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Psychic Octopus
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« Reply #75 on: March 27, 2010, 06:23:48 pm »
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Go Jerry!
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« Reply #76 on: March 28, 2010, 11:24:11 am »
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Very interesting, keep it up man Smiley
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« Reply #77 on: March 28, 2010, 12:42:37 pm »
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Very interesting, keep it up man Smiley

Thanks! Smiley
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« Reply #78 on: March 28, 2010, 01:32:46 pm »
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I should have the next update fairly soon. In the meantime, here's a list of Presidents.

Rocky In 1968 POTUS List


36. Lyndon Baines Johnson (D-TX): November 22, 1963—January 20, 1969

37. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (R-NY): November 22, 1969—September 22, 1975

38. John Goodwin Tower (R-TX): September 22, 1975—January 20, 1981

39. Edmond Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr. (D-CA): January 20, 1981—??

Rocky In 1968 VP List

Vacant: November 22, 1963—January 20, 1965
38. Hubert Horatio Humphrey (D-MN): January 20, 1965—January 20, 1969

39. John Goodwin Tower (R-TX): January 20, 1969—September 22, 1975

Vacant: September 22, 1975—December 17, 1975
40. Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. (R-MI): December 17, 1975—January 20, 1981

41. James Earl “Jimmy” Carter, Jr. (D-GA): January 20, 1981—??
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« Reply #79 on: March 28, 2010, 04:56:10 pm »
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The 1980 Congressional Elections
Democratic Pickups:
Elizabeth Holtzman (D-NY)
Pete Flaherty (D-PA)
Bill Schultz (D-AZ)
Ted Kulongoski (D-OR)

Republican Pickups:
None

Senate: 66 D (+4), 33 R (-4), 1 I
House: 310 D (+19), 125 R (-19)


The First Term of Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.

I am Governor Jerry Brown
My aura smiles
And never frowns
Soon I will be president...





The Cabinet of Edmund G. Brown, Jr.

Vice President: Jimmy Carter
Secretary of State: Frank Church
Secretary of Treasury: Ernest Hollings
Secretary of Defense: George McGovern
Attorney General: Patricia Harris
Secretary of Interior: Cecil D. Andrus
Secretary of Labor: Hugh Carey
Secretary of Agriculture: Robert Bergland
Secretary of Commerce: Jesse Jackson
Secretary of Health and Welfare: March Fong Eu
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Julian Bond
Secretary of Transportation: Mark Hatfield
Secretary of Education: David S. Saxon
Secretary of Energy: Mo Udall

President Jerry Brown would enter his first term with a bang, considering that as he gave his first inaugural address, the 52 hostages that were held be Iran for 444 days were finally released. Not only that, but at 42 years old, he held the record for the youngest President in history, surpassing Republican Theodore Roosevelt. He would walk to his inaugural ceremony, as opposed to taking the limousine.

On March 30, 1981, a deranged man named John Hinckley, Jr. shot President Brown. Brown survived the shooting, Brown survived a punctured lung, but survived, and when he was taken to the hospital, he jokingly told the doctors: “Please tell me that you’re all Democrats.” His surgeon would reply: “We’re all Democrats today, Mr. President.” The shooting incident increased President Brown’s approval ratings to 75%, increasing his considerable popularity.

Additionally, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Potter Stewart, announced his retirement at the age of 66 in 1981. President Brown wanted to create a precedent for future generations to come.  He thus nominated the first woman to the Supreme Court: Rose Bird, who he had previously appointed to the California Supreme Court back in his days as California Governor, who, despite objections from Conservatives, was confirmed by the Senate.  



In the realm of foreign policy, President Brown would cut defense spending, much to the ire of conservatives. This cut in defense spending would help ameliorate the deficit, and the size in the Federal Government decreased. He would also engage in talks with the Soviet Union leaders, continuing the policy of détente and maintaining bilateral arms reductions, and President Brown essentially tried to remain friendly to the Soviet Union, while the Soviet Union’s economy was slowly deteriorating. President Brown planned to push for a nuclear freeze later along the line, but now wasn’t the time for that, given the Soviet leaders in power at the time. Brown wanted a much more conciliatory Soviet leader to bargain with, and he figured that the time would come very very soon, when he could engage in talks for a nuclear freeze. Ultimately, it seemed that the President was aiming for “peaceful co-existence” with the Soviet Union as opposed to “sending The Soviet Union to the ash-heap of history.”

