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1  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Why do Dutch Reformed/Calvinists vote Republican so heavily? on: March 23, 2019, 06:22:25 pm
Calvinist theology and religious culture is very socially conservative, and very fiscally conservative/pro-business, even by conservative Protestant standards. A Dutch Calvinist is more likely to observe the Sabbath (e.g. not go to a restaurant after church), view divorce harshly,  and adhere to free market economics than say, an Scotch-Irish Baptist.

Interesting, thanks.

What do you mean by a pro-business theology?
DC Al Fine will put it more eloquently, I'm sure, but historically Calvinism conceives of work as a divine calling, and so self-betterment as bringing oneself closer to God—'industriousness is next to Godliness,' you could say. The historian Max Weber called this the "Protestant work ethic," and it was an important divergence away from Medieval ideas of wealth and competition and towards the modern market economy.

I'm probably missing several crucial theological distinctions, but that's my understanding anyways.
2  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Tulsi Gabbard on: March 23, 2019, 04:43:53 pm
It puzzles me that certain sectors of the Left like her for her foreign policy ideas despite them being firmly rooted in paleoconservatism (firmly pro-Israel, pro-drone, not opposed to torture, bizarrely anti-Islam) as opposed to principled left-wing anti-interventionism. The fact that plenty of right-wing reactionaries are in love with her isn't without foundation. She's also like Kamala Harris in the sense that she currently has a lot of progressive stances but her recent past is filled with a bunch of problematic crap (homophobia, Hare Krishna, BJP connections).

HP. Trash candidate.
This exactly.
3  General Politics / Individual Politics / The American Montfort (1809–10 election) on: March 23, 2019, 04:21:57 pm
Returning to Philadelphia in the spring of 1807, Prime Minister Gallatin presented a vigorous program of government to the members of the new House of Representatives, and the 1807–1810 Congressional term saw passage of several significant legislative items in spite of the limits imposed by a minority government. Foremost among these was an ambitious federal internal improvements plan, outlined in Gallatin's 1808 Report, which called for construction of an extensive network of roads and canals to bind the new states of the Trans-Appalachian West to the rest of the Union. While the united opposition of Federalists and "Old Republicans" led by Virginia's John Randolph prevented passage of the earlier, more expansive version of the infrastructure bill, Gallatin was able to secure funding for an extension of the Cumberland Road. In the realm of foreign affairs, Gallatin narrowly secured Congressional approval for an extension of the 1795 treaty with Britain. In the acrimonious battle on the House floor, the government was upheld by the votes of Federalist members after War Hawks in the Republican caucus joined Clay's Independents to vote against ratification. Tensions were only further exacerbated by the Chesapeake-Leopold affair, when sailors of the HMS Leopold seized the USS Chesapeake off the coast of Norfolk, Virginia and impressed members of the crew into the Royal Navy—an incident that left Clay and the War Hawks howling for revenge.

Gallatin seeks an unprecedented fourth term in government as the 1809 elections draw near. His Republicans present themselves as the party of peace and sanity against the anti-French warmongering of the Federalists and the anti-British warmongering of the Independent Republicans. Though a vocal minority of "Old Republicans" led by Randolph favor a more restrictive interpretation of federal power, the majority stand by Gallatin in favoring extension of the Bank of the United States beyond its original charter (due to expire in 1811) and federal internal improvement programs. In opposition, the Federalists continue to attack Gallatin's foreign policy, warning a Republican majority in the House will inevitably compel Gallatin to declare war on Britain, and themselves favoring an alliance with Britain against France. They support extending the National Bank but oppose Gallatin's internal improvement scheme, unwilling to finance extensive federal projects that will primarily benefit Republican constituencies in the South and West. Finally, the Independent Republicans are calling for an immediate declaration of war against Britain, citing the impressment of American sailors and Indian raids on the frontier. They support internal improvements but are divided over the issue of the Bank, which their leader, Clay, personally supports.

Two days. No cap on the Independent Republicans this time.
4  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: The American Montfort (1806–07 election) on: March 23, 2019, 02:36:08 pm
What happens if no one gets a majority of Electoral votes?
It would go to the House, as IRL—seeing as we elect the House alongside the presidency in these, the House vote would most likely be simulated, unless the result were for some reason unclear.

