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2726  Election Archive / 2004 U.S. Presidential Election / Re:States after 2004. on: November 12, 2003, 05:13:10 pm
This link.  I will eventually have it linked on a 2004 page (that will include candidate information, polls, ballot status of candidates, etc.).  
2727  Election Archive / 2004 U.S. Presidential Election / Re:States after 2004. on: November 12, 2003, 09:47:36 am
English,
Did you get an error message after attempting the upload?  The files showed up in the directory, but with zero file length.  I don't know what caused that (does the directory that you are attempting to read the file from have the correct permissions set?).  email me your file to leip at this domain (uselectionatlas.org) and I will upload it.

Dave
2728  Election Archive / 2004 U.S. Presidential Election / Re:States after 2004. on: November 11, 2003, 09:33:11 pm
New User Prediction Page:

2004 Prediction Page

I whipped this up and it still needs some polishing.  Post your comments, feature requests, modifications, etc.

Dave
2729  Election Archive / 2004 U.S. Presidential Election / Re:States after 2004. on: November 11, 2003, 04:13:12 pm
Oh yeah, and I had a quick question for you, Dave. Concerning the colors.
Why do you use blue for Republicans and red for Democrats, when most people do it the other way around, even calling the southern Republican states, "red states"? You probably don't really have an answer to this question. I mean, its probably just your preference of colors, but I was just curious. Smiley

Demrepdan - this is one of the most-frequently asked questions.  I have a FAQ entry on it, but the bottom line is that I started building these maps 12 years ago - way before states were referred to as "red" or "blue" (at least that I can remember).  I believe that I was most influenced by the map I saw in the Syracuse Herald Journal of Reagan's win in 1984 (I was 14).  The map was entirely blue (with exception of MN and DC).  Also, as has been pointed out on the forums in the past, Red is more traditionally the color of parties on the left.  Elephants are also "blue" Smiley

Dave
2730  Election Archive / 2004 U.S. Presidential Election / Re:States after 2004. on: November 11, 2003, 11:00:58 am
Hey,
I have read a lot of good posts on this forum.  As for the 2004 State predictions, I have a proposal:

I'll create a page that highlights your individual predictions.  You could download the main US Map and color it (using my standard 10 point scale) (using red for Democrats and blue for Republicans or green for Independent Smiley).  I'll add a web page interface so that you can upload your maps and add any text descriptions you like.

Comments?
Dave  
2731  About this Site / The Atlas / Re:New Forum Issues/Problems on: November 11, 2003, 08:06:42 am
Ryan,
I can see your message from this morning in "Election Odds".  Did you try to reload the page?  Some browsers cache the url and give you the same thing every time you look at it, until you refresh.

Dave
2732  About this Site / The Atlas / Re:New Forum Issues/Problems on: November 10, 2003, 09:09:31 pm
Does your computer use "smart quotes" that tilt to the right or left?  I don't seem to have a problem when I type in ' and "
2733  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re:Kentucky 2003 on: November 08, 2003, 09:29:40 am
You Betcha!  The whole primary schedule will be available soon (as a link from the Primary pulldown menu in the "Election Results" section) with pages dedicated to each state (I will not be covering the Republican primaries).  

2004 Gubernatorial (as well as the 2000 Gubernatorial) results will also be covered.  I am targeting completion of the 2000 Gubernatorial results in the spring time frame.

Dave
2734  General Discussion / History / Re:What constitutes a landslide victory? on: November 06, 2003, 04:52:40 pm
I generally believe that the media misuses the word "landslide".  In presidential politics, the term is most often used to refer to an "Electoral Vote" landslide - such as Ronald Reagan in 1984 or Franklin Roosevelt in 1936 ("as goes Maine, so goes Vermont").  I personally set the bar for an Electoral Vote landslide to be 9:1 (> 90% of the EVs going to one candidate).  Of course, such a result is always concurrent with a much closer result in the popular vote (Reagan won the popular vote in 1984 with 59% to 41%, but won the electoral vote 98% to 2%).   I would classify the popular vote as a solid win, but the electoral vote as a landslide.

On the other hand, Clinton's victory in 1992, winning the popular vote 43% to 37% to 19% was a modest win and the electoral vote win of 69% to 31% as a solid win (or even a supermajority), but not a landslide.

Dave
2735  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Mississippi 2003 on: November 05, 2003, 07:33:40 pm
Mississippi results have been posted in the Gubernatorial section (county data and map are included!).
2736  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Kentucky 2003 on: November 04, 2003, 10:47:37 pm
Kentucky results have been posted in the Gubernatorial section (county data and map are included!).
2737  About this Site / The Atlas / Re:Lost Members on: November 04, 2003, 03:56:26 pm
I actually sent those two members an email informing them of the new forum structure.  JustJoe replied saying that the "problem posters" had turned him off in the old forum, but that he would check out the new setup.  Haven't heard back from brandon20.

Dave
2738  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Presidential Election Process / Re:Election process if no one gets a majority in the Elec College? on: November 04, 2003, 10:42:19 am
Actually, NorthernDog, the Vice President is chosen by the Senate, not the House - see U.S. Constitution Amendment XII

In 1824, the VP was not decided by the Senate, as John Calhoun received 182 Electoral Votes vs. 78 Electoral Votes for all other VP candidates.

The Senate, however, did choose the VP in 1836 when the democratic electoral votes for Vice President were split between Richard Johnson (147) and William Smith (23) (with 124 Electoral Votes for other Vice Presidential candidates).  Johnson won the Senate vote.

I'm actually not clear on whether the Senate actually voted for Burr in 1800, as the rules under Article II, Section 1 were in effect at the time state: In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. - which would have been Burr, without a Senate vote.

Dave
2739  Election Archive / 2004 U.S. Presidential Election / Page Width! on: October 28, 2003, 06:08:28 pm
I'm curious to know how wide your web browsers are when you visit the site.  I have kept the layout rather narrow to accomodate the 640 x 480 monitor resolution.  However, a wider format provides more information in a cleaner table layout.  Feedback Welcome.

Dave
2740  Election Archive / 2004 U.S. Presidential Election / 2004 Democratic Primary on: October 28, 2003, 03:43:21 pm
With the caucuses and primaries about to kick off in a little over two months, whom do you support for the Democratic party's Presidential Nomination and why?  In many states, independents and even Republicans may vote in the democratic primaries.  (sorry, only eight options are available in this poll)

Dave
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