The one military expenditure that he increased was NASA, increasing the number of space academies, spending more money on space-based research, and increasing the number of United States satellites. Also, Brown began to invest in the Strategic Defense Initiative, or “Star Wars,” as critics called it. “Star Wars” utilized the idea of using space-based systems to protect the United States from strategic nuclear ballistic missiles. Due to President Brown’s space policies, Americans began to refer to President Brown as “President Moonbeam,” which was a continuation of his nickname as Governor, “Governor Moonbeam.”

During the Tower Administration, tax levels had been reduced from 90% to 28%, but then were raised to 33% and then 38.6% in a failed effort to stop inflation. Senator Ronald Reagan, along with several Republicans and fiscally conservative Democrats, worked on a tax cut bill that cut income taxes to 26%. President Brown, who actually was a fiscally conservative governor, heartily endorsed Reagan’s bill, and with Brown’s endorsement and Reagan’s charisma in the Senate, the “Brown tax-cuts” were passed. “While Ronnie and I clearly disagreed on foreign policy and cultural matters, I must say that Senator Reagan had to have been my greatest ally in Congress for economic matters,” mused President Brown in his autobiography released in the 1990s. Additionally, Brown would push numerous economic deregulations in the economy, moving heavily towards a free market. One of his most successful deregulations was that of the oil industry. Brown would end price controls on domestic oil, leading to an oil glut and a reduction in oil prices. The 1980s therefore, did not suffer the same oil shortages that the 1970s did. Liberal Democrats would sneer at the President’s policies, but Brown’s policies were widely popular with the public. The deficit would widen, since liberal Democrats in Congress did not agree to cut social spending (though Brown and Reagan managed to push for a reduction in some domestic spending), but the deficit was partially healed by Brown's cutting of the defense spending.

Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker wrenched the economy by contracting the money supply, so that the inflation problem that afflicted the nation would cease to exist. This caused a huge recession that caused President Brown’s popularity to go down. Unemployment would rise to a high of 10.8% on December 1982. Also, Volcker was very unpopular among the American public. Effigies of Volcker would be hung and burned on Capital Hill. Despite Volcker’s unpopularity, President Brown never tried to put the Federal Reserve under direct control and he never criticized Chairman Volcker publicly. Brown would be criticized by the right and the left for his inaction against Volcker. President Brown was wise to do this because Volcker’s policies were working quite successfully, and the beast of inflation was tamed.



By the end of 1982, Brown, while personally popular and revered by 1980s pop culture, was a politically unpopular President, with his approval ratings at a dismal 35%, largely due to Volcker’s deliberate recession. The Republicans managed to pick up four seats in the Senate (which became five after former Democratic Presidential Candidate and Senator Henry Jackson's death) and twenty-six seats in the House, due to the bad economy. If there was any light at the end of the tunnel, it was that inflation had fallen drastically from 10.3% in 1981 to 3.2% in 1983. The economy would hopefully prosper from there on.

Despite the midterm losses, the Democrats still had a commanding majority in Congress, with a filibuster proof majority in the Senate and six seats short of a veto-proof majority in the House (which could easily be filled by liberal Rockefeller Republicans). President Brown still had several items left to fill in his first term agenda, and he was undeterred from fulfilling this agenda despite his losses in Congress. The rest of his agenda, would prove to be much more liberal than his economic goals that he had accomplished.

The 1982 Congressional Midterm Elections

Republican Pickups:
Paul S. Trible, Jr. (R-VA)
George H.W. Bush (R-TX)
Paul E. Pfeifer (R-OH)
Phillip Ruppe (R-MI)
Daniel J Evans (R-WA) (Won the Special Election for Henry Jackson’s seat in 1983)

Democratic Pickups:
None

Senate: 61 D (-5), 39 R (+5)
House: 284 D (-26), 151 R (+26)
« Last Edit: March 29, 2010, 06:59:19 am by hantheguitarman »Logged
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« Reply #80 on: March 28, 2010, 04:56:53 pm »
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Any comments, suggestions, thoughts, or questions? Every comment helps and I'd love to hear them! Cheesy
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« Reply #81 on: March 28, 2010, 05:43:04 pm »
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The economy began to experience a recovery, and the boom began. President Brown’s popularity surged, and he was glad that he did not attack Volcker in any way, since inflation was gone, and due to “The Brown Tax Cuts” and deregulation, unemployment was reducing. Even Senator Reagan had to comment “It’s morning in America again.”

