst Congressional liberals.  Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA), says, “The President is trying to gut all of the programs that have been so beneficial to the American people, simply so he can pay for a foreign war.”  Senator Henry M. Jackson says, “We do not have to sacrifice butter for guns.  The President’s budget has been starved to death, and it does not need to be so.”  On February 12, Congress passes a budget that includes only minor cuts in social spending, and barely any increase in military spending.  The next day, President Tower vetoes the bill, and announces that he will veto any spending bill that lacks major increases in military spending, and major cuts in social spending.

Four days later, though, the Congress votes overwhelmingly to override the President’s veto.  In a statement, the President blames Congress for endangering the American military presence in Vietnam.

On May 12, 1969, Congress passes the Environmental Protection Act of 1969.  Written by Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), the EPA would establish an Environmental Protection Agency, giving the Agency a large amount of control over the country’s environmental programs.  Despite facing strong opposition from conservatives in Congress, the EPA passes on June 27 in the House, 300-135, and passes the Senate on July 18, 57-43.  Following his stinging spending defeat, Tower signs the legislation on July 19.

In early September, Congress begins debate on the Civil Rights Act of 1969.  Written primarily by Senator Hubert Humphrey (D-MN), the Act would prohibit discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, and national origin.  For the first time since the Voting Rights Act, the South filibusters.  Not all Southerners join in, though.  Senator Al Gore of Tennessee announces he will vote for cloture, as does Ralph Yarborough of Texas and both Senators from Florida, Spessard Holland and LeRoy Collins.

On October 23, by a vote of 79-17, the Senate approved cloture on the bill.  On October 30, they pass the Civil Rights Act of 1969, 73-27.  Upon reaching the House, the Act is bottled up in the Rules Committee by Chairman William Colmer (D-MS), a strong opponent of civil rights legislation.  For nearly a month, pro-civil rights Congressman try to get the Act discharged from Committee, without success.

On December 10, though, Colmer inexplicably releases the Act from Committee, sending it to the full House.  On December 19, by a vote of 280-155, the House passes the Civil Rights Act of 1968, and sends it to the President.  After several days of internal wrangling, the President signs the Act on December 22.

In his State of the Union Address on January 22, 1970, Tower calls for yet another increase in military spending.  He also comes out strongly in opposition to the Equal Rights Amendment, despite strong support amongst the voters.

By early February, the situation in Vietnam seems to have deteriorated since Tower took over.  On February 16, General Taylor resigns, and is replaced by General Westmoreland, after serving for a little over a year as Tower’s National Security Advisor.  Westmoreland, speaking to Congress in early March, says that he needs at least 50,000 more troops in order to win the war fully.

Following Westmoreland’s statement, though, criticism of the war effort begins to increase.  Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) says, “We have been in Vietnam for over a decade.  The time has come to pull out, and allow the Vietnamese to handle their own affairs.”  Even hawks such as Henry M. Jackson (D-WA) begin to move towards peace, with Jackson declaring, “There’s no point in spending an extra 5 years to overcome North Vietnam, when we can have a peaceful coexistence.”

Despite the calls, Tower refuses to cut back on troop levels, and begins suggesting that America may remain in Vietnam well into the 1970’s.

On June 3, Justice John Marshal Harlan dies of a heart attack.  To replace him, Tower nominates Clement Haynsworth of the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals.  However, the Haynsworth nomination runs into opposition from liberals, as well as unions and the NAACP.  On June 20, the Senate rejects Haynsworth’s nomination, 53-46, the first nominee to be rejected in 40 years.  On June 28, Tower nominates Bailey Aldrich of the 1st Circuit; on July 15, Aldrich is confirmed 97-2.

On August 3, Tower leaves for a tour of Europe.  He meets with every major European leader, including newly elected British Prime Minister Edward Heath, just several weeks after his Conservative Party regained the majority in Parliament.  Throughout Europe, Tower is criticized for his position of Vietnam.  Pope Paul VI spends nearly an hour lecturing Tower on the sanctity of life, as protesters rant outside of the Palace.  When Tower returns to the US on August 25, his approval rating stands at an all time low of 42%.

The Congressional Elections

With Tower’s approval ratings sinking very low, the Democrats make major gains in both Houses of Congress, giving them an impressive majority to confront Tower with.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=2;3;3&AZ=2;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=1;55;9&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;3&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;8&FL=1;27;3&GA=0;15;5&HI=1;4;9&ID=0;4;6&IL=1;21;9&IN=1;11;3&IA=0;7;4&KS=0;6;6&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;3&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=1;6;3&MO=1;11;3&MT=1;3;3&NV=1;5;9&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;15;3&NM=1;5;3&NY=1;31;9&NC=0;15;5&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;20;3&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;21;3&RI=1;4;3&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=1;11;3&TX=1;34;3&UT=0;5;7&VT=2;3;3&VA=3;13;3&WA=1;11;3&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=1;3;3&ME=1;2;3&ME1=1;1;3&ME2=1;1;3&NE=1;2;9&NE1=1;1;9&NE2=1;1;9&NE3=1;1;9)
Democrats: 59 (+6)
Republicans: 41 (-7)

House Results
Democrats: 260 (+28)
Republicans: 175 (-28)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 10, 2009, 06:26:03 pm
Hmm...It seems someone had to suffer the fate of LBJ ITTL, I just hoped it wouldn't be another Texan lol An interesting twist since we don't have a JFK assasination, would be for Arthur Bremer to actually succeed in killing the president or even causing him paryalsis in a manner like George Wallace. That might boost the GOP's chances of winning the '72 election, if not I can see Ted Kennedy(Assuming there was no Chappaquidick ITTL),George Mcgovern Eugene McCarthy, or even Shirley Chisholm taking over as the Dove wing of the Democrats gain control of the Party. It will be interesting to see where you take this...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 10, 2009, 08:39:23 pm
Hmm...It seems someone had to suffer the fate of LBJ ITTL, I just hoped it wouldn't be another Texan lol An interesting twist since we don't have a JFK assasination, would be for Arthur Bremer to actually succeed in killing the president or even causing him paryalsis in a manner like George Wallace. That might boost the GOP's chances of winning the '72 election, if not I can see Ted Kennedy(Assuming there was no Chappaquidick ITTL),George Mcgovern Eugene McCarthy, or even Shirley Chisholm taking over as the Dove wing of the Democrats gain control of the Party. It will be interesting to see where you take this...

In this timeline, actually, the dovish wing of the party is much weaker, since Vietnam did not prove such a divisive issue for the Democrats.  In January, 1971, the leading candidates for the Democratic nomination, all Senators, are (in no particular order):

Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (Minnesota)
Senator Edward M. Kennedy (Massachusetts)
Senator George McGovern (South Dakota)
Senator Henry M. Jackson (Washington)
Senator LeRoy Collins (Florida)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 11, 2009, 01:48:29 am
Ah I see, at least there is a pool of candidates for the Democrats...I wonder if any of the Moderate Republicans will run against Tower in an insurgency campaign.?Hmm decisions,decisions lol


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Mr.Phips on January 11, 2009, 03:46:24 am
(http://img132.imageshack.us/img132/4903/presidentjohntowerbeneu1.jpg)
The First Term of John Tower

In his Inaugural Address, continuing on the themes of his campaign, Tower promises for a strong military, including victory in Vietnam.  Tower promises for a bipartisan administration, and his Cabinet reflects that.

Secretary of State: William P. Rogers (R-NY)
Secretary of Treasury: George P. Shultz (R-NY)
Secretary of Defense: Olin E. Teague (D-TX)
Attorney General: Richard Kleindienst (R-AZ)
Postmaster General: Winton M. Blount (R-AL)
Secretary of the Interior: Don Samuelson (R-ID)
Secretary of Agriculture: Robert Docking (D-KS)
Secretary of Commerce: Elliot Richardson (R-MA)
Secretary of Labor: James D. Hodgson (R-MN)
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Caspar Weinberger (R-CA)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Frank E. Curran (D-CA)
Secretary of Transportation: John A. Volpe (R-MA)

Upon taking office, one of Tower’s first actions is to call for a massive troop increase in Vietnam.  He also asks Congress to pass a military pay raise, in an attempt to draw more people into the military.  He does, however, reject a suggestion from hawks such as the recently reelected Barry Goldwater (R-AZ) for a draft, saying it would only have a negative impact on the morale of soldiers.

In deciding to focus on the military, Tower decides to cut spending on numerous domestic programs, including NASA.  The decision, however, raises hell amongst Congressional liberals.  Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA), says, “The President is trying to gut all of the programs that have been so beneficial to the American people, simply so he can pay for a foreign war.”  Senator Henry M. Jackson says, “We do not have to sacrifice butter for guns.  The President’s budget has been starved to death, and it does not need to be so.”  On February 12, Congress passes a budget that includes only minor cuts in social spending, and barely any increase in military spending.  The next day, President Tower vetoes the bill, and announces that he will veto any spending bill that lacks major increases in military spending, and major cuts in social spending.

Four days later, though, the Congress votes overwhelmingly to override the President’s veto.  In a statement, the President blames Congress for endangering the American military presence in Vietnam.

On May 12, 1969, Congress passes the Environmental Protection Act of 1969.  Written by Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), the EPA would establish an Environmental Protection Agency, giving the Agency a large amount of control over the country’s environmental programs.  Despite facing strong opposition from conservatives in Congress, the EPA passes on June 27 in the House, 300-135, and passes the Senate on July 18, 57-43.  Following his stinging spending defeat, Tower signs the legislation on July 19.

In early September, Congress begins debate on the Civil Rights Act of 1969.  Written primarily by Senator Hubert Humphrey (D-MN), the Act would prohibit discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, and national origin.  For the first time since the Voting Rights Act, the South filibusters.  Not all Southerners join in, though.  Senator Al Gore of Tennessee announces he will vote for cloture, as does Ralph Yarborough of Texas and both Senators from Florida, Spessard Holland and LeRoy Collins.

On October 23, by a vote of 79-17, the Senate approved cloture on the bill.  On October 30, they pass the Civil Rights Act of 1969, 73-27.  Upon reaching the House, the Act is bottled up in the Rules Committee by Chairman William Colmer (D-MS), a strong opponent of civil rights legislation.  For nearly a month, pro-civil rights Congressman try to get the Act discharged from Committee, without success.

On December 10, though, Colmer inexplicably releases the Act from Committee, sending it to the full House.  On December 19, by a vote of 280-155, the House passes the Civil Rights Act of 1968, and sends it to the President.  After several days of internal wrangling, the President signs the Act on December 22.

In his State of the Union Address on January 22, 1970, Tower calls for yet another increase in military spending.  He also comes out strongly in opposition to the Equal Rights Amendment, despite strong support amongst the voters.

By early February, the situation in Vietnam seems to have deteriorated since Tower took over.  On February 16, General Taylor resigns, and is replaced by General Westmoreland, after serving for a little over a year as Tower’s National Security Advisor.  Westmoreland, speaking to Congress in early March, says that he needs at least 50,000 more troops in order to win the war fully.

Following Westmoreland’s statement, though, criticism of the war effort begins to increase.  Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) says, “We have been in Vietnam for over a decade.  The time has come to pull out, and allow the Vietnamese to handle their own affairs.”  Even hawks such as Henry M. Jackson (D-WA) begin to move towards peace, with Jackson declaring, “There’s no point in spending an extra 5 years to overcome North Vietnam, when we can have a peaceful coexistence.”

Despite the calls, Tower refuses to cut back on troop levels, and begins suggesting that America may remain in Vietnam well into the 1970’s.

On June 3, Justice John Marshal Harlan dies of a heart attack.  To replace him, Tower nominates Clement Haynsworth of the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals.  However, the Haynsworth nomination runs into opposition from liberals, as well as unions and the NAACP.  On June 20, the Senate rejects Haynsworth’s nomination, 53-46, the first nominee to be rejected in 40 years.  On June 28, Tower nominates Bailey Aldrich of the 1st Circuit; on July 15, Aldrich is confirmed 97-2.

On August 3, Tower leaves for a tour of Europe.  He meets with every major European leader, including newly elected British Prime Minister Edward Heath, just several weeks after his Conservative Party regained the majority in Parliament.  Throughout Europe, Tower is criticized for his position of Vietnam.  Pope Paul VI spends nearly an hour lecturing Tower on the sanctity of life, as protesters rant outside of the Palace.  When Tower returns to the US on August 25, his approval rating stands at an all time low of 42%.

The Congressional Elections

With Tower’s approval ratings sinking very low, the Democrats make major gains in both Houses of Congress, giving them an impressive majority to confront Tower with.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=2;3;3&AZ=2;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=1;55;9&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;3&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;8&FL=1;27;3&GA=0;15;5&HI=1;4;9&ID=0;4;6&IL=1;21;9&IN=1;11;3&IA=0;7;4&KS=0;6;6&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;3&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=1;6;3&MO=1;11;3&MT=1;3;3&NV=1;5;9&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;15;3&NM=1;5;3&NY=1;31;9&NC=0;15;5&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;20;3&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;21;3&RI=1;4;3&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=1;11;3&TX=1;34;3&UT=0;5;7&VT=2;3;3&VA=3;13;3&WA=1;11;3&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=1;3;3&ME=1;2;3&ME1=1;1;3&ME2=1;1;3&NE=1;2;9&NE1=1;1;9&NE2=1;1;9&NE3=1;1;9)
Democrats: 59 (+6)
Republicans: 41 (-7)

House Results
Democrats: 260 (+28)
Republicans: 175 (-28)

I dont think Democrats could have gained Senate seats in 1970 even if it was a really good year for them.  They were still overinflated by their 1958 gains, which they held in 1964. 


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 13, 2009, 08:11:28 pm
So when can we expect the next installment?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 13, 2009, 08:28:18 pm
They weren't so much overinflated over 1964, although I would not have thought that they could have picked up 6 seats if this were real. Maybe very close races went for the Dems. Remember, Vietnam is not so much a polarizing issue in this TL, and united Democrats could have won some more in 1970, due to Pesident Tower's low approval.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 13, 2009, 08:35:48 pm
Jackson-Humphrey or (vice-versa) in '72!!!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 14, 2009, 02:02:50 pm
So when can we expect the next installment?

In the next day or two.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on January 14, 2009, 04:42:45 pm
Jackson-Humphrey or (vice-versa) in '72!!!

Why would Senator Jackson accept the position as Senator Humphrey's running mate when he was already selected as Vice President Smathers' in 1968? If anything I'm expecting one of the many "New South" Governors, such as Reubin Askew or Jimmy Carter, to be selected by Humphrey, if of course, Humphrey does win the Democratic Nomination in 1972. However, I could be completely wrong.

As for the timeline, Benjamin, continue the good work. Hopefully this timeline does not fall off the wagon like your previous timeline, TR elected in 1912. If you long for your timeline to not meet similar fate I would happily suggest an excellent remedy. Foreign events, such as elections, wars, etc and a lot of them. However, make sure you find the right balance between both domestic and foreign events.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on January 15, 2009, 07:41:09 am
I agree with Prime Minister Chipp on both questions. For one, Jackson would never take a VEEP role, and even with the Democratic party less dovish, he wasn't exactly the most inspirational candidate (plus labor wouldn't give him their full support if Humphrey was the frontrunner). The Prime Minister's second point I also agree with. For my Kennedy timline, I have realized that international events can become solid filler, as well as making things more interesting. For instance, Russia and China have worse relations with the U.S., and Vietnam may very well become a dominant power in southeast Asia.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 17, 2009, 01:06:09 pm
Yes I suppose you're right.....

Jackson in '72 or an out of the blue candidate.


I know who will be president when this timeline ends....


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on January 17, 2009, 09:20:07 pm
who do you think? A Kennedy perhaps?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 18, 2009, 10:27:58 am
Im thinking that, the Democrats focus for the 72 election will be a successfull withdrawl from Vietnam, that being said I think Jackson will be able to clinch the nomination...and in a fight to regain working-class whites but to also sure up Black Voters unsure of his anti-busing stance, The Fighting democrat picks Kennedy. That way, you also get a balance on Age as well as Jackson was 60 compared to Teddy's 40. Although they probably don't get anything in the South, they may be able to cobble 270 electoral votes everwhere elese.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 18, 2009, 01:38:28 pm
who do you think? A Kennedy perhaps?

Nope, and I won't say until It is finished because


1. Benconstine may get mad at me.
2. It is a guess, but a good one.
3. And no, Mark Warner is not my guess.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 18, 2009, 01:55:23 pm
By all means, speculate.  I have absolutely no problem with speculating, unless I already told you.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 18, 2009, 01:59:11 pm
By all means, speculate.  I have absolutely no problem with speculating, unless I already told you.

When does the timeline end, exactly, if it is present day I have a feeling about who it is.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 18, 2009, 02:01:42 pm
By all means, speculate.  I have absolutely no problem with speculating, unless I already told you.

When does the timeline end, exactly, if it is present day I have a feeling about who it is.

I'll probably end it with the 2008 elections.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 18, 2009, 02:03:22 pm
President Jim Webb


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 18, 2009, 02:51:56 pm
No, it will not be Jim Webb.  PBrunsel already did that.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 18, 2009, 04:35:52 pm
No, it will not be Jim Webb.  PBrunsel already did that.

oh. dang it I was wrong.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 21, 2009, 09:26:42 am
By all means, speculate.  I have absolutely no problem with speculating, unless I already told you.


When does the timeline end, exactly, if it is present day I have a feeling about who it is.

I'll probably end it with the 2008 elections.

As Far as speculation goes...For the 1972 Democratic Nominee's im still leaning toward a Scoop/Teddy Ticket(It just makes sense all around) but since TTL is ripe for an asssasination...So Arthur Bremer might be able to take out John Tower(He wanted to get Nixon but was unsuccessful, then he settled on Wallace). So the GOP nominee could be....

As far as who becomes POTUS on January 20th 2009 im going to say either John John or Caroline(Both of whom might get interested in Politics earlier than in OTL, with their real dad being around...so those butterflies could be interesting.)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 21, 2009, 08:27:52 pm
I can't wait for the next update................................


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 21, 2009, 08:35:29 pm
I can't wait for the next update................................

In his State of the Union Address on January 23, 1971, President Tower declares that, “We have nearly won the war in Vietnam.  I can safely predict that by the end of 1973, Ho Chi Minh will be forced to sue for peace.”

However, shortly after the speech, Tower’s facts are disputed.  In testimony to the Senate Armed Services Committee, Secretary of the Navy John W. Warner says that, “Unless we have a drastic troop increase, and step up our bombing campaign, there will be no definite victory in the foreseeable future.”  In separate testimony, General Westmoreland confirms Warner’s statement.

Following these statements, Senate opposition to the war intensifies.  On March 1, a resolution introduced jointly by Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), and Charles Mathias (R-MD), calls for a complete withdrawal of troops from Vietnam by December 31, 1972.  The resolution is filibustered, and fails to gain cloture, failing 55-45.

On March 10, the Senate votes on the Equal Rights Amendment.  That same day, a poll showed that 71% of voters wanted the ERA passed, including a majority in 30 states.  However, the ERA fails to gain the necessary votes, getting just 59 in favor, to 41 against.  The vote is seen as a victory for Tower, who had strongly opposed the Amendment.

On April 3, the Senate votes on an Amendment to lower the voting age to 18.  On this Amendment, Tower had not taken a position, as he didn’t want to be seen opposing the right to vote for any group of people.  The Amendment passes, 83-17, and on April 29, it passes the House 374-61, and is sent to the states for ratification.

In the second week of April, Tower begins yet another international tour.  While in England, he meets once again with Prime Minister Heath who, less than 2 years after taking office, appears likely to be voted out in the next election.  Tower, who hasn’t had approval ratings above 50% since early 1970, sympathizes with the Prime Minister, and tells him to ignore the polling, and do what he thinks is best.

On May 4, the Senate begins debate on the Freedom of Information Act.  Written by Senator Humphrey, the FIA would require full or partial disclosure of previously unreleased information and documents controlled by the United States Government.  The legislation is filibustered in the Senate, due to strong opposition from conservatives, as well the President, FBI, CIA, and other executive departments.

(http://corporate.cq.com/user-assets/Images/congress101/filibuster-1.jpg)
Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC) filibustering the Freedom of Information Act

On June 17, the Senate votes on cloture.  In a surprise, the motion passes, 60-25.  On June 26, the Senate passes the FIA, 62-38.  It is then sent to the House, where it moves quickly, due to the illness of Rules Chairman William Colmer (D-MS).  It passes the House on July 25, 234-200.  It is, however, vetoed by President Tower, but on August 25, the Senate votes 70-30 to overrule the veto, and the House follows on September 16, 300-135.

On October 4, former President Eisenhower dies of congestive heart failure at his home in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  The funeral is attended by the President and his family, the Vice President and his family, President Pro Tempore of the Senate Richard B. Russell (D-GA), Speaker Carl Albert (D-OK), former Presidents Kennedy and Truman, and former Vice Presidents Johnson and Nixon, Nixon now serving as Governor of California.

In his State of the Union Address, President Tower pays tribute to Eisenhower, calling him “A true American hero.”  He also announces that he plans to up the troop levels in Vietnam, and repeats his statement from 1971 that the war will be over by 1973.

On February 4, 1972, the UK holds elections, and the results are a stunning defeat for incumbent Prime Minister Heath, as former Prime Minister Harold Wilson and the Labour Party regain their majority status.

(http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/j/Harold%20Wilson.jpg)
Prime Minister Wilson waving to supporters following the election returns

On February 19, former Vice President Johnson dies of a heart attack at the Johnson Ranch, after being in poor health for several years.  The former Vice President is eulogized by his good friend Richard B. Russell, who calls him, “One of the greatest men to ever serve in the United States Senate.”

On March 5, in a 6-3 decision written by Chief Justice Bazelon, the Supreme Court rules in Roe v. Wade, that states cannot prohibit the right to an abortion.  The decision immediately causes controversy, with conservatives, both Democrats and Republicans, condemning the decision.  President Tower, however, comes out in support of the decision, angering the conservative base as Tower prepares to seek a second term in office.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 21, 2009, 08:51:53 pm
Excellent Work!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 21, 2009, 10:17:07 pm
Hmm...I wasn't aware that Tower was Pro-choice in otl...So not only will Tower have to fend off a strong pool of Democratic candidates...He is going to have to face off against both the Conservative and Moderate wings of his own party over Roe V. Wade and Vietnam. He only has two choices that I forsee, unless some miracle happens in Vietnam, is to either withdraw his name from nomination like otl LBJ or go down like otl Carter....Keep it comming!!!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 21, 2009, 10:19:59 pm
Jackson! Jackson! Jackson! *woot*


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on January 22, 2009, 12:12:44 am
Excellent update, as always Ben :).

With Richard Nixon now Governor of California, what's going on with Ronald Reagan? Was he elected Governor in 1966 as he was in RL or did he lose the Republican Primary to the former Vice President? Anyway, I hope he will not make appearance in this timeline. However, I would be pleased if he made a miraculous political comeback and lost whatever political office he were perusing.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on January 22, 2009, 11:45:15 am
Yep Tower was Pro-Choice, so was Baker. It will be interesting as to how the Democratic Party will shift on abortion. Will Jack Kennedy be viewed as pro-choice or pro-life, and if the partisan divide is lessened, will abortion be that big of an issue.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 22, 2009, 03:31:09 pm
Hmm...It will be interesting to see where the true conservatives fall, especially if Abortion is taken out of the sails of the movement...I forsee a couple of Third Party runs, untill they blend back into the Republicans and Abortion seases to be an issue.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 22, 2009, 05:13:44 pm
Excellent update, as always Ben :).

With Richard Nixon now Governor of California, what's going on with Ronald Reagan? Was he elected Governor in 1966 as he was in RL or did he lose the Republican Primary to the former Vice President? Anyway, I hope he will not make appearance in this timeline. However, I would be pleased if he made a miraculous political comeback and lost whatever political office he were perusing.

Thank you :)  Ronald Reagan lost the GOP primary to Richard Nixon in 1966, and was appointed US Ambassador to the United Kingdom by President Tower in 1969, a role he has held ever since.  He has a gentleman's agreement with Governor Nixon that Nixon will step down in 1974, and Reagan will run again.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 23, 2009, 06:14:39 pm
The Democratic Nomination

On March 4, 1971, the first Democrat declares his candidacy for President.  Speaking in Philadelphia, the city that first put him on the national stage, Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota promises, “A brighter future for America.”  On March 22, Senator LeRoy Collins of Florida announces for the Presidency.  Three weeks later, Governor Kenneth M. Curtis of Maine declares his candidacy for President.

Almost immediately, it becomes clear that Humphrey has the edge.  On May 3, Senator Ed Muskie of Maine becomes the first major politician to endorse a candidate, when he announces his support for Humphrey.  Four days later, Senator George McGovern of South Dakota follows, and endorses Humphrey.  By the end of June, Humphrey has been endorsed by 19 Senators, 9 Governors, and 28 Congressman.

During the summer, though, all the talk centers not on Humphrey, but on two non-candidates: Senator Scoop Jackson of Washington, and Senator Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts.  Although the polls show Senator Humphrey with a large lead amongst the declared candidates, his lead disappears once Jackson and Kennedy are factored in.

On September 5, Kennedy calls a press conference.  He announces that he will not seek the Presidency, and is instead endorsing Humphrey.  Three days later, Jackson does the same.  By the middle of September, Humphrey appears to have the nomination locked up.

On January 24, the Iowa Caucuses are held.  The result is a resounding win for Humphrey, with 59% of the vote; Collins gets 31%, and Curtis gets 10%.  On March 7, the New Hampshire primary is held.  Humphrey wins, with 50% of the vote; Curtis receives 37%, and Collins receives 13%.

On March 14, Collins wins 98% in the uncontested Florida primary.  A week later, though, Humphrey wins 60% of the vote in Illinois, with Collins getting 26% and Curtis getting 14%.  On April 4, Humphrey wins 67% in Wisconsin, compared to 24% for Collins, and 9% for Curtis.  Following the defeat, Curtis drops out of the campaign, and endorses Humphrey.

On April 25, Humphrey clinches the nomination, with big victories in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.  Collins drops out, and endorses Humphrey.

As the DNC gathers in Miami, several names are floated for Humphrey’s Vice President.  Among the names are Senators Muskie, Kennedy, and Collins, along with Governors Warren E. Hearnes of Missouri, Robert W. Scott of North Carolina, and Mills E. Godwin, Jr. of Virginia.  The day the convention convenes, Humphrey announces his choice: Governor Hearnes.  The speech by Senator Humphrey is widely regarded as one of the best in party history; he delivers a blistering attack on the last 4 years, and promises “Peace with honor,” in Vietnam.

The Republican Nomination

Throughout 1971, there are rumors that Tower will receive a primary challenger.  However, the only candidate to declare is Congressman John M. Ashbrook of Ohio.  Tower, however, easily beats back the Ashbrook challenge, and after failing to reach 10% in any of the first five primaries, Ashbrook drops out, but refuses to endorse Tower.

At the RNC in Dallas, Tower once again promises victory in Vietnam.  The convention in notable for Vice President Agnew’s attack on Senator Humphrey, saying that he stand for just three things: “Acid, amnesty, and abortion.”  The attack fails, however, and comes off as exaggerated.

The General Election

On September 1, the general election moves into full swing.  As in 1968, the American Independent Party nominates a candidate – their 1968 VP nominee, former Georgia Governor Lester Maddox.  As his running mate, Maddox selects Congressman Ashbrook, bringing bipartisanship to the ticket.

On September 20, the first debate is held.  Tower spends the entire debate attacking Humphrey, while Humphrey maintains a positive tone.  Maddox attacks both candidates equally, calling Humphrey a “Soviet spy” and Tower a “Chinese tool.”  The second debate, on October 9, is mostly occupied by Humphrey attacking the failures of Tower’s first term, including his budget cuts for NASA.

Despite the controversy, the election is close until, on October 6, reports break that Vice President Agnew was under investigation by the United States Attorney’s office in Baltimore, Maryland, on charges of extortion, tax fraud, bribery, and conspiracy. On October 19, he was formally charged with having accepted bribes totaling more than $100,000, while holding office as Baltimore County Executive, governor of Maryland, and Vice President of the United States.

Immediately, the numbers swing in Humphrey’s favor.  The Tower charge that the investigation was a political ploy organized by the Democrats does little to help Agnew, and on election day, Humphrey wins a major victory.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1972&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;9;6&AK=1;3;5&AZ=2;6;5&AR=2;6;5&CA=1;45;5&CO=2;7;5&CT=1;8;5&DE=1;3;5&DC=1;3;8&FL=2;17;5&GA=2;12;5&HI=1;4;5&ID=2;4;5&IL=1;26;5&IN=2;13;5&IA=1;8;5&KS=2;7;5&KY=2;9;5&LA=2;10;6&MD=1;10;5&MA=1;14;5&MI=1;21;5&MN=1;10;6&MS=2;7;7&MO=1;12;5&MT=1;4;5&NE=2;5;6&NV=2;3;5&NH=1;4;4&NJ=1;17;5&NM=1;4;4&NY=1;41;5&NC=2;13;5&ND=2;3;5&OH=1;25;5&OK=2;8;5&OR=1;6;5&PA=1;27;5&RI=1;4;6&SC=2;8;6&SD=1;4;5&TN=2;10;5&TX=2;26;5&UT=2;4;5&VT=1;3;4&VA=2;12;5&WA=1;9;5&WV=1;6;5&WI=1;11;5&WY=2;3;5&ME=1;2;4&ME1=1;1;4&ME2=1;1;4)
Hubert Humphrey/Warren Hearnes: 52.6% PV, 336 EV
John Tower/Spiro Agnew: 37.4% PV, 202 EV
Lester Maddox/John Ashbrook: 8.7% PV, 0 EV
Others: 1.3% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

At the Congressional level, Tower’s low approval ratings bring down numerous Congressional candidates, with the Republicans suffering massive losses in the House and Senate.  The margins in several of the losses is attributed directly to Tower’s loss, and he is blamed by Republicans for the Congressional defeats.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=0;10;5&AR=1;6;3&CA=0;55;5&CO=1;9;9&CT=0;7;5&DE=1;3;9&DC=0;3;8&FL=0;27;5&GA=1;15;3&HI=0;4;5&ID=2;4;3&IL=2;21;3&IN=0;11;5&IA=1;7;9&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;9&LA=1;9;3&MD=0;10;5&MA=2;12;3&MI=2;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=1;6;3&MO=0;11;5&MT=1;3;9&NV=0;5;5&NH=1;4;3&NJ=2;15;3&NM=1;5;3&NY=0;31;5&NC=2;15;9&ND=0;3;6&OH=0;20;5&OK=1;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=2;8;3&SD=1;3;9&TN=2;11;3&TX=1;34;9&UT=2;5;7&VT=2;3;3&VA=1;13;3&WA=0;11;5&WV=1;5;3&WI=0;10;4&WY=2;3;3&ME=1;2;9&ME1=1;1;9&ME2=1;1;9&NE=2;2;3&NE1=2;1;3&NE2=2;1;3&NE3=2;1;3)
Democrats: 66 (+7)
Republicans: 34 (-7)

House Results
Democrats: 288 (+28)
Republicans: 147 (-28)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on January 23, 2009, 06:55:11 pm
Wow, a President Humphrey. Not to shocking if you think about the fact that he was royally screwed by Johnson/Vietnam, as well as pigeonholed as something he was not. I'm look forward to what one might call the most "Pragmatic Liberal" of all presidents.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on January 23, 2009, 08:25:27 pm
WOW - I didn't expect Old Hube to defeat President Tower in 1972 ;). An interesting update nonetheless.

However, I do have some questions regarding your latest update and they are as follows:

1. With no violence taking place at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, I assume that the McGovern-Fraser Commission never occurs? thus, the Democratic parties system of electing her presidential candidate remains the same?

2. Why does Senator George McGovern endorse Senator Hubert Humphrey for the Presidency of the United States in 1972? Both men absolutely despised each other, thus I find such an endorsement highly implausible. Unless, of course, there was some secret negotiation between the two men, as seen betweeen Harriman and Stevenson in my TL.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 23, 2009, 08:32:36 pm
1.  Basically, yes.  The primaries are starting to play a bigger role, but they are still not the only way of choosing delegates.

2.  Actually, Senator McGovern and Senator Humphrey got along very well before Vietnam became an issue; HHH got McGovern a job with the Peace Corps, and campaigned for him in 1962.  In this TL, then, the two men are still close friends.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on January 23, 2009, 08:43:31 pm
Thanks for clearing that up :).

I must admit, my queries regarding the friendship between Senators McGovern and Humphrey was purely based on the McGovern/Humphrey relationship seen during the 1972 Democratic primaries, in particular during the time between June and August of that year. However, a bit of anti-Humphrey bias, inspired by the writings of Hunter S. Thompson did also provoke me to ask such questions.

Also, why did President Tower lose the typical Republican strongholds of Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine to Senator Humphrey? Surely Governor Maddox's campaign wouldn't have had such drastic consequences in the results of those three states. After all, Governor Wallaces' RL 1968 campaign failed to receive more than four percent in those states in question.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 23, 2009, 08:47:50 pm
Thanks for clearing that up :).

I must admit, my queries regarding the friendship between Senators McGovern and Humphrey was purely based on the McGovern/Humphrey relationship seen during the 1972 Democratic primaries, in particular during the time between June and August of that year. However, a bit of anti-Humphrey bias, inspired by the writings of Hunter S. Thompson did also provoke me to ask such questions.

Also, why did President Tower lose the typical Republican strongholds of Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine to Senator Humphrey? Surely Governor Maddox's campaign wouldn't have had such drastic consequences in the results of those three states. After all, Governor Wallaces' RL 1968 campaign failed to receive more than four percent in those states in question.

Indeed, Governor Maddox had very little support; 3.8% in VT, 4.4% in NH, and 3.3% in ME.  Those three states were the three closest in the country: 0.29% in NH, 0.86% in VT, and 1.08% in ME.  The Agnew scandal caused a major backlash against Tower in those states, and it appears that there was a large number of Republicans voting for HHH at the Presidential level, but staying GOP at the Congressional level.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 23, 2009, 08:50:42 pm
Interesting so, with Humphrey actually in control of the Party machine and regains his working class base clinches the Democratic Nomination and the Presidency. I thinks it very plausible seeing how close he actually came to beating Nixon in OTL with so much going against his candidacy. Itll be interesting to see what effects a Neo-Great Society and probably a Nixonesque situation in Vietnam will have on the economy? seeing as how badly it drove up inflation on OTL...Also even worse however, America still might go through Three Presidents during the '70's if HHH is able to win a second term only to succumb to bladder cancer. Itll be intersting to see where you take this.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on January 23, 2009, 09:12:12 pm
What's going on in Canada? France? Australia? Germany?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 24, 2009, 05:23:55 pm
Canada: On the whole, Canada remains unchanged.  Canada did send a small number of troops to help in Vietnam, although they were removed in 1968.

France:  As in RL, de Gaulle is reelected President in 1965, although he only needs one round of voting to do so.  He does not order the removal of foreign troops, and keeps France within the military organization of NATO.  De Gaulle is much more supportive of US efforts in Vietnam, and sends troops to help the US in 1966, although he removes them again in 1970.  Although May, 1968 does occur to some extent, there is none of the violent rioting, and de Gaulle does not hold elections until February, 1969, where he gains a major victory.  As of 1972, de Gaulle is still in power, although his health seems to be failing somewhat.

Australia:  In the 1966 General Elections, Harold Holt scores a major victory, and is reelected; his party wins again in 1970, and elections are scheduled for March, 1973.

Germany:  East Germany, in 1973, is basically the same.  West Germany, likewise, is mostly unchanged, although Kiesinger's "Grand Coalition" is still in effect, although it is unlikely the Coalition will stand much longer, and Willy Brandt appears primed to be the next Prime Minister.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on January 24, 2009, 05:35:43 pm
Canada: On the whole, Canada remains unchanged.  Canada did send a small number of troops to help in Vietnam, although they were removed in 1968.

Thanks.

France:  As in RL, de Gaulle is reelected President in 1965, although he only needs one round of voting to do so.  He does not order the removal of foreign troops, and keeps France within the military organization of NATO.  De Gaulle is much more supportive of US efforts in Vietnam, and sends troops to help the US in 1966, although he removes them again in 1970.  Although May, 1968 does occur to some extent, there is none of the violent rioting, and de Gaulle does not hold elections until February, 1969, where he gains a major victory.  As of 1972, de Gaulle is still in power, although his health seems to be failing somewhat.

1. One round elections would never have occurred. Never. Especially under de Gaulle. It's set in stone.
2. If there is no election in 1968, why does de Gaulle dissolve in '69? Does he seek a larger majority than the one in the original 3rd legislature?
3. I assume the 1969 referendum passes, instead of failing.
4. Why would de Gaulle seek re-election in 1972 under poor health? Or are the 1972 elections not up yet?

Australia:  In the 1966 General Elections, Harold Holt scores a major victory, and is reelected; his party wins again in 1970, and elections are scheduled for March, 1973.

Germany:  East Germany, in 1973, is basically the same.  West Germany, likewise, is mostly unchanged, although Kiesinger's "Grand Coalition" is still in effect, although it is unlikely the Coalition will stand much longer, and Willy Brandt appears primed to be the next Prime Minister.

Fair enough.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 24, 2009, 05:40:26 pm
France:  As in RL, de Gaulle is reelected President in 1965, although he only needs one round of voting to do so.  He does not order the removal of foreign troops, and keeps France within the military organization of NATO.  De Gaulle is much more supportive of US efforts in Vietnam, and sends troops to help the US in 1966, although he removes them again in 1970.  Although May, 1968 does occur to some extent, there is none of the violent rioting, and de Gaulle does not hold elections until February, 1969, where he gains a major victory.  As of 1972, de Gaulle is still in power, although his health seems to be failing somewhat.

1. One round elections would never have occurred. Never. Especially under de Gaulle. It's set in stone.
2. If there is no election in 1968, why does de Gaulle dissolve in '69? Does he seek a larger majority than the one in the original 3rd legislature?
3. I assume the 1969 referendum passes, instead of failing.
4. Why would de Gaulle seek re-election in 1972 under poor health? Or are the 1972 elections not up yet?

1.  It was very close; de Gaulle barely got through.
2.  de Gaulle tries to get a larger majority, yes.
3.  It does indeed.
4.  He does seek reelection, and wins.  By "health is failing", I don't mean that he cannot run the government; he still seems in good enough health to serve, but he is 82 years old, and so is a little slower than he used to be.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on January 24, 2009, 05:54:11 pm
1. Ah. Misunderstood you. I thought you were saying the electoral system required one round only and not a runoff.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on January 24, 2009, 07:17:55 pm
Australia:  In the 1966 General Elections, Harold Holt scores a major victory, and is reelected; his party wins again in 1970, and elections are scheduled for March, 1973.

Fair enough, however, I believe that if Holt's Government was re-elected in 1970 (that's of course if he returned from his swim at Cheviot Beach on December 17) that his Government would have succumbed to internal scandals, such as the infamous VIP affair seen in RL, and he would have either resigned the Prime Ministership or be removed as leader after the 1970 election.

As always, I do have some questions regarding your timeline. What is Gough Whitlam doing as of 1972, and what are the prospects of the ALP being elected at the next election? and who is Prime Minister Harold Holt's likely successor as Prime Minister, if he and his Liberals lose in 1973?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: PBrunsel on January 24, 2009, 07:39:39 pm
Ben,

Always a good read, this timeline. :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 24, 2009, 09:04:36 pm
Fair enough, however, I believe that if Holt's Government was re-elected in 1970 (that's of course if he returned from his swim at Cheviot Beach on December 17) that his Government would have succumbed to internal scandals, such as the infamous VIP affair seen in RL, and he would have either resigned the Prime Ministership or be removed as leader after the 1970 election.

Possible; I'm not an expert on Australia, of course :)

As always, I do have some questions regarding your timeline. What is Gough Whitlam doing as of 1972, and what are the prospects of the ALP being elected at the next election? and who is Prime Minister Harold Holt's likely successor as Prime Minister, if he and his Liberals lose in 1973?

Gough Whitlam is currently leader of the opposition, and appears set lead the ALP to victory in the 1973 elections.  If the ALP does win, then Whitlam is set to be the next Prime Minister.

Ben,

Always a good read, this timeline. :)

Thank you :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 25, 2009, 10:33:11 pm
Excellent.... excellent...

Who is Governor of Massachusetts right now?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 25, 2009, 10:38:29 pm
Excellent.... excellent...

Who is Governor of Massachusetts right now?

Francis W. Sargent, as in real life.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 25, 2009, 11:01:33 pm
Excellent.... excellent...

Who is Governor of Massachusetts right now?

Francis W. Sargent, as in real life.

somehow I thought that. It's too soon for RFK....

You know, my grandfather keeps saying that if John Jr. hadn't died, he'd be the 44th President of the United States.



Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 25, 2009, 11:02:59 pm
Hmm...After rereading TTL's I don't think HHH adminstration wont stray to far from Nixon's atleast Domestically. In OTL Nixon ruled fairley liberal to have a free hand in foreign affairs...So under Humphrey will probably get the same propasals that Nixon had except that he may have the clout to actually pass Universal Health Care and a strong Apollo like Alt-energy program. However will Humphrey possibly bring in Volcker earlier ITTL? cuz that would really help with Inflation. But if not, I can definatley see a moderate to liberal Republican winning in '80...POTUS Brooke anyone?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 25, 2009, 11:52:22 pm
What is JFK doing right now, in the Greek Islands on a sailboat I presume...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 26, 2009, 05:56:34 pm
What is JFK doing right now, in the Greek Islands on a sailboat I presume...

Actually, JFK is teaching political science at Harvard.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 26, 2009, 10:39:27 pm
What is JFK doing right now, in the Greek Islands on a sailboat I presume...

Actually, JFK is teaching political science at Harvard.

Hmmmm... you know my grandfather met JFK once, he asked him whathe was going to do after his presidency and that is what he said.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 27, 2009, 01:13:19 pm
What is JFK doing right now, in the Greek Islands on a sailboat I presume...

Actually, JFK is teaching political science at Harvard.

Hmmmm... you know my grandfather met JFK once, he asked him whathe was going to do after his presidency and that is what he said.

Interesting; my grandfather met JFK a number of times, also.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 27, 2009, 04:27:47 pm
(http://harbour-square.com/residents/HubertHumphrey.gif)
The First Term of Hubert H. Humphrey

“It was once said that the moral test of Government is how that Government treats those who are in the dawn of life, the children; those who are in the twilight of life, the elderly; and those who are in the shadows of life, the sick, the needy and the handicapped.  Over the last few years, our Government has failed that test; and I intend for us to once again pass it.”  Humphrey announces that, once his entire Cabinet is confirmed, he will send to Congress an ambitious legislative package, that will help America pass the test again.  His Cabinet, when finally confirmed, seems well acquainted with the task, being made up of experts in each field.

Secretary of State: Edmund Muskie (D-ME)
Secretary of Treasury: Henry H. Fowler (D-VA)
Secretary of Defense: James R. Schlesinger (R-IL)
Attorney General: Edward H. Levi (R-IL)
Secretary of the Interior: Stewart Udall (D-AZ)
Secretary of Agriculture: Orville Freeman (D-MN)
Secretary of Commerce: Lawrence Fox (D-VA)
Secretary of Labor: Lane Kirkland (D-SC)
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Joseph A. Califano, Jr. (D-NY)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Patricia Roberts Harris (D-IL)
Secretary of Transportation: Howard Cannon (D-NV)

Despite his large majorities in Congress, Humphrey expects to have a difficult time getting his legislation through, largely due to the opposition of Senator Richard B. Russell of Georgia.  However, on February 4, Senator Russell dies in Washington, DC.  Humphrey is one of two people selected to eulogize Russell; the other is his friend, John Stennis.  In the eulogy, Humphrey calls Russell, “The epitome of what it means to be a United States Senator.  To replace Russell, Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter appoints Sam Nunn, a well known supporter of Humphrey.

Following Russell’s funeral, Humphrey sends the first major piece of legislation to Congress.  Called the Labor Freedom Act of 1973, it would repeal the Taft-Hartley Act, passed in 1947.  Humphrey had made a campaign promise to various unions to ask for the Bill, and it was written shortly after his election victory.

On March 7, to the surprise of many, the LFA passes the House, 222-213, and is sent to the Senate.  Harrison A. Williams, Jr. (D-NJ), chairman of the Labor Committee, promises to get the legislation quickly through, and on March 29, it is presented to the Senate.  On April 12, the Senate votes, and the Bill is defeated, 50-49.  However, Senator Jacob Javits (R-NY), who had originally voted against the Bill, decides to change his vote, allowing the legislation to pass.  It is rushed to President Humphrey, and, surrounded by Labor leaders, he signs the LFA on April 13.