I think you accidentally listed the percentage of seats for the House vote instead of the popular vote as labeled ?
The popular vote totals have been adjusted versus the poll to account for the seat cap on the IRs—basically I assumed a 1:1 ratio of % of the vote to seat share for the Independents, which gives them 18% of the pv, and evenly distributed the excess between the major parties. Given the strong showing for the IRs in the poll, I'm leaning toward scrapping the cap for the next elections, but it will depend on how the dice roll for 1807–1810 turns out.
5  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: The American Montfort – Master Thread on: March 23, 2019, 11:38:57 am
The Second Gallatin—Madison Ministry, 1804–1807
Improved relations with France and victory over the corsairs of Tunis, Algiers, and Tripoli characterized the foreign policy of the second Gallatin—Madison administration, whose efforts to protect American trade with Europe amidst the war raging between Great Britain and Napoleonic France yielded mixed results in the period from 1804 to 1807. The jewel of their labors was the 1804 acquisition of the Louisiana Territory from France, which doubled the size of the country with a single stroke of a pen resolved long-standing tensions regarding American merchant access to the port of New Orleans. Peace with Britain proved more elusive, as continued American trade with the Continent inspired fury in the Court of St. James, and American merchant vessels crossing the Atlantic became frequent prey of the Royal Navy.

Domestically, the events of the next three years were closely entwined with the decline and fall of Aaron Burr, who responded to the defeat of his faction in the 1803 general election by dueling and killing the man he held most responsible: former Prime Minister and chieftain of Federalism Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton's death at Burr's hand ruined the latter's reputation and exposed him to charges of murder, and the onetime Secretary of War fled west, where he became embroiled in the affair that came to be known as "Burr's Rebellion." The full extent of the role Burr may have played in encouraging discontent among the inhabitants Western Kentucky was never fully known. What seemed clear enough, was that in the spring of 1806, a ragtag company of two-hundred-odd white settlers in Western Kentucky took up arms in rebellion, responding to Indian raids and the perceived encroachment of federal power. The rebels seize several courthouses and expelled what few agents of the central government there were to be found; but by late July, the rebellion had begun to lose momentum, and the remaining rebels surrendered to the Kentucky militia.

Letters produced after the fact suggested Burr had some prior knowledge of the rebels' intentions, and had for a time hoped to use the uprising to detach Western Kentucky from the Union, and by taking New Orleans, establish an empire west of the Appalachians. Hazy plans for an expedition down the Mississippi outlined in correspondence with British agents in Canada fell apart, and Burr took no further action to pursue secession; but the publication of his letters to James Wilkinson, a general in the United States Army and a Spanish agent who for a time encouraged Burr's plans before turning on him, raised a fresh storm of controversy, and facing charges of treason, Burr fled to Texas.

The 1806-07 United States general election
In spite of the furious opposition of the Federalists, who gave their all to topple the Republican administration in 1806, Albert Gallatin proved himself equal to the storm, surviving charges of incompetence and even disloyalty to return to Philadelphia still the largest party in the House.  Two years after Hamilton met his end at Weehawken, the Federalist challenge proved largely impotent in the face of a superior Republican organization, and the party managed only marginal gains, failing even to crest one third of the seats in the lower chamber. Yet the success of the Independent Republicans across the West and Mid-Atlantic, as well as Virginia, where James Monroe led the anti-Madison Republicans, left the government short of an overall majority, forcing Gallatin to offer accommodation to the renegade leaders in the next Congress. The race for president was similarly narrow, Madison besting his rivals by a majority of four votes in the electoral college, becoming the third son of the Old Dominion to occupy the Executive Mansion that had so far seen only Virginians live under its roof.

Img

Republican (Albert Gallatin) 71 seats (-11), 47.0% popular votes
Federalist (Timothy Pickering) 46 seats (+3), 35.0% popular votes
Independent Republican (Henry Clay) 25 seats (+8), 18.0% popular votes

Img

Secretary of State James Madison (Republican, Virginia) 93 electors, 48.0% popular votes
Former U.S. Ambassador Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (Federalist, South Carolina) 42 electors, 24.0% popular votes
Secretary of War George Clinton (Republican, New York) 40 electors, 28.0% popular votes
6  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: The American Montfort (1806–07 election) on: March 23, 2019, 11:37:40 am
The 1806-07 United States general election
In spite of the furious opposition of the Federalists, who gave their all to topple the Republican administration in 1806, Albert Gallatin proved himself equal to the storm, surviving charges of incompetence and even disloyalty to return to Philadelphia still the largest party in the House.  Two years after Hamilton met his end at Weehawken, the Federalist challenge proved largely impotent in the face of a superior Republican organization, and the party managed only marginal gains, failing even to crest one third of the seats in the lower chamber. Yet the success of the Independent Republicans across the West and Mid-Atlantic, as well as Virginia, where James Monroe led the anti-Madison Republicans, left the government short of an overall majority, forcing Gallatin to offer accommodation to the renegade leaders in the next Congress. The race for president was similarly narrow, Madison besting his rivals by a majority of four votes in the electoral college, the third son of the Old Dominion to occupy the Executive Mansion that had so far seen only Virginians live under its roof.