To address environmental problems, the Democratic Congress passed a bill (the Environmental Protection Act of 1983) at the encouragement of President Brown that increased spending on alternate energy sources and scientific research, increased funding for the EPA, created thousands of solar panels and wind turbines to provide new energy, gave tax incentives for business owners that used alternate energy, and raised taxes on the oil industry. President Brown signed it immediately (while Brown ended price controls on oil, he was not averse to raising taxes on gas once gas prices became very cheap). Environmentalists loved President Brown for his signature of the Environmental Protection Act of 1983, and President Brown considered it one of his biggest achievements in his first term.

Additionally, there was the problem of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS, that was afflicting the nation, particularly those in the gay community. A champion of gay rights, President Brown would sign a bill passed by the Democratic Congress called the Civil Rights Act of 1983 (which mainly focused on gay rights as opposed to the black rights that former civil rights bills protected), which increased funding for AIDS, granted gay couples the same legal rights as heterosexual couples, permitted gay couples to adopt, and protected gay rights in the work place. Brown would adamantly tell the American people about the huge threat of AIDS and why the United States should eradicate it. This increased Brown’s standing with the gay community.

Finally, President Brown would continue his policy of conciliatory talks with the Soviet Union, and would place an emphasis on human rights rather than anticommunism. For example, President Brown would refuse to aid the Rebel Contras in Nicaragua, due to human rights concerns, much to the ire of Republicans. He signed the Boland Amendment in 1982, which restricted overt U.S. support of the Contras. Additionally, President Brown announced “The Brown Doctrine:” he would not give aid to any anticommunist forces if they did not respect human rights. He made no attempts to roll back Communism where it already existed (and did not help the anti-Communist rebels in Afghanistan), not wanting to face another Vietnam War. Vice President Jimmy Carter would proclaim: “Being confident of our own future, we are now free of that inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear. I’m glad that that’s being changed.”

Although Jerry Brown had suffered losses in the 1982 Congressional Midterm Elections, the economy was booming once more, and Brown’s popularity had skyrocketed, just the right time for the upcoming 1984 Presidential Election. Despite the increases in spending for NASA, increases in environmental spending and increases for spending for AIDS, Brown had successfully reduced the size of the Federal Government, earning the respect of some limited government Republicans and ultimately, President Jerry Brown's first term was considered successful.
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« Reply #82 on: March 28, 2010, 05:44:06 pm »
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Any comments, suggestions, thoughts, or questions? Every comment helps and I'd love to hear them! Cheesy
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« Reply #83 on: March 28, 2010, 05:45:55 pm »
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Brown seems like a great President so far! Continue. Smiley
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« Reply #84 on: March 28, 2010, 06:04:51 pm »
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Brown seems like a great President so far! Continue. Smiley

Thanks for the encouraging words Barnes! Cheesy
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« Reply #85 on: March 30, 2010, 03:58:49 pm »
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The 1984 Presidential Election

The Democratic Nomination

President Brown and Vice President Carter were easily renominated by the Democratic Party with little fuss. Despite the fact that Brown had let down fiscally liberal Democrats who supported tighter regulations and more aid to the poor, the Democratic Party was for the most part, united around Brown’s re-election campaign. Nevertheless, the far-left Democrats would have preferred somebody else.

The Republican Nomination
The battle for the Republican nomination would be far more divisive and climactic. Given President Brown’s popularity, only several candidates emerged, and none of those Republicans were prominent in the political scene. The major Republicans that jumped in the fray were televangelist Pat Robertson (R-VA), John Lindsay (R-NY), who was a former Congressman, a former mayor of New York City, a former Secretary of Transportation under Nelson Rockefeller, and a former Vice Presidential Candidate under John Anderson’s independent candidacy; and Barry Goldwater, Jr. (R-CA), a California congressman, and son of Barry Goldwater, who lost in a great landslide in 1964 against Lyndon Baines Johnson.