On April 25, former President Harry Truman dies peacefully in his sleep.  President Humphrey attends the funeral along with 19 Senators, 27 Congressman, every member of the Cabinet, former Presidents Kennedy and Tower, and former Vice Presidents Nixon, Agnew and Smathers; also in attendance is a visibly ill French President Charles de Gaulle, although he insists afterwards that he is in fine health.

On May 3, in a speech to Congress, President Humphrey asks for passage of a comprehensive universal health care bill that would provide health care for all Americans.  The government would pay for between 25-90% of the person’s health care costs, depending on the person’s yearly salary.

The legislation faces intense opposition from conservatives, who claim that the bill will put the country on the road to socialism.  Senator Roman Hruska (R-NE) claims that the bill would, “Rename Washington DC as Moscow.”  Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC) calls it, “An abominable mix of socialism and government handouts.”  However, the legislation does have some supporters; Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) says, “This is not socialism, it is not communism; it is making sure that every American has his G-d-given right to have health care!”

On June 20, the Senate votes on the health care bill; the vote ties at 50-50, and Vice President Hearnes votes for the bill, passing it 51-50 in the most dramatic way.  In the House, the legislation enjoys stronger support, and on July 12, after much debate, the bill passes, 235-200, and is signed into law by President Humphrey on July 14.

That same day, Charles de Gaulle dies in Paris, of a stroke.  Humphrey attends the funeral, along with former Vice President Richard Nixon.

On September 12, in a speech to Congress, President Humphrey announces that, starting January 1, 1974, he will begin withdrawing troops from Vietnam.  The announcement is met with loud applause from a majority of the members of Congress, although some remain noticeably silent.  Senator Henry Jackson (D-WA) calls it “A poor decision, with victory so near,” and Senator John Stennis (D-MS) says that, “The President is making a decision based on the polls, not the facts.”

On January 27, in his State of the Union Address, Humphrey says that, “We are well on our way to passing the great moral test.  We are not there yet, though, and it will take much more effort.”

On February 5, Justice William O. Douglas resigns.  To replace him, President Humphrey nominates Spottswood William Robinson III to replace him.  Robinson is confirmed without controversy, becoming the second African-American on the Court.

In March, Congress begins debate on the Privacy Act of 1974.  Written by Senator Frank Church (D-ID), the Act would require each Government agency have in place an administrative and physical security system to prevent the unauthorized release of personal records.  Strongly supported by both Houses of Congress, it is signed by the President on May 10.

By June 10, the President reports that half of US troops have withdrawn from Vietnam.  He says that, at the current rate, all troops would be out by January of 1975.

The Congressional Elections

With President Humphrey’s approval ratings in the high 50’s to low 60’s, the Democrats make even more gains, adding on to their sky high majorities, reaching their highest numbers since the Great Depression.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=1;3;3&AZ=2;10;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=2;55;3&CO=1;9;9&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;5&DC=0;3;8&FL=1;27;3&GA=1;15;3&HI=1;4;3&ID=1;4;3&IL=1;21;9&IN=2;11;3&IA=1;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;9&LA=1;9;3&MD=2;10;3&MA=0;12;6&MI=0;17;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=1;11;3&MT=0;3;5&NV=1;5;3&NH=1;4;9&NJ=0;15;5&NM=0;5;4&NY=2;31;3&NC=1;15;3&ND=1;3;9&OH=1;20;3&OK=2;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=2;21;3&RI=0;4;5&SC=1;8;3&SD=1;3;3&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;34;6&UT=2;5;3&VT=1;3;9&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;11;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=1;10;3&WY=0;3;6&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;5&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;6&NE1=0;1;6&NE2=0;1;6&NE3=0;1;7)
Democrats: 72 (+6)
Republicans: 28 (-6)

House Results
Democrats: 320 (+32)
Republicans: 115 (-32)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on January 27, 2009, 04:47:45 pm
Oh noes! Its falling off the wagon once more. Where are all of the foreign events and pictures which you said you would include more of? by my calculations I have only found two, and potentially the possibility of a third. Whilst its good to cover domestic affairs, which you do well, I believe, its integral to an excellent timeline to have a good balance between both foreign and domestic events. Just thought I'd lend a helping hand.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 27, 2009, 04:50:49 pm
Oh noes! Its falling off the wagon once more. Where are all of the foreign events and pictures which you said you would include more of? by my calculations I have only found two, and potentially the possibility of a third. Whilst its good to cover domestic affairs, which you do well, I believe, its integral to an excellent timeline to have a good balance between both foreign and domestic events. Just thought I'd lend a helping hand.

I know, know; I meant for this update to have more picture, but just forgot; the next update will have more international events, as well as pictures.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on January 27, 2009, 05:11:01 pm
Who is President of the Senate in France? Alain Poher? Gaston Monnerville?

Monnerville as interim President would be cool. Black guy as President in the '70s France, even for a few months?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 27, 2009, 07:29:52 pm
Who is President of the Senate in France? Alain Poher? Gaston Monnerville?

Monnerville as interim President would be cool. Black guy as President in the '70s France, even for a few months?

Gaston would be cool as interim President, and It would be interesting to see him elected to a full term as President in his own right. It might get the US used to the idea of a Black President alot faster than in otl. Anyways, great installment Ben smart move pulling in some of the better components from OTL Johnson and Carter's cabinents although im suprised he didn't give Scoop State or Defense. Itll be interesting to see what other 2nd Great Society goals HHH can get passed and I look forward to it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on January 27, 2009, 07:31:01 pm
Who is President of the Senate in France? Alain Poher? Gaston Monnerville?

Monnerville as interim President would be cool. Black guy as President in the '70s France, even for a few months?

Gaston would be cool as interim President, and It would be interesting to see him elected to a full term as President in his own right. It might get the US used to the idea of a Black President alot faster than in otl. Anyways, great installment Ben smart move pulling in some of the better components from OTL Johnson and Carter's cabinents although im suprised he didn't give Scoop State or Defense. Itll be interesting to see what other 2nd Great Society goals HHH can get passed and I look forward to it.

France wouldn't have elected a black man as President in 1972.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 27, 2009, 07:56:42 pm
How's Lloyd Bentsen? and what is John McCain up to right now?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 28, 2009, 03:59:47 pm
Hashemite: Poher is the President of the Senate, and so is President at the moment.

NiK: Bentsen is the junior Senator from Texas, and McCain is living quietly in Arizona following the end of his military service.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on January 28, 2009, 04:18:28 pm
Hashemite: Poher is the President of the Senate, and so is President at the moment.

So Monnerville stepped down in 1969 as in RL to lead the NO campaign to the 1969 referendum?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 28, 2009, 04:35:46 pm
Hashemite: Poher is the President of the Senate, and so is President at the moment.

So Monnerville stepped down in 1969 as in RL to lead the NO campaign to the 1969 referendum?

Yes, he did.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 29, 2009, 07:34:04 pm

NiK: Bentsen is the junior Senator from Texas, and McCain is living quietly in Arizona following the end of his military service.

Ok, great Bentsen is one my favorite politicans, it is nice to see him elected.....


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on February 02, 2009, 09:24:06 pm
When is the next update?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 02, 2009, 09:33:53 pm
When is the next update?

Sorry, I was busy all weekend.  Thursday, at the latest.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 05, 2009, 03:34:21 pm
When is the next update?

Sorry, I was busy all weekend.  Thursday, at the latest.

Looking forward to the next Installment, I am wondering however what Is Daniel Patrick Moynihan doing in your tl? Might he be working with HHH to try to get some type of Universal Health Care passed like he did with Nixon in otl?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 05, 2009, 03:59:04 pm
When is the next update?

Sorry, I was busy all weekend.  Thursday, at the latest.

Looking forward to the next Installment, I am wondering however what Is Daniel Patrick Moynihan doing in your tl? Might he be working with HHH to try to get some type of Universal Health Care passed like he did with Nixon in otl?

Moynihan was appointed US Ambassador to Israel in 1973, a post he still holds.  He did help President Humphrey write the health care bill that was passed, but didn't play a major role.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 05, 2009, 04:13:58 pm
On January 23, 1975, President Humphrey appears before Congress to deliver his State of the Union Address.  In the speech, Humphrey notes the large number of returning veterans from Vietnam, many of whom are returning without an opportunity for employment, merely sitting around in their parents’ homes.  Humphrey asks for a massive spending bill that would help pay for the education of many of these veterans.

On January 28, Humphrey sends that bill to Congress.  Called the New GI Bill, the legislation would provide for up to 75% of the cost of college for returning veterans, depending on their family income.  It would be paid for in two ways: a large tax increase on people in the top 5%, and a significant cut in military spending.

Almost immediately, the NGI faces major opposition.  Senator Bob Dole (R-KS) calls the NGI, “The most unwieldy piece of legislation I have ever seen in my entire life.”  Senator James Eastland (D-MS) says, “This bill is one step away from socialism.  In a few years, this city won’t be Washington anymore.  It’ll be Moscow.”

The most fervent opponent, though, is Senator Jess Helms (R-NC).  Helms attacks the legislation as, “Socialism from hell!”  Every day during the Senate debate, Helms speaks for one hour on the floor, and then gives a press conference blasting the NGI.

(http://media.newsobserver.com/smedia/2005/10/22/main-921536-563514.embedded.prod_affiliate.3.jpg)
Senator Helms attacking the NGI

Like always, though, the NGI does have some strong supporters.  Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) calls the legislation, “An extremely important, and necessary, action.”  Senator George McGovern (D-SD) says that, “This legislation must be passed, so that our children can have a future.”

(http://www.law.harvard.edu/students/orgs/forum/mcgov.jpg)
Senator McGovern giving a speech supporting the NGI

For more than a month, the Senate debates the NGI.  Every day, President Humphrey meets with Senators, trying to sway votes, and reach a majority.  On March 5, the Senate votes, 53-47, to approve the NGI.  In the House, there is considerably less opposition, and on March 28, the House votes 332-103 to pass the NGI.  It is signed by the President on March 30.

On April 5, President Humphrey begins a tour of Europe.  He first meets with Prime Minister Harold Wilson, and moves on throughout Europe, ending at the Berlin Wall.  While there, he gives a speech to the crowd, declaring that, “We in the West will not stop until freedom has spread to all places of the world!”  The speech is well received by the German citizens, and in the US, Humphrey’s approval rating shoots up to 70%.

(http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/07jb9g793J04N/610x.jpg)
President Humphrey speaking at the Berlin Wall

Upon returning to the US on April 28, President Humphrey collapses following a phone call with Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel, following Rabin’s major victory in the Israeli elections of April 25.  Humphrey is rushed to a hospital, where his condition is listed as critical.  Vice President Hearnes is immediately informed, and taken to the White House.

Several hours later, it is announced that President Humphrey is recovering.  He is expected to recover, although he will need to take some time to recuperate.   The President decides to return to Minnesota for his recovery, placing Vice President Hearnes in charge.

On May 17, Humphrey returns to Washington for the first time since his illness.  The President appears gaunt, having lost at least 30 pounds during his illness.  The President meets with his Cabinet, as well as with several Governors who were appearing before Congress.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fa/Humphrey_and_carter.JPG)
President Humphrey meeting with Governor Jimmy Carter (D-GA)

On June 2, elections are held in West Germany.  The results are a resounding victory for Willy Brandt, a friend of Humphrey, who becomes the new Prime Minister.  Humphrey calls to congratulate Brandt, and Brandt notes that Humphrey sounds very ill.

On June 10, former Vice President Agnew is found dead in his home in Baltimore, of an apparent suicide.  The funeral is attended by former Presidents Kennedy and Tower, former Vice Presidents Nixon and Smathers, President Humphrey, their wives, and numerous other dignitaries.  Following the funeral, former Vice President Nixon remarks to his wife that the President, “Looks like he will soon be a grave man.”

On June 23, President Humphrey collapses while working on a speech about education.  Although doctors say that exhaustion was the cause, Humphrey is kept overnight for observation, and tests are run.  The President returns to the White House the next day, and his pace intensifies.

On June 25, Humphrey gives a televised address.  In the speech, he calls for a national standard of education, so that, “American children will be prepared to face a complex and difficult future.”

In that idea, Humphrey proposes the National Education Act of 1975.  The NEA, written jointly by the President and Senator Kennedy, would set a national standard in math, science, and reading, for all students in grade K-12.  The standards would be updated by Congress every five years, although states could choose to set different standards, with the consent of the HEW Secretary.

The legislation, despite enjoying much support, is filibustered by a small group of conservatives, led by Senator Helms.  For nearly a month, the filibuster continues, until, on July 22, the Senate votes 70-30 for cloture.  Three days later, the NEA passes, 65-31, and is sent to the House.

In the House, the NEA enjoys strong support, and passes on August 5, 400-34.  At the signing ceremony on August 8, President Humphrey appears deathly pale, and his voice is weak.  Although he says that he is merely tired, the President’s hand shakes as he signs, and after the ceremony, he is seen reflexively massaging the left side of his chest while talking.

Upon returning to the White House, the President goes upstairs to take a nap.  Several hours later, his wife comes in to check on him, and finds him not moving.  He is rushed to a hospital, where he is pronounced dead, of an aortic aneurysm, at 6:21 PM on August 8, 1975.  Outside the hospital room, Vice President Hearnes is sworn into office.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 05, 2009, 05:39:35 pm
Wow, Excellent Installment bc, I was not expecting HHH to dye from an aortic aneurysim...was it a condidtion he suffered from in otl? Or is it a complication from the bladder cancer that he had? Well atleast he was able to get some progressive legislation done in the form of the NEA and the NGI(Which will help alot of the Vietnam veterans get back on their feet and might lead to a larger generation X). After doing some Research, It seems like Hearns was really the best choice to succeed HHH, as he was really pogressive on Public Education, Civil Rights, Traffic Saftey, and the enviorment. He should be a shoe in for the '76 election. But who nows it depends if Ronny runs or not.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on February 05, 2009, 10:11:31 pm
Shocking, I did not see that coming. Great update. Very good.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 11, 2009, 08:31:20 pm
Sorry about the lack of an update, guys.  The next one will probably come on Friday.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 15, 2009, 05:25:08 pm
Sorry about the lack of an update, guys.  The next one will probably come on Friday.

President Hearnes!!!President Hearnes!!!President Hearnes!!!lol


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 16, 2009, 01:20:12 pm
Sorry about not having an update; I've been going through a severe case of writer's block.  I hope to have an update by this weekend.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 26, 2009, 01:27:03 pm
Sorry about not having an update; I've been going through a severe case of writer's block.  I hope to have an update by this weekend.

So how's the next installment coming along?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 26, 2009, 10:29:04 pm
Sorry about not having an update; I've been going through a severe case of writer's block.  I hope to have an update by this weekend.

So how's the next installment coming along?

I'm terribly sorry.  I will publish an update tomorrow, I promise.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 02, 2009, 05:02:28 pm
(http://www.richgros.com/People/Other%20People/Hearnes.jpg)
The First Term of Warren Hearnes

Three hours after President Humphrey’s death, President Hearnes speaks to the American people live on national television.  “My fellow Americans, it is with great sadness that I speak to you tonight.  Three hours ago, President Hubert Horatio Humphrey died of an aortic aneurysm at his desk in the Oval Office.  In my first official act as President, I am declaring tomorrow to be a day of mourning for all Americans.  I ask you all to keep the Humphrey family in your prayers.  Thank you, and good night.”

Three days later, Humphrey’s funeral is held in Minneapolis.  He is eulogized by former President Kennedy, who calls Humphrey, “One of the greatest men in our country’s history.”  The former President is widely mourned, and all throughout the country, impromptu memorials are held for the President.

(http://pro.corbis.com/images/WL005080.jpg?size=67&uid=%7B6DB0FF5C-5EDD-4BCF-9364-633BE659AC04%7D)
Former Vice President Nixon at President Humphrey's Funeral

In the days following Humphrey’s funeral, little is heard from the White House.  President Hearnes schedules a speech to a joint session of Congress on August 14, three days after the funeral.

In the speech, Hearnes says, “We must continue!”  He announces an ambitious set of programs, designed to fulfill Humphrey’s dream of an America marked by equality and prosperity.  The speech is well received, and Hearnes’ approval rating starts out at a whopping 85%.

When Congress returns on September 4, they are presented with the first major piece of legislation: the Public Works Act of 1975.  The PWA, originally written by the President, would create a large number of new jobs for people across the country, by establishing new schools, and other government facilities throughout the country.

The PWA, though, faces stiff opposition from conservatives, claiming that the PWA would spend taxpayer money on unnecessary programs.  Conservatives, led by Senators Strom Thurmond (R-SC), and Herman Talmadge (D-GA) begin a lengthy filibuster.

(http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/media_content/m-671.jpg)
Senator Herman Talmadge (D-GA) filibustering the PWA

For almost a month, the filibuster continues, until, on October 2, by a vote of 71-29, the Senate grants cloture.  Three days later, the Senate passes the PWA, 68-32.

In the House, the PWA faces little opposition, and passes easily, 406-28, on October 17.  It is signed by the President on October 20.

On November 1, the State of Israel holds elections for the Knesset, resulting in a victory for the Likud Party.  For the first time, the left-wing lost an election, with the Alignment’s share of the vote reduced by more than a third.  The Israeli right-wing took power for the first time since Israeli independence in 1948. The left’s spectacular loss of power was attributed to two major causes; allegations of corruption and nepotism (such as the Dollar Account affair and the Yadlin affair), and a perceived favoring of Ashkenazi (European) Jews over Mizrahi Jews (from North Africa and the Middle East).  Likud’s Menachem Begin is elected Prime Minister.

(http://www.saveisrael.com/images/beginspeak.jpg)
Prime Minister Begin speaking to the Knesset.

On November 12, President Hearnes leaves for his first international tour as President.  His first stop is in London, where he meets with Prime Minister Wilson, who appears likely to lose his status once again to Conservative Leader Margaret Thatcher in the upcoming elections, scheduled for 12 January 1976.

From London, Hearnes goes to Spain, where he meets with an ailing Francisco Franco.  He travels then to Paris, meeting with French President Alain Poher, and ends in West Germany, where he gives a speech at the Berlin Wall.

Upon returning to the United States on November 26, President Hearnes gives a speech to the United Nations, where he says that, “We have a collective responsibility to help spread democracy, and ensure that all peoples are completely free.”  Following the speech, Hearnes deplores the oppressive regimes of men such as Idi Amin in Uganda, and the apartheid reign of the National Party in South Africa.

On December 1, the President announces that he will seek reelection.  Three days later, Congress passes the Ethics in Government Act, which required all federal officials to submit financial documents every year, and all officials seeking elected office to submit a complete and total list of everyone who donated over $50 to their campaign.

On January 12, the United Kingdom holds elections, and throw out Prime Minister Wilson and the Labour Party.  Conservative Margaret Thatcher becomes the country’s first female Prime Minister.

In his State of the Union on January 24, President Hearnes asks Congress to pass what he calls the “Equality Package.”  The package contains three major pieces of legislation: the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Native Discrimination Act of 1976.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act, written by Senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR), the PDA would prohibit companies from discriminating against pregnant women when hiring, as well as prevent companies from firing women for being pregnant, or denying them employment upon return from maternity leave.  The PDA faces surprisingly little opposition from conservatives, and is signed by the President on February 14.

The ADA also faces little opposition, despite its expansive nature.  Written by Senator Kennedy, the ADA would prohibit, under certain circumstances, discrimination based on disability, similar to the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  The ADA defined disability as “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity.”  The determination of whether any particular condition is considered a disability would be made on a case by case basis. Certain specific conditions were excluded as disabilities, such as current substance abuse and visual impairment which is correctable by prescription lenses.  The ADA passes the Senate on March 9, 89-10, and the House on March 24, 340-94, and is signed by the President on March 26.

The final piece of the package, the Native Discrimination Act of 1976, prohibits companies from discriminating against people based on their Native American ancestry.  Written by Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ), the NDA faces opposition from Southerners such as Jesse Helms (R-NC), who had sat out the two previous battles due to the fact that they were un-winnable.  The NDA, Helms says, would lead to a slew of people improperly claiming Native ancestry in order to get jobs.  Despite Helms’ concern, the NDA passes on April 20, and is signed by the President three days later.

With all his legislative priorities taken care of, President Hearnes begins the long and arduous task of preparing for his reelection campaign.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on March 02, 2009, 05:50:55 pm
Who won the snap Presidential election called in France after de Gaulle's death in 1974?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 02, 2009, 06:22:10 pm
Who won the snap Presidential election called in France after de Gaulle's death in 1974?

Poher did.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Dodger Blue on March 02, 2009, 06:22:18 pm
Whose funeral is that really a picture of?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 02, 2009, 06:22:57 pm
Whose funeral is that really a picture of?

I'm pretty sure it was LBJ's.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on March 02, 2009, 10:15:42 pm
(http://www.richgros.com/People/Other%20People/Hearnes.jpg)
The First Term of Warren Hearnes

Three hours after President Humphrey’s death, President Hearnes speaks to the American people live on national television.  “My fellow Americans, it is with great sadness that I speak to you tonight.  Three hours ago, President Hubert Horatio Humphrey died of an aortic aneurysm at his desk in the Oval Office.  In my first official act as President, I am declaring tomorrow to be a day of mourning for all Americans.  I ask you all to keep the Humphrey family in your prayers.  Thank you, and good night.”

Three days later, Humphrey’s funeral is held in Minneapolis.  He is eulogized by former President Kennedy, who calls Humphrey, “One of the greatest men in our country’s history.”  The former President is widely mourned, and all throughout the country, impromptu memorials are held for the President.

(http://pro.corbis.com/images/WL005080.jpg?size=67&uid=%7B6DB0FF5C-5EDD-4BCF-9364-633BE659AC04%7D)
Former Vice President Nixon at President Humphrey's Funeral

In the days following Humphrey’s funeral, little is heard from the White House.  President Hearnes schedules a speech to a joint session of Congress on August 14, three days after the funeral.

In the speech, Hearnes says, “We must continue!”  He announces an ambitious set of programs, designed to fulfill Humphrey’s dream of an America marked by equality and prosperity.  The speech is well received, and Hearnes’ approval rating starts out at a whopping 85%.

When Congress returns on September 4, they are presented with the first major piece of legislation: the Public Works Act of 1975.  The PWA, originally written by the President, would create a large number of new jobs for people across the country, by establishing new schools, and other government facilities throughout the country.

The PWA, though, faces stiff opposition from conservatives, claiming that the PWA would spend taxpayer money on unnecessary programs.  Conservatives, led by Senators Strom Thurmond (R-SC), and Herman Talmadge (D-GA) begin a lengthy filibuster.

(http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/media_content/m-671.jpg)
Senator Herman Talmadge (D-GA) filibustering the PWA

For almost a month, the filibuster continues, until, on October 2, by a vote of 71-29, the Senate grants cloture.  Three days later, the Senate passes the PWA, 68-32.

In the House, the PWA faces little opposition, and passes easily, 406-28, on October 17.  It is signed by the President on October 20.

On November 1, the State of Israel holds elections for the Knesset, resulting in a victory for the Likud Party.  For the first time, the left-wing lost an election, with the Alignment’s share of the vote reduced by more than a third.  The Israeli right-wing took power for the first time since Israeli independence in 1948. The left’s spectacular loss of power was attributed to two major causes; allegations of corruption and nepotism (such as the Dollar Account affair and the Yadlin affair), and a perceived favoring of Ashkenazi (European) Jews over Mizrahi Jews (from North Africa and the Middle East).  Likud’s Menachem Begin is elected Prime Minister.

(http://www.saveisrael.com/images/beginspeak.jpg)
Prime Minister Begin speaking to the Knesset.

On November 12, President Hearnes leaves for his first international tour as President.  His first stop is in London, where he meets with Prime Minister Wilson, who appears likely to lose his status once again to Conservative Leader Margaret Thatcher in the upcoming elections, scheduled for 12 January 1976.

From London, Hearnes goes to Spain, where he meets with an ailing Francisco Franco.  He travels then to Paris, meeting with French President Alain Poher, and ends in West Germany, where he gives a speech at the Berlin Wall.

Upon returning to the United States on November 26, President Hearnes gives a speech to the United Nations, where he says that, “We have a collective responsibility to help spread democracy, and ensure that all peoples are completely free.”  Following the speech, Hearnes deplores the oppressive regimes of men such as Idi Amin in Uganda, and the apartheid reign of the National Party in South Africa.

On December 1, the President announces that he will seek reelection.  Three days later, Congress passes the Ethics in Government Act, which required all federal officials to submit financial documents every year, and all officials seeking elected office to submit a complete and total list of everyone who donated over $50 to their campaign.

On January 12, the United Kingdom holds elections, and throw out Prime Minister Wilson and the Labour Party.  Conservative Margaret Thatcher becomes the country’s first female Prime Minister.

In his State of the Union on January 24, President Hearnes asks Congress to pass what he calls the “Equality Package.”  The package contains three major pieces of legislation: the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Native Discrimination Act of 1976.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act, written by Senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR), the PDA would prohibit companies from discriminating against pregnant women when hiring, as well as prevent companies from firing women for being pregnant, or denying them employment upon return from maternity leave.  The PDA faces surprisingly little opposition from conservatives, and is signed by the President on February 14.

The ADA also faces little opposition, despite its expansive nature.  Written by Senator Kennedy, the ADA would prohibit, under certain circumstances, discrimination based on disability, similar to the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  The ADA defined disability as “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity.”  The determination of whether any particular condition is considered a disability would be made on a case by case basis. Certain specific conditions were excluded as disabilities, such as current substance abuse and visual impairment which is correctable by prescription lenses.  The ADA passes the Senate on March 9, 89-10, and the House on March 24, 340-94, and is signed by the President on March 26.

The final piece of the package, the Native Discrimination Act of 1976, prohibits companies from discriminating against people based on their Native American ancestry.  Written by Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ), the NDA faces opposition from Southerners such as Jesse Helms (R-NC), who had sat out the two previous battles due to the fact that they were un-winnable.  The NDA, Helms says, would lead to a slew of people improperly claiming Native ancestry in order to get jobs.  Despite Helms’ concern, the NDA passes on April 20, and is signed by the President three days later.

With all his legislative priorities taken care of, President Hearnes begins the long and arduous task of preparing for his reelection campaign.

Wow that was definatley worth the wait...Hmm It seems President Hearnes isnt taking it slow with his legaslitive agenda. Is his approval rating still floating around 85% or have the've taken a hit? Is the economy in worse shape Stagflation wise with the onset of more Government programs? How's Nasa doing? and I cant wait to see who the GOP runs against Hearnes for the '76 election. Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 02, 2009, 10:20:49 pm
Wow that was definatley worth the wait...Hmm It seems President Hearnes isnt taking it slow with his legaslitive agenda. Is his approval rating still floating around 85% or have the've taken a hit? Is the economy in worse shape Stagflation wise with the onset of more Government programs? How's Nasa doing? and I cant wait to see who the GOP runs against Hearnes for the '76 election. Keep it comming

Thanks :)

President Hearnes' approval ratings stand at anywhere between 65-75% as of start of 1976.  The economy is actually in better shape, because the PWA has created a large number of jobs.  NASA isn't really important at the moment, although Humphrey raised their budget to the highest levels since the Kennedy years.

As for the GOP, there are no clear frontrunners.  Vice President Nixon had planned on runnings, but with Humphrey's death, he has decided not to.  There is word in some circles, though, that Governor Reagan will run.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on March 02, 2009, 11:44:55 pm
Hmm...So Hearnes really isn't that voulnerable in the '76 election.With that being said, 1976 might be two soon in the voters eyes after the disastorus Tower Presidency, and the growing conservative movement probably takes the backburner. Reagan may run for the nomination but he might not win it. I think moderates take the cake with leading candidates, being Nelson Rockefeller, Robert Dole, and Gerald Ford. I think Rocky ITTL might finally get his shot at the Presidency


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 03, 2009, 02:17:24 pm
Rocky will not run in 1976.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on March 03, 2009, 03:25:19 pm
Rocky will not run in 1976.

Aww, man...I was really pulling for him too...Shucks, now Im going to throw my support behind another moderate...Massachusetts Senator Edward Brooke. Btw, Deeds If you wan't to talk about some of the things that are causing writer's block with the TL feel free to hit me up via pm or in this thread. I find that healthy discussion on issues when writing an indepth Timeline really help solve the curse of writer's block, and may be helpful in your case. That way you don't exhaust you mind in trying to come up with scenario's lol.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 03, 2009, 10:03:32 pm
The Democratic Nomination

Following his announcement that he intended to seek reelection, President Hearnes was able to focus on his Vice President.  His major desires in the pick are to have someone with foreign policy experience, appeal to as many parts of the base as possible, and be young enough to succeed him in 8 years.  His short list comprises Senators Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, Sam Nunn of Georgia, Frank Church of Idaho, and Robert Byrd of West Virginia.  It also includes Congressman Les Aspin of Wisconsin and Ray Roberts of Texas.

As the Convention gathers in Chicago, Hearnes has narrowed the list down to Inouye, Aspin, and Church.  Hearnes initially decides to select Inouye, but, when asked, Inouye turns him down, preferring to stay in the Senate.  Following that, Hearnes decides to select Church, and Church accepts.

At the Convention, a long tribute is paid to President Humphrey, with an especially poignant tribute being delivered by Vice Presidential nominee Church.  Following the Convention, Hearnes appears to have a large, insurmountable lead.

The Republican Nomination

With President Humphrey’s death, multiple top level challengers decided not to seek the nomination.  Former Vice President and Governor Nixon, Governor Rockefeller of New York, and Senator Baker all decide not to run.

Eventually, three candidates emerge: Governor Ronald Reagan of California, Governor Tom McCall of Oregon, and Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts.

From the outset, Brooke attracts a large amount of media attention, as the first African-American to seriously contest the Presidency.  Early polls show Brooke in the lead, although a large number of voters, especially in the South, are undecided.

The first primary, in Iowa, is a close race, with Brooke pulling out a narrow victory, to the shock of everyone, becoming the first African-American to win a Presidential primary.  Following Iowa is New Hampshire, which also goes to Brooke.  Following New Hampshire, though, things take a decided turn towards Governor Reagan.  Reagan wins a string on primaries in Maryland, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Colorado, and California, with only one other candidate winning a primary, as McCall takes Oregon.

By the beginning of April, Brooke is the only other candidate remaining, and with primaries in Alaska, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Washington, he needs to win at least three to stay in the race.  However, he wins only Connecticut and Massachusetts, and pulls out of the race, giving Reagan the nomination.

At the RNC in Philadelphia, Reagan chooses a theme of unity.  All of his contenders are given major speaking slots, and as his running mate, he chooses Brooke supporter and retiring Congressman Gerald R. Ford as his running mate.  During the Convention, Reagan promises to “Make American right again,” which draws cheers from the crowd.

(http://www.ford.utexas.edu/images/avproj/new-images/B1272-18A.jpg)
Reagan and Ford shaking hands after Ford is announced as the Vice Presidential Nominee.


The General Election

As the campaign gets underway, Hearnes has the clear advantage.  His approval ratings stand in the high 60’s to low 70’s, and Reagan is unable to make a dent in the polls, trailing Hearnes 56-35 on October 1.

During the second debate, Reagan commits a serious blunder.  When asked about the USSR, Reagan declares that, “There is no Soviet domination of Eastern Europe, and there never will be.”  The remark loses him support amongst anti-Communist groups, many of whom flock to Hearnes, given his previous record on the issue.

By election day, the polls are showing Reagan losing in a landslide, and the results are little better, as Reagan suffers one of the biggest losses in US history.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1976&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=1;9;5&AK=1;3;5&AZ=1;6;5&AR=1;6;6&CA=2;45;4&CO=1;7;5&CT=1;8;6&DE=1;3;6&DC=1;3;8&FL=1;17;6&GA=1;12;6&HI=1;4;7&ID=1;4;4&IL=1;26;6&IN=1;13;5&IA=1;8;5&KS=1;7;5&KY=1;9;5&LA=1;10;6&MD=1;10;6&MA=1;14;6&MI=1;21;5&MN=1;10;6&MS=1;7;5&MO=1;12;6&MT=1;4;5&NE=2;5;5&NV=1;3;5&NH=1;4;5&NJ=1;17;6&NM=1;4;5&NY=1;41;6&NC=1;13;6&ND=2;3;5&OH=1;25;5&OK=1;8;5&OR=1;6;5&PA=1;27;6&RI=1;4;7&SC=1;8;5&SD=1;4;5&TN=1;10;6&TX=1;26;6&UT=2;4;5&VT=1;3;6&VA=1;12;5&WA=1;9;6&WV=1;6;7&WI=1;11;5&WY=2;3;5&ME=1;2;6&ME1=1;1;6&ME2=1;1;6)
Warren Hearnes/Frank Church: 58.9% PV, 478 EV
Ronald Reagan/Gerald Ford: 38.9% PV, 60 EV
Others: 2.2% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

Hearnes’ landslide brings even more Democrats into Congress, giving them one of their largest majorities in history.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=0;3;5&AZ=2;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=1;55;3&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;3&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;27;3&GA=0;15;5&HI=1;4;3&ID=0;4;6&IL=0;21;6&IN=1;11;3&IA=0;7;5&KS=0;6;5&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;3&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=1;6;3&MO=2;11;9&MT=1;3;3&NV=1;5;3&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;15;3&NM=1;5;3&NY=1;31;9&NC=0;15;4&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;20;9&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=1;21;9&RI=1;4;3&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=1;11;9&TX=1;34;3&UT=2;5;9&VT=1;3;9&VA=3;13;3&WA=1;11;3&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=1;3;3&ME=1;2;3&ME1=1;1;3&ME2=1;1;3&NE=1;2;9&NE1=1;1;9&NE2=1;1;9&NE3=1;1;9)
Democrats: 76 (+4)
Republicans: 24 (-4)

House Results
Democrats: 335 (+15)
Republicans: 100 (-15)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on March 03, 2009, 11:17:53 pm
Reagan loses.....

*NiK starts to cry*

JK. Great update.

Can we see a slice of Japan in the next update, What is their current economic growth levels?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Dodger Blue on March 03, 2009, 11:24:10 pm
Keep up the good work!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on March 04, 2009, 03:15:07 am
Wow, I was expecting the next installment so soon, and it did not disappoint. Nice to see Brooke coming so close to clinching the nomination. Hmm, it is sad to see Ronnie go the way off Goldwater/Mcgovern ITTL, but It will give the moderates a good shot of winning the election in 1980, if things go as half as bad as they did in otl. Im suprised though that President Hearnes wouldn't an African American as a running mate to sow up the base after Brooke ran so well. If he was looking for someone with foreign policy experience, Hearnes could go after 4 star General Daniel "Chappie" James Jr.  If not Chappie then Andrew Young, Barbara Jordan, Shrley Chisholm and others are all good choices. Can't wait to see how the next four years turn out...Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 05, 2009, 12:29:19 pm
Garrison, you know full well why I have that picture.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on March 08, 2009, 01:58:04 am
Like your previous timeline, this has jumped the shark once more.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 08, 2009, 02:01:47 am
Like your previous timeline, this has jumped the shark once more.

Damn it; what happened this time?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on March 08, 2009, 12:10:30 pm
Like your previous timeline, this has jumped the shark once more.

I don't understand why you say this timeline has "jumped the shark" It's one of the detailed and interesting timelines on the board. Just because ben likes to focus on American Legislation rather than foriegn affairs, is just a preference of writing style. I find that adding to much detail of foriegn policy rather than domestic can slow the timelines progress down somewhat. So you just have to appreciate the feat ben is trying to tackle here, and if you don't like it...change the channel


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: PBrunsel on March 13, 2009, 05:57:54 pm
Ben,

I really like this timeline and President Hearnes. In my education classes in college I have done a lot of research into how Governor Hearnes modernized the education system in Missouri, which went from in the bottom ten to the top ten durring his eight years as governor. 

Where did you get the idea of making Warren Hearnes the President? It was a fine stroke of writing. :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 13, 2009, 09:14:33 pm
Ben,

I really like this timeline and President Hearnes. In my education classes in college I have done a lot of research into how Governor Hearnes modernized the education system in Missouri, which went from in the bottom ten to the top ten durring his eight years as governor. 

Where did you get the idea of making Warren Hearnes the President? It was a fine stroke of writing. :)

Thank you very much :)  I'm glad that Hearnes was a good Governor; I couldn't find much information about him.

I wanted Humphrey to select a Southerner with experience, so it ended up as a tie between Governor Hearnes and Senator LeRoy Collins of Florida, who had previously served as Governor.  Since I intended for Humphrey to die, I wanted someone young enough to replace Humphrey as President, and so Hearnes won on the basis that he was several years younger than Collins.  Thanks again for the compliment :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: defe07 on March 13, 2009, 10:09:28 pm
Gee, sympathy votes really go a long way I guess!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on March 13, 2009, 10:14:32 pm
Who won the snap Presidential election called in France after de Gaulle's death in 1974?

Poher did.

No chance in hell. Poher had little name recognition, a large part of his own party didn't even support him, and there'd obviously be much stronger candidates in the race, like Giscard or Chaban-Delmas or Mitterrand or whoever.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on March 20, 2009, 10:11:52 am
Ok Ben, son when should we see the next installment...Will a nother Southern Governor fail at resolving the Iranian Hostage Crisis...I eagerly wait to find out.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 20, 2009, 12:49:15 pm
The next update will come tonight.  Thanks for your patience.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on March 20, 2009, 06:14:36 pm
Yes, I am to looking forward to this.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on March 24, 2009, 11:17:33 pm
When Will We See another Update Ben? I'm intrested to see how Hearnes handles the Iranian Hostage Crisis. Will He Send the Troops in? Will He Not Send the Troops In? Will there be a revolution at all? I am dying to know!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 05, 2009, 03:08:00 pm
(http://www.richgros.com/People/Other%20People/Hearnes.jpg)
The Second Term of Warren Hearnes

“My fellow Americans, as we enter our third century as a nation, we have a lot of work to do.  We must improve our country, so that we will always be great!”  Thus begins President Hearnes’ second term in office.  As outlined to Congress, Hearnes’ program would include various domestic improvement programs, as well as job creation programs.

The first such program was the Community Reinvestment Act.  Written by Senator Kennedy, the CRA was designed to encourage commercial banks and savings associations to meet the needs of borrowers in all segments of their communities, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods.  This would be done by requiring the appropriate federal financial supervisory agencies to encourage regulated financial institutions to meet the credit needs of the local communities in which they are chartered, consistent with safe and sound operation.  Despite claims from some Senators that the bill would have an adverse effect by giving out unsound loans, the CRA passes without difficulty, and is signed by the President on February 27.

The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, written by Senator Robert C. Byrd (D-WV), would abolish the U.S. Civil Service Commission and distributes its functions primarily among three agencies created by the Bill.  As explained by Senator Byrd, “This act is an effort to replace incompetent officials.”  Backed by a strange coalition of earnest reformers and limited government conservatives, the CSR passes the Senate on March 22, 62-37, and passes the House, 229-201, on April 4, being signed by the President the next day.

In a nationally televised speech on April 17, President Hearnes announces that unemployment stands at a remarkable low of 4.6%, that per-person wages have grown each of the last 7 years, and that the country is looking at a likely surplus and balanced budget by 1980.  Following the speech, Hearnes’ approval rating stands at a remarkable 73%.

Three days after the speech, Hearnes, along with Commerce Secretary Fox, Trade Representative Robert S. Strauss, and Secretary of the Treasury Fowler, flies to Canada to meet with Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and Mexican President José López Portillo about a possible free trade agreement between Mexico, the US and Canada.  The agreement, called the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), is signed on May 2, 1977.  The agreement would be finalized after ratification by the three nation’s legislatures.

When Hearnes brings NAFTA to the Senate, it is stalled by Senator Ralph Yarborough (D-TX), Chairman of the Senate Labor Committee.  Yarborough, an opponent of free trade, works with Majority Leader Byrd, another opponent of free trade, to keep NAFTA from being brought to the floor.  Yarborough and Byrd promise Hearnes that NAFTA will receive a vote by the summer of 1978.

On June 28, 1977, Justice Arthur Goldberg retires from the Court.  To replace him, President Hearnes nominates Senator Birch Bayh to replace him.  Bayh is confirmed quickly, without controversy.

Starting July 9, Hearnes begins his first international tour since his reelection.  He starts out in Africa, where he meets with numerous leaders, including Egyptian President Anwar El Sadat.  While in Cairo, Hearnes calls for talks between Israel and Egypt, offering to host a meeting in America.  Sadat promises to consider the offer.

After Egypt, Hearnes goes to Israel, where Prime Minister Begin is equally receptive to the notion of meeting with Sadat.  Begin’s Cabinet, however, is less pleased about the idea, and Hearnes leaves Israel unsure if a meeting will ever take place.

Following Israel, Hearnes takes his requisite trip throughout Europe, attending an economic conference in Geneva from July 22-July 26.  In Spain, Hearnes calls for a transition to democracy following the death of Francisco Franco.  Once again, Hearnes gives a speech at the Berlin Wall, in which he calls for the USSR to ease restrictions of people traveling between the East and West.

After ending his European tour on August 2 with a visit to Portugal, Hearnes decides to visit Latin America.  While in Chile, Hearnes criticizes governments that, “Suspend the rights of the people in order to continue holding power,” a pointed criticism of Chilean President Pinochet.  Throughout his tour of Latin America, Hearnes calls for more communication between Latin America and the United States.

When President Hearnes returns to Washington on August 18, he renews calls for the Senate to pass NAFTA.  Senator Yarborough agrees to have it out of Committee by October 1, although Majority Leader Byrd says that it is unlikely NAFTA will see a vote before the new year.

In September, Congress passes the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (or ANILCA), which would create 15 National Park Service properties, and provide for the designation of 79.53 million acres of public lands, fully a third of which was set aside as wilderness area.  Strongly supported by the liberals in Congress, and conservationist groups throughout the country, President Hearnes signs the ANILCA into law on September 26.

On October 8, NAFTA is finally freed from the Senate Labor Committee.  However, much to Hearnes’ anger, NAFTA is then sent to the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, Chaired by another opponent of NAFTA, Senator William Proxmire (D-WI).  Proxmire, however, promises to have NAFTA ready for a Senate vote by the beginning on 1978.

On October 28, 1977, Egyptian President Anwar El Sadat visits Israel, and speaks to the Knesset; in doing so, he implicitly recognizes Israel’s right to exist, something never done by any other Arab politician beforehand.  This decision, which was done after clandestine preparatory meetings between Egyptian and Israeli officials, was unknown even to the NATO countries.  Upon hearing of it, President Hearnes and Secretary of State Muskie begin preparation for a meeting in Washington, DC, between the two leaders.

In Sadat’s speech, he talked about his views on peace, the status of Israel’s occupied territories, and the Palestinian refugee problem.  The international response to his speech was not happy.  Hungarian leader Janos Kadar threatened war with Egypt if they signed a peace agreement with Israel, followed swiftly by Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, and Albania. Yugoslavia and East Germany also threatened to attack Egypt if they did not revoke their recognition of Israel. The Soviet Union, Poland, Finland, and Romania declined to threaten war, but they would enter Egypt should NATO armies intervene. Libya, Iraq, Syria, and other Arab nations called Egypt a traitor, and said they would support an Eastern invasion by any means possible, even by military action.

In a speech to the UN on November 7, US Ambassador to the UN  Robert C. Hill, announced that the United States would happily host a conference between the two nations in the United States.  For the next several months, though, nothing comes of the invitation.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 05, 2009, 03:08:28 pm
On December 8, Hearnes presents the Torrijos-Hearnes Treaties to the US Senate.  For two weeks, the Senate debates the treaty before recessing until 1978.  When it reconvenes on January 9, 1978, the Senate takes up the Treaty again.  Conservatives, led by Senator Jesse Helms (R-NC), and Strom Thurmond (R-SC) oppose the Treaty, arguing that it hurts US security interests.  Following a speech by the President on January 14 in favor of the Treaty, Senator Thurmond responds by saying, “The canal is ours, we bought and we paid for it and we should keep it.”

Despite the opposition of such conservatives, on February 9, the Senate ratifies the First Treaty, which provided that as from 12:00 on December 31, 1999, Panama would assume full control of canal operations and become primarily responsible for its defense.  The final vote on the Treaty was 62-30, with 8 Republicans, at least 5 of them conservatives, mot voting, led Senator Thurmond to declare that Hearnes had “Bribed my fellow conservatives to not vote, and let the Treaty pass,” ignoring the fact that 14 Democrats switched sides to vote against the Treaty.