Img

Republican (Albert Gallatin) 71 seats (-11), 47.0% popular votes
Federalist (Timothy Pickering) 46 seats (+3), 35.0% popular votes
Independent Republican (Henry Clay) 25 seats (+8), 18.0% popular votes

Img

Secretary of State James Madison (Republican, Virginia) 93 electors, 48.0% popular votes
Former U.S. Ambassador Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (Federalist, South Carolina) 42 electors, 24.0% popular votes
Secretary of War George Clinton (Republican, New York) 40 electors, 28.0% popular votes
7  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Mitch McConnell vs. Matt Bevin on: March 22, 2019, 05:12:55 pm
If future historians ever have cause to write The Decline and Fall of the American Republic, McConnell's picture will be on the cover.
8  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Isn't abolishing EC, etc. a Democratic power grab in some voters eyes? on: March 22, 2019, 12:17:01 pm
7. A 'national popular vote' or the equivalent is a strong step towards rejecting the shared sovereignty that is at the heart of American governance, and seems to me a dismaying display of ignorance about what the United States is.
Having a president at all was a strong step toward rejecting what the United States was prior to 1787. Systems of government can change when existing structures are shown to be inadequate.
9  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Should noncitizens vote in American elections? on: March 20, 2019, 10:39:04 pm
Literally no-one worth listening to supports this.
10  General Politics / Individual Politics / The American Montfort (1806–07 election) on: March 20, 2019, 10:29:33 pm
Improved relations with France and victory over the corsairs of Tunis, Algiers, and Tripoli characterized the foreign policy of the second Gallatin—Madison administration, whose efforts to protect American trade with Europe amidst the war raging between Great Britain and Napoleonic France yielded mixed results in the period from 1804 to 1807. The jewel of their labors was the 1804 acquisition of the Louisiana Territory from France, which doubled the size of the country with a single stroke of a pen resolved long-standing tensions regarding American merchant access to the port of New Orleans. Peace with Britain proved more elusive, as continued American trade with the Continent inspired fury in the Court of St. James, and American merchant vessels crossing the Atlantic became frequent prey of the Royal Navy.

Domestically, the events of the next three years were closely entwined with the decline and fall of Aaron Burr, who responded to the defeat of his faction in the 1803 general election by dueling and killing the man he held most responsible: former Prime Minister and chieftain of Federalism Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton's death at Burr's hand ruined the latter's reputation and exposed him to charges of murder, and the onetime Secretary of War fled west, where he became embroiled in the affair that came to be known as "Burr's Rebellion." The full extent of the role Burr may have played in encouraging discontent among the inhabitants Western Kentucky was never fully known. What seemed clear enough, was that in the spring of 1806, a ragtag company of two-hundred-odd white settlers in Western Kentucky took up arms in rebellion, responding to Indian raids and the perceived encroachment of federal power. The rebels seize several courthouses and expelled what few agents of the central government there were to be found; but by late July, the rebellion had begun to lose momentum, and the remaining rebels surrendered to the Kentucky militia.

Letters produced after the fact suggested Burr had some prior knowledge of the rebels' intentions, and had for a time hoped to use the uprising to detach Western Kentucky from the Union, and by taking New Orleans, establish an empire west of the Appalachians. Hazy plans for an expedition down the Mississippi outlined in correspondence with British agents in Canada fell apart, and Burr took no further action to pursue secession; but the publication of his letters to James Wilkinson, a general in the United States Army and a Spanish agent who for a time encouraged Burr's plans before turning on him, raised a fresh storm of controversy, and facing charges of treason, Burr fled to Texas.