As expected, Robertson would dominate the South, Lindsay would dominate the North, and Goldwater would dominate the West. Goldwater would attack Robertson for his policies, which seemed to be based on his religion. On the campaign trail, Goldwater would say: “Pat Robertson and his goddamn faction are not using their religious clout with wisdom. They are trying to force government leaders into following their position 100 percent. If you disagree with him and his faction on a particular moral issue, they complain, they threaten you with a loss of money or votes or both. I am warning him today: I will fight him every step of the way if he tries to dictate his moral convictions to all Americans in the name of ‘conservatism.’” In an affirmation of his religion, Robertson would proclaim: “Lord, give us righteous judges who will not try to legislate and dominate this society. Take control, Lord! We ask for additional vacancies on the court.” Lindsay would campaign on his connections with the deceased President Nelson Rockefeller, and Lindsay’s platform would be the typical liberal one: proposing increased federal aid for welfare purposes, and promoting social liberalism. Robertson would attack Lindsay for his liberalism and his role in the Anderson/Lindsay ticket in 1980. “If Anderson had not run as an independent with Lindsay,” declared Robertson, “The Republican Party would have been united, and John Tower would have won re-election.” Everybody knew however, that John Tower was so unpopular that he would have lost with or without Anderson’s independent candidacy. Conservatives who despised Lindsay were split up over Goldwater and Robertson, and many speculate that Goldwater or Robertson could have beaten out Lindsay for the nomination had only one of them run for the Republican nomination. John Lindsay gained momentum with his big gains in the Illinois Primary, the Connecticut Primary, the New York Primary, and the Wisconsin Primary. While neither Goldwater nor Robertson dropped out, they were unable to overcome the Lindsay momentum. Goldwater even lost his home state by one percentage point in the primaries.

At the Republican National Convention, John Lindsay had enough delegates to clinch the nomination on the first ballot, though Robertson and Goldwater did not fold yet, in hopes that some Lindsay delegates could defect to either of them. The defection never happened, and John Lindsay was nominated on the first ballot. It became very clear that Lindsay would not even attempt to diversify the ticket, as he would select the liberal Connecticut Senator Lowell Weicker as his Vice-Presidential nominee. Conservatives, who thought that Lindsay might at least select a moderate conservative for his Vice Presidential Candidate, exited the convention in disgust at this liberal Rockefeller Republican ticket. Lindsay’s nomination would however, attract liberal Democrats who disliked President Brown’s deregulatory policies.

Pat Robertson declared a run for the Presidency on the American Independent Party Ticket. He was easily nominated and he selected Democrat Jesse Helms as his running mate. Despite the furor and energy the “moral majority” felt against both Brown and Lindsay, most polls showed that Robertson’s candidacy would not affect the election in any way, and Robertson was never even considered for entry in the Presidential Debates scheduled that year.

Goldwater would endorse President Jerry Brown, as the lesser of two evils, or three evils if Robertson’s ticket counted. Goldwater’s father, Barry Goldwater, would also reluctantly endorse President Brown.


Red—Lindsay
Blue—Robertson
Green—Goldwater



John Lindsay (R-NY)


Lowell Weicker (R-CT)
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« Reply #86 on: March 30, 2010, 04:40:56 pm »
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The General Election

John Lindsay’s nomination greatly changed the political landscape of this election. Now, Jerry Brown was the conservative candidate (even though he was a social liberal and a dove in foreign policy), and Lindsay was the liberal candidate. Immediately, President Brown attacked Lindsay on Lindsay’s problems with union strikes and labor issues during his short mayoralty of New York City. He would also attack Lindsay on his tax increases during that short time span. Finally, Brown would also attack Lindsay for his limited executive experience, since Lindsay had only served as Mayor of New York City for 3 years, before serving as Secretary of Transportation under President Nelson Rockefeller. Many felt that John Lindsay was a “has been” in national politics. Lindsay would once again campaign as Rockefeller’s surrogate, but it was clear that that strategy was beginning to lose its effectiveness. He promised to increase welfare spending. Lindsay’s war chest was running low on money due to the expensive primary campaign, while President Brown had plenty of funds to campaign on. President Brown’s greatest asset was the booming economy that had flourished during his Presidency. Brown would campaign on the themes of limited government and restrained spending. Every poll showed Brown with a huge lead.