On March 22, the Senate ratifies the Second Treaty, which said the U.S. retained the permanent right to defend the canal from any threat that might interfere with its continued neutral service to ships of all nations.  There is less controversy for the Second Treaty, and it passes 78-22, with 5 Republicans joining 73 Democrats to vote in the Treaty’s favor, and 3 Democrats joining 19 Republicans in opposition.

On April 4, the Senate finally begins debate on NAFTA.  For almost two months, the Senate debates the Agreement, with an odd coalition of conservatives like Jesse Helms and Strom Thurmond and liberals like Barbara Mikulski opposing NAFTA.  These Senators argue that the Agreement would have a negative impact on American workers, as cheaper labor could be found elsewhere.

Throughout the debate, the Hearnes Administration pressures Democratic Senators to stay for the Agreement.  On May 28, with both sides convinced that they have the votes, cloture is achieved on NAFTA, 69-31.  On June 2, the Senate votes, 54-46, to pass NAFTA.  33 Democrats, joined by 21 Republicans, vote to pass the Agreement, while 43 Democrats and 3 Republicans vote against it.

In the House, the opposition is fragmented, and with NAFTA having the support of the Democratic leadership, there is never any doubt that NAFTA will pass.  On June 20, by a vote of 232-203, NAFTA passes, and is signed by the President.

On June 27, Justice William H. Hastie dies of a heart attack while in his Chambers.  To replace him, Hearnes nominates Hugh H. Bownes of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit to replace him; Bownes is confirmed without controversy.

As 1978 continues, the economy begins to drag; a report issued in July of 1978 shows unemployment at 6.2%, the highest it had been since 1975.  Despite some warnings of an oncoming recession, President Hearnes says in a July 4 speech that, “The American economy is strong, and will continue to be strong.”

Despite the falling American economy, the international economy is strong.  Japan, Israel, France, West Germany, the United Kingdom, and other nations in Europe see record levels of economic growth, leading to landslide victories for the ruling parties in elections held in Japan and the United Kingdom.

The Congressional Elections

After four years of extremely high approval ratings, a USA Today survey on August 3, 1978 shows the President’s rating below 60% for the first time in his term, at 56%.  The President’s waning approval ratings lead to several Democratic retirements, creating multiple open seats and pickup opportunities for the GOP.  On election day, the President’s approvals are at 52%, and the Republicans make major gains.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=0;10;5&AR=1;6;3&CA=0;55;6&CO=2;9;9&CT=0;7;6&DE=1;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=0;27;5&GA=1;15;3&HI=0;4;7&ID=2;4;3&IL=2;21;3&IN=0;11;4&IA=2;7;9&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=0;10;6&MA=2;12;3&MI=2;17;3&MN=2;10;9&MS=2;6;9&MO=0;11;4&MT=2;3;9&NV=0;5;5&NH=2;4;9&NJ=1;15;9&NM=2;5;9&NY=0;31;6&NC=2;15;3&ND=0;3;5&OH=0;20;5&OK=1;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=2;8;3&SD=1;3;3&TN=2;11;3&TX=1;34;3&UT=0;5;6&VT=0;3;6&VA=2;13;9&WA=0;11;5&WV=2;5;9&WI=0;10;5&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;9&ME1=2;1;9&ME2=2;1;9&NE=1;2;9&NE1=1;1;9&NE2=1;1;9&NE3=1;1;9)
Democrats: 68 (-8)
Republicans: 32 (+8)

House Results
Democrats: 274 (-61)
Republicans: 161 (+61)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on April 05, 2009, 04:38:50 pm
By the Gods an Update lol, I enjoyed very thorughly and suprised how Progressive Hearne's is handling the issues of the day especially on something like NAFTA. Yet as the economy goes, there goes the incumbent...I am looking forward to how Hearnes handels the Iran-Hostage Crisis, and I am pulling for Brooke to geting the GOP nomination....But as far as I know It could go either way(Brokering a Peace agreement between Egypt and Israel, would be one hell of an October Suprise)...Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on April 05, 2009, 05:14:48 pm
NO NOT NAFTA!!!!!! I thought that would have died a horrible death without a pro-buisness southerner at the helm!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on April 13, 2009, 05:42:43 pm
Is Hearnes eligible to run again? If he does, he has my support. If not, I will support a certain Robert Dole or a Gary Hart.

What's Gary Hart up to, anyway?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 13, 2009, 06:47:58 pm
President Hearnes is eligible to seek another term, since he served less than half of President Humphrey's term.

Gary Hart is currently a Senator from Colorado, as in RL.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on April 14, 2009, 01:47:16 pm
President Hearnes is eligible to seek another term, since he served less than half of President Humphrey's term.

Gary Hart is currently a Senator from Colorado, as in RL.

Excellent, Excellent.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 22, 2009, 04:52:44 pm
Sorry for the lack of an update; I've got a lot of stuff going on now, and I probably won't be able to write an update until at least next week.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 07, 2009, 04:23:24 pm
I'm really sorry for the lack of an update; expect at least 1 on Saturday.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 09, 2009, 08:48:13 pm
In his State of the Union Address on January 14, 1979, President Hearnes reflects on the weakening economy.  “Although our economy is still strong, we must be wary, and always be ready, for hard times down the line.”  The President’s gloomy predictions do little to help the economy.

Just five days after the President’s speech, economic issues are shunted to the side by a much bigger crisis.  On January 19, Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran leaves the country following strikes and demonstrations that had paralyzed the country since August, 1978.  On January 30, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returns to Tehran, being greeted by nearly one million followers.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/06/Imam_Khomeini_in_Mehrabad.jpg)
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini on his return to Tehran

Over the next few weeks, the Ayatollah cements his power.  He quickly makes Mehdi Bazargan his Prime Minister on February 4.  Within a short amount of time, soldiers began to defect to Khomeini's side.  On February 9 at about 10 P.M., a fight broke out between loyal Immortal Guards and pro-Khomeini rebel Homafaran of Iran Air Force. Khomeini responded by declaring jihad on loyal soldiers who did not surrender immediately.

The final collapse of the provisional non-Islamist government came at 2 p.m. on February 11 when the Supreme Military Council declared itself “neutral in the current political disputes… in order to prevent further disorder and bloodshed.”

Throughout the conflict, the United States had remained neutral.  On July 9, though, the neutrality is broken when the US allows the Shah into the country for cancer treatment.  The Shah's admission to the US intensifies Iranian revolutionaries’ anti-Americanism and spawned rumors of another U.S.-backed coup and re-installation of the Shah.

After several days of protests, though, it appeared that the US wouldn’t suffer for admitting the Shah.  On July 18, though, a group of Islamist students takes over the American embassy and take 66 diplomats hostage.

The Muslim Student Followers of the Imam's Line, the group responsible for the kidnapping, demanded that the Shah return to Iran for trial and execution, and that the US government apologize for its interference in the internal affairs of Iran and for the overthrow of Prime Minister Mossadeq.  The US refuses, and instead, President Hearnes issues Executive Order 12170, freezing all Iranian assets held in US.

For the next several months, the President attempts to try and secure the release of the hostages.  On October 9, 13 women and 1 African-American are released, but no others.

On December 18, the military launches Operation Eagle Claw to try and rescue the hostages.  The attempt fails miserably, resulting in the death of 8 soldiers, the wounding of another 4, and the deaths of 2 Iranian civilians.

On December 20, in a televised speech, a tearful President claims full responsibility, and apologizes to the families of the hostages.  The speech has no effect, though, and the President’s approval rating falls to 26%, with 72% disapproving.  That same day, a poll shows the President trailing the generic Republican 59-29 in a reelection match-up.

In his State of the Union Address on January 10, 1980, the President announces that, despite the poor poll numbers, he will indeed seek reelection.  He then leaves to campaign, facing a tough bid not only to win reelection, but also to win his own Party’s nomination.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on May 10, 2009, 11:57:17 am
A solid yet sobering installment Ben...I do have a question, who is Hearnes' Secretary of State ITTL? Because it was during this time in OTL, that the Neoconservatives(Scoop Jackson Democrats) left the party under Carter's Idealist foriegn policy views. Would your say that the Neoconservatives are still with the party or might they still bolt, under the plumenting Hearnes' Administration?

Also, it seems that Hearnes may face a primary challenge by any number of Candidates...I doubt anyone from the South(Although im not sure about Jimmy and Askew) will probably challenge him. Scoop may try to make a final run at the thing and either Bobby or Teddy from the left. It will be very interesting.

Things on the GOP side will be interesting as well...Looking at it from a purly Political standpoint after such a massive defeat in the 1976 Election, I don't think a Conservative in the mold of former President Tower or  Governor Reagan can win the 1980 Election. And for the time being the nation is still a Center to Left country. Any number of moderates could throw their hat in the wing; Edward Brooke(Who I am especially pulling for), Howard Baker, George H.W. Bush, David Rockefeller and even former Vice President Nixon(Which would be very interesting, especially if we can get Iran-Contra to a Watergate level of Scandal) would all be very strong ticket my guess...Brooke/Baker(Or the otherway around) or even Nixon/Rockefeller would be some hella strong tickets.

Can't wait to see how the election turns out...Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 10, 2009, 12:38:48 pm
The Democratic Nomination

Because he had served less than half of President Humphrey’s term, President Hearnes was eligible to seek reelection.  It was expected, through 1978, that he would be unopposed.  By the middle of 1979, though, with the Iranian crisis in full swing, rumors emerged that President Hearnes would face a challenger.

On August 5, word leaks out that Senator George McGovern would challenge Hearnes.  McGovern doesn’t issue a statement confirming or denying.  On November 8, though, in a live press conference, McGovern announces that he will forgo reelection to the Senate and challenge President Hearnes.  “President Hearnes has not only failed the American people, he has failed the Democratic Party.  The time has come for him to go.”

As the campaign goes on through the end of 1979 and into 1980, it becomes apparent that McGovern has a large lead.  However, when the Iowa Caucus finally rolls around, Hearnes scores a major upset, winning the Caucus by 3,000 votes.  Hearnes goes on to win New Hampshire and Maine, before finally being stopped in the Minnesota primary.

In March, primaries are held in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, and Texas.  Hearnes sweeps those primaries, building up his lead.  McGovern finally gets a string of wins Alaska, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, New Mexico, and South Dakota.

Those are, however, McGovern’s  only victories, and Hearnes is able to clinch the nomination at the Convention; McGovern gives a rousing speech, but refuses to acknowledge Hearnes.

The Republican Nomination

As early as February, 1979, candidates begin preparing to run for the Republican nomination.  On April 16, 1979, Senator Mark Hatfield of Oregon becomes the first candidate to declare for the nomination.  On June 28, Senator Charles Percy of Illinois enters the race.  On July 15, angry at the lack of a conservative candidate, Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina enters the race, becoming the final of three candidates.

During the campaign, Helms acts as an outsider, blasting both Hatfield and Percy for being too liberal.  As the primaries begin, Helms draws all of his support from religious conservatives, dooming him to failure in the early contests in Iowa (Hatfield), New Hampshire (Hatfield), and Michigan (Percy).

Finally, Helms picks up a victory in the Oklahoma Primary, and the three men begin trading primaries.  Following Oklahoma, Percy wins his home state of Illinois, Hatfield wins Minnesota and Maine, and Helms wins Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas.

By early May, the race has become a primarily a two person battle between Hatfield and Helms, with Percy winning an occasional race.  Hatfield sweeps the New England Primaries, and Helms does the same in the South.  However, a group of Midwestern Primaries in Wisconsin, Ohio, Kansas, and South Dakota break for Percy, giving him a sizable number of delegates.

On June 3, the final primaries are held in Alaska (Hatfield), Arizona (Percy), California (Hatfield), Colorado (Percy), Delaware (Percy), District of Columbia (Hatfield), Hawaii (Hatfield), Idaho (Hatfield), Indiana (Helms), Montana (Helms), Nebraska (Helms), New Mexico (Hatfield), Nevada (Hatfield), North Dakota (Hatfield), Oregon (Hatfield), Utah (Helms), Washington (Hatfield), and Wyoming (Percy).

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1980&ev_c=0&pv_p=0&ev_p=0&AL=3;9;4&AK=1;3;5&AZ=2;6;6&AR=3;6;4&CA=1;45;5&CO=2;7;5&CT=1;8;4&DE=2;3;4&DC=1;3;7&FL=3;17;5&GA=3;12;5&HI=1;4;4&ID=1;4;6&IL=2;26;4&IN=3;13;5&IA=1;8;5&KS=2;7;5&KY=3;9;4&LA=3;10;5&MD=2;10;4&MA=1;14;4&MI=2;21;4&MN=1;10;4&MS=3;7;4&MO=3;12;5&MT=3;4;5&NE=3;5;6&NV=1;3;6&NH=1;4;5&NJ=1;17;5&NM=1;4;5&NY=1;41;4&NC=3;13;4&ND=1;3;6&OH=2;25;5&OK=3;8;6&OR=1;6;4&PA=1;27;4&RI=1;4;4&SC=3;8;4&SD=2;4;6&TN=3;10;4&TX=3;26;5&UT=3;4;7&VT=1;3;4&VA=3;12;5&WA=1;9;4&WV=3;6;4&WI=2;11;4&WY=2;3;6&ME=1;2;4&ME1=1;1;4&ME2=1;1;4)
Final results of 1980 Republican Primaries

As the GOP heads to the Convention, no candidate holds a majority.  Hatfield holds 828 delegates, Helms has 607, and Percy has 537, with 987 needed for victory.  On the first ballot, those are the results, but on the second, a major shift occurs.  Percy urges his delegates to support Hatfield, and Hatfield is able to win the nomination.  He then selects George HW Bush, a Percy supporter and moderate, as his running mate.

The lack of a conservative on the ticket infuriates Helms, who leads, along with nearly 100 delegates, a walkout at the Convention.  Several days later, he announces that he will run on the American Independent Party ticket, with Governor Otis R. Bowen of Indiana as his running mate.

The General Election

From the outset of the campaign, President Hearnes is on the defensive.  Both Hatfield and Helms attack the President, citing either the poor economy, the Iranian crisis, or any other number of failings over the last 4 years.

In the only debate, on October 8, Helms excoriates both candidates, calling them “Russian stooges.”  When Hatfield suggests that the US should talk with the USSR, given the ill health of Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev.  The proposal is attacked by both Hearnes and Helms.

As election day nears, Hearnes makes one final effort, not to reach 270, but to deny Hatfield a majority, and try and win the House.  The effort fails, and Hatfield wins in a landslide.  Three days after the election, it is announced by the Ayatollah that the prisoners will be released on January 21, 1981.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1980&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=3;9;3&AK=2;3;4&AZ=2;6;4&AR=3;6;3&CA=2;45;4&CO=2;7;4&CT=2;8;5&DE=2;3;4&DC=1;3;7&FL=2;17;3&GA=3;12;3&HI=1;4;4&ID=2;4;6&IL=2;26;4&IN=2;13;5&IA=2;8;4&KS=2;7;5&KY=2;9;3&LA=3;10;3&MD=1;10;4&MA=1;14;4&MI=2;21;4&MN=1;10;4&MS=3;7;4&MO=1;12;3&MT=2;4;5&NE=2;5;5&NV=2;3;5&NH=2;4;5&NJ=2;17;4&NM=2;4;4&NY=1;41;4&NC=3;13;5&ND=2;3;6&OH=2;25;4&OK=2;8;4&OR=2;6;7&PA=2;27;4&RI=1;4;4&SC=3;8;3&SD=2;4;6&TN=2;10;3&TX=2;26;3&UT=2;4;5&VT=2;3;5&VA=2;12;4&WA=2;9;4&WV=1;6;4&WI=2;11;4&WY=2;3;6&ME=2;2;5&ME1=2;1;5&ME2=2;1;5)
Mark Hatfield/George HW Bush: 44.2% PV, 369 EV
Warren Hearnes/Frank Church: 38.5% PV, 104 EV
Jesse Helms/Otis Bowen: 17.3% PV, 65 EV

The Congressional Elections

At the Congressional level, an historic defeat occurs for the Democratic Party, as they suffer unprecedented losses in both Houses, across the nation.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=2;9;9&AK=2;3;9&AZ=2;10;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=2;55;3&CO=1;9;3&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;6&DC=0;3;9&FL=2;27;9&GA=2;15;9&HI=1;4;3&ID=2;4;9&IL=1;21;3&IN=2;11;9&IA=2;7;9&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=1;10;3&MA=0;12;6&MI=0;17;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=1;11;3&MT=0;3;4&NV=2;5;3&NH=2;4;9&NJ=0;15;5&NM=0;5;5&NY=2;31;3&NC=2;15;9&ND=2;3;9&OH=1;20;3&OK=2;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=2;21;3&RI=0;4;6&SC=1;8;3&SD=2;3;9&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;34;5&UT=2;5;3&VT=1;3;3&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;11;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=2;10;9&WY=0;3;6&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;6&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;5&NE1=0;1;5&NE2=0;1;4&NE3=0;1;6)
Democrats: 56 (-12)
Republicans: 44 (+12)

House Results
Democrats: 230 (-44)
Republicans: 205 (+44)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: LastMcGovernite on May 10, 2009, 01:03:23 pm
Wow- go President Hatfield- nice to see my favorite Republican getting some love here.

Great job as always, Mr. Deeds.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 10, 2009, 02:33:07 pm
Great job as always, Mr. Deeds.

Thank you.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on May 10, 2009, 03:38:30 pm
President Hatfield...Can't say I saw that one coming lol, IIRC, George H.W. Bush is Senator from Texas, as he was appointed to fill Tower's seat when he vacated it for the Presidency Correct? It's sad to see President Hearnes go down in such a massive defeat, hopefully he'll be able to revitilize his legacy, in the Post-Presidency much like OTL Carter did.

Looking at Hatfield's record, we should see a pretty bipartisan cabinent...The more interesting idea however, what will happen to the Social Conservatives ITTL, will they stay as a major third party influence or gravitate back toward either the Democrats or Republicans. In the GOP is can forsee the party taking a more libertarian stance toward economic and social policy, as Hatfield was a big proponent for Gay and Abortion rights. And assuming that Hatfield's sway over white working-class voters in the Rust Belt is not as artificial as I think it is(They voted against Hearnes not for Hatfield).

The Democrats however, can take either two ways...be the Mcgovern Party of 1972 or the Carter Party of 1976. What I mean by that is that the New Deal Coalition died pretty much with HHH, and theres going to be a split over what role to take the party esp if the GOP takes the Industrial states. Either the Upper-Class Liberalism of Mcgovern and the New Left, which doesn't work, or the Born-Again evangelical Centrists of Jimmy Carter and the New South which does.

Seeing how this all plays out without Nixon to help craft and shape effectively both parties for the last 40 years is really cool. Btw what are the other Kennedy's up to? and as always Keep It Comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 10, 2009, 03:53:08 pm
President Hatfield...Can't say I saw that one coming lol, IIRC, George H.W. Bush is Senator from Texas, as he was appointed to fill Tower's seat when he vacated it for the Presidency Correct?

No, actually.  Bush served as US Ambassador to the UN from 1969-1971, and Governor of Texas from 1971-1979.

Btw what are the other Kennedy's up to?

Ted is the senior Senator from Massachusetts, and Bobby and Jack both teach at Harvard.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 11, 2009, 08:28:03 pm
Hatfield?!? Wow nice one, i wasn't even thinking of him. I have been reading, just not posting.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 11, 2009, 08:33:56 pm
I have been reading, just not posting.

Please keep posting.  It's the only way I know people are still reading this :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 26, 2009, 11:09:37 pm
Update tomorrow.  I promise.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on May 27, 2009, 05:36:06 pm
I would think Bobby would do something politically rated.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on May 27, 2009, 07:03:48 pm
I would think Bobby would do something politically rated.

Or atleast stay within the legal community...He would still be fairly young, and I honestly think he would make one hell of a SCOTUS.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 30, 2009, 11:26:20 am
I'm having a severe case of writer's block, so in order to at least give you guys something, here is the county results map from the 1980 General Election:
(http://img11.imageshack.us/img11/717/1980countiesjfk.gif)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on May 30, 2009, 11:30:11 am
ROFLMAO at the Republicans winning Elliot County, KY. Epic fail. Or the Dems losing the solid Democratic mining counties in WV.

lololol


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 30, 2009, 11:32:26 am
ROFLMAO at the Republicans winning Elliot County, KY. Epic fail. Or the Dems losing the solid Democratic mining counties in WV.

lololol

I gave the GOP Elliot?  Crap.  Assume they won that; I had some issues matching up the counties.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Joe Republic on May 30, 2009, 11:36:31 am
ROFLMAO at the Republicans winning Elliot County, KY. Epic fail. Or the Dems losing the solid Democratic mining counties in WV.

lololol

Ah, good old constructive criticism at its best.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 30, 2009, 03:54:11 pm
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_e72NqcRHEEY/Rc7r2cfzVMI/AAAAAAAAAIM/EJqcFm1-4vg/s320/Mark_hatfield.jpg)
The First Term of Mark Hatfield

“My fellow Americans, the days ahead are long, and we face many challenges.  Together, though, we can overcome those challenges, and enter into a new era of prosperity.”  In order to bring about this new prosperity, Hatfield brings the best of the best into his Cabinet, regardless of political ideology.

Secretary of State: Charles Percy (R-IL)
Secretary of Treasury: William E. Simon (R-NJ)
Secretary of Defense: Caspar Weinberger (R-CA)
Attorney General: Mark White (D-TX)
Secretary of the Interior: John V. Evans (D-ID)
Secretary of Agriculture: Robert D. Ray (R-IA)
Secretary of Commerce: Malcolm Baldrige, Jr. (R-NE)
Secretary of Labor: Elizabeth Dole (R-KS)
Secretary of Health and Human Services: Richard Schweiker (R-PA)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Kenneth A. Gibson (D-NJ)
Secretary of Transportation: John Lindsay (R-NY)

Within days of taking office, Hatfield announces that he is sending Secretary of State Percy to Tehran, to try and convince the Ayatollah to order the release of the hostages.  However, on January 24, the day before Percy leaves for Tehran, all the hostages are released by the Iranians.  An explanation is never given by Tehran as to why the hostages were released, although the question is never asked, either.

On February 1, President Hatfield, Vice President Bush, Secretaries Percy, Weinberger, and Schweiker, along with numerous members of Congress, greet the hostages in Washington, DC, upon their return.

On March 2, the Economic Recovery Act of 1981 is presented to Congress.  The ERA would provide temporary tax relief to anyone who had been unemployed for more than four months, would create tax incentives for companies to hire more employees, and other such incentives.  It is quickly passed by Congress, and is signed by the President on March 25.

On April 4, President Hatfield is informed that Justice Potter Stewart has decided to retire from the Supreme Court.  Hatfield nominates Samuel James Ervin III, son of a former Senator, to replace Stewart.  He is confirmed quickly, without controversy.

On April 18, President Hatfield begins his first major international tour as President.  He begins in England, where he meets with Prime Minister Thatcher.  In London, he gives a speech criticizing human rights violations being committed by the Soviet Union.  From London, he travels throughout Europe, ending on May 2, in Berlin.  Standing at the Berlin Wall, President Hatfield beseeches Soviet Premier Leonid Brezhnev to tear down the Berlin Wall, and allow for more freedom in the USSR.

Upon his return to the United States, President Hatfield proposes a major military buildup to Congress.  The buildup, he claims, would cut unemployment in half by 1984, and have it at below 3% by 1988.  The buildup draws controversy, though, from liberals like Edward Kennedy.  The liberals make the claim that the buildup will send the country further into debt, and is unnecessary.  When the Senate recesses in July, the buildup is still being debated in the Senate.

When the Senate reconvenes in September, the President offers a compromise.  In exchange for the passage of his buildup, Hatfield will hold off on his proposed general tax cuts until FY 1983.  The compromise is accepted by all sides, and the Senate passes Hatfield’s buildup on September 29, 1981, 87-13.  The House follows on October 14, 432-2.

In his State of the Union Address on January 17, 1982, President Hatfield announces that unemployment has fallen to its lowest levels since 1978, and that his Economic Recovery Plan seems to be working.  He also says that, at current rates, the country will have a balanced budget by FY 1988.

On February 18, President Hatfield travels to Israel to meet with Prime Minister Menachem Begin.  While there, he attempts to convince Begin to reopen negotiations with Egyptian President Anwar El Sadat.  The talks that had started under Hearnes had broken down following the Iranian Revolution, and Hatfield wanted to restart the talks.  Begin, however, is reluctant, especially after the failure to achieve anything under Hearnes cost his Likud Party dearly in the 1981 elections.  He promises, though, to consider Hatfield’s offer.

Following his visit to Israel, Hatfield decides to make an impromptu visit to Europe, where he meets in London with Prime Minister Thatcher.  Thatcher, having just recently proposed a major arms buildup in the UK, commends Hatfield for doing the same.  From there, Hatfield tours Europe, ending in Portugal on May 4.  Throughout Europe, he is inundated with requests for foreign aid.

In a speech to Congress on May 9, Hatfield calls for a major increase in the foreign aid budget.  Thanks to intervention by Senator Jackson, the aid is agreed to, despite setting back the deficit.

Since 1981, there had been war in the Middle East between Saddam Hussein’s Iraq and Iran.  Acting with at least tacit support from the Hearnes Administration, Iraq had attempted to regain lost territory, and make a client state out of Iran.  The attempts failed, and since early 1981, Iraq had been on the defensive.

On June 14, though, Iran, acting with weapons imported from other countries, began to force the Iraqis back from the position they had held for more than a year, and it appeared that Iran may take Baghdad.

On June 19, Hatfield meets with Congressional Leaders to determine a course of action.  Senator Jackson, backed by the Republican Leadership, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and SecDef Weinberger, urges a major military invasion to help Iraq, and possibly overthrow the Iranian regime.  Secretary of State Percy, along with the Democratic Leadership, advises Hatfield to do nothing.

For several weeks, Hatfield wavers.  On July 13, he announces that he will not send American troops, claiming that the US has no reason to do so.  Although the decision is widely criticized by hawks, by early August, the Iraqi Army had repelled the Iranians, and the stalemate had resumed.

The Congressional Elections

With Hatfield having approvals in the high 50’s to low 60’s, the Republicans are able to make more gains in both Houses, and even manage to retake the Senate for the first time since 1954.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=0;3;5&AZ=2;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=2;55;9&CO=0;9;5&CT=2;7;9&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;27;3&GA=0;15;5&HI=1;4;3&ID=0;4;6&IL=0;21;6&IN=2;11;9&IA=0;7;5&KS=0;6;5&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;3&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=1;6;3&MO=2;11;3&MT=1;3;3&NV=2;5;9&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;15;3&NM=1;5;3&NY=1;31;3&NC=0;15;4&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;20;3&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;21;9&RI=2;4;9&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=1;11;3&TX=1;34;3&UT=2;5;3&VT=2;3;9&VA=2;13;9&WA=1;11;3&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=2;3;3&ME=1;2;3&ME1=1;1;3&ME2=1;1;3&NE=1;2;3&NE1=1;1;3&NE2=1;1;3&NE3=1;1;3)
Republicans: 51 (+7)
Democrats: 49 (-7)


House Results
Democrats: 221 (-9)
Republicans: 214 (+9)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: LastMcGovernite on May 30, 2009, 04:44:12 pm
ROFLMAO at the Republicans winning Elliot County, KY. Epic fail. Or the Dems losing the solid Democratic mining counties in WV.

lololol

He gets one county wrong, and that's an epic fail?  Dude,...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on May 30, 2009, 06:26:10 pm
Nice update Ben...I know that Writer's block can be a bitch when your trying to get an update out. So I assume the economic package that Hatfield got throught Congress wasn't full scale Supply-side economics but traditional Fiscal conservatism by slashing taxes etc? Was there an assasination attempt by John Hinckley? And have the conditions changed from what started the 82-83 Recession in OTL or have they just been pushed back? Cuz if things were as bad as they were in OTL Early '80's the might hinder Hatfield's reelection chances.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 30, 2009, 07:40:13 pm
1.  The Hatfield package was a mix of tax cuts, incentives to businesses, short term welfare, and various other things designed to keep the economy running.
2.  No assassination attempt as of now by Mr. Hinckley.
3.  It's a mix.  The economy is still at risk, but things are looking up.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on May 30, 2009, 08:18:39 pm
ROFLMAO at the Republicans winning Elliot County, KY. Epic fail. Or the Dems losing the solid Democratic mining counties in WV.

lololol

He gets one county wrong, and that's an epic fail?  Dude,...

Yes, but Elliot County. Elliot County. Come on now.

Anyways, what's the situation in France? Italy? Chile? Brazil? South Africa? Canada?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on June 09, 2009, 09:04:56 am
1.  The Hatfield package was a mix of tax cuts, incentives to businesses, short term welfare, and various other things designed to keep the economy running.
2.  No assassination attempt as of now by Mr. Hinckley.
3.  It's a mix.  The economy is still at risk, but things are looking up.

Hmm...So a quick fix to the economic troubles, but nothing really longterm like High Speed Rail, Public Work's programs or educational funding...Although Progressive, Hatfield is still probably is a "cut the pork" Republican. And a Hinckley assasination could be waiting for the wings..Can't wait for the next installment and as always...Keep it Comming.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on June 10, 2009, 08:05:45 pm
wheres Benconstine?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 10, 2009, 08:09:42 pm
Sorry guys, I've been busy.  An update will probably come next Wednesday, when summer vacation starts.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on June 10, 2009, 08:12:37 pm
Sorry guys, I've been busy.  An update will probably come next Wednesday, when summer vacation starts.

k cool. I'm looking forward to the 1984 election.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 14, 2009, 10:48:42 am
There will be an update Tuesday evening.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 17, 2009, 11:09:25 pm
In his 1983 State of the Union Address, President Hatfield devotes the entire speech to the economy.  He reports that, having hit a low in 1982, the economy is back on track, which he of course attributes to his own economic policies.

On January 24, Israel holds elections for the first time since 1981.  The results are a major defeat for the Likud Party, as the Alignment Party, led by Shimon Peres, retakes control of the Knesset.  Peres’ election is seen as good news for Hatfield’s proposed Israeli-Egyptian peace conference, an idea which had been rejected by Likud and Menachem Begin on multiple occasions.

In a speech on February 8, 1983, Hatfield announces that he will make preventing acid rain a major initiative.  He asks Congress to step up regulation, as well as increasing the budget for toxic waste cleanup.  In order to offset the environmental spending, Hatfield cuts spending significantly for the War on Drugs, much to the consternation of conservatives in both parties.

On February 17, the United Kingdom holds elections, with Margaret Thatcher and the Conservatives scoring a major victory.

On March 2, a report issued by the Treasury Department says that unemployment has been cut from 7.1% in February, 1981 to 5.4% as of February, 1983.  In a nationally televised speech, Hatfield trumpets the report as proof of the success of his own economic policies.

On March 19, President Hatfield receives a call from Prime Minister Peres.  He will agree to meet with Sadat in the United States, on the condition that talks start by May 31, 1983.  Hatfield calls Sadat and the next day, and they agree to start negotiations on April 4, 1983, at Camp David in Maryland.

Accompanied by their negotiating teams and with their respective interests in mind, Sadat and Begin arrive in Camp David on April 2, 1983, two days before the start of negotiations, in order to meet privately and informally, and gain a sense of the other man.

For the next ten days, talks move slowly.  By the eleventh day, the dual issues of Israeli settlement withdrawal from the Sinai and the status of the West Bank created so tense a situation that Peres and Sadat had stopped speaking to each other.  Hatfield then made the decision to salvage the agreement by conceding the issue of the West Bank to Peres, and advocate Sadat’s less controversial position on the removal of all settlements from the Sinai Peninsula.  At the same time, in a symbolic gesture, Hatfield took the two leaders to Gettysburg in the hopes of using the Civil War as a simile to their own struggle.

The plan pays off, as on April 16, 1983, Peres, Sadat, and Hatfield jointly release the two-part Camp David Accords.  The first part had three parts. The first part was a framework for negotiations to establish an autonomous self-governing authority in the West Bank and the Gaza strip and to fully implement SC 242.  The fate of Jerusalem was deliberately excluded from this agreement.  The second part dealt with Egyptian-Israeli relations, the real content being in the second agreement. The third part "Associated Principles" declared principles that should apply to relations between Israel and all of its Arab neighbors.

The second agreement outlined a basis for the peace treaty six months later, in particular deciding the future of the Sinai peninsula. Israel agreed to withdraw its armed forces from the Sinai, evacuate its 4,500 civilian inhabitants, and restore it to Egypt in return for normal diplomatic relations with Egypt, guarantees of freedom of passage through the Suez Canal and other nearby waterways (such as the Straits of Tiran), and a restriction on the forces Egypt could place on the Sinai peninsula, especially within 20-40 km from Israel. Israel also agreed to limit its forces a smaller distance from the Egyptian border, and to guarantee free passage between Egypt and Jordan. With the withdrawal, Israel also returned Egypt's Abu-Rudeis oil fields in western Sinai, which contained long term, commercially productive wells.  The agreement also called for the United States to commit several billion dollars worth of annual subsidies to the governments of both Israel and Egypt.

Following the signing of the Accords, a visibly tired President Hatfield returns to his home in Oregon for several weeks of recuperation.  On April 28, the 61 year old Hatfield is hospitalized for exhaustion, and the doctors advise him to rest for several weeks.

For the next several weeks, Hatfield takes a vacation in his Oregon home; on June 2, he returns to Washington.  In a speech the next day to Congress, Hatfield talked about his hospital stay.  “A few doors down from me was a lovely man named Roger.  He was dying, and I saw a man try to enter into his room, only to be turned away by the hospital staff.  Roger was a homosexual, and the man who was trying to see him had been his partner for more than a quarter of a century, and he was not allowed to be with his partner as his partner died.  That is not the American way.”

Hatfield asks Congress to pass a Sexual Orientation Act of 1983; the act had provisions including full custody, adoption, and visitation rights for homosexual couples.  On June 7, he signs an executive order ending the military policy of not allowing anyone who was not heterosexual to serve in the military, opening the military to everyone, regardless of sexual orientation.

From the outset, Hatfield faces intense Congressional opposition.  Within days, 29 Republican Senators announce their opposition to his plan; among those in opposition is the Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Strom Thurmond (R-SC).  At the same time, though, another prominent Republican, Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ) announces his support of the President’s plan.

On the Democratic side, opinion is very much on the side of the President.  Except for several holdovers from the South, the entire Senate Democratic Caucus takes the side of the President; even Minority Leader Robert Byrd (D-WV), not known as an advocate of gay rights, sides with the President.

Public opinion, meanwhile, is also divided.  A Gallup poll from June 16-19 finds 48% in support of the President, 46% opposed, and 6% unsure.  Rasmussen shows similar numbers.  In response, Hatfield dispatches numerous advocates of both Parties to try and sway public opinion.  The mission pays off, and by August, Hatfield’s plan bears the support of nearly 60% of the American Public.

When Congress reconvenes in September, there is still division over the plan.  After more than six weeks of hearings, Thurmond allows the Bill to be reported out to the full Senate on October 11.  The debate on the Senate floor is acrimonious.  Throughout the debate, Senators are shouting at each other from across the aisle, and on November 22, Senator Henry Jackson (D-WA) suffers a heart attack during a shouting match with Senator Bob Kasten (R-WI).  Although Jackson recovers, the incident is a stark example of how difficult the debate is.  When the Senate recesses in December, the Bill is still on the Floor.

In his 1984 State of the Union Address, Hatfield chides the Senate for not passing his Gay Rights Bill.  “We are talking about basic human rights, and the Senate is on the wrong side of this issue,” Hatfield says.

On February 22, the big cloture vote arrives.  The results is a 67-33 victory for Hatfield, with exactly the required number.  Scoop Jackson, having not been in the Senate since his heart attack, casts the decisive vote from a wheelchair.  On March 7, by a vote of 62-32, the Senate passes the Bill, and sends it over to the House.

In the House, the legislation has a more favorable reception.  Representative Peter W. Rodino, Jr. (D-NJ), Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, comes out strongly in support of the Bill, as does Claude Pepper (D-FL), Chairman of the Rules Committee.  On March 26, the Bill is reported out of Judiciary, and on April 5, it arrives of the House floor.

The debate in the House is much more civil than in the Senate.  On May 4, by a vote of 223-212, the House passes the Bill, and on May 7, surrounded by leaders from the LGBT community, President Hatfield signs the Bill into law.

Following Hatfield’s signing of the Gay Rights Bill, he returns to Oregon for several weeks, and then officially kicks off his reelection campaign.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on June 18, 2009, 06:55:40 am
Anyways, what's the situation in France? Italy? Chile? Brazil? South Africa? Canada?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on June 18, 2009, 07:49:46 am
I was not expecting such a push on Gay Rights this early by Hatfield, but with his libertarian leanings and the rising of the aids pandemic, I think its pretty plausible. Getting Hatfield to get the treaty between Israel and Egypt will probably cement his Legacy more than anything(Like OTL Carter). I am suprised however, that with Hatfield being such a huge advocate for the nuclear freeze during OTL , that he wouldn't try to get something passed with the Soviets ITTL. Might he try to save it for his second term? cuz I think the movement lost steam in the mid to late 80's IOTL. Eagerly awaiting for the update on the '84 elections.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: LastMcGovernite on June 18, 2009, 09:57:07 am
A great continuation of a fine timeline.

I do have a question, though- before the rise of the Christian Right, Mark Hatfield was regarded as the most visible evangelical Christian in American politics.  Is the Christian Right still behind him?  How are they reacting to an evangelical at the forefront of recognizing gay rights? 


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 18, 2009, 12:48:20 pm
Anyways, what's the situation in France? Italy? Chile? Brazil? South Africa? Canada?

France: In 1981, Valéry Marie René Georges Giscard d'Estaing was reelected President of France, very narrowly defeating the Socialist candidate, François Mitterrand.  Mitterrand, however, is already preparing to challenge d'Estaing again in 1988, and is the leading critic of his policies.  France has been undergoing some economic troubles, with unemployment nearing 8% as of January, 1984.

Italy: Italy is basically unchanged; its recent economic issues, shared by most of Europe, led to the election of Socialist Bettino Craxi in 1983.

Chile: Chile is pretty much the same; Pinochet still holds power, although is he facing US pressure to allow more freedom.

Brazil: Basically the same as IRL.

South Africa: South Africa is pretty much the same, but the movement to end Apartheid is gaining steam very quickly, and a Revolution seems to be brewing in South Africa.

Canada: Not really different from RL; Pierre Trudeau has held power since continually since 1968, although he is starting to lose favor.

I do have a question, though- before the rise of the Christian Right, Mark Hatfield was regarded as the most visible evangelical Christian in American politics.  Is the Christian Right still behind him?  How are they reacting to an evangelical at the forefront of recognizing gay rights? 

The Christian Right movement has not yet taken shape, and is very divided, with a plurality supporting Hatfield, others calling for a new Party, and still others calling for a challenge to Hatfield for the GOP nomination.  There really is no one view of the Evangelical community at this time.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 18, 2009, 03:32:37 pm
The Democratic Nomination

By the middle of 1983, candidates begin declaring for the Democratic Nomination.  The first to declare, on May 4, 1983, is Congressman Les Aspin of Wisconsin.  On May 29, Governor Dolph Briscoe of Texas throws his hat into the ring.  Despite rumors to the contrary, Senator Ted Kennedy declines to run for President, and on August 24, he endorses the incumbent Governor of Massachusetts, Michael Dukakis, who had entered on August 20.  On October 19, Senator Edward Zorinsky becomes the last candidate to enter the race.

On February 20, the Iowa Caucuses are held.  The result is a narrow win for Aspin, a surprising result.
Aspin: 34% (21 delegates)
Dukakis: 31% (17 delegates)
Briscoe: 20% (12 delegates)
Zorinsky: 15%

A week later, in the New Hampshire primary, Dukakis scores a major victory, dominating his three opponents.
Dukakis: 69% (19 delegaes)
Aspin: 14%
Zorinsky: 11%
Briscoe: 6%

On March 6, in Vermont, Dukakis records yet another landslide victory, and jumps into the frontrunner position.
Dukakis: 71% (12 delegates)
Aspin: 12%
Zorinsky: 10%
Briscoe: 7%

Following Vermont, the candidates prepare for the large set of primaries on March 13; for Zorinsky and Briscoe, they need to win multiple primaries to stay in.

Alabama: Briscoe: 48% (24 delegates), Zorinsky: 25% (11 delegates), Dukakis: 20% (10 delegates), Aspin: 7%
Florida: Briscoe: 39% (43 delegates), Dukakis: 32% (34 delegates), Zorinsky: 19% (23 delegates), Aspin: 10%
Georgia: Briscoe: 50% (41 delegates), Dukakis: 30% (22 delegates), Zorinsky: 12%, Aspin: 8%
Massachusetts: 83% (111 delegates), Aspin: 9%, Zorinsky: 5%, Briscoe: 3%
Nevada: Dukakis: 40% (5 delegates), Aspin: 27% (4 delegates), Zorinsky: 20% (3 delegates), Briscoe: 13%)
Oklahoma: Briscoe: 39% (18 delegates), Dukakis: 31% (14 delegates), Zorinsky: 23% (10 delegates), Aspin: 7%
Rhode Island: Dukakis: 63% (18 delegates_, Aspin: 20% (5 delegates), Briscoe: 10%, Zorinsky: 7%
Washington: Dukakis: 47% (33 delegates), Aspin: 27% (15 delegates), Briscoe: 18% (10 delegates), Zorinsky: 8%

Having failed to win any of the first 11 primaries, Zorinsky drops out on March 14, and endorses Briscoe.

Delegate Totals on March 14:
Dukakis: 295
Briscoe: 195
Aspin: 45

With the race apparently a two man game between Dukakis and Briscoe, the upcoming primaries are a gift for Dukakis, as they are held in Illinois, which is a winner take all state, and Connecticut, two Dukakis strongholds:
Illinois: Dukakis: 47% (179 delegates), Briscoe: 30%, Aspin: 23%
Connecticut: Dukakis: 62% (34 delegates), Aspin: 20% (12 delegates), Briscoe: 18% (8 delegates)

On April 3, the only April primaries are held, and they're big contests for all three candidates.
New York: Dukakis: 37% (94 delegates), Aspin: 33% (94 delegates), Briscoe: 30% (94 delegates)
Wisconsin: Aspin: 67% (56 delegates), Dukakis: 19% (19 delegates), Briscoe: 14%
Pennsylvania: Dukakis: 45% (101 delegates), Briscoe: 40% (84 delegates), Aspin: 15%

Delegates Totals on April 31:
Dukakis: 509
Briscoe: 373
Aspin: 195

Shortly before the Tennessee primary, Aspin decides to drop out and endorse Dukakis, giving him a seemingly insurmountable lead.  In order to convince Briscoe to drop out as well, Dukakis promises him the task of selecting a Vice President.  Briscoe agrees, and even though he wins the Tennessee primary with 57%, he endorses Dukakis for President.

At the Convention in Houston, Dukakis announces his selection of Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas as his running mate, and Bentsen delivers an excellent speech attacking the fiscal irresponsibility of the Hatfield Administration, and promising victory in November for the Dukakis/Bentsen ticket.
(http://www.4president.org/image/1988/dukakisbentsen1988.gif)

The Republican Nomination

Despite having approvals in the mid 60’s, President Hatfield faces a challenge for re-nomination in 1984.  On September 9, 1983, Reverend Pat Robertson, the son of former Senator Absalom Willis Robertson (D-VA), announces that he will run against Hatfield for the nomination.

Robertson attacks his fellow Evangelical Christian for not being tough enough on issues like abortion, and hits him especially hard on the Gay Rights legislation.  Robertson draws most of his support from fellow Evangelicals, and that is not nearly enough.  He draws just 32% in Iowa, 26% in New Hampshire, and just 9% in both Massachusetts and Vermont.  After getting just 44% in South Carolina, Robertson reluctantly drops out, and announces his support for Hatfield.

At the Convention in Miami, Hatfield and Bush are both re-nominated, and pledge victory in November, and a continuation of the previous 4 years’ policies.

The General Election

From the start, Hatfield has a significant lead.  The Israeli-Egyptian peace program, the economic recovery, and the Gay Rights Bill all place him leagues ahead of Dukakis.

In the debates, as well, Hatfield humiliates Dukakis, who stumbles and fumbles through each question.  Hatfield, by contrast, appears far more Presidential, and his lead only increases after each debate.