Now the sole leader of his party's caucus as Madison retires to seek the presidency, Gallatin seeks a third mandate from the public as the 1806 elections approach. His Republicans bill themselves as the party of free trade, low taxes, and peace abroad, seeing in newly-acquired western lands the foundations of a republic of independent farmers free from the corrupting influence of markets and speculators. They are opposed by the Federalists, once again led by Timothy Pickering, who decry the purchase of Louisiana as unconstitutional and accuse Gallatin of endangering American trade by needlessly antagonizing the British. There are also the so-called Independent Republicans, led by Kentucky's Henry Clay, of whom no-one is quite sure what to make. The descendants of Burr's dissident faction from 1803, they present an "third something" against the old Federalist and Republican banners, drawing their support from the West and parts of the South: ready to fight either Britain or France should the moment call for it, and broadly sympathetic to Burr's Rebellion, they are as much a personal vehicle for their leaders as an ideological outfit.

Also on the ballot is the presidency: with the incumbent Jefferson determined to retire, the Republicans have thrown their support behind Secretary of State Madison, while the Federalists have again nominated former U.S. Ambassador Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. The Independents are backing the candidacy of Secretary of War George Clinton, despite Clinton's personal rivalry with Burr and his role in suppressing the 1805 rebellion.

Two days. Due to their regional focus, the Independent Republicans are capped at 25 seats (18% of the total).
11  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Best President who served between LBJ and Obama on: March 20, 2019, 06:55:07 pm
12  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 2020 presidential election on: March 20, 2019, 06:54:25 pm
Sanders, but God, the VP choices are awful.
13  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE RESOLUTION: The Recall of Senators Amendment (CHECK THIS THREAD) on: March 20, 2019, 06:52:29 pm
With these changes, I can only recommend that the Amendment be soundly rejected, as it compromises the ability of the regions to regulate their own elections and potentially makes senators answerable to recall by an electorate different from that which put them in office (in the event a region opted to conduct senatorial elections in the regional legislature).

How does it affect the ability of regions to regulate their own elections?

Quote from: Amendment 17:03 by Ontario Progressive
Senators shall be subject to recall in each Region, according to the provisions that at least a quarter of registered voters in the respective Region must sign a petition to initiate a recall, an initiated recall vote must require the turnout of at least half of registered voters in the respective Region; and three-fifths of all votes, excluding abstentions, must be cast in favor of the recall [. . .]

The amendment establishes strict and onerous conditions for the recall of Senators, and mandates that all recall elections be conducted by popular vote. This eliminates the ability of the regions to determine the procedure for Senatorial recall, and in the event a region should chose to elect its senators by a vote of the regional legislature, would open up a scenario where senators are appointed by one body of voters (the regional parliament/council/Chamber of Delegates) and subject to removal by another (the population at-large). Senatorial recall elections are a bad idea anyways (usurping the Senate's exclusive right to judge the qualifications of its members), and if it comes with the additional price of the federal government controlling the process from beginning to end, it's certainly not a price worth paying.
14  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Isn't abolishing EC, etc. a Democratic power grab in some voters eyes? on: March 20, 2019, 03:51:26 pm
It is a democratic power grab, yes.
15  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Discord Regulations Bill (Debating) on: March 19, 2019, 09:56:45 pm
1. It is not a requirement for anyone in Atlas to join discord, you can't regulate something that isn't even part of the forum.
Seeing as discord screenshots are admissible as evidence in court, that's not exactly true. In principle, I'd be open to some legal measures to protect against harassment/privacy violations, but this particular bill is . . . just really bad. I could go through it point-by-point, but honestly I'm not sure it's even salvageable.
It might be admissible as evidence in court, but the court doesn't even have to do such a thing. Arguably the only thing that should be regulated by atlasian officials and/or law is things within this part of the forum.
If something is admissible in court, the implication insofar as the law is concerned would be that it is real and thus potentially subject to legislative action. To take it from another angle: in real life, only evidence that is 'of this world' is admissible in court—you can't find someone guilty based on a dream, or because you say God told you they committed the crime. Must is no longer a relevant question here, because the court does admit such evidence, so Discord is evidently part of Atlasia and thus subject to regulation. Congress has in fact already moved to regulate activity on Discord in the past, with the prohibition against holding session there in the House and Senate Rules. What it is not, is a Guantanamo-esque free zone where the Bill of Rights does not apply—so this bill as it stands is unconstitutional.
16  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Regional Governments / Re: S.19.1-21: Protecting Children from Poison in........Circumstances Act - Passed on: March 19, 2019, 09:48:17 pm
LOL.
17  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE RESOLUTION: The Recall of Senators Amendment (CHECK THIS THREAD) on: March 19, 2019, 09:45:35 pm
With these changes, I can only recommend that the Amendment be soundly rejected, as it compromises the ability of the regions to regulate their own elections and potentially makes senators answerable to recall by an electorate different from that which put them in office (in the event a region opted to conduct senatorial elections in the regional legislature).
18  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Discord Regulations Bill (Debating) on: March 19, 2019, 09:41:20 pm
1. It is not a requirement for anyone in Atlas to join discord, you can't regulate something that isn't even part of the forum.
Seeing as discord screenshots are admissible as evidence in court, that's not exactly true. In principle, I'd be open to some legal measures to protect against harassment/privacy violations, but this particular bill is . . . just really bad. I could go through it point-by-point, but honestly I'm not sure it's even salvageable.
19  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Nullifier Party vs. Know-Nothing Party on: March 19, 2019, 09:35:43 pm
Why are so many people voting for the avowedly pro-slavery party?
The bold could easily apply to either of these parties. While in Massachusetts, anti-slavery candidates co-opted the Know-Nothing banner for the 1854 elections while the party system was in flux, this was the exception rather than the rule: the Know Nothings had their base of support among Southern Whigs and others unwilling to join the Republicans because they were explicitly in favor of slavery, and after Millard Fillmore (of Fugitive Slave Law fame) was nominated by the Native American National Convention in 1856, the anti-slavery minority quit the party. Representing the Know Nothings as anything less than a pro-slavery party with a nativist, anti-Papist twist is ahistorical.
20  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Atlasia Territorial Statehood Act (SPONSOR!!!! Check thread) on: March 19, 2019, 09:23:14 pm
It seems the Senate's mind is made up, but for the record, as I believe I am the first person to advocate for admitting these territories to the Union post-reset, I fail to see how a referendum is remotely useful from a gameplay perspective. Because there are no players currently registered in these territories (and presumably no-one could legally register there, at least not without losing their right to vote in Atlasian elections), such a poll would be simulated entirely by the GM—which from my standpoint at least, strays a little too far towards giving the GM a vote on political questions.