Just like the last election in 1980, there were several Presidential Debates that were held, as well as one Vice Presidential Debate. In the Vice Presidential Debate, Vice President Carter would stress the importance a nuclear freeze. Carter said: “I had a discussion with my daughter Amy the day before I came here, about what the most important issue was, she said the control of nuclear arms.” While Carter’s remark did not cause Brown’s lead in the polls to shrink, the media and the press mocked Carter for his remark. In the Presidential Debate, Brown would say: “I think when you vote on Election Day, it might be well if you would ask yourself, are you better off than you were four years ago? I believe the answer is yes. The economy is booming, inflation is down, jobs are growing, and our country is internationally respected overseas.” This question resonated in the minds of voters, who, after Brown’s remarks, decided to support Brown over Lindsay.

On November 6, 1984, Jerry Brown would defeat John Lindsay in one of the greatest landslides of all time. Brown would even carry the Western conservative states like Wyoming, Idaho, Nebraska, and Utah, which would ordinarily never go Democratic. However, Lindsay’s unabashed liberalism, the endorsement of both Goldwaters, Brown’s western status, and Brown’s message of limited government pulled in the entire West for Brown. Pat Robertson would not win any electoral votes, and did not win that big of a victory in the popular vote, even for a third party, although he broke one percent. Lindsay only managed to carry Vermont, Connecticut, and New Hampshire by close margins. Lindsay wasn’t able to carry his home state, New York, let alone the city he once governed: New York City. It was clear that the people in 1984 were better off than they were four years ago, and that they wanted the status quo. With 59% of the vote and 523 electoral votes (tying with Franklin Delano Roosevelt for the greatest amount of electoral votes received by a candidate), President Brown had a mandate to continue the successful policies that he had started in 1981.



Jerry Brown (D-CA)/Jimmy Carter (D-GA): 523 EV, 58.6% PV

John Lindsay (R-NY)/Lowell Weicker (R-CT): 15 EV, 38.3% PV

Pat Robertson (AI-VA)/Jesse Helms (AI-NC): 0 EV, 2.7% PV

« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 12:33:33 pm by Han »Logged
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« Reply #87 on: March 30, 2010, 06:44:05 pm »
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Just started reading this. Very good! Smiley
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« Reply #88 on: March 30, 2010, 07:22:54 pm »
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Just started reading this. Very good! Smiley

Thanks! Smiley
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« Reply #89 on: March 30, 2010, 07:57:24 pm »
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You have no idea how long I have been waiting for someone to do a TL with a Brown presidency in the 1980's, much less one where the Democratic Party is libertarian leaning.
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It's over.
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« Reply #90 on: March 30, 2010, 07:58:26 pm »
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Go Goldwater Jr in 88!!!!
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« Reply #91 on: March 30, 2010, 08:04:11 pm »
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Jimmy! '88
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« Reply #92 on: March 31, 2010, 06:05:56 pm »
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Thanks for the comments guys! Every comment counts, and every comment is appreciated! Cheesy
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« Reply #93 on: April 01, 2010, 06:30:19 pm »
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The 1984 Congressional Elections
While the Democrats managed to pickup some of the 26 House seats that they lost in 1982, they actually lost seats in the Senate, despite Jerry Brown’s landslide victory. This proved that Jerry Brown’s popularity did not necessarily correspond to the popularity of the Democratic Party.

Republican Pickups:
Mitch McConnell (R-KY)
Gordon Humphrey (R-NH)
Nancy Hoch (R-NE)

Democratic Pickups:
None

Senate: 58 D (-3), 42 R (+3)

House: 294 D (+10), 141 R (-10)

The Second Term of Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.