On election day, Hatfield receives one of the largest margins in the second half the 20th Century, as Dukakis holds only his home state of Massachusetts, and the District of Columbia.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1984&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;9;6&AK=2;3;7&AZ=2;7;6&AR=2;6;6&CA=2;47;6&CO=2;8;6&CT=2;8;5&DE=2;3;5&DC=1;3;7&FL=2;21;6&GA=2;12;6&HI=2;4;5&ID=2;4;7&IL=2;24;5&IN=2;12;6&IA=2;8;5&KS=2;7;6&KY=2;9;6&LA=2;10;6&MD=2;10;5&MA=1;13;5&MI=2;20;5&MN=2;10;5&MS=2;7;6&MO=2;11;6&MT=2;4;7&NE=2;5;7&NV=2;4;7&NH=2;4;6&NJ=2;16;5&NM=2;5;5&NY=2;36;6&NC=2;13;6&ND=2;3;7&OH=2;23;5&OK=2;8;6&OR=2;7;7&PA=2;25;5&RI=2;4;5&SC=2;8;6&SD=2;3;6&TN=2;11;6&TX=2;29;6&UT=2;5;7&VT=2;3;6&VA=2;12;6&WA=2;10;6&WV=2;6;5&WI=2;11;6&WY=2;3;7&ME=2;2;5&ME1=2;1;5&ME2=2;1;5)
Mark Hatfield/George HW Bush: 60.2% PV, 522 EV
Michael Dukakis/Lloyd Bentsen: 37.6% PV, 16 EV
Others: 2.2% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

Despite Hatfield’s remarkable landslide, the victory is more personal than Party, and the GOP actually loses seats in the House.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=0;10;5&AR=1;6;3&CA=0;55;6&CO=2;9;3&CT=0;7;6&DE=1;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=0;27;5&GA=1;15;3&HI=0;4;7&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;21;9&IN=0;11;4&IA=1;7;9&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;9&LA=1;9;3&MD=0;10;6&MA=1;12;9&MI=2;17;3&MN=2;10;3&MS=2;6;3&MO=0;11;4&MT=2;3;3&NV=0;5;5&NH=2;4;3&NJ=1;15;3&NM=2;5;3&NY=0;31;6&NC=2;15;3&ND=0;3;5&OH=0;20;5&OK=1;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=2;8;3&SD=2;3;9&TN=1;11;9&TX=2;34;9&UT=0;5;6&VT=0;3;6&VA=2;13;9&WA=0;11;5&WV=2;5;3&WI=0;10;5&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;3&ME1=2;1;3&ME2=2;1;3&NE=1;2;3&NE1=1;1;3&NE2=1;1;3&NE3=1;1;3)
Republicans: 51 (-)
Democrats: 49 (-)

House Results
Democrats: 232 (+11)
Republicans: 203 (-11)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 18, 2009, 03:34:47 pm
County Map for 1984:
(http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/867/1984countiesjfk.gif)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on June 18, 2009, 04:09:08 pm
OUCH!!! Poor Mikey.  Despite my "Reagan Democrat" leanings, I really admire the former Bay State Governor. I think he would have been a very solid President with his intelligence and ability to make really good executive decisions.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on June 18, 2009, 04:11:16 pm
Also, for the county maps are you just going through paint and doing it manually?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 18, 2009, 04:22:11 pm
Also, for the county maps are you just going through paint and doing it manually?

Yup.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on June 18, 2009, 04:40:29 pm
Well, Ill be a monkey's uncle, I was not expecting the update on the '84 election so soon lol. Neither was I expecting for Duke to get the nod, but he was the pinacle for the White Ethnics who had begun to dominate the party from the 70's and 80's so it's not suprising he would still run. Zorinsky would have been a good pic if would have had more of a national profile. Btw did Vice President Church still sucumb to pancreatic cancer as he did IOTL. I am looking forward to see what else Hatfield gets done in second term. Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 18, 2009, 04:43:14 pm
Well, Ill be a monkey's uncle, I was not expecting the update on the '84 election so soon lol. Neither was I expecting for Duke to get the nod, but he was the pinacle for the White Ethnics who had begun to dominate the party from the 70's and 80's so it's not suprising he would still run. Zorinsky would have been a good pic if would have had more of a national profile. Btw did Vice President Church still sucumb to pancreatic cancer as he did IOTL. I am looking forward to see what else Hatfield gets done in second term. Keep it comming

Thanks you; sadly, Vice President Church did even earlier, in 1982.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 22, 2009, 11:10:59 pm
In case anyone's interested, I've uploaded the 1976 county results map into the Gallery.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on June 23, 2009, 09:02:06 am
Hmm. Seems like we forgot Elliot County again.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 23, 2009, 02:49:35 pm
Hmm. Seems like we forgot Elliot County again.

No, I got Elliot County correct.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on June 23, 2009, 03:09:12 pm
Hmm. Seems like we forgot Elliot County again.

No, I got Elliot County correct.

Actually, look closer. You didn't.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: YRABNNRM on June 23, 2009, 03:47:35 pm
Who cares? Is one county really going to take away from your enjoyment?

Keep it up Ben.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 23, 2009, 03:49:48 pm
(http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/GALLERY/2270_23_06_09_12_12_54.GIF)

Elliot is absolutely Democratic on this map.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on June 23, 2009, 04:07:11 pm
I was referring to 1984, obviously. The blue landslide.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 23, 2009, 04:12:04 pm
Damn it.  Well, I'm not perfect.  Deal with it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on June 23, 2009, 04:15:57 pm
Damn it.  Well, I'm not perfect.  Deal with it.

You made a mistake, that's all. There's no need to be aggressive.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 23, 2009, 07:08:13 pm
Damn it.  Well, I'm not perfect.  Deal with it.

You made a mistake, that's all. There's no need to be aggressive.

Not being aggressive; internet can't account for tone :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 27, 2009, 09:03:18 pm
The county map for 1972 is now in the gallery :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on June 28, 2009, 09:42:29 am
Your county maps are pretty impressive Deeds, it shows your expertise in the political field to show each candidates perdicted areas of strength. So when can we expect the next installment featuring Hatfield's Second Term.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 28, 2009, 03:27:00 pm
I'll have the Hatfield Administration done this week.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on July 05, 2009, 10:24:34 am
I'll have the Hatfield Administration done this week.

Cool Beans, I can't wait to see how two reformers such as President Hatfield and General Secretary Gorbachev or going to get along. Keep it comming.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 05, 2009, 12:38:50 pm
Sorry guys, but I won't have anything done this week.  I'm going to Richmond today, not getting back until Thursday.  Also, my computer is busted, so I don't know how long it will be until I can get an update.  Sorry :(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cassius Dio on July 06, 2009, 04:04:21 pm
Very good story. I've always thought of him as a good presidential candidate..I am looking forward to President Hatfield's second term.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 08, 2009, 06:56:47 pm
Very good story. I've always thought of him as a good presidential candidate..I am looking forward to President Hatfield's second term.

Thanks :)

I get home Friday afternoon, and should have an update that night.



Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on July 18, 2009, 11:34:16 am
Very good story. I've always thought of him as a good presidential candidate..I am looking forward to President Hatfield's second term.

Thanks :)

I get home Friday afternoon, and should have an update that night.



Hope you made it home from your vaction alright Ben; Writer's Block can be a stickler right lol?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 25, 2009, 09:57:52 pm
Tomorrow, tomorrow, an update, tomorrow, it's only a day away!  :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on July 27, 2009, 09:52:16 am
Tomorrow, tomorrow, an update, tomorrow, it's only a day away!  :)
So much for that :(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on July 27, 2009, 04:44:26 pm
Tomorrow, tomorrow, an update, tomorrow, it's only a day away!  :)
So much for that :(

I second that sentiment lol.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on July 27, 2009, 04:47:59 pm
But seriously Deeds, you cannot simply just give us that snappy jingle and forget about the update.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 27, 2009, 10:26:01 pm
Writer's Block is kicking my ass.  I'l lget an update out tomorrow, I promise.  I have been working on the 1985-1987 installment, and it will be done tomorrow.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on July 28, 2009, 05:48:52 am
Writer's Block is kicking my ass.  I'l lget an update out tomorrow, I promise.  I have been working on the 1985-1987 installment, and it will be done tomorrow.

We hope so


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on July 29, 2009, 08:48:05 am
Writer's Block is kicking my ass.  I'l lget an update out tomorrow, I promise.  I have been working on the 1985-1987 installment, and it will be done tomorrow.

Hey atleast you know you have some loyal readers here lol, but yeah like I said you the biggest thing to ease my writer's block is discussing certain aspects that Im having with the timeline with other board members. I find it really helpful...you should definatley try it Ben


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 29, 2009, 10:26:18 pm
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_e72NqcRHEEY/Rc7r2cfzVMI/AAAAAAAAAIM/EJqcFm1-4vg/s320/Mark_hatfield.jpg)
The Second Term of Mark Hatfield

In his Inaugural Address, Hatfield focuses mostly on the future, particularly a future involving the Soviet Union.  “We cannot let our children, or our children’s children, live in a world where the end could come with the push of a button.” 

To this end, Hatfield decides to travel to Moscow to meet with Soviet Premier Leonid Brezhnev, to discuss a series of arms limitation treaties.  When Hatfield arrives on January 26, he is greeted cordially by Brezhnev.  For the next several weeks, talks go on between the American and Soviet delegations, and on February 27, the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, or SALT, is announced.  SALT had several provisions.  The Soviets would reduce Tu-22M production to thirty aircraft per year and not to give them an intercontinental range; it banned new missile programs (a new missile defined as one with any key parameter 5% better than in currently deployed missiles), so both sides were forced to limit their new strategic missile types development although US preserved their most essential programs like Trident and cruise missiles.

Upon his return to the united States, Hatfield begins to push the ratification of SALT to the Senate.  He faces intense opposition from a hardcore group, led by Scoop Jackson, in his first real work since his heart attack.   Jackson argues that, rather than limit  the total arms number, the US should increase production, and force the Soviets to try and compete.  “The Soviets know they can’t compete, and that’s why Brezhnev is suddenly willing to negotiate,” Jackson says.  Senator Jesse Helms takes an even tougher line, saying that Hatfield is endangering America’s security by limiting the number of weapons.

(http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/ABPub/2008/08/29/2004288078.jpg)
Senator Jackson giving a speech opposing the SALT Treaty

In an attempt to place pressure on reluctant Senators, Hatfield takes his case directly to the American people.  In a series of television addresses, Hatfield explains the benefits of the SALT Treaty, and asks the people to write their Senators to support the SALT Treaty.  This appears to succeed, and by the start of April, the Treaty has the support of 64% of Americans.

As the Senate moves into April, the debate becomes even more acrimonious.  Day after day, Senators hurl insults at each other, predicting the apocalypse if the other side wins.  On May 2, Majority Leader Dole announces that the Senate will vote by the end of May.  On May 23, the Senate votes, 67-33, to pass the Treaty.  Three days later, Senator Jackson suffers a second, fatal heart attack.

On June 10, the Congress begins debate on the Immigration Reform Act of 1985.  The Act would make illegal to knowingly hire or recruit illegal immigrants (immigrants who do not possess lawful work authorization), required employers to attest to their employees’ immigration status, and granted amnesty to certain illegal immigrants who entered the United States before January 1, 1981 and had resided there continuously. The Act also granted a path towards legalization to certain agricultural seasonal workers and immigrants who had been continuously and illegally present in the United States since January 1, 1981.

The legislation was strongly supported by the President and the liberal members of Congress, but faced opposition from conservatives.  Jesse Helms, still angry over the SALT passage, decides to filibuster the legislation.  For almost three weeks, he and a group of Republicans talk non-stop, trying to defeat the Bill.  They fail, and on July 15, the Senate votes 64-36 for cloture; on July 23, it votes 57-36 to pass the Bill.

In the House, the Bill faces little opposition, and passes 325-84 on September 16.

On October 22, Iran and Iraq announce an official end to hostilities between the two nations, following almost four stalemated years of conflict.

In early February, the Senate begins debate on the Goldwater-Nichols Act.  The Act would rework the command structure of the United States military, as well as increase the powers of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.  It was also the most major changes to the United States Department of Defense since it’s establishment in 1947.

The rationale behind the legislation, according to Senator Goldwater, was to end the organizational troubles that had plagued the military since World War II, and had been evident during the Vietnam War.  The legislation was strongly supported by the military, and passed quickly through both houses of Congress, being signed into law on March 4, 1986.

On April 10, 1986, President Hatfield, in a speech to the UN, condemns South Africa’s apartheid program.  He announces that the United States will not trade, or interact at all, with South Africa until it ends its program, including releasing Nelson Mandela from prison.

On May 1, while having dinner with the Japanese Prime Minister, Vice President Bush collapses.  He is hospitalized for several days, with the doctors unable to find a reason for his collapse.  On May 10, he is released, with doctors still unsure of the reason for his collapse.

On June 6, a report breaks that Oliver North, the Deputy Secretary of Defense, had been surreptitiously sending military aid to Iraq during the Iran-Iraq War, in order to prevent Iran from winning.  This was in direct violation of an Executive Order issued by the President in 1981.

Three days after the news is broken, North announces his resignation.  Congress begins an inquiry, with a Committee of 12 Congressman, 6 from each Houses, investigating who knew what about the Affair, to be Chaired by Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC), with two Vice Chairman, Senator John Stennis (D-MS), and Congressman Robert Michel (R-IL).

For several weeks, the Committee hears testimony, from nearly the entire DoD.  When they recess in August, they begin writing a report, which is published in December, 1986.  The report places no blame on Hatfield, and says that the entire Affair was organized by North and several other minor officials in the DoD.

The Congressional Elections

The Iran Arms Scandal, coupled with overall fatigue, leads to major losses for the GOP in both Houses, as the Democrats regain control of the Senate.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;9&AK=2;3;3&AZ=2;10;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=1;55;9&CO=1;9;3&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;6&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;27;9&GA=1;15;9&HI=1;4;3&ID=1;4;9&IL=1;21;3&IN=2;11;3&IA=2;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=1;10;3&MA=0;12;6&MI=0;17;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=2;11;9&MT=0;3;4&NV=1;5;9&NH=2;4;3&NJ=0;15;5&NM=0;5;5&NY=2;31;3&NC=1;15;9&ND=1;3;9&OH=1;20;3&OK=2;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=2;21;3&RI=0;4;6&SC=1;8;3&SD=1;3;9&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;34;5&UT=2;5;3&VT=1;3;3&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;11;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=2;10;3&WY=0;3;6&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;6&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;5&NE1=0;1;5&NE2=0;1;4&NE3=0;1;6)
Democrats: 57 (+8)
Republicans: 43 (-8)

House Results
Democrats: 250 (+18)
Republicans: 185 (-18)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on July 29, 2009, 11:18:53 pm
Im suprised you still have Brezhenv still alive ITTL's 1985-1987, I think Hatfield would have gotten alot more accomplished working with a Reformer like Gorbachev. Things aren't looking to good for the GOP in 1988, especially if Bush's health issues' force him out of the Race early. Maybe a Moderate like Senator Hart and Senator Gore might clinch the nod for the Democrats. Can't wait to see what you come up Ben...and as always Keep it comming.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on July 31, 2009, 08:44:39 am
Im suprised you still have Brezhenv still alive ITTL's 1985-1987, I think Hatfield would have gotten alot more accomplished working with a Reformer like Gorbachev. Things aren't looking to good for the GOP in 1988, especially if Bush's health issues' force him out of the Race early. Maybe a Moderate like Senator Hart and Senator Gore might clinch the nod for the Democrats. Can't wait to see what you come up Ben...and as always Keep it comming.

Any answer to why Brezhenev's still alive an kicking ITTL Ben lol?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 31, 2009, 03:24:36 pm
Any answer to why Brezhenev's still alive an kicking ITTL Ben lol?

Brezhnev never invaded Afghanistan in 1979, and had less stress in general.  This prevented the stroke that basically ended his rule.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on July 31, 2009, 04:37:26 pm
Any answer to why Brezhenev's still alive an kicking ITTL Ben lol?

Brezhnev never invaded Afghanistan in 1979, and had less stress in general.  This prevented the stroke that basically ended his rule.

Looking forward 1988 race :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Senator Robert A. Taft on August 01, 2009, 01:39:23 pm
I must say, this is a very interesting timeline.  It appears that the GOP is less of a Southern conservative Party, and more of a Midwestern Party, due ot Reagan's defeat.  I'm eagerly awaiting the next installment.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 01, 2009, 04:49:29 pm
I must say, this is a very interesting timeline.

Thanks :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on August 03, 2009, 08:56:07 am
Hmm 1988 should be a very interesting race especially if Bush doesn't run due to Health Concerns. First on the Democratic Side, Although I'm a hughe Coumo fan, I don't think the party is stupid enough to nominate a Northern Liberal after The Duke's disastorus '84 Campaign. They will probably shift toward the DLC Democrats earlier than IOTL, that mean's folks like Senator Gary Hart of Colorado, former Governor Bruce Babbitt of of Arizona, Governor Chuck Robb of Virginia, and Senator Al Gore of Tennesse would all be strong choices to win the nomination and possibly beat the GOP in the General Election. Senator Dale Bumpers of Arkansas and Senator John Glenn of Ohio would be a good choice as well.

On the Republican side, you'd proably have around the same list of Candidates as IOTL, Dole, Kemp, Laxalt, Du Pont, Rumsfeld. However, I think the GOP would proably look for someone who could trully be their heir to the Hatfield throne...John Chafee would be a good choice, but his age would probably work against him...Al D'Amato of New York, George Deukmajean of California, and Big Jim Thompson of Illinois could work as well. Just throwing some ideas out there, nothing wrong with a litte discussioon now and then right? lol, Keep this TL comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 11, 2009, 07:17:44 pm
We need an update!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 11, 2009, 07:27:59 pm
We need an update!

I'm sorry; I totally forgot about this :P  An update will be released in the next couple of days.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 11, 2009, 07:36:20 pm
We need an update!

I'm sorry; I totally forgot about this :P  An update will be released in the next couple of days.

Ok thanks.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 17, 2009, 10:14:16 pm
Update tomorrow.  I promise.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 18, 2009, 10:44:20 pm
In his State of the Union Address on January 16, 1987, President Hatfield refers to the economy as, “Being in the best shape in the last twenty years!”  Hatfield’s remark is not without basis; unemployment in February, 1987 stands at just 5.8%, and the average American’s wages are higher than ever before.

In early February, Congress begins debate on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987.  The legislation had a myriad of services to homeless people, including the Continuum of Care Programs: the Supportive Housing Program, the Shelter Plus Care Program, and the Single Room Occupancy Program, as well as the Emergency Shelter Grant Program. It established the Interagency Council on the Homeless.

Because of its wide scope, the McKinney-Vento Act immediately faces strong opposition from conservatives.  Senator Helms calls it “A throwaway to the laziest members of society,” while Senator Thurmond says, “We might as well be encouraging people to live out on the street.”

For several weeks, acrimonious debate continues in Congress.  By early March, the Congress is in deadlock over the bill, with neither side willing to yield.  Eventually, though, Senate liberals agree to make certain concessions – they agree to cut spending in several other areas, not including defense, to pay for the bill.  On April 7, cloture is achieved 62-38, and the bill passes on April 16, 57-37.  In the House, the debate goes much the same way, and it passes on May 5, 226-200.

On June 4, Soviet Premier Leonid Brezhnev dies of a stroke.  After several weeks of internal wrangling, Vitaly Fedorchuk, the head of the KGB since 1982, is named to replace him.  Fedorchuk immediately begins rooting out corruption in the Soviet infrastructure.

(http://www.lifeinlegacy.com/2008/0301/FedorchukVitaly.jpg)
New Soviet Premier Vitaly Fedorchuk

On July 10, President Hatfield arrives in Moscow for his first meeting with Fedorchuk.  During the meeting, Hatfield presses Fedorchuk to open up the USSR, including freeing political prisoners.  Fedorchuk politely declines, and also states that there are no political prisoners in the USSR.

Upon his return to the US on July 16, Hatfield gives a series of speeches criticizing the USSR for its suppression of political freedoms.  He announces that, unless the USSR releases its political prisoners, the United States will cease dealing with the USSR effective January 1, 1988.

Hatfield’s ultimatum cause a major uproar, both at home and abroad.  He is commended by people such as Senator Helms, but is criticized by moderates and liberals; a Gallup Poll finds that 79% of Americans disapprove of Hatfield’s Ultimatum.

Internationally, Hatfield is criticized by every foreign government.  Prime Minister Thatcher, French President François Mitterrand, West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, and every other European leader jointly sign a statement disagreeing with Hatfield, and saying that they will not join in.

In a speech on August 15, Hatfield defends his Ultimatum.  “This is the only way we can get the Soviets to act on their human rights abuses.  It is my sincere hope they will accede to our pressures, but we must be prepared for them not to.”

By early October, the Soviets appear to not be giving in to Hatfield’s demands.  Across the country, Americans begin to prepare for a complete cutoff from Russia, buying whatever things they want in bulk.

Inside the Soviet Bloc, Fedorchuk also faces pressure to give in to Hatfield’s demands, or to find a compromise.  Fedorchuk is told that the USSR would collapse if it completely stopped trading the US; its trade with Europe couldn’t compensate.  Fedorchuk, however, is resolute in his refusal to give in.

On December 10, Hatfield and Fedorchuk meet in New York, three weeks before the embargo goes into effect.  Hatfield urges Fedorchuk to give in, but the Premier refuses; he also refuses to try and compromise with Hatfield, as his advisors suggested.

At 12:01 AM on January 1, 1988, President Hatfield issues Executive Order 12483, which officially shut off trade with the Soviet Union.  In a speech on January 10, Hatfield justifies his Embargo, by stating that it will not have a negative effect on the US economy, and that “American must make a stand for human rights.”

By early March, though, Hatfield’s prediction is proving false.  Unemployment, which was 6.1% in December, has risen to 6.9% by March 1.  In June, a report is released stating that the economy had the slowest growth during the First Quarter of 1988 than any year that decade.  By early May, unemployment has risen to 7.5%, and Hatfield’s approval rating has fallen from 63% Approve – 34% Disapprove in a December 15 survey to 49% Approve and 49% Disapprove in a May 14 survey.  Against this backdrop, the 1988 Presidential Election begins to shape together.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on August 19, 2009, 12:12:32 am
Wow wasn't expecting Hatfield to take such an hardline against the Soviets with an trade Embargo, I guess even the best of us gets cantankerous as we get older lol. The Homeless Act was a nice piece of Progressive Legislation, and I can't wait to see what you've got cooked up for '88 Ben...Im assuming a Peace Democrat wins the nomination someone the likes of Ron Dellums of California, Paul Simon of Illinois, Patricia Schoeder of Colorado, George Mcgoven of South Dakota, and Martha Layne Collins of Kentucky would all be good choices...Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 19, 2009, 12:26:08 am
The 1988 Election will probably come out later today or Thursday.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on August 19, 2009, 09:29:50 am
The 1988 Election will probably come out later today or Thursday.

We look forward to it


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 19, 2009, 10:53:30 pm
The Democratic Nomination

As the 1988 race begins heating up, a large number of candidates declare for the nomination.  The first is Governor Richard Lamm of Colorado, who declares on June 8, 1987.  Governor Scott Matheson of Utah declares for the nomination on June 27, 1987.  On August 25, 1987, Senator Lawton Chiles of Florida declares he will seek the nomination.  On September 15, Governor Richard Riley of South Carolina announces he will run, and on December 5, Congressman Ron Dellums of California declares for the nomination, becoming the first African-American to make a serious bid for the Presidency on the Democratic side.

On February 8, the Iowa Caucuses are held, with a surprising win by Governor Lamm.  One week after Iowa, the candidates descend on New Hampshire, where Dellums' record on defense scores him an upset win with the peace-loving New Hampshire voters.

Following two last place finishes, Governor Riley drops out and endorses Chiles.

One week after New Hampshire two primaries are held in Kentucky and South Dakota; resulting in a Chiles victory in Kentucky, and a Matheson win in South Dakota.

On March 5, primaries are held in Alabama (Chiles), Arizona (Matheson), Connecticut (Lamm), Florida (Chiles), Illinois (Chiles), Massachusetts (Dellums), North Carolina (Chiles), South Carolina (Chiles), and Wyoming (Matheson).

Despite winning two primaries, Matheson decides to drop out, and endorses Lamm on March 7.

Following Matheson's drop-out, a major run of primaries are held on March 15 in Alaska (Lamm), Arkansas (Chiles), California (Dellums), Georgia (Chiles), Hawaii (Dellums), Louisiana (Chiles), Maryland (Chiles), Mississippi (Chiles), Missouri (Chiles), Ohio (Lamm), Oklahoma (Chiles), Rhode Island (Lamm), Tennessee (Chiles), Texas (Chiles), and Virginia (Chiles).

Following Chiles' domination, Lamm drops out and endorses Chiles.  Dellums, however, decides to continue competing, and on March 22 primaries are held in Delaware (Chiles), Indiana (Chiles), Michigan (Chiles), New York (Chiles), and West Virginia (Chiles).

Following the sweep, Dellums finally drops out, and endorses Chiles.

At the Democratic Convention, Chiles decides to select Senator Joe Biden of Delaware as his running mate.

Notable endorsements

Lawton Chiles
•   Senator John C. Stennis of Mississippi
•   Senator Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia
•   Senator Ernest Hollings of South Carolina
•   Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas
•   Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia
•   Senator Terry Sanford of North Carolina
•   Senator J. Bennett Johnston of Louisiana
•   Senator David Boren of Oklahoma
•   Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas
•   Governor Jim Hunt of North Carolina

Ron Dellums
•   Representative John Lewis of Georgia
•   Representative Mickey Leland of Texas
•   Representatives Charlie Rangel of New York
•   Representatives John Conyers of Michigan

Richard Lamm
•   Governor Roy Romer of Colorado
•   Senator Gary Hart of Colorado

Richard Riley:
•   Governor Joe Frank Harris of Georgia
•   Governor Ned McWherter of Tennessee



The Republican Nomination

On June 27, 1987, Vice President Bush announces that, due to his health problems, he would not seek the Republican nomination.  On July 5, barely a week after Bush’s announcement, Senator Bob Dole of Kansas declares for the nomination.  On August 18, former Governor Pierre S. du Pont of Delaware enters the race; on October 5, Senator Jack Kemp of New York puts his name in, and on October 24, former Governor Dick Thornburgh of Pennsylvania enters the race.

As the primaries get under way, Dole appears to be the frontrunner, and he wins a resounding victory in Iowa.  One week later, in New Hampshire, Kemp pulls off an upset victory; an angry Dole attacks Kemp for “lying about my record.”

Two weeks after Iowa, a Super Tuesday set of primaries are held in Alabama (Dole), Arizona (Dole), Connecticut (Kemp), Delaware (du Pont), Florida (Dole), Georgia (Dole), Illinois (Thornburgh), Ohio (Dole), Virginia (Dole), and Wisconsin (Dole).  After winning just one primary, Kemp drops out and endorses du Pont.

Following Super Tuesday, Dole sweeps Alaska, California, and Hawaii, forcing du Pont out of the race.  Thornburgh, however, stays in, taking the Pennsylvania primary held the next week.  Dole finally closes him out by winning Colorado, Massachusetts, New York, and Texas the next week.

At the Republican Convention in New York City, Dole makes the decision to select Kemp as his running mate.

Notable endorsements

Bob Dole
•   Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina
•   Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska
•   Senator Lowell Weicker of Connecticut
•   Senator Nancy Kassebaum Baker of Kansas
•   Senator Warren Rudman of New Hampshire
•   Senator Larry Pressler of South Dakota
•   Governor George Deukmejian of California
•   Governor Carroll A. Campbell, Jr. of South Carolina

Dick Thornburgh
•   Senator Bob Packwood of Oregon
•   Senator Pete Domenici of New Mexico
•   Senator H. John Heinz III of Pennsylvania
•   Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania
•   Governor Edward D. DiPrete of Rhode Island

Pierre S. du Pont
•   Senator Bill Roth of Delaware
•   Governor Mike Castle of Delaware

Jack Kemp
•   House Minority Whip Trent Lott of Mississippi
•   Senator Gordon Humphrey of New Hampshire
•   Representative Robert C. Smith of New Hampshire

The General Election

From day one, the election is extremely close.  Chiles immediately goes on the attack, criticizing Dole for supporting the Embargo, which is supported by just 17% of Americans.  Dole, in return, attacks Chiles for being too liberal.

On September 25, at the first debate, Chiles hits Dole hard on the Embargo, while Dole says that he opposed the Embargo from the start.  Following the debate, Chiles and Dole still stand almost even, although people seem to be shifting to Chiles.  Chiles gets a resounding victory in the second debate on October 17, and polls show him pulling away.

On October 26, barely a week before the election, Hatfield finally lifts the Embargo, in an attempt to pull up Dole.  The attempt fails, and Chiles squeaks by on Election Day.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1988&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=1;9;5&AK=2;3;5&AZ=2;7;5&AR=1;6;5&CA=2;47;4&CO=2;8;5&CT=2;8;4&DE=1;3;4&DC=1;3;8&FL=1;21;6&GA=1;12;5&HI=1;4;5&ID=2;4;6&IL=2;24;4&IN=2;12;5&IA=2;8;4&KS=2;7;6&KY=1;9;5&LA=1;10;5&MD=1;10;5&MA=1;13;5&MI=2;20;4&MN=1;10;5&MS=1;7;5&MO=1;11;5&MT=2;4;5&NE=2;5;6&NV=1;4;4&NH=2;4;5&NJ=2;16;5&NM=2;5;5&NY=1;36;5&NC=1;13;5&ND=1;3;4&OH=1;23;5&OK=1;8;4&OR=2;7;5&PA=2;25;5&RI=1;4;5&SC=1;8;5&SD=2;3;5&TN=1;11;5&TX=1;29;5&UT=2;5;6&VT=2;3;5&VA=1;12;5&WA=2;10;5&WV=1;6;5&WI=2;11;5&WY=2;3;6&ME=2;2;5&ME1=2;1;5&ME2=2;1;5)
Lawton Chiles/Joe Biden: 50.3% PV, 285 EV
Bob Dole/Jack Kemp: 48.1% PV, 253 EV
Others: 1.6% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

Given the extremely close election, the Congressional makeup stays much the same, with on gains in the Senate for either Party, and minor gains for House Democrats.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=0;3;5&AZ=1;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=2;55;3&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;9&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;27;3&GA=0;15;5&HI=1;4;3&ID=0;4;6&IL=0;21;6&IN=2;11;3&IA=0;7;5&KS=0;6;5&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;3&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=2;6;9&MO=2;11;3&MT=2;3;9&NV=1;5;9&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;15;3&NM=1;5;3&NY=1;31;3&NC=0;15;4&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;20;3&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;21;3&RI=2;4;3&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=1;11;3&TX=1;34;3&UT=2;5;3&VT=2;3;3&VA=1;13;9&WA=2;11;9&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=2;3;3&ME=1;2;3&ME1=1;1;3&ME2=1;1;3&NE=1;2;3&NE1=1;1;3&NE2=1;1;3&NE3=1;1;3)
Democrats: 57 (-)
Republicans: 43 (-)


House Results
Democrats: 253 (+3)
Republicans: 182 (-3)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on August 20, 2009, 06:06:10 am
Wow you are a master at keeping your Presidential candidates unknown Ben. Having Lawton Chiles as President will be pretty interesting, especially since his health really never recovered after his triple-Bi-pass surgery IOTL 1985. Dole/Kemp in 1988 was a nice touch as well, and it makes sense the Lawton didn't pick Dellums for Vice President, as needed the entire south to coble together even a narrow victory. Biden's youth applies to baby boomer's and his Catholic, White Working class routes appeal to voters in the rust belt. Maybe he should give Dellums the post of Secretary of State or Secretary of Defense. Just ideas, and I look forward to the first term of our nation's 40th President


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 25, 2009, 09:11:17 am
Sorry, but I won't have an update until at least Saturday, since I'm going on vacation.  Here's the 1988 County Map:
(http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/GALLERY/2270_25_08_09_10_10_11.GIF)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on August 25, 2009, 10:06:22 am
Awesome County map, and with the GOP's habit of giving the nomination to the previous Primary's runner up...Im going to perdict either Pete Dupont or Dick Thornburgh in '92 already. Looking forward to the Chiles Presidency...Keep it comming Ben.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on August 29, 2009, 08:30:55 am
Bumpity Bump.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on August 30, 2009, 05:04:21 pm
(http://www.ricesigns.com/real_pictures/bump_signs.jpg)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2009, 10:45:19 pm
An update will come soon.  If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask them.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on August 31, 2009, 08:23:53 am
An update will come soon.  If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask them.

Ben, what's happens to Al Gore, Bill Clinton, John Kerry and some othe figures?

Also, I think this is strong possibility that Biden will be President ITTL, regarding Chiles poor health (after all, he died in office as Florida Governor, but Presidency is much more harsh), but I don't want to suggest anything ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 31, 2009, 11:19:50 am
An update will come soon.  If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask them.

Ben, what's happens to Al Gore, Bill Clinton, John Kerry and some othe figures?

Gore, Clinton, and Kerry are all holding the same jobs in this TL that they held at this point in RL.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on August 31, 2009, 11:59:37 am
Whats going on with my man Rudy Giuliani?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 31, 2009, 01:58:50 pm
Whats going on with my man Rudy Giuliani?

Giuliani worked in the Hatfield Justice Department from 1981-1984, when he was appointed U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York.  As of now, he still holds that position.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Хahar 🤔 on August 31, 2009, 09:41:48 pm
Hilarious California results.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 31, 2009, 09:44:52 pm
Hilarious California results.

How so?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Хahar 🤔 on September 03, 2009, 05:33:55 pm
Fresno, Tulare and Kings do not vote D if Santa Barbara and San Benito vote D.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on September 05, 2009, 09:12:42 pm
I bump thee.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 05, 2009, 09:16:08 pm
I bump thee.

Tomorrow or Monday, most likely.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on September 07, 2009, 05:59:06 pm
I bump thee.

Tomorrow or Monday, most likely.

Untill then...Here's a recap, for the first half of the timeline...

JFK Lives: Presidents of the United States

35. John F. “Jack” Kennedy (D-MA): January 20th 1961-January 20th 1969
36. John Tower (R-TX): January 20th 1969-January 20th 1973
37. Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN): January 20th 1973-August 8th 1975*
38. Warren E. Hearnes (D-MO): August 8th 1975-January 20th 1981
39. Mark O. Hatfield (R-OR): January 20th 1981-January 20th 1989
40. Lawton M. Chiles Jr. (D-FL): January 20th 1989-???

Notes

37. Died in office due to an aortic aneurism.

JFK Lives: Vice-Presidents of the United States

37. Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX): January 20th 1961-January 20th 1965
38. George A. Smathers (D-FL): January 20th 1965-January 20th 1969
39. Spiro T. Agnew (R-MD): January 20th 1969-January 20th 1973
40. Warren E. Hearnes (D-MO): January 20th 1973-August 8th 1975
Vacant: August 8th 1975-January 20th 1977
41. Frank F. Church III (D-ID): January 20th 1977-January 20th 1981
42. George H.W. Bush (R-TX): January 30th 1981-January 20th 1989
43. Joseph R. “Joe” Biden Jr. (D-DE): January 20th 1989-???

JFK Lives: Failed Tickets

1964: Barry M. Goldwater (R-AZ)/William Scranton (R-PA)
1968: George A. Smathers (D-FL)/Henry M. “Scoop” Jackson (D-WA):  William C. Westmoreland (A-SC)/Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)
1972: John Tower (R-TX)/Spiro T. Agnew (R-MD):  Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/John M. Ashbrook (A-OH)
1976: Ronald W. Reagan (R-CA)/Gerald R. Ford (R-MI)
1980: Warren E. Hearnes (D-MO)/Frank F. Church III (D-ID):  Jesse A. Helms Jr. (A-NC)/Dr. Otis R. Bowen (A-IN)
1984: Michael S. “Mike” Dukakis (D-MA)/Lloyd M. Bentsen (D-TX)
1988: Robert J. “Bob” Dole (R-KA)/Jack F. Kemp (R-NY)




Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 07, 2009, 06:01:25 pm
Thanks Historico; I regret to announce that an update will not be out for at least 4 more days; I start school tomorrow, and will have a lot to do because of that.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 12, 2009, 03:03:31 pm
Well, my brain has apparently shut down almost completely, and I have no idea when an update will come.  Sorry :(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on September 12, 2009, 03:08:44 pm
Well, my brain has apparently shut down almost completely, and I have no idea when an update will come.  Sorry :(

Just know that we all love this timeline and are big fans of it. ;D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 12, 2009, 08:44:43 pm
Just know that we all love this timeline and are big fans of it. ;D

And believe me, that's encouraging.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on September 16, 2009, 02:43:17 pm
(http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e279/Bbgeminigirl/bump.jpg)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 19, 2009, 08:52:33 pm
(http://www.museumoffloridahistory.com/collections/governors/portraits/48_Chiles.jpg)
The First Term of Lawton Chiles

“My friends, as we enter the last decade of the twentieth century, I see a bright future for America.  Whatever troubles are ahead, we shall overcome them.  I believe in the American spirit, and I know that nothing is impossible.”  Much like his hopeful Inaugural Address, Chiles’ Cabinet represents a broad cross section of America, in terms of partisan affiliation and ideological views; Democrats and Republicans, liberals and conservatives.

Secretary of State: Dante Fascell (D-FL)
Secretary of Treasury: Lloyd Bentsen (D-TX)
Secretary of Defense: John Chafee (R-RI)
Attorney General: Charles Mathias (R-MD)
Secretary of the Interior: Bruce Babbitt (D-AZ)
Secretary of Agriculture: John W. Carlin (D-KS)
Secretary of Commerce: Al D'Amato (R-NY)
Secretary of Labor: William D. Ford (D-MI)
Secretary of Health and Human Services: Pierre S. du Pont, IV (R-DE)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Meyera E. Oberndorf (D-VA)
Secretary of Transportation: Norman Mineta (D-CA)
Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs: Alan K. Simpson (R-WY)

On January 26, Congress begins debate on the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.  The Legislation, written by Congressman John Dingell of Michigan, would prohibit discrimination based on disabilities, similar to the way the Civil Rights Act of 1964, made discrimination based on race, religion, sex, national origin, and other factors illegal.  The ADA defined a disability as “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity.”

Because of its far reaching nature, strong opposition to the ADA was expected.  However, there is very little opposition in the House, which passes the ADA on April 23, by a vote of 403-19.  In the Senate, the ADA is actively opposed only by Jesse Helms, and on June 5, by a vote of 87-8, the Senate passes the ADA.  On June 7, the President signs it into law.

On June 27, both Chief Justice Bazelon and Justice Brennan announce their joint retirement from the Court.  To replace Bazelon as Chief Justice, Chiles nominates Judge Richard Sheppard Arnold of the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals, widely considered one of the greatest Judges to have served in the American Judiciary.  So great was Arnold’s esteem that a statement, signed by all nine Justices of the Supreme Court, was publically released in which they urged that Arnold be confirmed.  The Senate decides to not even hold hearings for Arnold, and he is confirmed on July 8, by a vote of 100-0.

To replace Brennan, Chiles nominates Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the DC Circuit, making her the first woman to be appointed to the Court.  Ginsburg, despite being very widely respected, faces opposition from conservatives like Jesse Helms.  Despite that, she if confirmed on July 26 by a vote of 87-10.

In August, leading up to the 50th anniversary of the start of World War II, President Chiles begins a tour of Europe, culminating with a speech at the Berlin Wall on September 1, 1989.  In the speech, Chiles discusses the need to stand up to tyranny, and to support, “Spreading the enabler of innovation, democracy.”

In October, Congress begins debate on the Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989.  The Act, written by Congressman John Conyers of Michigan, protected persons who work for the government that report agency misconduct; it also federal agencies from taking a “personnel action with respect to any employee or applicant because of any disclosure of information by the employee or applicant that he or she reasonably believes evidences a violation of a law, rule or regulation; gross mismanagement; gross waste of funds; an abuse of authority; or a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety.”

Much like the ADA, the WPA finds little opposition; it passes the House 364-49 on November 7, and it passes the Senate 71-12 on December 15; it is signed by the President on December 18.

In his State of the Union Address in January 15, 1990, President Chiles confidently says that, “The State of our Union is stronger than ever.”  His statement is not unjustified.  Unemployment sits at just over 7%, and per-person wages have risen dramatically since the end of the Soviet Embargo.

On February 17, in a speech to the UN, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein accuses the US of “trying to make my country to give them dirt cheap oil by pressuring our neighbors to not trade with us, forcing us to lower our prices in order to put food on our people’s tables.”  Chiles denies the accusation, forcefully, in a speech at the UN on February 26.

On March 9, Hussein calls Kuwait “a colony of the United States,” and threatens military action if they don’t, “stop letting the United States dictate the economic policies of the entire Middle East.”

On March 29, Hussein follows through on his threat, and on March 30, Iraq officially invades Kuwait.  Despite warnings, the Kuwait military was not fully prepared; 25% of the Kuwait Air Force was lost during the initial invasion.  Iraqi tanks attacked Dasman Palace, the royal residence. Amir Jaber Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, on the advice of the United States military, had already fled into the Saudi desert. His younger half brother, Sheikh Fahad Al-Ahmed Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, was shot and killed, after which his body was placed in front of a tank and run over.

Within several weeks of the invasion, members of Congress began demanding military action to force Saddam out of Kuwait.  Senator Joe Lieberman (D-CT), said, “It is shameful that the United States is allowing a common thug to depose the rightful government of Kuwait.”

On April 17th, President Chiles announces that, in order to defend Saudi Arabia, he will send 200,000 troops into Saudi Arabia.  Over the next few weeks, he builds a coalition of 34 countries, to send troops into Kuwait: Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Morocco, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Spain, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States itself; totaling 956,000 troops, of whom 73% were Americans.  Japan and West Germany, while not sending in troops, contribute large amounts of money.  The Senate, on May 1, votes 67-33 to allow military force; the House follows on May 5, 334-101.  On May 8, 1990, Operation Desert Storm officially begins.

Within a few weeks of the invasion, Iraqi troops were being driven out of Kuwait in large numbers.  By July 1, President Chiles states that “We expect Kuwait to be restored to its rightful government by Bastille Day.”  By July 14, only a handful of Iraqi troops remain.  On July 25, 1990, Saddam officially signs a ceasefire agreement, bringing the Gulf War to an end.  Following the ceasefire, Saddam blasts the USSR, which had stayed out of the affair, as “Leaving us to the mercy of the American dogs.”

In early August, with an Approval Rating of 69%, President Chiles takes a much deserved vacation in Florida, before hitting the campaign trail for Congressional Democrats.

The Congressional Elections

Because of Chiles’ sky high Approval Ratings (they would be 64% on election day), the Democrats make incredible gains in both Houses of Congress; in the Senate, this includes taking the seat of Jesse Helms, by Charlotte Mayor Harvey Gant, by 881 votes.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=0;10;5&AR=1;6;3&CA=0;55;6&CO=2;9;3&CT=0;7;6&DE=2;3;9&DC=0;3;9&FL=0;27;5&GA=1;15;3&HI=0;4;7&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;21;3&IN=0;11;4&IA=1;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;9&LA=1;9;3&MD=0;10;6&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;9&MN=1;10;9&MS=2;6;3&MO=0;11;4&MT=1;3;9&NV=0;5;5&NH=2;4;3&NJ=1;15;3&NM=2;5;3&NY=0;31;6&NC=1;15;9&ND=0;3;5&OH=0;20;5&OK=1;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=2;8;3&SD=2;3;3&TN=1;11;3&TX=2;34;3&UT=0;5;6&VT=0;3;6&VA=2;13;3&WA=0;11;5&WV=1;5;3&WI=0;10;5&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;3&ME1=2;1;3&ME2=2;1;3&NE=1;2;3&NE1=1;1;3&NE2=1;1;3&NE3=1;1;3)
Democrats: 61 (+4)
Republicans: 39 (-4)


House Results
Democrats: 276 (+23)
Republicans: 158 (-24)
Independents: 1 (+1)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Хahar 🤔 on September 19, 2009, 09:26:56 pm
Defending Saudi Arabia?