Frankly, the arguments against this bill all strike me as very poor, but then I don't know what I was expecting. Tongue
21  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: H-17.9: Joint Resolution to Suspend the Federal Electoral Act (3/19/19) on: March 19, 2019, 09:09:38 pm
This shouldn't be illegal in the first place. We have a grace period for correcting ballot errors during elections; I don't see how it's a significant weakening of the law to allow similar corrections for registrations.

And yes, I understand a strict reading of the current law does not seem to provide for this and any new provision would not be retroactive. Nevertheless, the contention that allowing Kenobi to return to Texas is tantamount to the death of law and order in Atlasia strikes me as silly—and this is coming from someone who is very much a pedant when it comes to the law. Tongue
22  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Region Moving Grace Period Act (Debating) on: March 19, 2019, 09:04:56 pm
Section 6 is good theory, if perhaps a little rough in execution. The addendum to Section 5 is emblematic of a larger and profoundly negative trend of trying to legislate for every possible minor abuse of power (rather than encouraging responsibility on the part of lawmakers) and should be incinerated.
23  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Discord Regulations Bill (Debating) on: March 19, 2019, 08:50:37 pm
Well, this is problematic, to say the least.
24  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: The Megathread for All Things Hoosier! on: March 19, 2019, 03:24:04 pm
Mayor Pete has qualified for the debates!

https://www.wkyt.com/content/news/Thanks-donors-Mayor-Pete-says-hes-in-presidential-debates-507267061.html

Quote
Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg (BOO'-tuh-juhj) says he's met a fundraising threshold to participate in this summer's debates.

The South Bend, Indiana, mayor said on Saturday he received donations from more than 65,000 individual donors.

The Democratic National Committee said last month up to 20 candidates can qualify for the debates by collecting donations from at least 65,000 individuals, with at least 200 unique donors in at least 20 states. They also can qualify by reaching 1 percent support in at least three national or early primary state polls.

In an email to supporters Buttigieg says "we weren't even close" to 65,000 donors when the DNC announced the requirement. The 37-year-old veteran says more than 76,000 people have now donated.

The debates will be held in June and July.

This is going to be an interesting campaign!

Cheesy
25  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Elections / Re: bruhgmger2 for Fremont Parliament on: March 18, 2019, 10:44:43 pm
What is your position on Alaskan Irredentism? If elected, do you pledge to oppose the disgusting efforts of Eastern imperialists to partition Frémont?
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