With newfound enthusiasm and a mandate, Jerry Brown was ready to take on his second term. One of the objectives that he had wanted to accomplish was the creation of a Balanced Budget Amendment. At Brown’s urging, Illinois senator Paul Simon wrote a Balanced Budget Amendment. However, the Congress voted against the passage of such an amendment, leading to the first major disappointment of the Brown Administration.

Upon the deaths of Yuri Andropov and Konstantin Chernenko, the Politburo elected Mikhail Gorbachev General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985. Gorbachev enacted many reforms, namely glasnost and perestroika. After a meeting with Gorbachev that year, President Brown decided that now was the time to try for a nuclear freeze. He traveled to Moscow on November 19, 1985. After lengthy discussions with Gorbachev, Brown and Gorbachev signed the Nuclear Freeze of 1985: no more nuclear weapons would be developed. Despite the bipartisan objections of anticommunists in both parties, Congress ratified the Nuclear Freeze of 1985 by a tight margin. In some ways, the Nuclear Freeze of 1985 was a pyrrhic victory, as the Nuclear Freeze allowed the Soviet Union to survive faster than without the threat of the United States. Gorbachev refused to let the Eastern Bloc nations go “their own way.” Senator Ronald Reagan, who had described the Soviet Union as “an Evil Empire,” was outraged by this turn of events in the Cold War, and made no attempt at publicly covering his contempt for the nuclear freeze. Polls showed that many Americans did not support the Nuclear Freeze, and it was clear the Democrats would pay in the 1986 midterm elections.

President Brown would also relax the War on Drugs, much to the ire of conservatives. He and the Democratic Congress lightened punishments for drug offenders, cut down on the number of law enforcement officials enforcing the War on Drugs, cut down on the money spent to fight the War on Drugs, legalized medicinal marijuana, and treated drug offenders more like people with a medical problem as opposed to criminals. Additionally, Brown pushed for a law fully decriminalizing marijuana (even though he and Congress had already liberalized federal marijuana laws and legalized medical marijuana). Congressman Ron Paul, at Brown’s urging, wrote the bill to federally decriminalize marijuana. However, Congress voted against it, leading to yet another legislative failure of the Brown Administration. President Brown’s policies would prove to be polarizing, as a great chunk of the electorate opposed Brown’s “surrender flag” on the War on Drugs.

On October 22, 1986, President Brown signed Tax Reform Act of 1986, sponsored by two Democrats: Dick Gephardt (D-MO) in the House and Bill Bradley (D-NJ) in the Senate. The bill cut taxes, consolidated tax brackets, simplified the income tax code, broadened the tax base, and eliminated tax shelters. While Brown had become unpopular among the Republicans due to his Cold War policies, Republicans were largely supportive of this tax reform.

Yet another controversy would envelop Jerry Brown’s presidency: a personal scandal. The First Wife and rock star Linda Ronstadt and President Jerry Brown divorced. Ronstadt had married Brown in the White House in 1981. The two had largely fallen out of love, not to mention that Ronstadt did not like being a political wife and performing the chores that being the First Lady entailed. Additionally, Linda had never sat well with the fact that Brown waited to marry her after his election in 1980, since Brown did not want to marry her in the late 1970s, since he admitted to his friends that the wedding could cost him the White House, as Ronstadt had admittedly done drugs numerous times and used so much cocaine her nose had to be cauterized twice (Ronstadt's drug use would feed charges that Brown relaxed the War on Drugs only so she could do drugs). Ronstadt reported Brown’s unwillingness to marry her to the press. The divorce proceedings went normally, and there were no major legal issues between Brown and Ronstadt. However, the divorce served as an severe embarrassment for the Brown Administration, as Brown was the first President to have to deal with a divorce while in the White House, not to mention that Brown was the first President ever to have gotten a divorce. Brown’s popularity decreased.