Disgusting.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on September 19, 2009, 09:28:24 pm
Chiles should visit rather a country where the war actually started :P

Anyway, great update as alaway, even if I second Xahar thought ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on September 20, 2009, 06:46:30 pm
Wow, it's good to see this bird back up again...the Chiles Presidency been pretty good so far, especially with a early yet successful conclusion to the Gulf War. I could see him bringing on board a major piece of Child Health Care legislation. Im just wondering if his he might die sooner than IOTL, due to the stresses of the Presidency...Can't wait to see the rest of the Chiles 1st term and the '92 election...Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on September 20, 2009, 07:54:59 pm
I wondering if President Chiles health would not get worse during his term. I killed him in 1988 :P

Poor Joe, always a heartbet away, in OTL and TTL ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on September 25, 2009, 04:02:19 pm
After rereading the last installment, Im actually suprised Lawton doesn't have a really inclusive cabinent Deed's, especially as a progressive New South former Governor. He only has one Female, and one Asian American member of his cabinent. I don't think the African American Democratic Base would be to happy about that especially after the close nature of the Dellums/Chiles shootout in the primaries.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on September 26, 2009, 01:45:53 pm
May we see an update on the living former presidents? I'd like to see how they are spending their lives currently.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 28, 2009, 03:07:58 pm
May we see an update on the living former presidents? I'd like to see how they are spending their lives currently.

President Kennedy had been teaching at Harvard since leaving office; he's currently on leave to work full time for his son's campaign for Governor of Massachusetts.

President Tower has largely stayed out of the limelight, living quietly in Texas.

President Hearnes, like President Truman, has been a major figure at his library, giving talks every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.  He also campaigns for Democratic candidates, and his popularity has seen an increase in the last few years.

President Hatfield, just starting his retirement, has taken the Bill Clinton route of starting various charities, and managing them.

After rereading the last installment, Im actually suprised Lawton doesn't have a really inclusive cabinent Deed's, especially as a progressive New South former Governor. He only has one Female, and one Asian American member of his cabinent. I don't think the African American Democratic Base would be to happy about that especially after the close nature of the Dellums/Chiles shootout in the primaries.

Dellums was offered SecDef, but he turned it down to stay in the House.  Chiles was looking for the best person for each job, while still maintaining a healthy partisan balance, and this is the best he could do.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on September 28, 2009, 06:26:33 pm
Thanks!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 12, 2009, 10:14:33 am
Sorry for the lack of an update; school has taken most of my substantive free time.  Hopefully an update will come out this week.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 22, 2009, 06:14:25 pm
So, I have no idea when another update will come out, but I'm hoping this weekend.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Robespierre's Jaw on October 25, 2009, 11:33:46 pm
Benjamin

If you can't think of anything to write why not summarise what you were intending to write, provided with complimentary electoral maps! Plenty of other forumites, such as HC have do so and that hasn't hindered the appreciation of their timelines, so I highly suggest you doing so yourself. That's what I was planning on doing but I had no idea what was going to happen after 1958.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 26, 2009, 03:41:20 pm
I do intend to finish the timeline, and I will hopefully have an update this weekend.  I will not abandon this timeline.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on October 26, 2009, 03:50:12 pm
I do intend to finish the timeline, and I will hopefully have an update this weekend.  I will not abandon this timeline.

Yes, good to hear, Ben. Abandoning this TL would be... so Liefish


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 26, 2009, 04:47:49 pm
I do intend to finish the timeline, and I will hopefully have an update this weekend.  I will not abandon this timeline.

Yes, good to hear, Ben. Abandoning this TL would be... so Liefish

Exactly.  I fully intend to finish this beast.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on November 11, 2009, 09:23:21 am
Yeah...I know University puts big timelines like my Reagan in '68 TL, and TTL's on Ice for a majority of the semester. Atleast this way its in the back of your mind, with Ideas churning on different ways you could take it....Keep it comming Ben


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 14, 2009, 11:38:45 am
On January 29, 1991, in his State of the Union Address, President Chiles declares that, “The State of our Union is strong, and getting stronger.”  Following the Address, Hatfield makes the first visit to Moscow by an American President since the Hatfield ultimatum.  During his meeting with Soviet Premier Vitaly Fedorchuk, Chiles pushes for a more open relationship between the two countries, both politically and economically.  Fedorchuk, however, is unresponsive to the offer.

On March 8, the Senate begins debate on the High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991.  Also known as the Gore Bill, after Senator Al Gore (D-TN), the legislation would create the National Information Infrastructure and begin funding of the National Research and Education Network (NREN).  Primary opposition to the HPCA came from conservatives who were worried about the high costs attached to the HPCA.  Senator Richard Shelby (D-AL) claimed that, “This would plunge our nation deep into debt, from which we would take a long time to recover.”  Eventually, though, the HPCA passes the Senate, 57-36, on April 25, and the House, 227-184, on May 16.

On June 18, Justices Spottswood William Robinson III and Byron White both announce their retirements.  To replace them, President Chiles nominates Harry T. Edwards of the DC Circuit, and Stephanie Kulp Seymour of the 10th Circuit.  They are both confirmed without controversy.

On July 15, 1991, President Chiles, in a speech to a joint session of Congress, calls for an invasion of Panama to overthrow Panamanian leader, general, and dictator Manuel Noriega.  In the speech, Chiles gives four reasons for invading Panama: protecting Panamanian and American citizens, defending democracy and human rights in Panama from Noriega, fighting a serious drug trafficking problem in Panama, and protecting the integrity of the Torrijos-Hearnes Treaties, which Chiles claimed was being threatened by Noriega.  On July 20, by a vote of 60-36, the Senate grants Chiles the authority; the House follows on July 24, 309-104.

On July 26, the invasion, named “Operation Just Cause”, begins.  28,000 American troops attacked strategic installations such as the civilian Punta Paitilla Airport in Panama City, a PDF garrison and airfield at Rio Hato, where Noriega also maintained a residence. U.S. Navy SEALS destroyed Noriega’s private jet and a Panamanian gunboat.  During this attack, one Navy SEAL and two American soldiers were killed.

By August 2, the only objective remaining for the Americans was the capture of Noriega.  He had taken residence in the Vatican Embassy since July 31, but the Americans, on August 4, managed to force him out.  He surrendered, and was extradited to Miami.  Guillermo Endara, who had attempted to overthrow Noriega, then living in hiding, was sworn in as president by a judge on the night preceding the invasion. The casualties were 20 on the American side, and around 200 Panamanian casualties.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Manuel_Noriega_mug_shot.jpg)
Manuel Noriega following his arrest

In a speech on September 10, 1991, President Chiles, reacting to a report finding that nearly 13% of Americans lives below the poverty line, announced a series of initiatives on education and job creation to lower that number.  Despite reservations, the House passes the Education Opportunity Act of 1991, which would provide monetary scholarships to low income people attempting to go to University, on November 20, 227-204.  The Senate follows on December 12, 53-43. 

On January 15, the House passes the Employment Jumpstart Act of 1992, which provided funds for unemployed people to seek education in the career field of their choice for three years, 220-212.  On February 9, the Senate passes the EJA, 50-42.  Shortly after signing the EJA, President Chiles begins campaigning in earnest for his reelection.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on November 14, 2009, 11:41:03 am
On January 29, 1991, in his State of the Union Address, President Chiles declares that, “The State of our Union is strong, and getting stronger.”  Following the Address, Hatfield makes the first visit to Moscow by an American President since the Hatfield ultimatum.  During his meeting with Soviet Premier Vitaly Fedorchuk, Chiles pushes for a more open relationship between the two countries, both politically and economically.  Fedorchuk, however, is unresponsive to the offer.

On March 8, the Senate begins debate on the High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991.  Also known as the Gore Bill, after Senator Al Gore (D-TN), the legislation would create the National Information Infrastructure and begin funding of the National Research and Education Network (NREN).  Primary opposition to the HPCA came from conservatives who were worried about the high costs attached to the HPCA.  Senator Richard Shelby (D-AL) claimed that, “This would plunge our nation deep into debt, from which we would take a long time to recover.”  Eventually, though, the HPCA passes the Senate, 57-36, on April 25, and the House, 227-184, on May 16.

On June 18, Justices Spottswood William Robinson III and Byron White both announce their retirements.  To replace them, President Chiles nominates Harry T. Edwards of the DC Circuit, and Stephanie Kulp Seymour of the 10th Circuit.  They are both confirmed without controversy.

On July 15, 1991, President Chiles, in a speech to a joint session of Congress, calls for an invasion of Panama to overthrow Panamanian leader, general, and dictator Manuel Noriega.  In the speech, Chiles gives four reasons for invading Panama: protecting Panamanian and American citizens, defending democracy and human rights in Panama from Noriega, fighting a serious drug trafficking problem in Panama, and protecting the integrity of the Torrijos-Hearnes Treaties, which Chiles claimed was being threatened by Noriega.  On July 20, by a vote of 60-36, the Senate grants Chiles the authority; the House follows on July 24, 309-104.

On July 26, the invasion, named “Operation Just Cause”, begins.  28,000 American troops attacked strategic installations such as the civilian Punta Paitilla Airport in Panama City, a PDF garrison and airfield at Rio Hato, where Noriega also maintained a residence. U.S. Navy SEALS destroyed Noriega’s private jet and a Panamanian gunboat.  During this attack, one Navy SEAL and two American soldiers were killed.

By August 2, the only objective remaining for the Americans was the capture of Noriega.  He had taken residence in the Vatican Embassy since July 31, but the Americans, on August 4, managed to force him out.  He surrendered, and was extradited to Miami.  Guillermo Endara, who had attempted to overthrow Noriega, then living in hiding, was sworn in as president by a judge on the night preceding the invasion. The casualties were 20 on the American side, and around 200 Panamanian casualties.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Manuel_Noriega_mug_shot.jpg)
Manuel Noriega following his arrest

In a speech on September 10, 1991, President Chiles, reacting to a report finding that nearly 13% of Americans lives below the poverty line, announced a series of initiatives on education and job creation to lower that number.  Despite reservations, the House passes the Education Opportunity Act of 1991, which would provide monetary scholarships to low income people attempting to go to University, on November 20, 227-204.  The Senate follows on December 12, 53-43. 

On January 15, the House passes the Employment Jumpstart Act of 1992, which provided funds for unemployed people to seek education in the career field of their choice for three years, 220-212.  On February 9, the Senate passes the EJA, 50-42.  Shortly after signing the EJA, President Hatfield begins campaigning in earnest for his reelection.

You mean President Chiles right? ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 14, 2009, 11:45:40 am
You mean President Chiles right? ;)

Yes :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on November 14, 2009, 12:09:29 pm
By the Gods...After two months, it has returned to us...Anyways, what a pretty successfull conclusion to Chiles' first term in office. With two Millitary victories, Educational Reform and Minority Judges nominated; Lawton's approval ratings should still remain in the 60's or 70's. The GOP will probably run a pretty strong Fiscal Conservative attacking the high spending policies of the Chiles adminstration. Will Ross Perot still run an anti-deficit independent campaign ITTL ALT 1992 General Election? Maybe Congressman Barry Goldwater Jr. of California, former Governor Pete du Pont of Deleaware, or Governor Carroll Campbell of South Carolina? I don't know why I bother trying to guest your lists, as you always seem to be one step ahead over everyone when it comes to your elections...Keep it Comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 14, 2009, 01:43:59 pm
By the Gods...After two months, it has returned to us...Anyways, what a pretty successfull conclusion to Chiles' first term in office. With two Millitary victories, Educational Reform and Minority Judges nominated; Lawton's approval ratings should still remain in the 60's or 70's. The GOP will probably run a pretty strong Fiscal Conservative attacking the high spending policies of the Chiles adminstration. Will Ross Perot still run an anti-deficit independent campaign ITTL ALT 1992 General Election? Maybe Congressman Barry Goldwater Jr. of California, former Governor Pete du Pont of Deleaware, or Governor Carroll Campbell of South Carolina? I don't know why I bother trying to guest your lists, as you always seem to be one step ahead over everyone when it comes to your elections...Keep it Comming

You have guessed one person who will be on a ticket in 1992.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on November 14, 2009, 06:20:06 pm
Hooray, it has returned!



Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 15, 2009, 01:10:22 pm
The Democratic Nomination

With his approval ratings hovering in the high 50’s for all of 1991 and heading into 1992, President Chiles is virtually unchallenged in his attempt to be re-nominated.  Several minor candidates emerge, but none pose any significant challenge.

At the Convention in Atlanta, President Chiles and Vice President Biden are re-nominated unanimously.  The Keynote Speaker is the 32 year old Governor of Massachusetts, John F. Kennedy Jr.  Kennedy’s speech, praising the Chiles Administration, is very well received by the public, and Chiles heads into the General Election leading in the polls.

The Republican Nomination

President Chiles’ high approval ratings manage to scare away many top tier contenders for the GOP nomination.  On March 9, 1991, Congressman Hal Rogers of Kentucky becomes the first candidate to declare for the nomination.  On June 23, Governor John Ashcroft of Missouri enters the race.  July 4 sees Governor Carroll Campbell of South Carolina declare for the nomination.  On August 5, Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah enters the race, and on August 27, Dick Thornburgh decides to make a second go at winning the nomination.

Entering the primaries, Thornburgh has all of the momentum, coming off his strong showing in 1988.  Thornburgh, however, if upset by Campbell, who wins 34% of the vote; Thornburgh comes in second, with 30%, Ashcroft gets 18%, Hatch gets 16%, and Rogers manages 2%.  Thornburgh follows with a victory in New Hampshire, taking 36% of the vote.

Following Iowa and New Hampshire, the candidates compete in California, which is won by Thornburgh.  After California, they head to Georgia, which goes to Campbell.  Following Georgia, they prepare for primaries in Alabama (Campbell), Alaska (Hatch), Arkansas (Campbell), Delaware (Thornburgh), Illinois (Thornburgh), Louisiana (Campbell), New York (Campbell), South Carolina (Campbell), and Wyoming (Thornburgh).  Following these primaries, Rogers drops out and endorses Campbell.

One week after the first Super Tuesday, the candidates compete in Connecticut (Thornburgh), Idaho (Hatch), Indiana (Ashcroft), Ohio (Thornburgh), and West Virginia (Campbell).  Following the string of primaries, the candidates all move to Florida, where a heated contest is expected.  Campbell, however, dominates the competition, taking over 50% of the vote.  The next week, primaries are held in Missouri (Ashcroft), and Tennessee (Campbell).  With few delegates, and no money, Hatch drops out, and endorses Thornburgh.

Following those primaries, the second Super Tuesday comes along, with contests in Arizona (Thornburgh), Colorado (Thornburgh), Kentucky (Campbell), Maryland (Campbell), Michigan (Campbell), and Texas (Campbell).  With just two primary victories, and no cash, Ashcroft drops out, and endorses Campbell.

With just two candidates remaining, each contest becomes extremely important.  The primary in New Jersey was critical, and Campbell was able to stun the pundits by winning a strong victory, gaining 53% of the vote.  The nomination was expected to come down to Mini Tuesday, a set of 6 primaries in Kansas (Campbell), Massachusetts (Thornburgh), North Carolina (Campbell), Oklahoma (Campbell), Virginia (Campbell), and Wisconsin (Campbell).  By the end of the evening, Campbell had claimed enough delegates to clinch the nomination, and Thornburgh backed down and endorsed him.

At the Republican Convention in Miami, Campbell selects Senator Dan Quayle of Indiana as his running mate.  The Keynote Speech, given by Governor Bob Martinez of Florida, blasted the Chiles Administration for running a massive deficit.

The General Election

Entering the election, polls show Chiles ahead of Campbell.  The lead, however, is slim.  A Gallup Poll from September 15 shows Chiles at 40%, Campbell at 37%, and 23% undecided.  After the first debate on September 24, which was thought to be a draw, Chiles leads 44-42-14

Throughout the campaign, Campbell attacks Chiles on the economy.  Known for balancing the South Carolina budget, Campbell blasts the “irresponsible fiscal policies of Lawton Chiles” in speech after speech.  Economic conditions, too, begin to hit Chiles.  On October 2, a report from the Department of Labor shows unemployment to be at nearly 7%, the highest since 1990.  Campbell claims that the spending policies of the Chiles Administration are responsible for the job loss, and after Chiles fails to defend himself during the October 20 debate, polls show Campbell ahead 47-45-8.

The last poll before the election, taken on November 2, shows Campbell and Chiles tied at 46%, with 8% still undecided.  On election night, the voters split nearly evenly, but Campbell pulls out an extremely narrow victory.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1992&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;9;5&AK=2;3;5&AZ=2;8;5&AR=1;6;5&CA=1;54;5&CO=2;8;5&CT=1;8;5&DE=1;3;5&DC=1;3;8&FL=1;25;5&GA=2;13;4&HI=1;4;5&ID=2;4;6&IL=2;22;4&IN=2;12;5&IA=2;7;4&KS=2;6;5&KY=1;8;4&LA=1;9;5&MD=1;10;5&MA=1;12;5&MI=1;18;5&MN=1;10;5&MS=2;7;5&MO=2;11;5&MT=2;3;5&NV=2;4;5&NH=2;4;5&NJ=2;15;4&NM=2;5;5&NY=1;33;5&NC=2;14;4&ND=2;3;5&OH=2;21;5&OK=2;8;5&OR=2;7;4&PA=1;23;5&RI=1;4;5&SC=2;8;5&SD=2;3;5&TN=1;11;4&TX=2;32;5&UT=2;5;6&VT=1;3;5&VA=2;13;5&WA=2;11;4&WV=1;5;5&WI=2;11;4&WY=2;3;6&ME=1;2;5&ME1=1;1;5&ME2=1;1;5&NE=2;2;5&NE1=2;1;5&NE2=2;1;5&NE3=2;1;5)
Carroll A. Campbell/Dan Quayle: 49.5% PV, 285 EV
Lawton Chiles/Joe Biden: 49.4% PV, 253 EV
Others: 1.1% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

Once again, the extremely close Presidential election results in minor Congressional changes, with the GOP netting just one Senate seat, and a few House seats.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=2;10;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=1;55;3&CO=1;9;3&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;6&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;27;3&GA=2;15;9&HI=1;4;3&ID=2;4;9&IL=1;21;3&IN=2;11;3&IA=2;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=1;10;3&MA=0;12;6&MI=0;17;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=2;11;3&MT=0;3;4&NV=1;5;3&NH=2;4;3&NJ=0;15;5&NM=0;5;5&NY=2;31;3&NC=2;15;9&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;20;3&OK=2;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=2;21;3&RI=0;4;6&SC=1;8;3&SD=1;3;3&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;34;5&UT=2;5;3&VT=1;3;3&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;11;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=1;10;9&WY=0;3;6&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;6&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;5&NE1=0;1;5&NE2=0;1;4&NE3=0;1;6)
Democrats: 59 (-2)
Republicans: 41 (+2)


House Results
Democrats: 271 (-5)
Republicans: 163 (+5)
Independent: 1 (-)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on November 15, 2009, 01:58:44 pm
Awesome update...Can't say I was expecting Chiles with his strong foriegn policy achievments but It was nice to see Governor Campbell finally getting his shot at the White House in which he never did IOTL. I guess "It's the economy stupid." still rang true ITTL, and for Campbell's Presidency...I will be looking at whether he continues to govern as the Nondoctrinate Conservative as he did in South Carolina. I know the next update might be a while, but Ill still be patiently waiting lol.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on November 25, 2009, 01:29:35 pm
Gotta love being on Vacation, just sat through and read every single line of this freakin awesome Timeline and Im still impressed. Your writing style, is short and too the point, but yet it leaves the reader feeling satisfied enough both on Domestic and Foreign Policy issues as if they read my textbook format tls lol. Can't wait to see what happens in the Campbell Presidency...Keep it commin Ben!!!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on December 11, 2009, 12:34:25 pm
I expect to see an Installment on the Campbell Presidency in the next few weeks Good Sir...lol jk


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 12, 2009, 06:00:13 pm
I expect to see an Installment on the Campbell Presidency in the next few weeks Good Sir...lol jk

Definitely in the next few weeks ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 17, 2009, 03:50:03 pm
An update will come next week.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cassius Dio on December 20, 2009, 11:53:41 pm
An update will come next week.
I'm looking forward to it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Bo on December 21, 2009, 08:24:27 pm
An update will come next week.
I'm looking forward to it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on December 27, 2009, 10:58:43 am
What's going on in Russia? Has the USSR collapsed, or is Fedorchuk still General Secretary?

As for the US...perhaps Campbell will try to repeal Humphrey-Care, though with Democratic majorities in both houses that looks like a difficult goal...

So, to sum it all up: when can we expect the next update, Ben?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on December 27, 2009, 11:46:31 am
An update will come next week.

LIAR!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 30, 2009, 04:01:27 pm
Sorry, guys.  I've started the 1993-1995 update, but I dunno when I'll be able to finish it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 30, 2009, 04:12:06 pm
While y'all wait, here's the 1992 county results map:
(http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/9972/1992countiesjfk.gif)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on January 09, 2010, 10:56:03 am
Campbell, Campbell, Campbell!!!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on January 19, 2010, 08:10:59 am
Bump...still waiting on that Campbell Presidency, Ben...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on January 19, 2010, 08:14:31 am
Ben, can you hear us?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 21, 2010, 10:25:21 pm
Ben, can you hear us?

Maybe this weekend.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: President Mitt on January 21, 2010, 10:27:46 pm
You guys would be surprised how hard it is to stick to something. I know I wouldn't have been able to get as far as Ben has.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 22, 2010, 09:09:43 pm
I'd like to say, also, that I really appreciate the fact that you guys still like this timeline, and want it updated.  It's very encouraging to a writer.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on January 22, 2010, 09:23:00 pm
Can I have updates on what these people are doing?

Mark Warner

Mitt Romney

Tony Blair

George W. Bush

Barack Obama


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on January 25, 2010, 10:21:27 am
AMAZING timeline. Keep up the great work!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Bo on January 27, 2010, 07:01:09 pm
Good TL.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 04, 2010, 10:08:47 am
Although Wehaven't seen a real update on TTL in almost 3 months, I am still one of it's loyal fans as I know how hard it is to be a full time Undergrad Student and trying to write a Well-Written TL at the Same time. But once again Ben, if you need any help coming up legistlation, butterflies or any ideas feel free to PM me. The best tl's are written with a collabrative effort in my opinion, so you don't have to stress yourself out trying to think of everything by yourself.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 04, 2010, 01:40:02 pm
Wow; I didn't realize how long it had been.

I solemnly promise an update this weekend.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on February 07, 2010, 05:36:44 pm
 Is it coming today?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 07, 2010, 05:38:50 pm
Is it coming today?

Yes it is; I am working on it right now.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on February 07, 2010, 05:40:31 pm
:D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cassius Dio on February 07, 2010, 05:41:49 pm


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 07, 2010, 06:03:52 pm
(http://www.sciway.net/hist/governors/graphics/campbell.jpg)
The First Term of Carroll Campbell

“As we enter the last seven years of this century, we cannot be content with our past achievements.  We must look ahead to a century, and new accomplishments.”  The Campbell Cabinet, as it is filled out, is filled with men of good experience, and a wide range of views and partisan affiliation, including the first African-American Secretary of State, Colin Powell.

Secretary of State: Colin Powell (R-VA)
Secretary of Treasury: William V. Roth Jr. (R-DE)
Secretary of Defense: Sam Nunn (D-GA)
Attorney General: Orrin Hatch (R-UT)
Secretary of the Interior: George Mickelson (R-SD)
Secretary of Agriculture: Bob Miller (D-NV)
Secretary of Commerce: Bart Gordon (D-TN)
Secretary of Labor: William Brock (R-TN)
Secretary of Health and Human Services: Louis Sullivan (R-GA)
Secretary of Education: Lamar Alexander (R-TN)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Kathy Whitmire (D-TX)
Secretary of Transportation: Samuel Skinner (R-IL)
Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs: Alan K. Simpson (R-WY)

A few days after taking office, President Campbell presents to Congress his new economic program.  The new program presented a series of tax cuts on all but the wealthiest 5% of Americans.  At the same time, the President unveils a budget full of spending cuts, focused heavily in social services, but also cutting the budgets for NASA and the military.

In Congress, debate begins immediately on the new economic program.  While the tax cuts enjoy strong support among Republicans, the GOP clearly lacks the votes to pass it, needing to pull off 47 more Democrats to pass the cuts.  They focus initially on the conservative Southern Democrats, led by Jamie Whitten (D-MS-01), Chairman of the Appropriations Committee.  While announcing his support in principle, Whitten says that, in order for the cuts to pass, they will have to be reduced.  On February 25, the White House agrees to a reduction of the cuts: taxes will be cut for all but the top 15%, and the top 5% will see a minor increase in taxes.  The spending cuts, also, are reduced, with social programs maintaining close to their old levels of funding.

Some Democrats, though, see even this is as not good enough.  Congressman Pete Stark (D-CA-13) blasts the cuts as a “deal with the devil”, and Congressman Bernie Sanders (I-VT-AL) calls the cuts a “handout to America’s wealthy oligarchs”.  However, the deal had attracted a large number of supporters, and on March 23, the Campbell Cuts pass the House, 350-79.

In the Senate, the Campbell Cuts also face stiff opposition from liberal Democrats.  Senator Claiborne Pell (D-RI) leads the opposition; his Pell Grants are among the programs proposed for cutting.  Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA) calls it a “senseless gutting of social programs, designed only to hurt the downtrodden in America.”

For more than two months, the Senate goes back and forth on the Campbell Cuts.  The President throws his weight behind the cuts, and a Gallup poll from June 2 shows 58% of Americans support the cuts, while just 35% oppose them.  Finally, on June 17, after a series of deals re-allocated some of the cuts, the Senate votes 52-48 to pass the Campbell Cuts; on June 29, after minimal re-debate, the House accepts the Senate version, 332-100.

On July 2, Justice John Robert Brown announces his retirement from the Court.  President Campbell appoints Judge E. Grady Jolly of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals to replace him; Jolly is confirmed on August 15, 89-10.

Starting September 4, Campbell begins a tour of Europe.  He starts in London, where he throws a farewell party for Prime Minister Thatcher, who has announced that she will be leaving office following the September 27 elections.  While in London, he takes an opportunity to denounce the Soviet Union.  In Paris, he meets with President François Mitterrand, although the two clash over economic differences.  He ends his tour in West Berlin, where, standing by Chancellor Helmut Kohl, he calls for Soviet Premier Fedorchuk to end the division of Berlin, and reunite Germany.  He then returns to the US after almost a month, and begins campaigning for Republican Gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia, with mixed success; Christine Todd Whitman is elected Governor of New Jersey in a landslide, while in Virginia, previously unknown businessman Mark Warner defeats Republican Congressman George Allen by a narrow, 10,000 vote margin.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=3;9;6&AK=3;3;5&AZ=3;10;5&AR=3;6;5&CA=3;55;5&CO=3;9;5&CT=1;7;5&DE=1;3;5&DC=0;3;7&FL=3;27;5&GA=3;15;5&HI=1;4;5&ID=3;4;6&IL=1;21;5&IN=3;11;5&IA=3;7;5&KS=3;6;6&KY=3;8;6&LA=3;9;6&MD=1;10;5&MA=1;12;5&MI=3;17;5&MN=1;10;5&MS=3;6;6&MO=3;11;5&MT=3;3;6&NV=3;5;5&NH=3;4;5&NJ=3;15;5&NM=3;5;5&NY=1;31;5&NC=3;15;5&ND=3;3;6&OH=3;20;5&OK=3;7;6&OR=1;7;5&PA=3;21;5&RI=1;4;5&SC=3;8;7&SD=3;3;6&TN=3;11;6&TX=3;34;6&UT=3;5;7&VT=1;3;5&VA=3;13;5&WA=1;11;5&WV=3;5;5&WI=3;10;5&WY=3;3;6&ME=1;2;5&ME1=1;1;5&ME2=1;1;5&NE=3;2;6&NE1=3;1;6&NE2=3;1;6&NE3=3;1;6)
State by State average approval rating of President Campbell on January 20, 1994.

In his State of the Union on January 26, 1994, President Campbell lauds Congress for passing his economic program, and proudly says that unemployment in down by 1.2% from when he took office.

On March 1, 1994, Justice Samuel James Ervin III dies of a stroke in his office.  To replace him, President Campbell nominates Judge Antonin Scalia of the DC Court of Appeals.  Scalia’s nomination, though, is met with controversy.  His past writings are used against him by liberal Democrats, and the Judiciary Committee narrowly votes 13-12 to advance his nomination to the full Senate, where Senator Kennedy leads the charge against him.  However, Scalia’s qualifications are ultimately enough to pull away some conservative Democrats, and on May 12, by a vote of 52-45, Scalia is confirmed.

On June 2, Campbell meets for the first time with the new British Prime Minister, Norman Lamont.  Lamont, elected to replace Thatcher after the Conservatives won a reduced majority in the September 27, 1993 elections, promises to work closely with the United States on domestic and international issues.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=3;9;6&AK=3;3;5&AZ=3;10;5&AR=3;6;5&CA=3;55;5&CO=3;9;5&CT=1;7;5&DE=3;3;5&DC=0;3;9&FL=3;27;5&GA=3;15;5&HI=1;4;5&ID=3;4;6&IL=1;21;5&IN=3;11;5&IA=3;7;5&KS=3;6;6&KY=3;8;6&LA=3;9;5&MD=3;10;5&MA=1;12;6&MI=3;17;5&MN=1;10;5&MS=3;6;5&MO=3;11;5&MT=3;3;5&NV=3;5;6&NH=3;4;5&NJ=3;15;5&NM=3;5;5&NY=1;31;5&NC=3;15;6&ND=3;3;5&OH=3;20;5&OK=3;7;6&OR=3;7;5&PA=3;21;5&RI=1;4;6&SC=3;8;7&SD=3;3;6&TN=3;11;6&TX=3;34;6&UT=3;5;7&VT=1;3;5&VA=3;13;5&WA=3;11;5&WV=3;5;5&WI=3;10;5&WY=3;3;6&ME=1;2;5&ME1=1;1;6&ME2=1;1;5&NE=3;2;6&NE1=3;1;6&NE2=3;1;4&NE3=3;1;6)
State by State average approval rating of President Campbell on Election Day, 1994.

The Congressional Elections

As election day 1994 comes close, everything is set for a Republican landslide.  President Campbell’s approval ratings stands nationally at 61%, and the GOP has outspent the Democrats in nearly every race.  On election day, the predictions come true; the GOP makes major gains in both Houses.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=0;3;5&AZ=2;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=2;55;3&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;3&DE=1;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=2;27;9&GA=0;15;5&HI=1;4;3&ID=0;4;6&IL=0;21;6&IN=2;11;3&IA=0;7;5&KS=0;6;5&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;3&MA=1;12;3&MI=2;17;9&MN=2;10;9&MS=2;6;3&MO=2;11;3&MT=2;3;3&NV=2;5;9&NH=0;4;5&NJ=2;15;9&NM=1;5;3&NY=1;31;3&NC=0;15;4&ND=1;3;3&OH=2;20;9&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;21;3&RI=2;4;3&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=2;11;9&TX=1;34;3&UT=2;5;3&VT=2;3;3&VA=1;13;3&WA=2;11;3&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;9&ME1=2;1;9&ME2=2;1;9&NE=1;2;3&NE1=1;1;3&NE2=1;1;3&NE3=1;1;3)
Democrats: 51 (-8)
Republicans: 49 (+8)


House Results
Democrats: 241 (-30)
Republicans: 193 (+30)
Independents: 1 (-)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 07, 2010, 08:59:06 pm
Ask and Ye shall Recieve...Wow, it is good to see this old bird back up again, and a fairly successfull Campbell Presidency so far; besides the Clintonian Budget issues. Im suprised to see that Terrorisim and Genocide both domestic and foriegn hasn't been a problem for the adminstration(If the WTC attacks and Rwandan Genocide) still hapens ITTL. I can't see Campbell's Undocrtinate Conservativism leading to a Idealist foriegn policy as the Kissingerian Realpolitik still probably being the rule of reason in the GOP.

On the 1996 election, former Vice President "Say it isn't so Joe" Biden will probably have the nomination wrapped up do to his Proto-Baby Boomer youthfulness, Years of Expeirence and appeal amonst White Working Class Ethnics in the Rust Belt(Which Campbell seems to be struggling with). He'll probably go for a history making VP pick as well so maybe former Governor Douglas Wilder of Virgina, Governor Ann Richards of Texas(Does she win ITTL), Senator Dianne Feinstein of California or Congressman Ron Dellums...Keep it comming(I just hope we dont have to wait another three months for another update lol


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 07, 2010, 10:04:18 pm
Mark Warner

As you can see, he was elected Governor of Virginia in an upset in 1993, after a few years as a very successful businessman.

Mitt Romney

Mitt decided to challenge John F. Kennedy Jr. for the Governorship of Massachusetts in 1994, and was defeated, 57.5-42.5.

Tony Blair

He is currently the Leader of the Opposition in the British Parliament.

George W. Bush

He's the new Commissioner of the MLB, which had a very successful 1994 season.

Barack Obama

A young lawyer in Chicago, there are rumors he will run for Congress in 1996.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 08, 2010, 07:52:31 am
Ok...Here are my Where are they Now Requests... Bill Clinton, Ann Richards, Douglas Wilder, Hillary Rodham, former President John F. Kennedy, former President John Tower, former President Mark Hatfield, former President Lawton Chiles, Vicente Fox, and Jesse Jackson.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on February 08, 2010, 10:38:41 am
As you can see, he was elected Governor of Virginia in an upset in 1993, after a few years as a very successful businessman.

I knew it ::)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on February 08, 2010, 10:40:20 am
As you can see, he was elected Governor of Virginia in an upset in 1993, after a few years as a very successful businessman.

I knew it ::)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 08, 2010, 11:55:27 am
As you can see, he was elected Governor of Virginia in an upset in 1993, after a few years as a very successful businessman.

I knew it ::)

Yeah :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on February 08, 2010, 11:59:20 am
As you can see, he was elected Governor of Virginia in an upset in 1993, after a few years as a very successful businessman.

I knew it ::)

Yeah :P

I guess I can allow you to hold this vice since your timelines are good anyway :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on February 08, 2010, 05:14:01 pm
YAY! IT'S BACK, AND ABOUT TIME TOO!

The approval rating maps are kind of weird, though.

Btw: since I have nothing to do, can I use your Senate maps to construct your ATL Senates?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 08, 2010, 06:29:14 pm
Btw: since I have nothing to do, can I use your Senate maps to construct your ATL Senates?

Please do!  That would be amazing :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on February 08, 2010, 09:36:28 pm
Hey Ben, are you going to cover my Where are they Know list?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 09, 2010, 03:30:58 pm
Bill Clinton

Clinton was elected Governor of Arkansas in 1978, defeated in 1980, but reelected in 1982, 1984, 1988, and 1992.  He is term limited, and will not be able to seek reelection in 1996.  There are rumors he will make a run for the Presidency.

Ann Richards

Elected Governor of Texas in 1990, she was defeated by Kay Bailey Hutchison, 56.9-43.1, in 1994.

Douglas Wilder

After serving as Governor of Virginia from 1990-1994, he attempted to run for Senate as an Independent against Chuck Robb in 1994, finishing 3rd, with 27%; Republican Oliver North got 35%, and Robb got 38%.

Hillary Rodham

She eventually graduated from Yale Law School, and became a premier lawyer in Chicago, Illinois.  She has never gotten involved with politics.

former President John F. Kennedy

After leaving office, he taught Government at Harvard until 1990, when he resigned to help his son run for Governor.  Since then, he has been an informal adviser to the Governor.

former President John Tower,

A Professor of International Relations at the University of Texas until his untimely death from a heart attack in 1983.

former President Mark Hatfield

He runs a foundation promoting education in inner-city areas.

former President Lawton Chiles

He is living quietly in Tallahassee, Florida, writing his memoirs.

Vicente Fox

In 1991, he was gunned down during his race for the governorship of Guanajuato by supporters of Ramón Aguirre Velázquez of the PRI.

Jesse Jackson.

He runs a Church in Chicago, Illinois, where he encourages followers to be active in the political arena; he himself eschews politics, though.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Hash on February 09, 2010, 05:45:11 pm
Fernando Collor de Mello
Luis Inacio Lula da Silva
Fernando Henrique Cardoso

Where be they now?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 09, 2010, 06:19:19 pm
Fernando Collor de Mello

He managed to beat the impeachment charges, and served out his term as President, being replaced by Fernando Henrique Cardoso.

Luis Inacio Lula da Silva

After a failed Presidential run in 1989, he was reelected to Congress in 1990, and ran for President in 1994, losing in the first round to Fernando Henrique Cardoso.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso

He was elected President in the first round in 1994, and currently enjoys great popularity in Brazil.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: James Rivington on February 09, 2010, 06:26:53 pm
Good job on keeping this old thing going for so long. I've tried my hand at a couple of TL's at the Alternative History Board, all of whom I lost relative interest for in a matter of weeks.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 09, 2010, 06:29:56 pm
Good job on keeping this old thing going for so long. I've tried my hand at a couple of TL's at the Alternative History Board, all of whom I lost relative interest for in a matter of weeks.

Thanks; as you can see, I also lose the ability to keep it going for long periods of time, but I always come back to it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on February 13, 2010, 09:07:29 am
Right. Of course, I said I'd have nothing to do, so I've been busy all week. Here are the 1964 & 1966 Senate elections, JFK Lives.

1964 Senate Elections (64-36 Democratic majority):
•   Arizona: Paul Fannin (R) retiring-replaces Barry Goldwater (R)
•   California: George Murphy (R) defeats Pierre Salinger (D)
•   Connecticut: Thomas Dodd (D) reelected
•   Delaware: John Williams (R) reelected
•   Florida: Spessard Holland (D) reelected
•   Hawaii: Hiram Fong (R) reelected
•   Indiana: Vance Hartke (D) reelected
•   Maine: Edmund Muskie (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Joseph Tydings (D) defeats James Glenn Beall (R)
•   Massachusetts: Edward Kennedy (D) reelected
•   Michigan: Philip Hart (D) reelected
•   Minnesota: Eugene McCarthy (D) reelected
•   Mississippi: John Stennis (D) reelected
•   Missouri: Stuart Symington (D) reelected
•   Montana: Mike Mansfield (D) reelected
•   Nebraska: Roman Hruska (R) reelected
   Nevada: Paul Laxalt (R) defeats Howard Cannon (D)
•   New Jersey: Harrison Williams, Jr. (D) reelected
•   New Mexico: Joseph Montoya (D) defeats Edwin Mechem (R)
•   New York: Kenneth Keating (R) reelected
•   North Dakota: Quentin Burdick (D) reelected
•   Ohio: Stephen Young (D) reelected
•   Oklahoma: Fred Harris (D) retiring-replaces Howard Edmondson (D)
•   Pennsylvania: Hugh Scott (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: John Pastore (D) reelected
•   Tennessee: Albert Gore, Sr. (D) reelected
•   Tennessee: Ross Bass (D) retiring-replaces Herbert Walters (D)
•   Texas: Ralph Yarborough (D) reelected
•   Utah: Frank Moss (D) reelected
•   Vermont: Winston Prouty (R) reelected
•   Virginia: Harry Byrd (D) reelected
•   Washington: Henry Jackson (D) reelected
•   West Virginia: Robert Byrd (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: William Proxmire (D) reelected
•   Wyoming: Gale McGee (D) reelected

Afterwards (63-37 Democratic majority):
•   Florida: Leroy Collins (D) retiring-replaces George Smathers (D)
•   Michigan: Robert Griffin (R) retiring-replaces Patrick McNamara (D)
•   South Carolina: Donald Russell (D) retiring-replaces Olin Johnston (D)
•   Virginia: Harry Byrd, Jr. (D) retiring-replaces Harry Byrd (D)

1966 Senate Elections (59-41 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: John Sparkman (D) reelected
•   Alaska: Bob Bartlett (D) reelected
•   Arkansas: John Little McClellan (D) reelected
•   Colorado: Gordon Allott (R) reelected
•   Delaware: Caleb Boggs (R) reelected
•   Florida: Leroy Collins (D) reelected
•   Georgia: Richard Russell, Jr. (D) reelected
•   Idaho: Leonard Jordan (R) reelected
•   Illinois: Charles Percy (R) defeats Paul Douglas (D)
•   Iowa: Jack Miller (R) reelected
•   Kansas: James Pearson (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: John Sherman Cooper (R) reelected
•   Louisiana: Allen Ellender (D) reelected
•   Maine: Margaret Chase Smith (R) reelected
•   Massachusetts: Edward Brooke (R) retiring-replaces Leverett Saltonstall (R)
•   Michigan: Robert Griffin (R) reelected
•   Minnesota: Hubert Humphrey (D) reelected
•   Mississippi: James Eastland (D) reelected
•   Montana: Tim Babcock (R) defeats Lee Metcalf (D)
•   Nebraska: Carl Curtis (R) reelected
•   New Hampshire: Thomas McIntyre (D) reelected
•   New Jersey: Clifford Case (R) reelected
•   New Mexico: Clinton Presba Anderson (D) reelected
•   North Carolina: Everett Jordan (D) reelected
•   Oklahoma: Fred Harris (D) reelected
•   Oregon: Mark Hatfield (R) retiring-replaces Maurine Brown Neuberger (D)
•   Rhode Island: Claiborne Pell (D) reelected
•   South Carolina: Strom Thurmond (R) reelected
•   South Carolina: Ernest Hollings (D) retiring-replaces Donald Russell (D)
•   South Dakota: Karl Earl Mundt (R) reelected
•   Tennessee: Howard Baker (R) defeats Ross Bass (D)
•   Texas: John Tower (R) reelected
•   Virginia: Harry Byrd, Jr. (D) reelected
•   Virginia: William Spong, Jr. (D) retiring-replaces Absalom Willis Robertson (D)
•   West Virginia: Jennings Randolph (D) reelected
•   Wyoming: Clifford Hansen (R) retiring-replaces Milward Simpson (R)

Afterwards (58-42 Democratic majority):
•   Alaska: Theodore Stevens (R) retiring-replaces Bob Bartlett (D)


I'll have the next couple of ones posted later today, hopefully.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 14, 2010, 11:21:03 am
This is very impressive, Vosem; please keep it up :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on February 14, 2010, 12:26:09 pm
This is very impressive, Vosem; please keep it up :)

Ask and ye shall receive.

1968 Senate Elections (51-49 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: James Allen (D) retiring-replaces Lister Hill (D)
•   Alaska: Mike Gravel (D) defeats Ernest Gruening (ID)
•   Arizona: Barry Goldwater (R) retiring-replaces Carl Hayden (D)
•   Arkansas: William Fulbright (D) reelected
•   California: Max Rafferty (R) retiring-replaces Thomas Kuchel (R)
•   Colorado: Peter Dominick (R) reelected
•   Connecticut: Abraham Ribicoff (D) reelected
•   Florida: Leroy Collins (D) reelected
•   Georgia: Herman Talmadge (D) reelected
•   Idaho: Frank Church (D) reelected
•   Illinois: Everett Dirksen (R) reelected
•   Indiana: William Ruckelshaus (R) defeats Birch Bayh (D)
•   Iowa: Harold Hughes (D) retiring-replaces Bourke Hickenlooper (R)
•   Kansas: Bob Dole (R) retiring-replaces Frank Carlson (R)
•   Kentucky: Marlow Cook (R) retiring-replaces Thruston Ballard Morton (R)
•   Louisiana: Russell Long (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Charles Mathias, Jr. (R) defeats Daniel Brewster (D)
•   Missouri: Thomas Curtis (R) retiring-replaces Edward Long (D)

•   Nevada: Alan Bible (D) reelected
•   New Hampshire: Norris Cotton (R) reelected
•   New York: Jacob Javits (R) reelected
•   North Carolina: Sam Ervin (D) reelected
•   North Dakota: Milton Young (R) reelected
•   Ohio: William Saxbe (R) retiring-replaces Frank Lausche (D)
•   Oklahoma: Henry Bellmon (R) defeats Mike Monroney (D)
•   Oregon: Bob Packwood (R) defeats Wayne Morse (D)
•   Pennsylvania: Richard Schweiker (R) defeats Joseph Clark (D)

•   South Carolina: Ernest Hollings (D) reelected
•   South Dakota: George McGovern (D) reelected
•   Utah: Wallace Bennett (D) reelected
•   Vermont: George Aiken (R) reelected
•   Washington: Warren Magnuson (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: Gaylord Nelson (D) reelected

Afterwards (51-49 Democratic majority):
•   Illinois: Ralph Tyler Smith (R) retiring-replaces Everett Dirksen (R)
•   Texas: Paul Eggers (R) retiring-replaces John Tower (R)

1970 Senate Elections (57-43 Democratic majority):
•   Alaska: Ted Stevens (R) reelected
•   Arizona: Paul Fannin (R) reelected
•   California: John Tunney (D) defeats George Murphy (R)
•   Connecticut: Joseph Duffey (D) defeats Thomas Dodd (ID)
•   Delaware: William Roth, Jr. (R) retiring-replaces John Williams (R)
•   Florida: Lawton Chiles (D) retiring-replaces Spessard Holland (D)
•   Hawaii: Cecil Heftel (D) defeats Hiram Fong (R)
•   Illinois: Adlai Stevenson III (D) defeats Ralph Tyler Smith (R)
•   Indiana: Vance Hartke (D) reelected
•   Maine: Edmund Muskie (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Joseph Tydings (D) reelected
•   Massachusetts: Ted Kennedy (D) reelected
•   Michigan: Philip Hart (D) reelected
•   Minnesota: Walter Mondale (D) retiring-replaces Eugene McCarthy (D)
•   Mississippi: John Stennis (D) reelected
•   Missouri: Stuart Symington (D) reelected
•   Montana: Mike Mansfield (D) reelected
•   Nebraska: Frank Morrison (D) defeats Roman Hruska (R)
•   Nevada: Grant Sawyer (D) defeats Paul Laxalt (R)
•   New Jersey: Harrison Williams (D) reelected
•   New Mexico: Joseph Montoya (D) reelected
•   New York: Richard Ottinger (D) defeats Kenneth Keating (R)
•   North Dakota: Quentin Burdick (D) reelected
•   Ohio: Howard Metzenbaum (D) retiring-replaces Stephen Young (D)
•   Pennsylvania: Hugh Scott (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: John Pastore (D) reelected
•   Tennessee: Al Gore, Sr. (D) reelected
•   Texas: Lloyd Bentsen (D) retiring-replaces Ralph Yarborough (D)
•   Utah: Frank Moss (D) reelected
•   Vermont: Winston Prouty (R) reelected
•   Virginia: Harry Byrd, Jr. (ID) reelected
•   Washington: Henry Jackson (D) reelected
•   West Virginia: Robert Byrd (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: William Proxmire (D) reelected
•   Wyoming: Gale McGee (D) reelected

Afterwards (57-43 Democratic majority):
•   Georgia: David Gambrell (D) retiring-replaces Richard Russell, Jr. (D)
•   Louisiana: Elaine Edwards (D) retiring-replaces Allen Ellender (D)
•   Vermont: Robert Stafford (R) retiring-replaces Winston Prouty (R)



Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Bo on February 14, 2010, 12:27:06 pm
Nice job


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on February 15, 2010, 08:41:33 am
1972 Senate Elections (64-36 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: John Sparkman (D) reelected
•   Alaska: Ted Stevens (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: John Little McClellan (D) reelected
•   Colorado: Floyd Haskell (D) defeats Gordon Allott (R)
•   Delaware: Joe Biden (D) defeats Caleb Boggs (R)
•   Georgia: Sam Nunn (D) retiring-replaces David Gambrell (D)
•   Idaho: James McClure (R) retiring-replaces Leonard Jordan (R)
•   Illinois: Charles Percy (R) reelected
•   Iowa: Dick Clark (D) defeats Jack Miller (R)
•   Kansas: James Pearson (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: Walter Huddleston (D) retiring-replaces John Sherman Cooper (R)
•   Louisiana: Bennett Johnston (D) retiring-replaces Elaine Edwards (D)
•   Maine: William Hathaway (D) defeats Margaret Chase Smith (R)
•   Massachusetts: Edward Brooke (R) reelected
•   Michigan: Robert Griffin (R) reelected
•   Minnesota: Wendell Anderson (D) retiring-replaces Hubert Humphrey (D)
•   Mississippi: James Eastland (D) reelected
•   Montana: John Melcher (D) defeats Tim Babcock (R)
•   Nebraska: Carl Curtis (R) reelected
•   New Hampshire: Thomas McIntyre (D) reelected
•   New Jersey: Clifford Case (R) reelected
•   New Mexico: Jack Daniels (D) retiring-replaces Clinton Presba Anderson (D)
•   North Carolina: Jesse Helms (R) retiring-replaces Everett Jordan (D)
•   Oklahoma: Ed Edmondson (D) retiring-replaces Fred Harris (D)
•   Oregon: Mark Hatfield (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: Claiborne Pell (D) reelected
•   South Carolina: Strom Thurmond (R) reelected
•   South Dakota: James Abourezk (D) retiring-replaces Karl Earl Mundt (R)
•   Tennessee: Howard Baker (R) reelected
•   Texas: Barefoot Sanders (D) defeats Paul Eggers (R)
•   Vermont: Robert Stafford (R) reelected
•   Virginia: William Spong, Jr. (D) reelected
•   West Virginia: Jennings Randolph (D) reelected
•   Wyoming: Clifford Hansen (R) reelected

Afterwards (64-36 Democratic majority):
•   Maine: George Mitchell (D) retiring-replaces Edmund Muskie (D)

1974 Senate Elections (71-29 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: James Allen (D) reelected
•   Alaska: Mike Gravel (D) reelected
•   Arkansas: Dale Bumpers (D) reelected
•   California: Max Rafferty (R) reelected
•   Colorado: Gary Hart (D) defeats Peter Dominick (R)
•   Connecticut: Abraham Ribicoff (D) reelected
•   Florida: Leroy Collins (D) reelected
•   Georgia: Herman Talmadge (D) reelected
•   Hawaii: Daniel Inouye (D) reelected
•   Idaho: Frank Church (D) reelected
•   Illinois: Adlai Stevenson III (D) reelected
•   Indiana: William Ruckelshaus (R) reelected
•   Iowa: John Culver (D) retiring-replaces Harold Hughes (D)
•   Kansas: Bob Dole (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: Wendell Ford (D) defeats Marlow Cook (R)
•   Louisiana: Russell Long (D) reelected
•   Maine: George Mitchell (D) reelected
•   Missouri: Joseph Teasdale (D) defeats Thomas Curtis (R)
•   Nevada: Harry Reid (D) retiring-replaces Alan Bible (D)
•   New Hampshire: John Durkin (D) retiring-replaces Norris Cotton (R)
•   New York: Jacob Javits (R) reelected
•   North Carolina: Robert Burren Morgan (D) retiring-replaces Sam Ervin (D)
•   North Dakota: William Guy (D) defeats Milton Young (R)
•   Ohio: John Glenn (D) defeats William Saxbe (R)
•   Oklahoma: Henry Bellmon (R) reelected
•   Oregon: Bob Packwood (R) reelected
•   Pennsylvania: Richard Schweiker (R) reelected
•   South Carolina: Ernest Hollings (D) reelected
•   South Dakota: George McGovern (D) reelected
•   Utah: Jake Garn (R) retiring-replaces Wallace Bennett (R)
•   Vermont: Patrick Leahy (D) retiring-replaces George Aiken (R)
•   Washington: Warren Magnuson (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: Gaylord Nelson (D) reelected

Afterwards (71-29 Democratic majority):
No changes


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on February 15, 2010, 08:44:43 am
1976 Senate Elections (71-29 Democratic majority):
•   Arizona: Sam Steiger (R) retiring-replaces Paul Fannin (R)
•   California: John Tunney (D) reelected
•   Connecticut: Joseph Duffey (D) reelected
•   Delaware: William Roth, Jr. (R) reelected
•   Florida: Lawton Chiles (D) reelected
•   Hawaii: Cecil Heftel (D) reelected
•   Indiana: Vance Hartke (D) reelected
•   Maine: George Mitchell (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Paul Sarbanes (D) retiring-replaces Joseph Tydings (D)
•   Massachusetts: Ted Kennedy (D) reelected
•   Michigan: Donald Riegle, Jr. (D) retiring-replaces Philip Hart (D)
•   Minnesota: Walter Mondale (D) reelected
•   Mississippi: John Stennis (D) reelected
•   Missouri: John Danforth (R) retiring-replaces Stuart Symington (D)
•   Montana: Max Baucus (D) retiring-replaces Mike Mansfield (D)
•   Nebraska: Frank Morrison (D) reelected
•   Nevada: Grant Sawyer (D) reelected
•   New Jersey: Harrison Williams (D) reelected
•   New Mexico: Joseph Montoya (D) reelected
•   New York: Richard Ottinger (D) reelected
•   North Dakota: Quentin Burdick (D) reelected
•   Ohio: Howard Metzenbaum (D) reelected
•   Pennsylvania: William Green III (D) retiring-replaces Hugh Scott (R)
•   Rhode Island: Philip Noel (D) retiring-replaces John Pastore (D)
•   Tennessee: Jim Sasser (D) retiring-replaces Al Gore, Sr. (D)
•   Texas: Lloyd Bentsen (D) reelected
•   Utah: Orrin Hatch (R) defeats Frank Moss (D)
•   Vermont: Thomas Salmon (D) defeats Robert Stafford (R)
•   Virginia: Harry Byrd, Jr. (ID) reelected
•   Washington: Henry Jackson (D) reelected
•   West Virginia: Robert Byrd (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: William Proxmire (D) reelected
•   Wyoming: Gale McGee (D) reelected

Afterwards (71-29 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: Maryon Pittman Allen (D) retiring-replaces James Allen (D)
•   Arkansas: Kaneaster Hodges, Jr. (D) retiring-replaces John McClellan (D)
•   Idaho: Cecil Andrus (D) retiring-replaces Frank Church (D)
•   New Mexico: Jeff Bingaman (D) retiring-replaces Joseph Montoya (D)

1978 Senate Elections (63-37 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: Howell Heflin (D) retiring-replaces John Sparkman (D)
•   Alabama: Donald Stewart (D) retiring-replaces Maryon Pittman Allen (D)
•   Alaska: Ted Stevens (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: David Pryor (D) retiring-replaces Kaneaster Hodges, Jr. (D)
•   Colorado: William Armstrong (R) defeats Floyd Haskell (D)
•   Delaware: Joe Biden (D) reelected
•   Georgia: Sam Nunn (D) reelected
•   Idaho: James McClure (R) reelected
•   Idaho: Cecil Andrus (D) reelected
•   Illinois: Charles Percy (R) reelected
•   Iowa: Roger Jepsen (R) defeats Dick Clark (D)
•   Kansas: Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R) retiring-replaces James Pearson (R)
•   Kentucky: Walter Huddleston (D) reelected
•   Louisiana: Bennett Johnston, Jr. (D) reelected
•   Maine: William Cohen (R) defeats William Hathaway (D)
•   Massachusetts: Edward Brooke (R) reelected
•   Michigan: Robert Griffin (R) reelected
•   Minnesota: Rudy Boschwitz (R) defeats Wendell Anderson (D)
•   Mississippi: Thad Cochran (R) retiring-replaces James Eastland (D)
•   Montana: Stan Stephens (R) defeats John Melcher (D)

•   Nebraska: Edward Zorinsky (D) retiring-replaces Carl Curtis (R)
•   New Hampshire: Gordon Humphrey (R) defeats Thomas McIntyre (D)
•   New Jersey: Bill Bradley (D) retiring-replaces Clifford Case (R)
•   New Mexico: Joe Skeen (R) defeats Jack Daniels (D)
•   New Mexico: Jeff Bingaman (D) reelected
•   North Carolina: Jesse Helms (R) reelected
•   Oklahoma: Ed Edmondson (D) reelected
•   Oregon: Mark Hatfield (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: Claiborne Pell (D) reelected
•   South Carolina: Strom Thurmond (R) reelected
•   South Dakota: Lars Herseth (D) retiring-replaces James Abourezk (D)
•   Tennessee: Howard Baker (R) reelected
•   Texas: Barefoot Sanders (D) reelected
•   Virginia: John Warner (R) defeats William Spong, Jr. (D)
•   West Virginia: Arch Moore, Jr. (R) defeats Jennings Randolph (D)

•   Wyoming: Alan Simpson (R) retiring-replaces Clifford Hansen (R)

Afterwards (63-37 Democratic majority):
No change


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on February 15, 2010, 08:47:55 am
1980 Senate Elections (52-48 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: Jeremiah Denton (R) retiring-replaces Donald Stewart (D)
•   Alaska: Frank Murkowski (R) retiring-replaces Mike Gravel (D)

•   Arizona: Barry Goldwater (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: Dale Bumpers (D) reelected
•   California: Ed Davis (R) retiring-replaces Max Rafferty (R)
•   Colorado: Gary Hart (D) reelected
•   Connecticut: Chris Dodd (D) retiring-replaces Abraham Ribicoff (D)
•   Florida: Paula Hawkins (R) retiring-replaces Leroy Collins (D)
•   Georgia: Mack Mattingly (R) retiring-replaces Herman Talmadge (D)

•   Hawaii: Daniel Inouye (D) reelected
•   Idaho: Steve Symms (R) defeats Cecil Andrus (D)
•   Illinois: Alan Dixon (D) retiring-replaces Adlai Stevenson III (D)
•   Indiana: William Ruckelshaus (R) reelected
•   Iowa: Chuck Grassley (R) defeats John Culver (D)
•   Kansas: Bob Dole (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: Wendell Ford (D) reelected
•   Louisiana: Russell Long (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Barbara Mikulski (D) defeats Charles Mathias, Jr. (R)
•   Missouri: Joseph Teasdale (D) reelected
•   Nevada: Chic Hecht (R) defeats Harry Reid (D)
•   New Hampshire: Warren Rudman (R) defeats John Durkin (D)

•   New York: Al d’Amato (R) defeats Jacob Javits (IR)
•   North Carolina: John Porter East (R) defeats Robert Burren Morgan (D)
•   North Dakota: Mark Andrews (R) defeats William Guy (D)

•   Ohio: John Glenn (D) reelected
•   Oklahoma: Don Nickles (R) retiring-replaces Henry Bellmon (R)
•   Oregon: Bob Packwood (R) reelected
•   Pennsylvania: Arlen Specter (R) retiring-replaces Richard Schweiker (R)
•   South Carolina: Ernest Hollings (D) reelected
•   South Dakota: James Abdnor (R) defeats George McGovern (D)
•   Utah: Jake Garn (R) reelected
•   Vermont: Patrick Leahy (D) reelected
•   Washington: Warren Magnuson (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: Bob Kasten (R) defeats Gaylord Nelson (D)

Afterwards (51-49 Democratic majority):
•   Illinois: Dave O’Neal (R) retiring-replaces Charles Percy (R)
•   New Jersey: Nicholas Brady (R) retiring-replaces Harrison Williams (D)
•   Oregon: Norma Paulus (R) retiring-replaces Mark Hatfield (R)

1982 Senate Elections (56-44 Republican majority):
•   Arizona: Sam Steiger (R) reelected
•   California: Pete Wilson (R) defeats John Tunney (D)
•   Connecticut: James Buckley (R) defeats Joseph Duffey (D)

•   Delaware: William Roth, Jr. (R) reelected
•   Florida: Lawton Chiles (D) reelected
•   Hawaii: Cecil Heftel (D) reelected
•   Illinois: Dave O’Neal (R) reelected
•   Indiana: Dan Quayle (R) defeats Vance Hartke (D)
•   Maine: George Mitchell (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Paul Sarbanes (D) reelected
•   Massachusetts: Ted Kennedy (D) reelected
•   Michigan: Donald Riegle, Jr. (D) reelected
•   Minnesota: Walter Mondale (D) reelected
•   Mississippi: John Stennis (D) reelected
•   Missouri: John Danforth (R) reelected
•   Montana: Max Baucus (D) reelected
•   Nebraska: Frank Morrison (D) reelected
•   Nevada: Paul Laxalt (R) defeats Grant Sawyer (D)
•   New Jersey: Frank Lautenberg (D) retiring-replaces Nicholas Brady (R)
•   New Mexico: Jeff Bingaman (D) reelected
•   New York: Richard Ottinger (D) reelected
•   North Dakota: Quentin Burdick (D) reelected
•   Ohio: Howard Metzenbaum (D) reelected
•   Oregon: Norma Paulus (R) reelected
•   Pennsylvania: William Scranton III (R) defeats William Green III (D)
•   Rhode Island: Lincoln Almond (R) defeats Philip Noel (D)

•   Tennessee: Jim Sasser (D) reelected
•   Texas: Lloyd Bentsen (D) reelected
•   Utah: Orrin Hatch (R) reelected
•   Vermont: Richard Snelling (R) defeats Thomas Salmon (D)
•   Virginia: Paul Trible, Jr. (R) retiring-replaces Harry Byrd, Jr. (ID)

•   Washington: Henry Jackson (D) reelected
•   West Virginia: Robert Byrd (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: William Proxmire (D) reelected
•   Wyoming: Malcolm Wallop (R) reelected

Afterwards (57-43 Republican majority):
•   Washington: Daniel Evans (R) retiring-replaces Henry Jackson (D)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on February 24, 2010, 09:19:24 pm
Bump.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on February 26, 2010, 01:34:20 pm
Excellent! :) Very interesting!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on March 07, 2010, 01:41:18 pm
So when can we expect the next installment Ben?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 07, 2010, 03:23:53 pm
So when can we expect the next installment Ben?

No clue.  Probably when I go on spring break, which starts March 27.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: paul718 on March 29, 2010, 08:53:44 pm
Good stuff, Benjamin.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 02, 2010, 11:10:42 pm
In a speech to the United Nations on January 11, 1995, President Campbell calls for an end to apartheid in South Africa.  “As President of the freest nation on Earth, it is my duty to speak out against oppression worldwide.  I call upon every other free nation of the world to join me in ceasing to trade, or even to cooperate, with South Africa until it ends it heinous abuses of human rights.”  The international response is very positive; British Prime Minister Lamont lauds Campbell for “standing up for human rights; I will happily join him in his crusade.”  Every country of Western Europe signs a document urging South Africa to end apartheid.  They then follow up by, individually, placing severe sanctions on South Africa, to the point that only the USSR and Eastern Europe remain trading partners of any significance with South Africa.

On February 5, 1995, South African President PW Botha dies of a stroke, and is replaced by F.W. de Klerk.  De Klerk acts swiftly, releasing Mandela from prison on February 10.  On February 26, after intense negotiations midwifed by President Campbell, Namibia becomes an independent state.  On March 12, an all white electorate approves, by a vote of 62-38, de Klerk’s decision to negotiate an end to apartheid.  On April 17, de Klerk announces that, on January 1, 1996, South Africa will hold an election with universal suffrage, ending apartheid.

On March 14, Congress begins debate on the Line Item Veto Act of 1995.  Written by Senator John McCain (R-AZ) the act would allow the President to nullify or cancel specific provisions of a bill without vetoing the entire legislative package, and then subject it to the possibility of legislative override.  Strongly supported by conservatives of both parties, the act faced a filibuster from Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV), who threatened to sue if the legislation passed.  On June 5, by a vote of 71-29, the Senate passed cloture, ending Byrd’s filibuster, and on June 15, passed the bill 53-43.

In the House, the legislation faces less opposition.  Congressman Ron Paul (R-TX-14) calls the bill “the best way possible to eliminate pork barrel spending.”  Congressman Owen Pickett (D-VA-02) calls the bill “a necessary power for the President, in order to ensure financial stability.”  The bill passes on September 3, 1995, by a vote of 332-103, and is signed by the President on September 5.

On September 24, Senator Byrd sues, but is dismissed as lacking standing.  On December 8, President Campbell vetoes a provision of an appropriations bill, and the next day, Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D-MA) of Boston sues, and, due to provision in the bill, it goes straight to the Supreme Court, with oral arguments being held on December 14.

From January 1-January 4, 1996, elections are held in South Africa.  The African National Parliament captures 252 of 400 seats, less than necessary to alter the Constitution.  On January 12, Nelson Mandela is sworn in as the new President of South Africa, with Thabo Mbeki and Frederik Willem de Klerk as deputy presidents.

On February 24, the Supreme Court rules 5-4 that the Line Item Veto Act does not violate the Constitution.  The majority opinion, written by Chief Justice Arnold and joined by Aldrich, Robinson, Jolly, and Scalia, says the act, “does not violate any specific textual constitutional command, nor does it violate any implicit Separation of Powers principle.”  The dissent, written by Justice Bayh and joined by the other three dissenters, argued that the bill “usurps the basic power of the purse, and is an unconstitutional delegation of power to the President.”  President Campbell hails the decision, but all the leading contenders for the Democratic nomination condemn it, setting up a major issue for the 1996 election.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on April 02, 2010, 11:45:32 pm
Finally...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on April 03, 2010, 07:58:14 am
Nice to see this old bird flying again...I like these "last two years" of the term posts, because it means with you Ben that an Election Post is coming soon afterward. I like the idea of using the debate over the line-Item veto as one of the major issues of the campaign(Cuz I see at as a huge expansion of Executory power, making an already Imperial Presidency more powerful). I wonder who your democratic candidates will be?I assume that fomer Vice President Biden will be the frontrunner...But I assume that other cnaidates might run against him, as he is a walking gaffe machine? Maybe Douglas Wilder or Ann Richards? Keep it comming.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 03, 2010, 02:00:51 pm
The Democratic Nomination

On June 3, 1995, former Vice President Joe Biden becomes the first Democrat to announce for the 1996 nomination, claiming experience and electability.  On August 8, Senator David Pryor of Arkansas announces his retirement from the Senate, and his intention to seek the Democratic nomination.  August 23 see Governor Bob Casey of Pennsylvania declare, and on October 1, Congressman Bob Wise of West Virginia becomes the last Democrat to declare for the nomination.

In the months leading up to Iowa, the line item veto becomes the major issue, with every candidate making a stand against it; Senator Pryor joins Senator Byrd in conducting a weeks long filibuster, voting against cloture and final passage, as does Congressman Wise.  Vice President Biden calls it, “A gross expansion of federal power,” and while Governor Casey criticizes it, he is attacked for using a line item veto as Governor of Pennsylvania.

On the night of the Iowa Caucus, Vice President Biden wins 39% of the vote; Senator Pryor wins 33%, Congressman Wise wins 16%, and Governor Casey wins 12%.  New Hampshire sees Vice President Biden win 50%, Governor Casey 24%, Senator Pryor 15%, and Congressman Wise 11%.

Following New Hampshire, the candidates spread out prior to Super Tuesday, with primaries being held in Alabama (Pryor), Arkansas (Pryor), Colorado (Biden), Delaware (Biden), Hawaii (Biden), Michigan (Casey), New York (Biden), Utah (Biden), and West Virginia (Wise).  Following the primaries, Wise drops out, and endorses Biden.  In a March 9 interview with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Governor Casey criticizes the people opposed to the line item veto, calling it, “Actually a good idea, in theory.”  This prompts Biden to call Casey, “A shill for the imperial Presidency,” and it hurts Casey in the Georgia primary held two days later, gathering just 21%; Biden receives 41%, and Pryor gets 38%.

A week after Georgia, primaries are held in California and Texas; Biden wins California, and Pryor wins Texas.  Casey then drops out of the race, and endorses Biden.  Facing a severe deficit in both cash and delegates, Pryor drops out and endorses Biden.

At the Democratic Convention held in Philadelphia, Biden selects Senator Barbara Mikulski of Maryland as his running mate, making her the first female on a major party ticket.  They pledge to, “Make the Government responsible to the People, not just some runaway Empire.”

The Republican Nomination

President Campbell enters the race for the nomination unopposed, and enjoying high approval ratings.  At the Convention, he and Vice President Quayle are re-nominated unanimously, and Campbell boasts of the achievements of the past four years, especially the line item veto, which he calls, “A significant step in reducing the deficit, and making Congress accountable.”

The General Election

The general election begins with Campbell enjoying a 45-40-15 lead over Biden.  The first debate, held on September 16, focuses on the economy, with Campbell touting low unemployment, and Biden criticizing the spending cuts made by Campbell, in addition to the line item veto.

In early October, Biden releases a series of ads attacking Campbell for supporting programs that help the rich at the expense of the poor, and he says offhand that Campbell, “Is so far up the asses of big business that they [big business] can taste his shampoo.”  The gaffe provokes outrage, and Biden plummets from 46% in the polls, down just two, to trailing 48-40-12.

In the second debate, Biden tries to attack Campbell for supporting regimes that commit human rights abuses, but Campbell responds with his cutting off of ties to South Africa, and the forcing of change there, and Biden is stymied.

By the end of October, the race appears over; Campbell leads 50-42-8, and all of Biden’s attempts to attack Campbell have failed.  In the third debate, held on October 24, Campbell asks the simple question, “Are you better off today than you were four years ago?”  The voters respond in one direction, overwhelmingly, and Campbell is reelected.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=1996&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;9;6&AK=2;3;6&AZ=2;8;6&AR=2;6;6&CA=2;54;5&CO=2;8;5&CT=2;8;5&DE=1;3;5&DC=1;3;8&FL=2;25;6&GA=2;13;6&HI=1;4;5&ID=2;4;7&IL=2;22;5&IN=2;12;6&IA=2;7;5&KS=2;6;6&KY=2;8;5&LA=2;9;6&MD=1;10;5&MA=1;12;5&MI=2;18;5&MN=1;10;5&MS=2;7;6&MO=2;11;5&MT=2;3;6&NV=2;4;6&NH=2;4;5&NJ=2;15;5&NM=2;5;5&NY=1;33;5&NC=2;14;6&ND=2;3;6&OH=2;21;5&OK=2;8;6&OR=2;7;5&PA=2;23;5&RI=1;4;5&SC=2;8;7&SD=2;3;7&TN=2;11;6&TX=2;32;6&UT=2;5;7&VT=1;3;5&VA=2;13;6&WA=2;11;5&WV=2;5;5&WI=2;11;5&WY=2;3;7&ME=2;2;5&ME1=2;1;5&ME2=2;1;5&NE=2;2;6&NE1=2;1;5&NE2=2;1;5&NE3=2;1;7)
Carroll A. Campbell/Dan Quayle: 56.2% PV, 452 EV
Joe Biden/Barbara Mikluski: 42.7% PV, 82 EV
Others: 1.1% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

The Campbell Presidential landslide brings major Congressional gains for the GOP, as they retake the Senate for the first time since 1987, and the House for the first time since 1955.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=2;9;9&AK=2;3;3&AZ=0;10;5&AR=2;6;9&CA=0;55;6&CO=2;9;3&CT=0;7;6&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=0;27;5&GA=2;15;9&HI=0;4;7&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;21;3&IN=0;11;4&IA=1;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;9&LA=1;9;3&MD=0;10;6&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=2;6;3&MO=0;11;4&MT=1;3;3&NV=0;5;5&NH=2;4;3&NJ=1;15;3&NM=2;5;3&NY=0;31;6&NC=1;15;3&ND=0;3;5&OH=0;20;5&OK=2;7;9&OR=2;7;3&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=2;8;3&SD=1;3;9&TN=1;11;3&TX=2;34;3&UT=0;5;6&VT=0;3;6&VA=2;13;3&WA=0;11;5&WV=1;5;3&WI=0;10;5&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;3&ME1=2;1;3&ME2=2;1;3&NE=2;2;9&NE1=2;1;9&NE2=2;1;9&NE3=2;1;9)
Republicans: 54 (+5)
Democrats: 46 (-5)


House Results
Republicans: 236 (+43)
Democrats: 198 (-43)
Independents: 1 (-)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on April 03, 2010, 02:03:37 pm
Excellent update! :D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 03, 2010, 11:43:01 pm
Excellent update! :D

Thanks, much appreciated :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on April 04, 2010, 12:16:43 am
Very good, solid update. I'm a bit curious why Biden chose Miluski, as it isn't geographically balanced. Still, interesting, and I'm looking forward to the rest of the Campbell presidency, and the 2000 Election.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on April 04, 2010, 07:41:12 am
Very good, solid update. I'm a bit curious why Biden chose Miluski, as it isn't geographically balanced. Still, interesting, and I'm looking forward to the rest of the Campbell presidency, and the 2000 Election.


Yeah, I was thinking the same, I think Senator Dianne Fienstein of California would've been a really strong pick puts atleast that puts the Pacific Coast into Play? Hey, Ben how close was Pennsylvannia with that being his home state in all? I really would have expected Joe to do better in his native rust belt...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 04, 2010, 09:40:26 am
Hey, Ben how close was Pennsylvannia with that being his home state in all? I really would have expected Joe to do better in his native rust belt...

Well, he won his home state of Delaware easily, 57-42, and lost Pennsylvania 50-48, so it was very close.  Biden really ran a terrible campaign; he was lucky to win what he did.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Barnes on April 04, 2010, 10:30:04 am
Great update! I'm looking forward to the end of the '90s, and the 2000 election! :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on May 03, 2010, 09:40:40 am
BUMP


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 05, 2010, 06:29:19 pm
I will eventually bring this back, but not until after the Extemp TOC, May 14-16.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Tuck! on May 05, 2010, 06:44:41 pm
Can't wait! :D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on May 05, 2010, 06:56:46 pm
I will eventually bring this back, but not until after the Extemp TOC, May 14-16.

YOU MADE TOC?! CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!! :D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 05, 2010, 09:06:18 pm
YOU MADE TOC?! CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!! :D

Thanks :)  I qualified by winning the State Championship.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on May 05, 2010, 09:08:05 pm
YOU MADE TOC?! CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!! :D

Thanks :)  I qualified by winning the State Championship.

Congratulations on that too! :D And good luck at the TOC!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 05, 2010, 09:09:49 pm
Congratulations on that too! :D And good luck at the TOC!

Thanks!  Once that's done, I'll get to work on this old thing.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 09, 2010, 05:05:50 pm
In the meantime, can you please tell me what each of the following people are doing? :)

Jim Webb
Tom Campbell
Rudy Giuliani
Al Franken
Clint Eastwood
Phil Hartman
Boris Yeltsin


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 09, 2010, 05:26:40 pm
Jim Webb

After serving in the military, he was Secretary of the Navy from 1982-1986, before being fired by President Hatfield.  He was Ambassador to Ireland from 1989-1992, when he resigned.  He is currently writing a history of the Irish in America.

Tom Campbell

He's been in the House since 1989, from California's 12th District.

Rudy Giuliani

He served in the Hatfield Justice Department, was Deputy Solicitor General 1983-1988, and was DA for NYC from 1988-1993, when he was elected Mayor.

Al Franken

He's exactly the same, except he sometimes hosts Weekend Update all by himself.

Clint Eastwood

Exactly the same.

Phil Hartman

Alive and well.

Boris Yeltsin

Mayor of Moscow from 1984-1991, he was Ambassador to the UN from 1991-1995, and has been the Soviet Foreign Minister since 1995.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 09, 2010, 05:30:16 pm
Is Phil Hartman married to Brynn Omdahl ITTL?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 09, 2010, 05:33:56 pm
Is Phil Hartman married to Brynn Omdahl ITTL?

Nope; married Jan Hooks.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 09, 2010, 05:35:29 pm
Is Phil Hartman married to Brynn Omdahl ITTL?

Nope; married Jan Hooks.

Excellent.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 09, 2010, 05:44:40 pm
Excellent.

Yes, yes it is.  This is my timeline, and I will not have one of my favorite actors murdered by a crazy wife.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on May 09, 2010, 05:47:45 pm
Since we're talking about favorite celebrities and crazy wives, did John Lennon ever meet Yoko? Is Lennon still alive?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 09, 2010, 06:01:35 pm
Since we're talking about favorite celebrities and crazy wives, did John Lennon ever meet Yoko? Is Lennon still alive?

Yes :( and Yes :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on May 09, 2010, 06:08:21 pm
Since we're talking about favorite celebrities and crazy wives, did John Lennon ever meet Yoko? Is Lennon still alive?

Yes :( and Yes :)

Awesome about him being alive! :) Have the Beatles ever reunited or at the very least played together since their breakup? 


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 09, 2010, 06:33:52 pm
Awesome about him being alive! :) Have the Beatles ever reunited or at the very least played together since their breakup? 

They've played a number of shows every few years; the last one was at Wimbledon in 1992.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Dancing with Myself on May 09, 2010, 06:44:16 pm
What about the James Bond series? Is the order of movies the same, and More importantly, did George Lazenby stay on longer?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 09, 2010, 06:47:58 pm
What about the James Bond series? Is the order of movies the same, and More importantly, did George Lazenby stay on longer?

James Bond has basically stayed the same.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 16, 2010, 09:36:28 pm
Another question...

Did Arnold Schwarzenegger marry Maria Shriver IITL? If so, what is his relationship with the Kennedy family, and being that he is a Republican, are they close?

Or is he a Republican at all? ;) 


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 17, 2010, 03:38:24 pm
Another question...

Did Arnold Schwarzenegger marry Maria Shriver IITL? If so, what is his relationship with the Kennedy family, and being that he is a Republican, are they close?

Or is he a Republican at all? ;) 

He's actually dead; he was killed during a robbery in 1976.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on May 17, 2010, 03:41:29 pm
Another question...

Did Arnold Schwarzenegger marry Maria Shriver IITL? If so, what is his relationship with the Kennedy family, and being that he is a Republican, are they close?

Or is he a Republican at all? ;) 

He's actually dead; he was killed during a robbery in 1976.

:( Who played the Terminator ITTL?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 17, 2010, 03:43:50 pm
:( Who played the Terminator ITTL?

(http://findlaydonnan.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/sylvester-stallone-as-rambo.jpg)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 17, 2010, 05:35:05 pm
:( Who played the Terminator ITTL?

(http://findlaydonnan.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/sylvester-stallone-as-rambo.jpg)

Great!

Hey Rocky you not human?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: HappyWarrior on May 17, 2010, 05:37:58 pm
:( Who played the Terminator ITTL?

(http://findlaydonnan.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/sylvester-stallone-as-rambo.jpg)

Yo he gonna run fa Governa of Calirfornia?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 20, 2010, 06:26:18 pm
Yo he gonna run fa Governa of Calirfornia?

Nope.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 20, 2010, 07:02:16 pm

Wha abou fa Senata from Calirfornia?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 20, 2010, 07:15:02 pm
He will never run for anything :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 20, 2010, 07:17:19 pm
:(

Anyways, looking forward to the next update...

May I ask what your next project will be?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 21, 2010, 02:45:32 pm
May I ask what your next project will be?

I haven't decided yet.  This timeline will run until the 2010 midterms in all likelihood, and I may then switch back to the TR TL, and run that until 2010 as well.  After that, I don't know.  I still have the French story on backburner, or I may just take some time off.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 21, 2010, 10:02:05 pm
May I ask what your next project will be?

I haven't decided yet.  This timeline will run until the 2010 midterms in all likelihood, and I may then switch back to the TR TL, and run that until 2010 as well.  After that, I don't know.  I still have the French story on backburner, or I may just take some time off.

That would be excellent.

I was hoping you'd mention the French story, too. :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 21, 2010, 10:58:11 pm
That would be excellent.

I was hoping you'd mention the French story, too. :)

It's a tougher project than I'd imagined, especially given the style I want it to be written in.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on May 21, 2010, 11:05:27 pm
That would be excellent.

I was hoping you'd mention the French story, too. :)

It's a tougher project than I'd imagined, especially given the style I want it to be written in.

Yes, that will take a great deal of time, thought, and effort.

Not to mention that it is especially hard to find documents not written from an American point of view.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 23, 2010, 11:24:40 am
Yes, that will take a great deal of time, thought, and effort.

Not to mention that it is especially hard to find documents not written from an American point of view.

Indeed; because I'm writing it as a mockumentary, I need to alter the style of writing to be more formal, more historical.  It's tough.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on May 23, 2010, 09:21:57 pm
Any update coming soon?
(1000th post!)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 27, 2010, 01:16:50 pm
Any update coming soon?

No idea; probably not for another month.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on May 27, 2010, 01:25:16 pm
Any update coming soon?

No idea; probably not for another month.

>:(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 27, 2010, 01:28:11 pm
>:(

Between school and debate, I just don't have any free time.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 06, 2010, 01:58:46 pm
In three weeks, there will be a new update.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on June 06, 2010, 01:59:41 pm
In three weeks, there will be a new update.

:D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 17, 2010, 08:28:44 pm
One week from today :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario) on June 17, 2010, 08:34:04 pm
One week from today :)

Yay! Can't wait!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on June 17, 2010, 09:23:02 pm


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Derek on June 17, 2010, 10:32:25 pm
Then Kennedy would've died soon anyways with the amount of pills he was on. That's the reason his face swelled up so much while he was in office. I asked my psychiatrist about this and he agreed.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 18, 2010, 12:59:38 pm
This was view 30,000 :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on June 18, 2010, 09:20:58 pm
Then Kennedy would've died soon anyways with the amount of pills he was on. That's the reason his face swelled up so much while he was in office. I asked my psychiatrist about this and he agreed.

actually his face swelled up because he used cortisone shots. He was actually far skinnier when he was younger, almost lethally. The cortisone helped save his political career and to some extent his life.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 23, 2010, 11:55:55 pm
(http://www.sciway.net/hist/governors/graphics/campbell.jpg)
The Second Term of Carroll Campbell

“As we enter the last four years of this century, I see an America that can handle any challenge, no matter how potent.  That, my friends, is the American spirit: the ability to conquer any foe, no matter who, or what, it may be.”  On that optimistic note, President Campbell enters the last four years of his Administration, facing approvals in the high 50’s, and, for the first time, a completely compliant Congress.

As his first act with the new Congress, Campbell propose the Welfare Reform Act of 1997.  The legislation, written by Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY) and Congressman Mark Sanford (R-SC), would require anyone on welfare after six months to face periodic reviews of their situation, as well as setting an overall limit on the amount of time a person could spend on welfare, without extenuating circumstances such as disability.

From the beginning, the WRA faces severe opposition.  Senator Edward M. Kennedy (D-MA) calls it, “An attempt to destroy America’s less fortunate, to leave them with no options besides a life of crime.”  Senator Paul Sarbanes (D-MD) decries it as, “A shameless cave-in to corporate interests and all those who have no regard for America’s poor.”

However, the Senate bill does attract a large number of conservative Democratic supporters.  Senator Ernest Hollings (D-SC) calls it, “A positive step towards truly reforming a broken health care system.”  Al Gore (D-TN) says, “This may not be perfect, but we need to reform welfare, and this bill is a start.”

Senate liberals then begin a lengthy filibuster which is not broken until June 24, by a vote of 60-40, exactly the margin needed to break the filibuster.  Every Republican except John Chafee of Rhode Island votes for cloture, and 7 Democrats (Richard Shelby of Alabama, Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, John Breaux and Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, Kent Conrad of North Dakota, Hollings, and Gore) break lines to vote in favor of it.  On July 27, by a vote of 57-43, the bill passes, and is sent to the House, though debate does not begin because of the August recess.

When the House reconvenes on September 2, debate begins – if it can be called debate.  The Rules Committee, now led by Republican Gerald B. H. Solomon of New York, moves debate along quickly, and the new Speaker, Newt Gingrich of Georgia, keeps Republicans in line.  On October 8, by a vote of 232-203, the bill passes, and on October 11, Campbell signs the reforms into law.  The next day, the New York Times front page bears the headline: “Campbell to welfare recipients: drop dead.”

On November 2, Soviet Premier Vitaly Fedorchuk dies after 10 years as Premier, at the age of 79.  He is replaced by Boris Yeltsin, the former Mayor of Moscow and Soviet Foreign Minister.  On November 19, Campbell travels to the Kremlin to meet with Yeltsin, and the two men promise a renewed era of cooperation between the Americans and the Soviets.

On January 7, international conservatism is dealt a blow as the British Labour Party, led by Tony Blair, manages to retake Parliament for the first time in twenty plus years.  Blair, at age 45, is the youngest Prime Minister since Lord Liverpool in 1812.  On January 17, Blair and Campbell meet, and Campbell, in a statement to the press, says that, “The special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom will continue, as strong as ever, with Mr. Blair at the helm.”

In his State of the Union on January 25, Campbell praises Congress for passing the WRA, and promises more legislation in the coming months.

On March 4, a bomb explodes outside the US Embassy in Sana‘a, the capital of Yemen, killing 19.  Responsibility for the attack is claimed by a terrorist organization known as al-Qaeda, and Campbell responds with a series of bombing campaigns that kills over 1,000 Yemeni and Omani civilians, although a small al-Qaeda hideout is reported as destroyed.  A report issued by the Department of Defense in October reports that the bombings were not as well targeted as they could have been, resulting in unnecessary civilian deaths.

On June 13, Campbell presents the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1998, which would reduce the number of “frivolous” securities lawsuits filed in federal courts, by making investors have facts in-hand that strongly suggest a deliberate fraud.  The legislation faces little opposition; it passes the Senate 89-7 on July 27, and the House 387-40 on September 10, being signed by the President on September 12.

The Congressional Elections

On elected day 1998, President Campbell holds an approval of 56%.  However, despite Campbell’s high approvals, the GOP suffers losses in both houses, but manage to retain them both.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=1;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=2;10;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=1;55;3&CO=1;9;3&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;6&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;27;3&GA=2;15;3&HI=1;4;3&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;21;3&IN=1;11;9&IA=2;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=1;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=1;10;3&MA=0;12;6&MI=0;17;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=2;11;3&MT=0;3;4&NV=1;5;3&NH=2;4;3&NJ=0;15;3&NM=0;5;5&NY=1;31;9&NC=1;15;9&ND=1;3;3&OH=2;20;9&OK=2;7;3&OR=1;7;9&PA=2;21;3&RI=0;4;6&SC=1;8;3&SD=1;3;3&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;34;5&UT=2;5;3&VT=1;3;3&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;11;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=1;10;3&WY=0;3;6&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;6&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;5&NE1=0;1;5&NE2=0;1;4&NE3=0;1;6)
Republicans: 51 (-3)
Democrats: 49 (+3)


House Results
Republicans: 220 (-16)
Democrats: 214 (+16)
Independents: 1 (-)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on June 25, 2010, 09:22:28 am
Great update Ben! :D I can't wait to see the rest of Campbell's second term and the 2000 election! I have several questions (and I'm sorry if you've already answered them in your TL and I just haven't picked them up :P).

1. How has Dan Quayle been as VEEP? Has he made similar gaffes as he did OTL? As of 1998, would Republicans be nervous about running him in 2000?
2. With the USSR still living on longer than OTL, is there a huger push from conservatives for anti-communist policy? How strong is anti-communist sentiment in America?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 25, 2010, 10:15:51 am
1. How has Dan Quayle been as VEEP? Has he made similar gaffes as he did OTL? As of 1998, would Republicans be nervous about running him in 2000?

Quayle has been fairly low-profile as Vice President, and so he has not made many gaffes in his nearly 6 years in office.  Republicans have no qualms with him running for President, except those who feel he's too conservative.

2. With the USSR still living on longer than OTL, is there a huger push from conservatives for anti-communist policy? How strong is anti-communist sentiment in America?

Not a huge push, and Campbell's fairly moderate Presidency has left the strongly anti-Communist conservatives out in the cold.  Anti-Communist sentiment in general is weakening, since no President has made it a major theme.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Derek on June 25, 2010, 10:39:08 am
If Kennedy had lived (he was killed by the secret service for a letter he wrote asking them to kill his wife so that he could be with Marilyn Monroe) then the democrats would have likely had a better shot at 1968 and been voted out in 1972. By 1980 it would have been the democrats' turn to win again and Reagan would've never been president.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Barnes on June 25, 2010, 01:55:17 pm
Great update, Ben!

If Kennedy had lived (he was killed by the secret service for a letter he wrote asking them to kill his wife so that he could be with Marilyn Monroe) then the democrats would have likely had a better shot at 1968 and been voted out in 1972. By 1980 it would have been the democrats' turn to win again and Reagan would've never been president.

Don't ever post in this TL again.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Historico on June 25, 2010, 02:37:24 pm
Interesting update Ben, and glad to have this back on Track, I wonder how Carroll and Tony will get along...Keep it comming


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 09, 2010, 01:02:09 am
Update in the next 18 hours :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on July 09, 2010, 04:49:17 pm
In celebration of the upcoming update, a treat.

1984 Senate Elections (56-44 Republican majority):
•   Alabama: Howell Heflin (D) reelected
•   Alaska: Ted Stevens (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: David Pryor (D) reelected
•   Colorado: William Armstrong (R) reelected
•   Delaware: Joe Biden (D) reelected
•   Georgia: Sam Nunn (D) reelected
•   Idaho: James McClure (R) reelected
•   Illinois: Paul Simon (D) defeats Dave O’Neal (R)
•   Iowa: Tom Harkin (D) defeats Roger Jepsen (R)
•   Kansas: Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: Mitch McConnell (R) defeats Walter Huddleston (D)
•   Louisiana: Bennett Johnston, Jr. (D) reelected
•   Maine: William Cohen (R) reelected
•   Massachusetts: John Kerry (D) defeats Edward Brooke (R)
•   Michigan: Robert Griffin (R) reelected
•   Minnesota: Rudy Boschwitz (R) reelected
•   Mississippi: Thad Cochran (R) reelected
•   Montana: Stan Stephens (R) reelected
•   Nebraska: Bob Kerrey (D) retiring-replaces Edward Zorinsky (D)
•   New Hampshire: Gordon Humphrey (R) reelected
•   New Jersey: Bill Bradley (D) reelected
•   New Mexico: Joe Skeen (R) reelected
•   North Carolina: Jesse Helms (R) reelected
•   Oklahoma: David Boren (D) retiring-replaces Ed Edmondson (D)
•   Oregon: Norma Paulus (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: Claiborne Pell (D) reelected
•   South Carolina: Strom Thurmond (R) reelected
•   South Dakota: Bill Janklow (R) defeats Lars Herseth (D)
•   Tennessee: Al Gore (D) retiring-replaces Howard Baker (R)
•   Texas: Phil Gramm (R) defeats Barefoot Sanders (D)
•   Virginia: John Warner (R) reelected
•   West Virginia: Arch Moore, Jr. (R) reelected
•   Wyoming: Alan Simpson (R) reelected
Afterwards (56-44 Republican majority):
•   North Carolina: Jim Broyhill (R) retiring-replaces John Porter East (R)

1986 Senate Elections (52-48 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: Richard Shelby (D) defeats Jeremiah Denton (R)
•   Alaska: Frank Murkowski (R) reelected
•   Arizona: John McCain (R) retiring-replaces Barry Goldwater (R)
•   Arkansas: Dale Bumpers (D) reelected
•   California: Tom Bradley (D) defeats Ed Davis (R)
•   Colorado: Tim Wirth (D) retiring-replaces Gary Hart (D)
•   Connecticut: Chris Dodd (D) reelected
•   Florida: Bob Graham (D) defeats Paula Hawkins (R)
•   Georgia: Wyche Fowler (D) defeats Mack Mattingly (R)
•   Hawaii: Daniel Inouye (D) reelected
•   Idaho: John Evans (D) defeats Steve Symms (R)
•   Illinois: Alan Dixon (D) reelected
•   Indiana: William Ruckelshaus (R) reelected
•   Iowa: Chuck Grassley (R) reelected
•   Kansas: Bob Dole (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: Wendell Ford (D) reelected
•   Louisiana: John Breaux (D) retiring-replaces Russell Long (D)
•   Maryland: Barbara Mikulski (D) reelected
•   Missouri: Kit Bond (R) defeats Joseph Teasdale (D)
•   Nevada: Harry Reid (D) defeats Chic Hecht (R)
•   New Hampshire: Warren Rudman (R) reelected
•   New York: Al d’Amato (R) reelected
•   North Carolina: Terry Sanford (D) defeats Jim Broyhill (R)
•   North Dakota: Kent Conrad (D) defeats Mark Andrews (R)
•   Ohio: John Glenn (D) reelected
•   Oklahoma: Don Nickles (R) reelected
•   Oregon: Bob Packwood (R) reelected
•   Pennsylvania: Arlen Specter (R) reelected
•   South Carolina: Ernest Hollings (D) reelected
•   South Dakota: Tom Daschle (D) defeats James Abdnor (R)
•   Utah: Jake Garn (R) reelected
•   Vermont: Patrick Leahy (D) reelected
•   Washington: Brock Adams (D) retiring-replaces Warren Magnuson (D)
•   Wisconsin: Bob Kasten (R) reelected
Afterwards (52-48 Democratic majority):
No changes


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on July 09, 2010, 06:11:16 pm
1988 Senate Elections (54-46 Democratic majority):
•   Arizona: Terry Goddard (D) defeats Sam Steiger (R)
•   California: Pete Wilson (R) reelected
•   Connecticut: Joe Lieberman (D) defeats James Buckley (R)
•   Delaware: William Roth, Jr. (R) reelected
•   Florida: Buddy MacKay (D) retiring-replaces Lawton Chiles (D)
•   Hawaii: Cecil Heftel (D) reelected
•   Indiana: Dan Quayle (R) reelected
•   Maine: George Mitchell (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Paul Sarbanes (D) reelected
•   Massachusetts: Ted Kennedy (D) reelected
•   Michigan: Donald Riegle, Jr. (D) reelected
•   Minnesota: Walter Mondale (D) reelected
•   Mississippi: Trent Lott (R) retiring-replaces John Stennis (D)
•   Missouri: John Danforth (R) reelected
•   Montana: Conrad Burns (R) defeats Max Baucus (D)
•   Nebraska: Frank Morrison (D) reelected
•   Nevada: Richard Bryan (D) defeats Paul Laxalt (R)
•   New Jersey: Frank Lautenberg (D) reelected
•   New Mexico: Jeff Bingaman (D) reelected
•   New York: Robert Abrams (D) retiring-replaces Richard Ottinger (D)
•   North Dakota: Quentin Burdick (D) reelected
•   Ohio: Howard Metzenbaum (D) reelected
•   Pennsylvania: William Scranton III (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: Lincoln Almond (R) reelected
•   Tennessee: Jim Sasser (D) reelected
•   Texas: Lloyd Bentsen (D) reelected
•   Utah: Orrin Hatch (R) reelected
•   Vermont: Richard Snelling (R) reelected
•   Virginia: Chuck Robb (D) retiring-replaces Paul Trible, Jr. (R)
•   Washington: Slade Gorton (R) retiring-replaces Daniel Evans (R)
•   West Virginia: Robert Byrd (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: Herb Kohl (D) retiring-replaces William Proxmire (D)
•   Wyoming: Malcolm Wallop (R) reelected
Afterwards (54-46 Democratic majority):
•   Delaware: Dale Wolf (R) retiring-replaces Joe Biden (D)
•   New York: Geraldine Ferraro (D) retiring-replaces Al d’Amato (R)
•   Texas: Beau Bolter (R) retiring-replaces Lloyd Bentsen (D)
•   Wyoming: Teno Roncalio (D) retiring-replaces Alan Simpson (R)

1990 Senate Elections (59-41 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: Howell Heflin (D) reelected
•   Alaska: Ted Stevens (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: David Pryor (D) reelected
•   Colorado: Hank Brown (R) retiring-replaces William Armstrong (R)
•   Delaware: Dale Wolf (R) reelected
•   Georgia: Sam Nunn (D) reelected
•   Idaho: Larry Craig (R) retiring-replaces James McClure (R)
•   Illinois: Paul Simon (D) reelected
•   Iowa: Tom Harkin (D) reelected
•   Kansas: Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: Harvey Sloane (D) defeats Mitch McConnell (R)
•   Louisiana: Bennett Johnston, Jr. (D) reelected
•   Maine: William Cohen (R) reelected
•   Massachusetts: John Kerry (D) reelected
•   Michigan: James Blanchard (D) defeats Robert Griffin (R)
•   Minnesota: Paul Wellstone (D) defeats Rudy Boschwitz (R)
•   Mississippi: Thad Cochran (R) reelected
•   Montana: Dorothy Bradley (D) defeats Stan Stephens (R)
•   Nebraska: Bob Kerrey (D) reelected
•   New Hampshire: Bob Smith (R) retiring-replaces Gordon Humphrey (R)
•   New Jersey: Bill Bradley (D) reelected
•   New Mexico: Joe Skeen (R) reelected
•   New York: Geraldine Ferraro (D) reelected
•   North Carolina: Harvey Gantt (D) defeats Jesse Helms (R)
•   Oklahoma: David Boren (D) reelected
•   Oregon: Norma Paulus (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: Claiborne Pell (D) reelected
•   South Carolina: Strom Thurmond (R) reelected
•   South Dakota: Bill Janklow (R) reelected
•   Tennessee: Al Gore (D) reelected
•   Texas: Phil Gramm (R) reelected
•   Texas: Beau Bolter (R) reelected
•   Virginia: John Warner (R) reelected
•   West Virginia: Charlotte Pritt (D) retiring-replaces Arch Moore (R)
•   Wyoming: Craig Thomas (R) retiring-replaces Teno Roncalio (D)
Afterwards (60-40 Democratic majority):
•   North Dakota: Jocelyn Burdick (D) retiring-replaces Quentin Burdick (D)
•   Vermont: Bernie Sanders (D) retiring-replaces Richard Snelling (R)



Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 18, 2010, 08:45:07 pm
It's gonna be at least another week guys.  I'm at camp, and thus away from the computer with my timeline.  Sorry :(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: sentinel on July 19, 2010, 11:56:25 am
This is a really good timeline and I was reading some from the beginning, but historically, Kennedy is on the record saying that he would pull troops out of Vietnam in his second term and was against escalation.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on July 19, 2010, 12:05:23 pm
Hey Ben, have JFK's extramarital affairs been discovered yet (sorry if you already pointed this out in the TL)?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 19, 2010, 10:52:08 pm
Hey Ben, have JFK's extramarital affairs been discovered yet (sorry if you already pointed this out in the TL)?

They have not.  The media still loves JFK, and with his son being the (former) Governor of Massachusetts, they have stayed under wraps.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 18, 2010, 10:18:37 pm
I'm feeling an update tomorrow.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario) on August 18, 2010, 10:24:46 pm
I'm feeling an update tomorrow.

:D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on August 23, 2010, 09:03:33 am
AHEM. Procrastinator.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 24, 2010, 05:02:22 pm
When I get back from Paris on Sunday :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 24, 2010, 08:11:07 pm
When I get back from Paris on Sunday :P

Have fun in the meantime. How is it? I've never been to "latin" Europe. :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on August 25, 2010, 01:11:33 am
Ok, Ben let's go straight.

If you won't update your TL after return, we're hijacking this thread just as we did to Gporter's 1972 thing.

>:(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hcallega on August 25, 2010, 01:41:14 pm
Ok, Ben let's go straight.

If you won't update your TL after return, we're hijacking this thread just as we did to Gporter's 1972 thing.

>:(

Thing is a good way to put that.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 25, 2010, 04:46:18 pm
Have fun in the meantime. How is it? I've never been to "latin" Europe. :)

I rather preferred Britain, but the Louvre was amazing, and I look forward to returning to it, and going to Versailles.

Ok, Ben let's go straight.

If you won't update your TL after return, we're hijacking this thread just as we did to Gporter's 1972 thing.

>:(

Thing is a good way to put that.

It will be updated then, I promise.  At least I'm not Lief :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on August 25, 2010, 04:47:15 pm
It will be updated then, I promise.  At least I'm not Lief :P

We hope so.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 25, 2010, 04:51:20 pm
Have fun in the meantime. How is it? I've never been to "latin" Europe. :)

I rather preferred Britain, but the Louvre was amazing, and I look forward to returning to it, and going to Versailles.


Ah, I've only been to Heathrow. Will you be swinging north to Germany afterward?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Fuzzybigfoot on August 25, 2010, 07:41:15 pm
I'm having a severe case of writer's block, so in order to at least give you guys something, here is the county results map from the 1980 General Election:
(http://img11.imageshack.us/img11/717/1980countiesjfk.gif)

Maricopa would be very unlikely to go to the Dems, it hasn't since '48.  But other than that, it's great!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 26, 2010, 03:54:35 pm
Ah, I've only been to Heathrow. Will you be swinging north to Germany afterward?

Nah, I leave for home Sunday morning.

Maricopa would be very unlikely to go to the Dems, it hasn't since '48.  But other than that, it's great!

Keep in mind, this is a different timeline.  Also, remember the Third Party in 1980 - he took a good % in Arizona, so that could have contributed to it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Goldwater on August 26, 2010, 05:40:26 pm
I just read this whole TL, & I like it. :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 27, 2010, 10:55:26 am
I just read this whole TL, & I like it. :)

Excellent :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on August 27, 2010, 12:58:14 pm
I just read this whole TL, & I like it. :)

Excellent :)

And I read it already and I want more asap >:(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 29, 2010, 10:10:01 pm
As I finish the 1998-2000 update, enjoy the 1996 county map (also viewable in the Gallery)
(http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/GALLERY/2270_29_08_10_10_09_26.GIF)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 29, 2010, 10:32:30 pm
In his State of the Union Address on January 22, 1999, President Campbell declares, “Our economy is as strong as it has ever been.  The Line Item Veto has given me the ability to weed out unnecessary spending, and the WRA has prevented people from taking advantage of our welfare system.”

On February 9, Campbell travels to Moscow to meet with Soviet Premier Yeltsin to discuss a new arms limitation treaty, as well as the continuing issue of human rights abuses in the USSR.  Ultimately, nothing comes of the discussions, fueling conservative anger at Campbell.

On February 20, in a speech to the Knesset, with Israeli Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu of the Likud Party looking on stoically, Campbell calls for “A permanent two state solution, in which both Israelis and Palestinians can live in peace.”  The speech is criticized by conservatives for being too harsh on Israel, and by liberals for not being harsh enough.

On March 7, Campbell meets with Netanyahu and Yasser Arafat at Camp David for a three day summit which Campbell hopes will result in some sort of preliminary agreement.  Nothing comes of it, though, after Netanyahu storms out following an innocuous remark by Arafat about Israeli killings on Muslims.  Just two months later, Netanyahu loses a bid for reelection to the Labour Party of Ehud Barak.

On April 12, Congress begins debate on the Hyde Resolution.  Introduced by Congressman Henry Hyde (R-IL), the HR would prevent any federal funding from going to abortions.  During an acrimonious debate in the House, Congressman Barney Frank (D-MA) punches Congressman Ron Paul (R-TX) after Paul calls a woman’s right to an abortion “A fallacy allowing fools and liars to perpetrate a Holocaust of epic proportions.”  Frank is reprimanded officially by the House, and the Debate dies down slightly, with the HR finally being passed on May 29, 221-214.

In the Senate, debate over the HR is just as contentious, with a liberal filibuster consuming months, with many arguments being repeated on both sides.  On September 10, cloture fails 58-42, and debate continues; after much arm twisting, cloture passes 60-40 on October 6, and the bill passes 56-41 on October 11.  Campbell signs the bill on October 14, infuriating Democrats.

In his 2000 State of the Union Address, Campbell puts forward an ambitious job creation program, involving public works and spending.  Democrats, though, still angry about the Hyde Resolution, decide to not cooperate with any of Campbell’s proposals, and so, as the 2000 Election begins, none of Campbell’s new legislation goes anywhere, setting up the fall campaign.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario) on August 30, 2010, 01:01:05 am
It's back! :D

This TL is epic! Keep it coming!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 03:08:15 pm
This TL is epic! Keep it coming!

I intend to release the 2000 Election later today.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 08:21:35 pm
The Democratic Nomination

The initial popularity of President Campbell, and the disaster that was the Biden 1996 campaign, had scared off several prominent Democrats from seeking the nomination.  On July 2, 1999, Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa declares for the Presidency, running a progressive populist style campaign aimed at winning a bloc of farm states early on.  On August 5, Congressman John Tanner of Tennessee announces, followed by Governor Ben Nelson of Nebraska on August 28, and on September 19, John F. Kennedy Jr., son of the former President and former Governor of Massachusetts, announces that he will run for President.

Due to Harkin’s presence in the race, the candidates all ignore Iowa, with Harkin receiving 73% of the vote, Kennedy getting 14%, Nelson getting 10%, and Tanner getting 3%.  One week later, Kennedy dominates neighboring New Hampshire, receiving 42% of the vote to Harkin’s 29%; Nelson receives 22%, and Tanner takes 7%.

Super Tuesday, sees primaries in California (Kennedy), Connecticut (Kennedy), Delaware (Kennedy), Georgia (Nelson), Missouri (Nelson), Rhode Island (Kennedy), Massachusetts (Kennedy), Maryland (Kennedy), Maine (Kennedy), Ohio (Nelson), New York (Harkin), Washington (Harkin), and Vermont (Kennedy).  Finishing dead last in every contest, Tanner drops out and throws his meager support to Nelson, who, along with Harkin, vows to fight on.

The next week brings contests in Arizona (Nelson), Colorado (Nelson), Utah (Nelson), Tennessee (Nelson), Florida (Kennedy), Mississippi (Kennedy), Oklahoma (Nelson), Louisiana (Nelson), Texas (Kennedy), and Illinois (Harkin).  Harkin then drops out for Kennedy, but Nelson vows to continue, staking everything on Pennsylvania and North Carolina the next week; Kennedy wins both contests, and Nelson drops out and endorses Kennedy.

At the Convention in Los Angeles, former President Kennedy gives a stirring address in favor of his son, with Senator John Breaux of Louisiana, a Nelson supporter, giving the Keynote Address, and then being selected as Kennedy’s Vice President.  Entering the General, polls show Kennedy with a slight lead.

The Republican Nomination

On the Republican side, it is made clear early on that Vice President Quayle is the establishment favorite.  However, two other candidates step forward.  One, Senator Bob Smith of New Hampshire, ran to the right of Quayle, calling him “a communist front man.”  The other, Congressman Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, ran to the left, criticizing the GOP’s policies on social issues and welfare.

Early on, Quayle appears to dominate, but is stunned when the voters in Iowa end up supporting, by a narrow margin, Bob Smith, who also wins New Hampshire, with Quayle finishing third.  However, Quayle rebounds by winning Arkansas and Nevada the next week.

On Super Tuesday, Chafee is knocked out, with primaries in Alaska (Smith), Delaware (Quayle), Florida (Quayle), Hawaii (Chafee), Illinois (Quayle), Indiana (Quayle), Texas (Quayle), Virginia (Smith), and Vermont (Chafee).  Chafee refuses to make an endorsement.

Smith decides to funnel all of his resources into the next two weeks’ worth of primaries, in California, Georgia, New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.  All the primaries are won by Quayle, and Smith then drops out.

At the Convention in Salt Lake City, President Campbell touts his achievements, attacks Kennedy’s youth, and calls Quayle “The best man for the job.”  Quayle selects Smith as his running mate, and prepares for a long and hard campaign.

The General Election

From the begging, the campaign is hard fought.  Quayle blasts Kennedy as, “Someone who only got to where he is today because of a famous last name” and, “A man not fit to run a pub, much less the United States of America.  Kennedy, meanwhile, calls Quayle, “A man with no respect for, and no knowledge of, the American Constitution,” and points out his distinguished record as a two term Governor of Massachusetts as an indicator of his ability to hold public office.

Before the first debate, on September 27, polls show Quayle at 45%, Kennedy at 45%, and 10% undecided.  After the debate, which strongly goes to Kennedy, Kennedy leads 49-44-7.  Following the second debate on October 12, a Quayle win, it becomes 48-46-6 for Kennedy.  The campaign continues to descend into mud slinging, and the voters go the polls with Kennedy leading 48-46-6, and indicator of how close the election will actually be.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2000&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;9;5&AK=2;3;5&AZ=2;8;5&AR=2;6;5&CA=1;54;5&CO=1;8;4&CT=1;8;6&DE=1;3;6&DC=1;3;8&FL=1;25;5&GA=2;13;5&HI=1;4;6&ID=2;4;6&IL=2;22;4&IN=2;12;6&IA=2;7;4&KS=2;6;6&KY=2;8;5&LA=1;9;5&MD=1;10;6&MA=1;12;7&MI=2;18;5&MN=1;10;5&MS=2;7;5&MO=1;11;5&MT=2;3;5&NV=1;4;4&NH=1;4;4&NJ=1;15;5&NM=1;5;4&NY=1;33;6&NC=2;14;5&ND=2;3;6&OH=1;21;4&OK=2;8;6&OR=1;7;5&PA=1;23;5&RI=1;4;7&SC=2;8;5&SD=2;3;6&TN=2;11;5&TX=2;32;5&UT=2;5;7&VT=1;3;6&VA=2;13;5&WA=1;11;5&WV=1;5;5&WI=2;11;4&WY=2;3;6&ME=1;2;6&ME1=1;1;5&ME2=1;1;6&NE=2;2;6&NE1=2;1;5&NE2=2;1;5&NE3=2;1;7)

John F. Kennedy Jr./John Breaux: 50.4% PV, 296 EV
Dan Quayle/Bob Smith: 48.8% PV, 242 EV
Others: 0.8% PV, 0 EV

The Congressional Elections

Despite the close Presidential race, the Democrats make strong gains in Congress, retaking both the House and Senate.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=0;3;5&AZ=2;10;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=1;55;9&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;3&DE=1;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;27;9&GA=0;15;5&HI=1;4;3&ID=0;4;6&IL=0;21;6&IN=2;11;3&IA=0;7;5&KS=0;6;5&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;9;5&MD=1;10;3&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;9&MN=2;10;3&MS=2;6;3&MO=2;11;3&MT=2;3;3&NV=2;5;3&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;15;9&NM=2;5;3&NY=1;31;3&NC=0;15;4&ND=1;3;3&OH=2;20;3&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;21;3&RI=0;4;6&SC=0;8;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=2;11;3&TX=2;34;9&UT=2;5;3&VT=2;3;3&VA=1;13;3&WA=1;11;9&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;3&ME1=2;1;3&ME2=2;1;3&NE=1;2;3&NE1=1;1;3&NE2=1;1;3&NE3=1;1;3)
Democrats: 53 (+4)
Republicans: 47 (-4)


House Results
Democrats: 231 (+17)
Republicans: 203 (-17)
Independents: 1 (-)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on August 30, 2010, 08:54:41 pm
YES!!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 30, 2010, 09:48:25 pm
Ah, excellent! A fitting end to the timeline as it draws to a close. Hopefully JFK Jr. turns out to be a fantastic president, and one who can properly guide the nation through the debacle that was the 2000s decade.

Actually, I have a theory... but I'll see if it is proven right before I mention it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on August 30, 2010, 09:52:35 pm
John F. Kennedy Jr.? Cool, it's only fitting that he see the White House in this timeline. :) What are John F. Kennedy Jr.'s politics? IIRC he was a DLC Clintonesque Democrat OTL, but does this hold true for this TL?

Wouldn't JFK Sr. most likely be dead at this point though, due to his Addison's disease? And what is Bobby Kennedy doing ITTL?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Fmr President & Senator Polnut on August 30, 2010, 10:03:05 pm
Just thinking... would they be happy with electing JFK Jr at a few weeks shy of 40?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 10:55:48 pm
Just thinking... would they be happy with electing JFK Jr at a few weeks shy of 40?

Age was a pretty big issue, but Kennedy had been Governor of Massachusetts for 8 years and had been quite competent, and so that deflated the issue.  Plus, the Kennedy name has a lot of mystique, and so voters were more inclined to trust JFK Jr. than they otherwise would.

John F. Kennedy Jr.? Cool, it's only fitting that he see the White House in this timeline. :) What are John F. Kennedy Jr.'s politics? IIRC he was a DLC Clintonesque Democrat OTL, but does this hold true for this TL?

JFK Jr. is a pretty standard liberal, closer to Ted than Jack.  Breaux, though, is a DLC Democrat, so that will have some influence.

Wouldn't JFK Sr. most likely be dead at this point though, due to his Addison's disease? And what is Bobby Kennedy doing ITTL?

Nah, JFK is alive and well; Bobby died of a heart attack in 1994, though.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Fmr President & Senator Polnut on August 30, 2010, 11:01:04 pm
Additionally, would the Kennedy name have had the mystique had JFK not been assassinated?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey on August 30, 2010, 11:10:38 pm
Bobby died of a heart attack in 1994, though.

:( How did Robert Kennedy Jr. turn out? Did he still get in trouble for heroin, or was his father able to rein him in?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 11:10:57 pm
Additionally, would the Kennedy name have had the mystique had JFK not been assassinated?

Not the same type of mystique.  Rather, there's the association with a successful President.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 30, 2010, 11:19:23 pm
What about Caroline? Is the elder sister a prominent figure in the family? And I take it that Jack is the "clan" leader, being the eldest Kennedy. Does this mean that there is no divide, as there was in real life? Does Jack have any additional children?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 11:21:16 pm
What about Caroline? Is the elder sister a prominent figure in the family? And I take it that Jack is the "clan" leader, being the eldest Kennedy. Does this mean that there is no divide, as there was in real life? Does Jack have any additional children?

Carolina isn't that prominent; she teaches law at Boston College.  The Kennedy Family is a very united group, which was seen at the 2000 DNC; Jack didn't have any additional children, since Jackie died in a plane crash in 1972.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 30, 2010, 11:25:55 pm
What about Caroline? Is the elder sister a prominent figure in the family? And I take it that Jack is the "clan" leader, being the eldest Kennedy. Does this mean that there is no divide, as there was in real life? Does Jack have any additional children?

Carolina isn't that prominent; she teaches law at Boston College.  The Kennedy Family is a very united group, which was seen at the 2000 DNC; Jack didn't have any additional children, since Jackie died in a plane crash in 1972.


Very well. What was JFK Junior's alma matter?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 11:28:20 pm
Very well. What was JFK Junior's alma matter?

University of Virginia Class of 1982, Duke University Law Class of 1985.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 30, 2010, 11:34:35 pm
Very well. What was JFK Junior's alma matter?

University of Virginia Class of 1982, Duke University Law Class of 1985.

Interesting. He kept his individual flair as in real life, without going to Harvard, which would have been orthodox.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 11:40:26 pm
Interesting. He kept his individual flair as in real life, without going to Harvard, which would have been orthodox.

He would have gone, but thought it was inappropriate since his father was teaching there, so he went to UVA and the Duke.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 30, 2010, 11:48:14 pm
Interesting. He kept his individual flair as in real life, without going to Harvard, which would have been orthodox.

He would have gone, but thought it was inappropriate since his father was teaching there, so he went to UVA and the Duke.

Ah yes, forgot. UVA like his uncles, and then Duke. Is he married to Carolyn Bessette, or did you mention that it was someone else? :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on August 30, 2010, 11:52:57 pm
Ah yes, forgot. UVA like his uncles, and then Duke. Is he married to Carolyn Bessette, or did you mention that it was someone else? :)

Neither.  JFK Jr. married Julia Louis-Dreyfus in 1986, at the Kennedy Compound.  They have three children, JFK III (b. May 1, 1988), Michael (b. January 4, 1992), and Elaine (b. November 2, 1999).


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Fmr President & Senator Polnut on August 30, 2010, 11:53:36 pm
Just FWIW....

I saw people who knew JFK Jr say that he was a social-liberal and economic moderate, and not really as much of a social-democrat as Uncle Teddy was.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Psychic Octopus on August 31, 2010, 07:41:41 pm
Ah yes, forgot. UVA like his uncles, and then Duke. Is he married to Carolyn Bessette, or did you mention that it was someone else? :)

Neither.  JFK Jr. married Julia Louis-Dreyfus in 1986, at the Kennedy Compound.  They have three children, JFK III (b. May 1, 1988), Michael (b. January 4, 1992), and Elaine (b. November 2, 1999).

That's awesome. I will be missing Elaine on Seinfeld, though. I hope JFK III embarks on a political career like his father and grandfather.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 01, 2010, 01:17:53 pm
Julia actually was on Seinfeld, and the episode where she meets JFK Jr. still happened :)  Also, JFK III is planning a career in politics - he was school president at his local elementary school in Boston.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on September 16, 2010, 03:53:38 pm
BUMP. Ben, when are you going to update?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 18, 2010, 02:51:26 pm
BUMP. Ben, when are you going to update?

Some point in the distant future.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario) on September 18, 2010, 05:05:59 pm
BUMP. Ben, when are you going to update?

Some point in the distant future.

:(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 18, 2010, 08:16:32 pm
:(

I simply don't have the time to put out a good update; sorry :(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario) on September 18, 2010, 08:43:10 pm
:(

I simply don't have the time to put out a good update; sorry :(

I understand. But it doesn't change the fact that I am :(.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on September 19, 2010, 08:33:52 pm
:(

I simply don't have the time to put out a good update; sorry :(

I understand. But it doesn't change the fact that I am :(.

Me too, considering that it's one of my top favorite TLs.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Nichlemn on September 25, 2010, 10:11:50 am
The story is good, but the Congressional elections irk me. Even popular Presidents rarely achieve large midterm gains for their own party (see Calvin Coolidge in 1926).


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on October 17, 2010, 07:56:59 pm
BUMP. Ben, when are you going to update?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 17, 2010, 08:03:35 pm
BUMP. Ben, when are you going to update?


Some point in the distant future.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 06, 2010, 04:53:15 pm
(http://www.superiorpics.com/wenn_album/JFK_Jr_-_Bad_Flight_Decision/JFK_Jr_001_072006.jpg)
The First Term of John F. Kennedy Jr.

“My fellow Americans, we are at the precipice of a new century.  As we move forward, we must look to innovation, to technology, and to knowledge to keep our country strong.”

Secretary of State: Colin Powell (R-VA)
Secretary of Treasury: Lawrence Summers (D-MA)
Secretary of Defense: Ike Skelton (D-MO)
Attorney General: Robert C. Clark (D-MA)
Secretary of the Interior: Chuck Grassley (R-IA)
Secretary of Agriculture: Kit Bond (R-MO)
Secretary of Commerce: Bill Richardson (D-NM)
Secretary of Labor: Alexis Herman (D-AL)
Secretary of Health and Human Services: Donna Shalala (D-WI)
Secretary of Education: Hugo Sonnenschein (I-IL)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Andrew Cuomo (D-NY)
Secretary of Transportation: Rodney Slater (D-AR)
Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs: James Webb (R-VA)

As John F. Kennedy Jr., the youngest elected President in America history takes office, he promises vigorous activity to improve the country.  To that end, on January 28, 2001, he presents to Congress the Education Reform Act of 2001.  The legislation, written jointly by Kennedy, his new Secretary of Education (the outgoing President of the University of Chicago), his uncle Senator Edward M. Kennedy (D-MA), and Congressman Dale Kildee (D-MI), would institute major reforms to the American education system.  It provided for a standard national curriculum, standard national tests, funding for charter schools, as well as other measures to cut tuition for education.

From the outset, the legislation faces opposition on both sides.  Senator Paul Wellstone (D-MN) calls the bill “a slap in the face of American children.”  Various teachers’ unions from throughout the country attack the section on merit pay, promising to work to defeat any Congressman who votes for the bill.

President Kennedy goes out on the offensive, appearing on numerous news networks to defend his bill.  On Meet the Press he tells Tim Russert, “The American system of education is broken.  This bill will go a long way towards fixing that.”  Secretary of Education Sonnenschein tells Fox News, “This bill was written with an eye towards preparing Americans to deal with a modern economy.”

Throughout the spring, hearings are held in Congress about the bill.  The only interruption comes in June, when the Senate confirms Carl E. Stewart of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court following the death of Justice Bownes.

On July 15, 2001, the House ends debate on the ERA.  Up until the hour of the vote, the President and his allies had been gathering support, and by a vote of 223-212, the ERA passes and is sent to the Senate.

In the Senate, debate continues, with Senators Kennedy (D-MA) and Brownback (R-KS) being the main supporters.  On September 3, Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD) announces his opposition to the ERA; he is followed by Whip Harry Reid (D-NV).  The Republican leadership is more supportive, though.  On October 25, the Senate finally votes; the ERA ties, 50-50, with Vice President Breaux breaking the tie in favor.  On October 30, President Kennedy signs the legislation.

In his State of the Union Address on January 18, 2002, President Kennedy declares, “The State of our Union is strong.  Our economy is growing, but not fast enough.  We need to encourage businesses to grow.  That is why I am asking Congress to pass a comprehensive tax reform bill.”

This reform, called the Kennedy Tax Cuts, cut taxes for all Americans by 3% across the board, except for those in the previous 10% bracket – they had theirs reduced by 7%.  The program is immensely unpopular among Democrats.  The House Congressional Progressive Caucus – 62 Democrats – unanimously declares against the Cuts.  Of the 40 Blue Dog Democrats, all but Charlie Stenholm (D-TX) declare in favor of the Cuts.  On March 20, 2002, the House votes 230-205 for the Cuts – 28 Democrats and all 202 Republicans join together for the vote.

In the Senate, the President recoil, and line up against them.  Senator Herb Kohl (D-WI) calls the Cuts “A handout to the wealthy.”  After Treasury Secretary Summers defends the bill before the Senate, there is still little traction.  On May 29, the Senate fails to achieve cloture, 54-44, and debate continues.  Following this failure, Senator Kennedy cuts a deal with liberals involving tax rates on the top 1%, and on August 8, by a vote of 60-40, cloture is achieved; three days later the Cuts pass 53-47, and President Kennedy signs them all in on August 10.

The Congressional Elections

On elected day 2002, President Kennedy’s approval rating stands at 54%, an unusual level of popularity.  Overall, Democrats make minor gains.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=2;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=0;10;5&AR=1;6;9&CA=0;55;6&CO=2;9;3&CT=0;7;6&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=0;27;5&GA=2;15;3&HI=0;4;7&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;21;3&IN=0;11;4&IA=1;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;3&LA=1;9;3&MD=0;10;6&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=2;6;3&MO=0;11;4&MT=1;3;3&NV=0;5;5&NH=2;4;3&NJ=1;15;3&NM=2;5;3&NY=0;31;6&NC=1;15;3&ND=0;3;5&OH=0;20;5&OK=2;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=2;8;3&SD=2;3;9&TN=1;11;3&TX=2;34;3&UT=0;5;6&VT=0;3;6&VA=2;13;3&WA=0;11;5&WV=1;5;3&WI=0;10;5&WY=2;3;3&ME=1;2;9&ME1=1;1;9&ME2=1;1;9&NE=2;2;3&NE1=2;1;3&NE2=2;1;3&NE3=2;1;3)
Democrats: 54 (+1)
Republicans: 46 (-1)


House Results
Democrats: 233 (+2)
Republicans: 220 (-2)
Independents: 1 (-)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on November 06, 2010, 04:55:24 pm
:D :D :D :D :D :D
Anyways, Kennedy seems to be a conservative democrat.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: HappyWarrior on November 06, 2010, 05:34:47 pm
Who are the newly elected Senators and Congressman?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 06, 2010, 07:15:04 pm
Who are the newly elected Senators and Congressman?

Tom Allen in Maine, and Mark Pryor in Arkansas for the Senate.  In the House, Lynwood Lewis defeated Ed Schrock in Virginia's 2nd District.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario) on November 07, 2010, 12:33:51 am
It's back! :D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 07, 2010, 06:46:48 pm
It's back! :D

Yes, for a brief update.  2001-2003 was relatively uneventful :P


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: MyRescueKittehRocks on November 21, 2010, 04:46:16 pm
A good center-left timeline. 2000 should've been time for a conservative (social, fiscal and Taftite foreign policy) asendacy. Can we have a Ron Paul Presidency?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 23, 2010, 10:13:16 pm
A good center-left timeline. 2000 should've been time for a conservative (social, fiscal and Taftite foreign policy) asendacy. Can we have a Ron Paul Presidency?

What?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: MyRescueKittehRocks on November 24, 2010, 05:49:53 pm
It feels like that Ittl conservatives are quite divided.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 24, 2010, 08:13:47 pm
It feels like that Ittl conservatives are quite divided.

That is somewhat true.  There was never the backlash against liberalism that there was in our world.  In addition, both parties are less polarized.  There are more conservatives in the Democratic Party, and more liberals in the Republican Party, than we have in our world.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on November 30, 2010, 06:04:07 pm
1992 Senate Elections (58-42 Democratic majority):
•   Alabama: Richard Shelby (D) reelected
•   Alaska: Frank Murkowski (R) reelected
•   Arizona: John McCain (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: Dale Bumpers (D) reelected
•   California: Barbara Boxer (D) retiring-replaces Tom Bradley (D)
•   Colorado: Ben Nighthorse Campbell (D) retiring-replaces Tim Wirth (D)
•   Connecticut: Chris Dodd (D) reelected
•   Florida: Bob Graham (D) reelected
•   Georgia: Paul Coverdell (R) defeats Wyche Fowler (D)
•   Hawaii: Daniel Inouye (D) reelected
•   Idaho: Dirk Kempthorne (R) defeats John Evans (D)
•   Illinois: Carol Moseley-Braun (D) retiring-replaces Alan Dixon (D)
•   Indiana: William Ruckelshaus (R) reelected
•   Iowa: Chuck Grassley (R) reelected
•   Kansas: Bob Dole (R) reelected
•   Kentucky: Wendell Ford (D) reelected
•   Louisiana: John Breaux (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Barbara Mikulski (D) reelected
•   Missouri: Kit Bond (R) reelected
•   Nevada: Harry Reid (D) reelected
•   New Hampshire: Judd Gregg (R) retiring-replaces Warren Rudman (R)
•   New York: Al d’Amato (R) reelected
•   North Carolina: Lauch Faircloth (R) defeats Terry Sanford (D)
•   North Dakota: Kent Conrad (D) retiring-replaces Jocelyn Burdick (D)
•   North Dakota: Byron Dorgan (D) retiring-replaces Kent Conrad (D)
•   Ohio: John Glenn (D) reelected
•   Oklahoma: Don Nickles (R) reelected
•   Oregon: Bob Packwood (R) reelected
•   Pennsylvania: Arlen Specter (R) reelected
•   South Carolina: Ernest Hollings (D) reelected
•   South Dakota: Tom Daschle (D) reelected
•   Utah: Robert Bennett (R) retiring-replaces Jake Garn (R)
•   Vermont: Bernie Sanders (D) reelected
•   Washington: Patty Murray (D) retiring-replaces Brock Adams (D)
•   Wisconsin: Russ Feingold (D) defeats Bob Kasten (R)
Afterwards (60-40 Democratic majority):
•   Delaware: Charles Oberly (D) retiring-replaces William Roth, Jr. (R)
•   Georgia: Max Cleland (D) retiring-replaces Sam Nunn (D)
•   Indiana: Frank O’Bannon (D) retiring-replaces Dan Quayle (R)
•   Utah: Merrill Cook (R) retiring-replaces Orrin Hatch (R)
•   Wyoming: Craig Thomas (R) retiring-replaces Alan Simpson (R)

1994 Senate Elections (51-49 Democratic majority):
•   Arizona: Jon Kyl (R) defeats Terry Goddard (D)
•   California: Pete Wilson (R) reelected
•   Connecticut: Joe Lieberman (D) reelected
•   Delaware: Charles Oberly (D) reelected
•   Florida: Jeb Bush (R) defeats Buddy MacKay (D)
•   Georgia: Max Cleland (D) reelected
•   Hawaii: Cecil Heftel (D) reelected
•   Indiana: Dan Coats (R) defeats Frank O’Bannon (D)
•   Maine: Olympia Snowe (R) retiring-replaces George Mitchell (D)

•   Maryland: Paul Sarbanes (D) reelected
•   Massachusetts: Ted Kennedy (D) reelected
•   Michigan: Spencer Abraham (R) retiring-replaces Donald Riegle, Jr. (D)
•   Minnesota: Rod Grams (R) retiring-replaces Walter Mondale (D)

•   Mississippi: Trent Lott (R) reelected
•   Missouri: John Ashcroft (R) retiring-replaces John Danforth (R)
•   Montana: Conrad Burns (R) reelected
•   Nebraska: Frank Morrison (D) reelected
•   Nevada: Jim Gibbons (R) defeats Richard Bryan (D)
•   New Jersey: Chuck Haytaian (R) defeats Frank Lautenberg (D)

•   New Mexico: Jeff Bingaman (D) reelected
•   New York: Robert Abrams (D) reelected
•   North Dakota: Kent Conrad (D) reelected
•   Ohio: Mike de Wine (R) retiring-replaces Howard Metzenbaum (D)
•   Pennsylvania: William Scranton III (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: Lincoln Almond (R) reelected
•   Tennessee: Fred Thompson (R) defeats Jim Sasser (D)
•   Texas: Bob Krueger (D) defeats Beau Bolter (R)
•   Utah: Merrill Cook (R) reelected
•   Vermont: Jim Jeffords (R) reelected
•   Virginia: Chuck Robb (D) reelected
•   Washington: Slade Gorton (R) reelected
•   West Virginia: Robert Byrd (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: Herb Kohl (R) reelected
•   Wyoming: Mike Enzi (R) retiring-replaces Malcolm Wallop (R)
•   Wyoming: Craig Thomas (R) reelected
Afterward (51-49 Democratic majority):
no changes


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on December 07, 2010, 06:34:50 pm
bump. Where are you, Ben?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: hawkeye59 on December 29, 2010, 06:17:58 pm
bump. Where are you, Ben?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 30, 2010, 08:37:33 am

I'm here.  I just haven't updated for a while.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kalwejt on December 30, 2010, 12:30:31 pm

Hahahahahaha, lol...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 19, 2011, 04:16:53 pm
In his State of the Union Address on January 12, 2003, President Kennedy declares, “Our Union is strong.  Our economy is growing, and it will continue to grow.”

However, over the next few months Kennedy’s assessment is proven false.  In early April unemployment, which had been just over 6% in December of 2002, reaches 8%.  In a speech at the Cato Institute on May 7, 2003, Fed Chairman Allen Greenspan says that, “While we may not be in a recession yet, things do not look good long term.”  In June, in order to respond, Senator Russ Feingold (D-WI) introduces the Prevent a Recession Act.  The PRA, written by liberal economist Paul Krugman, would provide a stimulus to the American people by cutting taxes for all Americans making less than $40,000 per year.  In a speech to the American people explaining the legislation, Kennedy says “Our current problems are caused by a lack of spending.  Through tax cuts, it is my hope that we can jumpstart the economy, and avoid a recession.”  The legislation is rushed through Congress, and signed by the President on June 25.

The legislation ultimately proves ineffective.  On August 17, the New York Times carries the headline, “It’s Official: America is in a Recession.”  Three days later, President Kennedy gives another televised address to the American people, urging them to “continue spending, and do not panic.”  That does not go over well.  On August 24, President Kennedy’s approvals fall to 42%, providing him with little confidence as he begins his reelection campaign.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on April 19, 2011, 04:38:58 pm
Hoping either Kennedy can pull it out by 2004 or a good Republican beats him.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on April 19, 2011, 04:40:30 pm
By the way, there's a cycle that I noticed going from 1960 to 2000:
1960-1980
Democrat for eight years
Republican for four years
Democrat for eight years
1980-2000
Republican for eight years
Democrat for four years
Republican for eight years

I wonder if the cycle was rest in 2000 or not.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 19, 2011, 06:24:46 pm
By the way, there's a cycle that I noticed going from 1960 to 2000:
1960-1980
Democrat for eight years
Republican for four years
Democrat for eight years
1980-2000
Republican for eight years
Democrat for four years
Republican for eight years

I wonder if the cycle was rest in 2000 or not.

I totally didn't do that intentionally.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on April 19, 2011, 06:45:40 pm
By the way, there's a cycle that I noticed going from 1960 to 2000:
1960-1980
Democrat for eight years
Republican for four years
Democrat for eight years
1980-2000
Republican for eight years
Democrat for four years
Republican for eight years

I wonder if the cycle was rest in 2000 or not.

I totally didn't do that intentionally.

Regardless, it's weird how it ended up. Han actually did the same thing on his "Wet house" timeline with:
1940-1960:
Republican for eight years
Democrat for four years
Republican for eight years
1960-?
Democrat for eight years
Republican for four years
Democrat for ? (hasn't been continued past 1972, but my guess is the Democrat will be re-elected)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 19, 2011, 07:39:48 pm
The Democratic Nomination

As the recession deepens in the middle of 2003, rumors abound that President Kennedy will receive a primary challenger.  Much of the speculation centers around Senator Russ Feingold of Wisconsin, but he announces in early July that he will be running for reelection to the Senate.  Finally, on August 21, 2003, Senator Paul Wellstone of Minnesota announces his candidacy.  “The Kennedy Administration has spent two years working for big business and the wealthy, and it has led us straight into a recession.  If elected, I will work for the people, not the corporations.”

Wellstone runs an insurgent campaign, raising money through small donors and campaigning in caucus states like Iowa, New Mexico, Michigan, etc; while also using big names who have endorsed him like Senator Feingold.

Kennedy, by contrast, uses big money and big names.  His father, the 87 year old ex-President, lambasts Wellstone for “thinking his candidacy will do anything other than doom the Democratic Party.”

On January 19, the Iowa Caucus yields an upset.  Wellstone wins with 54% of the vote, netting 24 of 45 delegates.  On January 27, Kennedy, as expected, takes 78% of the vote in New Hampshire.  February 3 yields split results, with Kennedy taking Arizona, Missouri, Oklahoma, and South Carolina; and Wellstone taking Delaware, New Mexico, and North Dakota.

February 7 results in two major Wellstone wins, as he takes 60+ in Michigan and Washington, although Kennedy dominates in Maine.  On February 10 Kennedy takes Nevada, Tennessee, and Virginia by big margins.  On February 17 Wellstone dominates Wisconsin, as expected.  February 24 sees Kennedy win 98% of the vote in Massachusetts, despite Wellstone being on the ballot, but Wellstone captures Hawaii and Utah, continuing the stalemate.

On March 2, the stalemate ends on Super Tuesday, where 11 primaries are held in California (Kennedy), Connecticut (Kennedy), Georgia (Kennedy), Maryland (Kennedy), Montana (Wellstone), Minnesota (Wellstone), New York (Kennedy), Ohio (Wellstone), Rhode Island (Kennedy), Texas (Kennedy), and Vermont (Kennedy).  Wellstone, however, refuses to drop out, placing bets on Mini Super Tuesday the next week, when primaries are held in Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, North Carolina, and New Jersey.  However, after only managing to win Florida, Wellstone drops out.  He does not endorse Kennedy, however, and refuses to speak at the Convention.

At the DNC, Wellstone supporters walk out of the Convention before Kennedy and Breaux are re-nominated.  They instead form the Progressive Party, and offer Wellstone the nomination, which he accepts, and chooses Vermont Congressman Bernie Sanders as his running mate.  Thus, heading into Labor Day, the dark horse Republican nominee appears to have things sown up.

The Republican Nomination

From early 2003, Republicans vie to challenge President Kennedy.  On  May 23, Senator Gordon Smith of Oregon enters the ring, followed by Governor George W. Bush of Texas on June 26.  On July 4, a dark horse enters the race: former Governor of Tennessee Elvis Presley.  The former King of Rock and Roll, after retiring from music in the late 1970s, had entered politics.  Serving in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1983 until 1995, he served as Governor of Tennessee from 1995 to 2003.

Although Presley is initially dismissed, he handily wins the Iowa Caucus, taking 43% in a three way race.  He narrowly loses the New Hampshire primary to Smith, but gets revenge by winning Alaska and Michigan the next weekend.

Mini Super Tuesday occurs next for the Republicans, three days later, with primaries and caucuses in Alabama (Presley), Arizona (Bush), Connecticut (Smith), North Dakota (Smith), and Washington (Smith).

The next week, there is a split result in the contests in Arkansas (Presley), Colorado (Bush), and Vermont (Smith).  However, Smith drops out the next week after losing big primaries in Illinois (Bush) and Florida (Presley), as he was unable to compete in terms of delegates.  He endorses Bush.

With only two candidates, Super Tuesday appears to be the decider, with primaries held in California (Presley), Delaware (Bush), Georgia (Presley), Hawaii (Presley), Kentucky (Presley), Mississippi (Presley), New Jersey (Bush), New York (Bush), North Carolina (Bush), Ohio (Presley), Pennsylvania (Presley), South Carolina (Presley), and Virginia (Presley).  Bush then drops out, and endorses Presley.

At the RNC in Philadelphia, Presley selects Smith as his running mate.  He attacks Kennedy’s handling of the economy, and boasts of his achievements as Governor of Tennessee.

The General Election

From the get go, Kennedy faces an uphill battle.  With Wellstone attacking from the Left, and Presley from the Right, Kennedy has little room to maneuver.  In the first debate Wellstone blasts Kennedy for “selling out to Big Business” and Presley blasts Kennedy for “pursuing patently anti-business policies.”  Wellstone, in turn, dismisses Presley as “an entertainer – my favorite entertainer, but an entertainer nonetheless.”  Kennedy is left defending his own policies.

By election day, unemployment is listed at 7.8%, up from 5.7% the year before.  Thus, with attacks from both sides of the political spectrum, JFK Jr. fails to do what his father did, and is defeated for reelection.  The results are brutal for the Democrats, as Wellstone splits the vote to such a degree that Democratic strongholds, like New York, Hawaii and California, fall to Presley, while Wellstone manages to win 5 states and a Congressional District in Maine.  After the election, MSNBC anchor and ardent Kennedy supporter Chris Matthews would note that, “While Kennedy may well have lost without Wellstone, it is clear from the results that Wellstone ended any chance Kennedy had of being reelected.  If you give Kennedy the states where he and Wellstone combined to beat Presley, and give Kennedy the states Wellstone won, then Kennedy is reelected.  Not to mention how Wellstone weakened Kennedy during the primaries.  Certainly JFK Jr. deserves blame for his loss, but Wellstone deserves nearly as much.”

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2004&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;9;6&AK=2;3;5&AZ=2;10;4&AR=2;6;6&CA=2;55;3&CO=2;9;4&CT=1;7;5&DE=2;3;3&DC=1;3;5&FL=2;27;3&GA=2;15;5&HI=2;4;3&ID=2;4;6&IL=1;21;3&IN=2;11;5&IA=2;7;3&KS=2;6;6&KY=2;8;6&LA=2;9;4&MD=3;10;3&MA=1;12;6&MI=3;17;3&MN=3;10;4&MS=2;6;6&MO=2;11;4&MT=2;3;4&NV=2;5;5&NH=1;4;3&NJ=1;15;4&NM=2;5;4&NY=2;31;3&NC=2;15;3&ND=2;3;4&OH=2;20;4&OK=2;7;7&OR=2;7;3&PA=2;21;4&RI=1;4;4&SC=2;8;5&SD=2;3;5&TN=2;11;6&TX=2;34;6&UT=2;5;7&VT=3;3;4&VA=2;13;5&WA=2;11;3&WV=2;5;4&WI=3;10;3&WY=2;3;5&ME=1;2;4&ME1=3;1;3&ME2=1;1;4&NE=2;2;6&NE1=2;1;5&NE2=2;1;6&NE3=2;1;5)
Elvis Presley/Gordon Smith: 43.5% PV, 418 EV
John F. Kennedy Jr./John Breaux: 38.9% PV, 69 EV
Paul Wellstone/Bernie Sanders: 17.6% PV, 51 EV

The Congressional Elections

With the drubbing of President Kennedy, Democrats nationwide lose big.  In some places, though, the candidate is reelected, but the party switches, as in the Alabama Senate race, where Richard Shelby switches parties.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2012&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=2;9;9&AK=2;3;3&AZ=2;11;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=1;55;3&CO=2;9;9&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;6&DC=0;3;9&FL=2;29;9&GA=2;16;3&HI=1;4;3&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;20;3&IN=1;11;3&IA=2;6;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;9&LA=2;8;9&MD=1;10;3&MA=0;11;6&MI=0;16;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=2;10;3&MT=0;3;4&NV=1;6;3&NH=2;4;3&NJ=0;14;5&NM=0;5;5&NY=1;29;3&NC=2;15;9&ND=1;3;3&OH=2;18;3&OK=2;7;3&OR=1;7;3&PA=2;20;3&RI=0;4;6&SC=2;9;9&SD=1;3;3&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;38;5&UT=2;6;3&VT=1;3;3&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;12;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=0;10;5&WY=1;3;3&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;6&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;5&NE1=0;1;5&NE2=0;1;4&NE3=0;1;6)
Republicans: 53 (+7)
Democrats: 47 (-7)


House Results
Republicans: 240 (+39)
Democrats: 195 (-38)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on April 19, 2011, 07:49:02 pm
I didn't want Kennedy to go down, but it's worth it with Elvis!!!!! (will post picture of the king later)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Captain Chaos on April 20, 2011, 07:11:52 pm
President Elvis. :D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on April 21, 2011, 11:30:51 pm
Presidents of the United States:
John F. Kennedy (D-MA): January 20, 1961 - January 20, 1969
John Tower (R-TX): January 20, 1969 - January 20, 1973
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN): January 20, 1973 - August 8, 1975
Warren Hearnes (D-MO): August 8, 1975 - January 20, 1981
Mark Hatfield (R-OR): January 20, 1981 - January 20, 1989
Lawton Chiles (D-FL): January 20, 1989 - January 20, 1993
Carroll Campbell (R-SC): January 20, 1993 - January 20, 2001
John F. Kennedy Jr. (D-MA): January 20, 2001 - January 20, 2005
Elvis Presley (R-TN): January 20, 2005 - ?

Vice Presidents of the United States:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX): January 20, 1961 - January 20, 1965
George Smathers (D-FL): January 20, 1965 - January 20, 1969
Sprio Agnew (R-MD): January 20, 1969 - January 20, 1973
Warren Hearnes (D-MO): January 20, 1973 - August 8, 1975
Vacant: August 8, 1975 - January 20, 1977
Frank Church (D-ID): January 20, 1977 - January 20, 1981
George HW Bush (R-TX): January 20, 1981 - January 20, 1989
Joe Biden (D-DE): January 20, 1989 - January 20, 1993
Dan Quayle (R-IN): January 20, 1993 - January 20, 2001
John Breaux (D-LA): January 20, 2001 - January 20, 2005
Gordon Smith (R-OR): January 20, 2005 - ?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on April 25, 2011, 08:12:23 am
1996 Senate Elections (54-46 Republican majority):
•   Alabama: Jeff Sessions (R) retiring-replaces Howell Heflin (D)
•   Alaska: Ted Stevens (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: Tim Hutchinson (R) retiring-replaces David Pryor (D)
•   Colorado: Wayne Allard (R) retiring-replaces Hank Brown (R)
•   Delaware: Dale Wolf (R) reelected
•   Georgia: Guy Millner (R) defeats Max Cleland (D)
•   Idaho: Larry Craig (R) reelected
•   Illinois: Dick Durbin (D) retiring-replaces Paul Simon (D)
•   Iowa: Tom Harkin (D) reelected
•   Kansas: Pat Roberts (R) retiring-replaces Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R)
•   Kentucky: Jim Bunning (R) defeats Harvey Sloane (D)
•   Louisiana: Mary Landrieu (D) retiring-replaces Bennett Johnston, Jr. (D)
•   Maine: Susan Collins (R) retiring-replaces William Cohen (R)
•   Massachusetts: John Kerry (D) reelected
•   Michigan: James Blanchard (D) reelected
•   Minnesota: Paul Wellstone (D) reelected
•   Mississippi: Thad Cochran (R) reelected
•   Montana: Max Baucus (D) reelected
•   Nebraska: Chuck Hagel (R) retiring-replaces Bob Kerrey (D)
•   New Hampshire: Bob Smith (R) reelected
•   New Jersey: Robert Torricelli (D) retiring-replaces Bill Bradley (D)
•   New Mexico: Joe Skeen (R) reelected
•   North Carolina: Harvey Gantt (D) reelected
•   Oklahoma: Jim Inhofe (R) retiring-replaces David Boren (D)
•   Oregon: Norma Paulus (R) reelected
•   Rhode Island: Jack Reed (D) retiring-replaces Claiborne Pell (D)
•   South Carolina: Strom Thurmond (R) reelected
•   South Dakota: Tim Johnson (D) defeats Bill Janklow (R)
•   Tennessee: Al Gore (D) reelected
•   Texas: Phil Gramm (R) reelected
•   Virginia: John Warner (R) reelected
•   West Virginia: Charlotte Pritt (D) reelected
•   Wyoming: Craig Thomas (R) reelected
Afterwards (54-46 Republican majority):
No changes

1998 Senate Elections (51-49 Republican majority):
•   Alabama: Richard Shelby (D) reelected
•   Alaska: Frank Murkowski (R) reelected
•   Arizona: John McCain (R) reelected
•   Arkansas: Blanche Lincoln (D) retiring-replaces Dale Bumpers (D)
•   California: Barbara Boxer (D) reelected
•   Colorado: Ben Nighthorse Campbell (D) reelected
•   Connecticut: Chris Dodd (D) reelected
•   Florida: Bob Graham (D) reelected
•   Georgia: Paul Coverdell (R) reelected
•   Hawaii: Daniel Inouye (D) reelected
•   Idaho: Mike Crapo (R) retiring-replaces Dirk Kempthorne (R)
•   Illinois: Carol Moseley-Braun (D) reelected
•   Indiana: Evan Bayh (D) retiring-replaces William Ruckelshaus (R)
•   Iowa: Chuck Grassley (R) reelected
•   Kansas: Sam Brownback (R) retiring-replaces Bob Dole (R)
•   Kentucky: Scotty Baesler (D) retiring-replaces Wendell Ford (D)
•   Louisiana: John Breaux (D) reelected
•   Maryland: Barbara Mikulski (D) reelected
•   Missouri: Kit Bond (R) reelected
•   Nevada: Harry Reid (D) reelected
•   New Hampshire: Judd Gregg (R) reelected
•   New York: Chuck Schumer (D) defeats Al d’Amato (R)
•   North Carolina: John Edwards (D) defeats Lauch Faircloth (R)
•   North Dakota: Byron Dorgan (D) reelected
•   Ohio: George Voinovich (R) retiring-replaces John Glenn (D)
•   Oklahoma: Don Nickles (R) reelected
•   Oregon: Ron Wyden (D) retiring-replaces Bob Packwood (R)
•   Pennsylvania: Arlen Specter (R) reelected
•   South Carolina: Ernest Hollings (D) reelected
•   South Dakota: Tom Daschle (D) reelected
•   Utah: Robert Bennett (R) reelected
•   Vermont: Bernie Sanders (D) reelected
•   Washington: Patty Murray (D) reelected
•   Wisconsin: Russ Feingold (D) reelected
Afterwards (50-50 Republican majority):
•   Georgia: Zell Miller (D) retiring-replaces Paul Coverdell (R)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on May 06, 2011, 05:50:27 pm
(http://www.cardboardposters.com/images/401378ElvisPresleyRichardNixon.jpg)

(http://webrevolutionary.com/price/img-large/elvis-for-president-1956-sheet-music-very-scarce_120708912754.jpg)

(http://cockoonest.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/elvis-presley-2008-weekly-world-news-president.jpg)

Of all of them I like the first one the best.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 05, 2011, 10:39:05 pm
This timeline is 2.5 years old.  I need to update more.  I will update it more.  I will update it soon :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on July 22, 2011, 09:59:16 am
This timeline is 2.5 years old.  I need to update more.  I will update it more.  I will update it soon :)

Yup.  Eventually :D


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on July 22, 2011, 10:16:03 am
Please update!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on September 03, 2011, 10:07:37 pm
This TL needs to come back.


2000 Senate Elections (53-47 Democratic majority):
Arizona: Jon Kyl (R ) reelected
California: Al Checchi (D) retiring-replaces Pete Wilson (R )
Connecticut: Joe Lieberman (D) reelected
Delaware: Charles Oberly (D) reelected
Florida: Bill Nelson (D) defeats Jeb Bush (R )
Georgia: Zell Miller (D) reelected
Hawaii: Cecil Heftel (D) reelected
Indiana: Dan Coats (R ) reelected
Maine: Olympia Snowe (R ) reelected
Maryland: Paul Sarbanes (D) reelected
Massachusetts: Ted Kennedy (D) reelected
Michigan: Debbie Stabenow (D) defeats Spencer Abraham (R )
Minnesota: Rod Grams (R ) reelected
Mississippi: Trent Lott (R ) reelected
Missouri: John Ashcroft (R ) reelected
Montana: Conrad Burns (R ) reelected
Nebraska: Ben Nelson (D) retiring-replaces Frank Morrison (D)
Nevada: Jim Gibbons (R ) reelected
New Jersey: Jon Corzine (D) defeats Chuck Haytaian (R )
New Mexico: Bill Redmond (R ) defeats Jeff Bingaman (D)
New York: Robert Abrams (D) reelected
North Dakota: Kent Conrad (D) reelected
Ohio: Mike de Wine (R ) reelected
Pennsylvania: William Scranton III (R ) reelected
Rhode Island: Lincoln Almond (R ) reelected
Tennessee: Fred Thompson (R ) reelected
Texas: John Cornyn (R ) defeats Bob Krueger (D)
Utah: Michael Leavitt (R ) retiring-replaces Merrill Cook (R )
Vermont: Jim Jeffords (R ) reelected
Virginia: Chuck Robb (D) reelected
Washington: Maria Cantwell (D) defeats Slade Gorton (R )
West Virginia: Robert Byrd (D) reelected
Wisconsin: Herb Kohl (D) reelected
Wyoming: Mike Enzi (R ) reelected

Afterwards (Democratic majority 55-44-1):
Iowa: Chet Culver (D) retiring-replaces Chuck Grassley (R )
Missouri: Jean Carnahan (D) retiring-replaces Kit Bond (R )
Vermont: Jim Jeffords (R ) becomes Jim Jeffords (ID)


2002 Senate Elections (Democratic majority 55-44-1):
Alabama: Jeff Sessions (R ) reelected
Alaska: Ted Stevens (R ) reelected
Arkansas: Mark Pryor (D) defeats Tim Hutchinson (R )
Colorado: Wayne Allard (R ) reelected
Delaware: Dale Wolf (R ) reelected
Georgia: Guy Millner (R ) reelected
Idaho: Larry Craig (R ) reelected
Illinois: Dick Durbin (D) reelected
Iowa: Tom Harkin (D) reelected
Iowa: Chet Culver (D) reelected
Kansas: Pat Roberts (R ) reelected
Kentucky: Jim Bunning (R ) reelected
Louisiana: Mary Landrieu (D) reelected
Maine: Chellie Pingree (D) defeats Susan Collins (R )
Massachusetts: John Kerry (D) reelected
Michigan: James Blanchard (D) reelected
Minnesota: Paul Wellstone (D) reelected
Mississippi: Thad Cochran (R ) reelected
Missouri: Jim Talent (R ) defeats Jean Carnahan (D)
Montana: Max Baucus (D) reelected
Nebraska: Chuck Hagel (R ) reelected
New Hampshire: John Sununu (R ) retiring-replaces Bob Smith (R )
New Jersey: Frank Lautenberg (D) retiring-replaces Robert Torricelli (D)
New Mexico: Walter Bradley (R ) retiring-replaces Joe Skeen (R )
North Carolina: Harvey Gantt (D) reelected
Oklahoma: Jim Inhofe (R ) reelected
Oregon: Gordon Smith (R ) retiring-replaces Norma Paulus (R )
Rhode Island: Jack Reed (D) reelected
South Carolina: Lindsey Graham (R ) retiring-replaces Strom Thurmond (R )
South Dakota: John Thune (R ) defeats Tim Johnson (D)
Tennessee: Al Gore (D) reelected
Texas: Rick Perry (R ) retiring-replaces Phil Gramm (R )
Virginia: John Warner (R ) reelected
West Virginia: Charlotte Pritt (D) reelected
Wyoming: Craig Thomas (R ) reelected

Afterwards (Democratic majority 54-45-1):
Alabama: Richard Shelby (D) becomes Richard Shelby (R )
Alaska: Lisa Murkowski (R ) retiring-replaces Frank Murkowski (R )

2004 Senate Elections (Republican majority 53-46-1):
Alabama: Richard Shelby (R ) reelected
Alaska: Lisa Murkowski (R ) reelected
Arizona: John McCain (R ) reelected
Arkansas: Blanche Lincoln (D) reelected
California: Barbara Boxer (D) reelected
Colorado: Pete Coors (R ) retiring-replaces Ben N. Campbell (D)
Connecticut: Chris Dodd (D) reelected
Florida: Mel Martinez (R ) retiring-replaces Bob Graham (D)
Georgia: Johnny Isakson (R ) retiring-replaces Zell Miller (D)

Hawaii: Daniel Inouye (D) reelected
Idaho: Mike Crapo (R ) reelected
Illinois: Carol Moseley-Braun (D) reelected
Indiana: Evan Bayh (D) reelected
Iowa: Bob vander Plaats (R ) defeats Chet Culver (D)
Kansas: Sam Brownback (R ) reelected
Kentucky: Rebecca Jackson (R ) defeats Scotty Baesler (D)
Louisiana: David Vitter (R ) retiring-replaces John Breaux (D)

Maryland: Barbara Mikulski (D) reelected
Missouri: Jim Talent (R ) reelected
Nevada: Harry Reid (D) reelected
New Hampshire: Judd Gregg (R ) reelected
New York: Chuck Schumer (D) reelected
North Carolina: Richard Burr (R ) retiring-replaces John Edwards (D)
North Dakota: Byron Dorgan (D) reelected
Ohio: George Voinovich (R ) reelected
Oklahoma: Tom Coburn (R ) retiring-replaces Don Nickles (R )
Oregon: Ron Wyden (D) reelected
Pennsylvania: Arlen Specter (R ) reelected
South Carolina: Jim de Mint (R ) retiring-replaces Fritz Hollings (D)
South Dakota: Tom Daschle (D) reelected
Utah: Bob Bennett (R ) reelected
Vermont: Bernie Sanders (D) reelected
Washington: Patty Murray (D) reelected
Wisconsin: Russ Feingold (D) reelected




Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on September 03, 2011, 10:10:14 pm
Please update!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 03, 2011, 10:44:22 pm
Yeah, I dunno what the deal is here.  It'll probably be a while.  Sorry :(


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 22, 2011, 10:18:01 pm
If Lief is gonna update his timeline, I'll update mine.  Three weeks.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on September 22, 2011, 11:17:37 pm
If Lief is gonna update his timeline, I'll update mine.  Three weeks.

You better!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 01, 2011, 10:43:55 pm
(http://www.8notes.com/images/artists/elvis-presley.jpg)
The First Term of Elvis Presley

“My fellow Americans, our economy is like a hound dog, crying all the time.  The failed policies of the past will be repealed; businesses will be set free from regulation, and allowed to do what they do best: create jobs.  That is my word, and my word is good as gold.”  The Presley Administration opens with a warning shot fired at liberals of both parties; the conservative ideology represented by Presley is shown in his Cabinet, where conservatism reigns.

Secretary of State: Paul Wolfowitz (R-NY)
Secretary of Treasury: Thomas Sowell (R-CA)
Secretary of Defense: Donald Rumsfeld (R-IL)
Attorney General: Robert A. Levy (R-DC)
Secretary of the Interior: Jim Geringer (R-WY)
Secretary of Agriculture: Mike Johanns (R-NE)
Secretary of Commerce: Hank Paulson (R-NY)
Secretary of Labor: John Boehner (R-OH)
Secretary of Health and Human Services: Edward Miller (I-MD)
Secretary of Education: Lamar Alexander (R-TN)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Bill Purcell (D-TN)
Secretary of Transportation: Mary Peter (R-AZ)
Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs: Jim Webb (R-VA)

Within a few weeks of taking office, Presley sends Congress an ambitious series of tax cuts for businesses; dubbed the “Viva Las Vegas Businesses Bill” by both supporters and opponents, the tax cuts represented anywhere from a 10-35% cut for businesses, as well as incentives for creating jobs and not outsourcing.  Upon entering the House, it is enthusiastically backed by Republicans, with Speaker Gingrich calling it “absolutely brilliant.”  Congressman Ron Paul (R-TX) praises it as well, noting the tax cuts will “invigorate our stagnant economy.”

Equally vehement, though, is liberal opposition.  Newly dethroned Speaker David Bonior (D-MI) calls the cuts, “An abomination, a travesty, a handout to Big Business.”  House Minority Whip Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) declares her “unending opposition to this monstrosity.”  However, not all Democrats are opposed; Gene Taylor (D-MS) comes out in support of the Cuts; as does Jim Matheson (D-UT).  The Cuts move through the House, being passed on April 18, 2005, by a vote of 256-172.

On June 20, 2005, Justice Bailey Aldrich retires from the Supreme Court.  Presley appoints Clarence Thomas of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals to replace him.  Thomas is confirmed without controversy, 97-0, making him the third African-American member of the Court.

In the Senate, Democrats filibuster the Bill; Ted Kennedy gives two speeches totaling nearly six hours during the filibuster.  By mid June, the filibuster seems unbeatable.  However, on June 27, 2005, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) calls for cloture.  The vote ends up at exactly 60-40, with 7 Democrats having defected to join the Republicans; on July 14, the Cuts pass 54-40; the six absent votes are all Democrats who had voted for cloture.  The next day, Presley signs the cuts.

In a speech on August 8, the President announces his intention to introduce federal legislation curbing the rights of unions to organize and bargain.  The legislation is vigorously protested, with labor unions organizing outside the White House and Capital.  Secretary of Labor Boehner tells Congress the bill is necessary; “our economy is being ruined by greedy unions.  The only way to prevent depression is to restrict their power significantly.”  This statement provokes outrage, with Senator Feingold calling Boehner “despicable.”  Despite the protests both inside and outside of Congress, the House passes the “Labor Restructuring Act of 2005” on October 24, by a vote of 237-170.  In the Senate, there is no filibuster; liberals are simply too defeated.  On December 11, just before adjourning for the year, the Senate votes 50-31 to pass the bill; it is signed by the President on December 15.

In his State of the Union on January 23, Presley happily notes that unemployment dropped from 7.9% to 6.6% during his first year in office; the Dow had risen from 8,232 when he took office to having closed at 10,771 earlier in the day.  Presley is given full credit; his approval rating on February 1 stands at 64%, and 71% have a favorable view of the President.

On March 5, 2006, Chief Justice Arnold dies of lymphoma.  To replace him, Presley appoints J. Harvie Wilkinson III to replace him.  Wilkinson’s hearings are mostly spent praising Arnold, and Wilkinson is confirmed on March 20, without fanfare, 91-2.

In early April, leading economists report that the country is officially out of a recession; unemployment falls below 6% in June.  In early July, Presley concludes free trade agreements with South Korea and Venezuela, which leads to an boost in manufacturing and oil jobs.

The Congressional Elections

On election day, with the economy recovering, the President enjoys a 61% approval rating, which translates into major Republican gains, consolidating leads in both the House and Senate.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2012&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=0;9;6&AK=0;3;5&AZ=2;11;3&AR=0;6;5&CA=1;55;3&CO=0;9;5&CT=1;7;3&DE=1;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=2;29;9&GA=0;16;5&HI=1;4;3&ID=0;4;6&IL=0;20;6&IN=2;11;3&IA=0;6;5&KS=0;6;5&KY=0;8;5&LA=0;8;5&MD=2;10;9&MA=1;11;3&MI=2;16;9&MN=1;10;9&MS=2;6;3&MO=2;10;3&MT=2;3;3&NV=2;6;3&NH=0;4;5&NJ=1;14;3&NM=2;5;3&NY=1;29;3&NC=0;15;4&ND=1;3;3&OH=2;18;3&OK=0;7;6&OR=0;7;5&PA=2;20;3&RI=2;4;3&SC=0;9;5&SD=0;3;5&TN=2;11;3&TX=2;38;3&UT=2;6;3&VT=3;3;9&VA=2;13;9&WA=1;12;3&WV=1;5;3&WI=1;10;3&WY=2;3;3&ME=2;2;3&ME1=2;1;3&ME2=2;1;3&NE=2;2;9&NE1=2;1;9&NE2=2;1;9&NE3=2;1;9)
Republicans: 56 (+3)
Democrats: 43 (-4)
Independents: 1 (+1)


House Results
Republicans: 253 (+13)
Democrats: 182 (-13)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on October 01, 2011, 10:52:07 pm
This is fu cking awesome! ;D Cant say I like the union bit, but having a President propose a "Viva Las Vegas bill" alone is worth it.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 01, 2011, 10:54:20 pm
This is fu cking awesome! ;D Cant say I like the union bit, but having a President propose a "Viva Las Vegas bill" alone is worth it.

That's not the official title; it's the unofficial one - the equivalent of ObamaCare


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on October 01, 2011, 11:01:08 pm
This is fu cking awesome! ;D Cant say I like the union bit, but having a President propose a "Viva Las Vegas bill" alone is worth it.

That's not the official title; it's the unofficial one - the equivalent of ObamaCare

Dammit! >:( Well at least we still have his great quote about the state of our economy.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 02, 2011, 10:24:54 pm
Dammit! >:( Well at least we still have his great quote about the state of our economy.

But of course ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 09, 2011, 10:18:18 pm
I just realizes this thread is nearly 3 years old.  And that it has been viewed 44,492 times.  That's kind of humbling.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Dancing with Myself on October 10, 2011, 09:36:25 pm
I just realizes this thread is nearly 3 years old.  And that it has been viewed 44,492 times.  That's kind of humbling.

And it is a great one at that, be proud to have written this.

I like Elvis as the President the best, if only that could have happened...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on October 13, 2011, 08:30:07 pm
And it is a great one at that, be proud to have written this.

Thanks!  I feel like none of my timelines has ever reached its fullest potential, though.  That makes me sad.

Post #500, btw.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 17, 2012, 07:19:27 pm
More than 3 years old; 501 posts, 47,097 views.  Wow.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on January 17, 2012, 07:22:38 pm
Update!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on January 17, 2012, 07:49:13 pm
Update!

Soon, I promise.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on January 18, 2012, 08:19:01 pm
Just came across this; it's an oldie but a goodie, and I think it's about to get its motor revving again ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on January 18, 2012, 08:33:23 pm
I'm wondering who the nation's better Presidents 1960-onward are. I'd say JFK, Humphrey, Hatfield, & Campbell. Worse ones would probably be Tower, Humphrey's successor, & JFK jr. Chiles I'd say would be neutral.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on January 18, 2012, 08:39:56 pm
I'm wondering who the nation's better Presidents 1960-onward are. I'd say JFK, Humphrey, Hatfield, & Campbell. Worse ones would probably be Tower, Humphrey's successor, & JFK jr. Chiles I'd say would be neutral.
Though JohnJohn will go down in history ITTL, along with OTL Bush, McCain, and Obama, as okay men but also in the wrong place at the wrong time


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: ask_not on February 29, 2012, 12:27:06 pm
you say the elvis  for  president thing is just a dream.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 29, 2012, 10:25:08 pm
I'm listening to some Elvis right now; I plan to update this sometime soon.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on February 29, 2012, 11:16:21 pm
I'm listening to some Elvis right now; I plan to update this sometime soon.

Great!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on February 29, 2012, 11:17:12 pm
I'm listening to some Elvis right now; I plan to update this sometime soon.

Great!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on April 23, 2012, 10:23:27 pm
Uh oh


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 06, 2012, 10:06:16 pm
Uh oh

It'll totally get done eventually.  I promise.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on May 07, 2012, 07:46:30 pm
Uh oh

It'll totally get done eventually.  I promise.

Ok.  Take your time.  No rush, but if it's not done by July then, well do you remember the scene in Tale of Two Cities when the peasants storm the Bastille?  I wont be Madame Defarge, but I'll be part of the mob ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on May 28, 2012, 10:19:28 pm
I'm working on an update, maybe this week :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: adrac on May 29, 2012, 04:41:28 pm
I'm working on an update, maybe this week :)
That would awesome.
I think I've read through all of this TL like 3 times now.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 14, 2012, 10:57:40 am
Maybe this weekend.  In fact, yes, this weekend.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on June 14, 2012, 06:52:39 pm
Please!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on June 17, 2012, 10:35:22 pm
Please!


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 24, 2012, 12:39:17 am
Entering 2007, President Presley stands at an all time high in popularity.  The economy, after having been in decline when Presley took office, has rebounded fully and improved under Presley.

Presley takes advantage of the situation to push through a major piece of legislation.  The first is the Taylor-Gramm-Cochran Act.  Jointly sponsored by Congressman Gene Taylor (D-MS), Senator Phil Gramm (R-TX) and Senator Thad Cochran (R-MS), the legislation would remove barriers in the market among banking companies, securities companies and insurance companies that prohibited any one institution from acting as any combination of an investment bank, a commercial bank, and an insurance company, repealing parts of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933.

During debate over the bill, it becomes apparent that a majority of Congress favors the changes.  However, liberals in Congress strongly oppose the change, with Congressman John Dingell (D-MI) warning that “In the near future, probably before many of us have left this body, we will have banks that are ‘Too big to fail’, and they will start to fail.  And then we will answer for our mistakes.”  However, despite Dingell’s warning, the Act passes the House on June 15 by a vote of 345-89 (250-3 among GOP, 95-86 among Democrats).  In the Senate, a Ted Kennedy-led filibuster is overcome, and the Senate passes the bill on November 29 by a vote of 87-13 (55-1 among GOP, 32-11 among Democrats, 0-1 among Independents).  The Act is signed into law by Presley on December 9.

On August 14 Justice Stephanie Kulp Seymour retires, and Presley appoints Judge John Roberts to replace her.  Roberts is confirmed without controversy, 87-3.

On January 7, 2008, Justice Birch Bayh dies of a stroke.  President Presley nominates Solicitor General Paul Clement to replace him.  Clement runs into liberal opposition, but he is eventually confirmed on February 26 by a vote of 73-27.

Following Clement’s confirmation, Presley begins his reelection campaign.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 24, 2012, 01:24:48 am
The Democratic Nomination

The popularity of President Presley scares off many high profile Democrats, with popular choices like former Vice President Breaux and Senator Russ Feingold (WI) declining to run.  In the end, several candidates declare: Governor John Baldacci of Maine, Senator Tom Carper of Delaware, Senator Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico, and Governor Brad Henry of Oklahoma.

Early in the race, no candidate appears to have much of a lead, with polling showing no candidate nationally over 30%.  The Iowa Caucus is a divided affairs, with Henry winning at 34%, followed by Bingaman (31%), Baldacci (26%), and Carper (9%).  New Hampshire is a complete reverse, with Baldacci (37%), followed by Carper (25%), Bingaman (23%), and Henry (15%).

South Carolina is a win for the semi-Southern Henry, taking 40% with Carper (24%), Bingaman (21%), and Baldacci (15%) trailing.  Nevada is an easy win for nearby Bingaman (46%), with Henry (25%), Carper (20%), and Baldacci (9%) trailing.  On Super Tuesday the pack separates, with Henry (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Minnesota, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Wisconsin) and Bingaman (Arizona, Illinois, New Mexico, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming) easily dominating Baldacci (Maine, Massachusetts), and Carper (Delaware).  Carper then drops out, and endorses Henry.

Over the next month, however, Baldacci responds by winning several primaries (California, Connecticut, Michigan, New York), while both Henry (Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina) and Bingaman (Montana) struggle.  In early March, Mini-Tuesday provides the final blow to Bingaman, as he fails to win primaries in Florida (Henry), Texas (Baldacci), or Pennsylvania (Baldacci).  He then drops out and endorses Baldacci, providing him with the necessary resources to finish his comeback, and at the DNC, he chooses Bingaman to be his running mate.

The Republican Nomination

The extremely popular Presley is renominated by acclamation, with an optimistic GOP looking towards November.

The General Election

From the start, Baldacci faces an uphill battle.  In the debates Presley is confident and charismatic, while Baldacci fails to connect.  Baldacci fails to give the voters a reason to vote for him, and Presley is reelected overwhelmingly.

(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=1&pv_p=1&ev_p=1&type=calc&AL=2;9;6&AK=2;3;6&AZ=2;10;5&AR=2;6;6&CA=2;55;5&CO=2;9;5&CT=1;7;5&DE=1;3;5&DC=1;3;8&FL=2;27;6&GA=2;15;5&HI=2;4;5&ID=2;4;6&IL=1;21;5&IN=2;11;6&IA=2;7;5&KS=2;6;6&KY=2;8;5&LA=2;9;5&MD=2;10;5&MA=1;12;5&MI=2;17;5&MN=1;10;5&MS=2;6;5&MO=2;11;5&MT=2;3;6&NV=2;5;5&NH=2;4;5&NJ=2;15;5&NM=1;5;4&NY=1;31;5&NC=2;15;5&ND=2;3;6&OH=2;20;5&OK=2;7;6&OR=2;7;5&PA=2;21;5&RI=1;4;5&SC=2;8;6&SD=2;3;6&TN=2;11;6&TX=2;34;6&UT=2;5;7&VT=1;3;5&VA=2;13;6&WA=2;11;5&WV=2;5;6&WI=2;10;5&WY=2;3;6&ME=1;2;5&ME1=1;1;5&ME2=1;1;5&NE=2;2;7&NE1=2;1;6&NE2=2;1;6&NE3=2;1;7)
Elvis Presley/Gordon Smith: 55.6% PV, 435 EV
John Baldacci/Jeff Bingaman: 43.3% PV, 103 EV

The Congressional Elections

The Presley landslide leads to major Republican gains in Congress, where they establish their biggest majorities since before the New Deal.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2008&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=2;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=0;10;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=0;55;6&CO=2;9;3&CT=0;7;6&DE=2;3;3&DC=0;3;9&FL=0;27;5&GA=2;15;3&HI=0;4;7&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;21;3&IN=0;11;4&IA=1;7;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;3&LA=2;9;9&MD=0;10;6&MA=1;12;3&MI=1;17;3&MN=1;10;3&MS=2;6;3&MO=0;11;4&MT=1;3;3&NV=0;5;5&NH=2;4;3&NJ=1;15;3&NM=2;5;3&NY=0;31;6&NC=2;15;9&ND=0;3;5&OH=0;20;5&OK=2;7;3&OR=2;7;3&PA=0;21;5&RI=1;4;3&SC=2;8;3&SD=2;3;3&TN=2;11;9&TX=2;34;3&UT=0;5;6&VT=0;3;6&VA=2;13;3&WA=0;11;5&WV=1;5;3&WI=0;10;5&WY=2;3;3&ME=1;2;3&ME1=1;1;3&ME2=1;1;3&NE=2;2;3&NE1=2;1;3&NE2=2;1;3&NE3=2;1;3)
Republicans: 59 (+3)
Democrats: 40 (-3)
Independent: 1 (-)


House Results
Republicans: 282 (+29)
Democrats: 153 (-29)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on June 24, 2012, 10:53:42 am
Awesome stuff, thanks for updating! I have a bad feeling about Presley's second term though...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on June 24, 2012, 01:34:28 pm
This is great.  Was Chafee the Repub who voted against it, and I assume Bernie Sanders is the indie?  Thanks for the update; keep it up!  ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 25, 2012, 12:59:35 am
This is great.  Was Chafee the Repub who voted against it, and I assume Bernie Sanders is the indie?  Thanks for the update; keep it up!  ;)

Correct, and thanks :)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 25, 2012, 01:50:27 pm
(http://www.8notes.com/images/artists/elvis-presley.jpg)
The Second Term of Elvis Presley

Beginning his second term, President Presley sees a mandate from the American people for true conservative change.  In the weeks following his reelection, he works with advisers to implement his conservative vision.

In early February, he reveals his major bill.  Officially called the Government Restructuring Act of 2009, it is informally called the “Slash and Burn Act”.  The legislation would eliminate five Cabinet Departments (Labor, HHS, Housing, Transportation, and Veterans’ Affairs), merging them with Treasury, Interior, and Defense respectively.

Immediately after arriving in the House the legislation provokes controversy.  In the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Chairman Darrell Issa attempts to kill the legislation by leaving it in his committee; this only works until Speaker Gingrich forces him to report the Act.  In response to liberal threats to introduce poison amendments, Rules Committee Chairman David Dreier (R-CA) pushes the bill forward with a no-amendment rule.  During debate in the House moderate and liberal Republicans vent their frustration, with Issa calling the Act “a monstrosity and an example of ideological rigidity gone too far.”  Congressman Mike Castle (R-DE) notes that the Act represents “the most drastic attempted reorganization of government since FDR’s court packing plan seventy years ago.”  However, on July 16, 2009, by a vote of 219-216, the Act is passed.  Only one Democrat, Gene Taylor of Mississippi, votes in favor, while 64 Republicans vote against it.

In the Senate, the legislation faces significant challenges.  Like in the House, the Committee to which the legislation is referred to faces a recalcitrant Chairman, in the form of Alaska Senator Frank Murkowski.  Murkowski refuses to let the Act out, and it is not until early January that it reaches the Senate floor.  During the debate in the Senate, liberals launch into an extended filibuster, with liberal Republicans like Olympia Snowe of Maine attacking Presley for not allowing Republicans to see the bill before being given to Congress.  On April 17 Majority Leader McConnell calls for cloture, which fails after getting just 52 votes, 8 short of the necessary 60.  On May 3 McConnell announces he will try again on May 10.  On May 8, however, McConnell suffers a massive heart attack after meeting with liberal Republicans, and passes away the next morning.  The Senate recesses for his funeral, and when the Senate reconvenes on May 18, Jon Kyl of Arizona is elected Majority Leader.  Two weeks later, on June 3, Kyl calls for cloture, losing 58-41.  The next day he meets with Presley privately, informing him that “Mr. President, we don’t have the votes.  [The liberals] will delay this thing until Congress ends, and then we’ll have to start all over again.”  Dejected, Presley tells Kyl to look for a compromise.  The new Act, however, is rejected by the Senate on September 2 by a vote of 48-52, and it is never introduced in the House.  Presley, despite his landslide win, fails to achieve anything of substance.

The Congressional Elections
During the debate, public opinion turns sharply against Presley, forcing him to campaign vigorously for the legislation.  By the time the Senate compromise is rejected, Presley’s approval rating has fallen from 64% on January 20, 2009 to 37%.  As a result, Republicans suffer a pounding in the midterm elections, losing seven seats in the Senate and actually losing their majority in the House in the largest single year loss for a party in the House since the GOP lost 101 seats in 1932.

Senate Results
(http://uselectionatlas.org/TOOLS/genusmap.php?year=2012&ev_c=0&pv_p=1&ev_p=0&type=calc&AL=2;9;3&AK=2;3;3&AZ=2;11;3&AR=1;6;3&CA=1;55;3&CO=1;9;9&CT=1;7;3&DE=0;3;6&DC=0;3;9&FL=1;29;9&GA=2;16;3&HI=1;4;3&ID=2;4;3&IL=1;20;3&IN=1;11;3&IA=2;6;3&KS=2;6;3&KY=2;8;3&LA=1;8;9&MD=1;10;3&MA=0;11;6&MI=0;16;5&MN=0;10;5&MS=0;6;5&MO=2;10;3&MT=0;3;4&NV=1;6;3&NH=1;4;9&NJ=0;14;5&NM=0;5;5&NY=1;29;3&NC=1;15;9&ND=1;3;3&OH=1;18;9&OK=2;7;3&OR=1;7;3&PA=1;20;9&RI=0;4;6&SC=2;9;3&SD=1;3;3&TN=0;11;5&TX=0;38;5&UT=2;6;3&VT=1;3;3&VA=0;13;5&WA=1;12;3&WV=0;5;5&WI=1;10;3&WY=0;3;6&ME=0;2;5&ME1=0;1;6&ME2=0;1;5&NE=0;2;5&NE1=0;1;5&NE2=0;1;4&NE3=0;1;6)
Republicans: 52 (-7)
Democrats: 47 (+7)
Independent: 1 (-)


House Results
Democrats: 235 (+82)
Republicans: 200 (-82)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on June 25, 2012, 05:03:48 pm
Really?  Just because of one failed bill?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 25, 2012, 06:53:53 pm
Really?  Just because of one failed bill?

Think of the negative reaction to ObamaCare, not cube that, and square the resulting number; that is the negative reaction to what happened here.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on June 25, 2012, 10:58:45 pm
If y'all are interested, I'm uploading the CD results to the Gallery; so far we have 1964, 1968, and 1972.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Jerseyrules on June 26, 2012, 12:14:16 am
Really?  Just because of one failed bill?

Think of the negative reaction to ObamaCare, not cube that, and square the resulting number; that is the negative reaction to what happened here.

?  Anyway, I still think this is just a minor thing, and his approvals would remain above 50%, but that's just my opinion.  More please ;)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 02, 2012, 02:26:56 pm
So I meant to finish this before leaving for college, but left my notes at home.  So I'll try for an update in early October.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Cath on September 02, 2012, 03:03:41 pm
Cool stuff man.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on September 03, 2012, 12:44:45 pm
Cool stuff man.

Thanks.  I've been at this one a long time.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 15, 2012, 01:45:03 pm
5 months without an update is a long time.  I'll try and do one soon.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on December 05, 2012, 03:51:34 pm
5 months without an update is a long time.  I'll try and do one soon.

Not only are we nearly at 6 months without an update, this reaches it's 4th birthday on December 27.  I'll try for an update by then.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: ask_not on January 23, 2013, 03:36:46 pm
what happens after president presly who is next?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on February 27, 2013, 06:23:35 pm
what happens after president presly who is next?

Hopefully I'll finish it eventually and you can find out.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on November 28, 2013, 12:51:43 am
Someday, maybe?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on December 28, 2014, 01:13:00 pm
what happens after president presly who is next?


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: bobloblaw on January 09, 2015, 03:09:33 pm
JFK dies by 1970 from Addisons Disease


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Kaine for Senate '18 on March 25, 2015, 02:00:41 pm
Maybe someday I'll finish this?  (I know I've said that many times before, but hey, you never know?)


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: Vosem on April 07, 2015, 08:11:30 pm
Maybe someday I'll finish this?  (I know I've said that many times before, but hey, you never know?)

We still hold out hope...


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: AussieLaborite on October 04, 2015, 06:27:27 am
Still a good Tl.


Title: Re: JFK Lives
Post by: frostyfreeze on January 24, 2017, 03:17:00 pm
I would like this to be revived one day..