The 1986 Congressional Midterm Elections
There were many factors as to why the Republicans did so well in 1986. One of the major ones was Democratic fatigue. After 6 years with a Democratic President and a Democratic Congress, people just simply wanted a change. Additionally, Jerry Brown’s policies of a relaxation of drug laws and a nuclear freeze proved to be unpopular with a great portion of the public, which conservatives used to win. Jerry Brown’s divorce proceedings only served to diminish his unpopularity, which gave Republicans a small boost. As if that weren’t enough, Democrat Jesse Helms switched over to the Republican Party after he had had enough of Brown’s liberalism. Had Helms not switched, the Republicans would have only managed to create a 50-50 tie, keeping the Senate in Democratic hands due to Vice President Jimmy Carter’s tiebreaking vote. However, the Republicans had officially taken over the Senate.

Republican Pickups:
John McCain (R-AZ)
Pete Wilson (R-CA)
Ken Kramer (R-CO)
Bob Dole (R-KS)
Arlen Specter (R-PA)
Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Kit Bond (R-MO)
Mack Hattingly (R-GA)
Henson Moore (R-LA)

Democratic Pickups:
Barbara Mikulski (D-MD)

Senate: 51 R (-8), 49 D (+8)

House: 278 D (-16), 157 R (+16)
« Last Edit: April 12, 2010, 05:07:42 pm by hantheguitarman »Logged
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« Reply #94 on: April 01, 2010, 08:40:53 pm »
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Awesome update, Im sorry to see Jerry and Linda not making it(I bet the first White House Wedding of a President, would be a big enough event, that it would probably make Prince Charles and Diana's wedding pale in comparision). Can't wait to see happens in the rest of the Brown Presidency and the 1988 Election...Keep it comming
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« Reply #95 on: April 02, 2010, 11:07:26 am »
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Awesome update, Im sorry to see Jerry and Linda not making it(I bet the first White House Wedding of a President, would be a big enough event, that it would probably make Prince Charles and Diana's wedding pale in comparision). Can't wait to see happens in the rest of the Brown Presidency and the 1988 Election...Keep it comming

Thanks Historico! Smiley Here's the next update!
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« Reply #96 on: April 02, 2010, 11:08:36 am »
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The Republicans had gained the Senate for the first time since 1952. Jerry Brown would’ve lied if he said it didn’t hurt him at all that the Republicans gained the Senate during his presidency. Nevertheless, he was determined to walk out of the White House in 1989 with flying colors.

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Lewis Powell, whom Nelson Rockefeller had appointed to the Supreme Court, announced his retirement in 1987. To fill in Powell’s position, President Brown nominated California Attorney General John Van De Kamp. Brown was worried about the Attorney General’s ability to be nominated by the Republican Senate. Indeed, conservative Republicans in the Senate found Van De Kamp to be soft on crime, especially given his actions in the Hillside Strangler case. Nevertheless, the Senate confirmed Van De Kamp on a tight vote. Van De Kamp began service as Associate Justice on June 26, 1987.



On the economic arena of politics, President Brown did not have a huge problem with the Republicans in Congress. To ameliorate the deficit, Republicans in Congress devised a plan to cut welfare spending. The heavily Democratic House demanded that the cut in welfare spending be reduced. The House passed the reduced version of this cut, then the Senate passed it, then Brown signed it. While Brown had failed in his plan to pass a balanced budget and eliminate the deficit, the deficit was not amazingly high, and had been reduced since the Rockefeller/Tower years, largely due to his cutting of the military budget, his relaxation of the drug war, and his willingness to cut domestic spending. The economy, however, would be far from completely sunny, as the stock market crashed on October 19, 1987. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 508 points. However, the Federal Reserve pumped liquidity, and the market recovered from the crash. Economists however, began to wonder how the economy would be during the next four years. In the meantime however, the economy was still doing quite well, especially compared to the 1970s, and this helped President Brown’s popularity. All in all, Jerry Brown was well regarded by both the Republicans and the Democrats for his work on the economy: inflation was low, and 14 million new jobs had been created.

On December 8, 1987, Jerry Brown and Mikhail Gorbachev signed the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, formally titled The Treaty Between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Elimination of Their Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles, which called for the elimination of nuclear and conventional ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with intermediate ranges. Not only had Brown agreed to a freeze in nuclear weapon production, but it was clear that he was determined to eliminate nuclear weapons that already existed Congress passed the treaty by tight margins. The Soviet Union continued to economically deteriorate, and Brown’s SDI program scared them into increasing some military spending. However, the Soviet Union still managed to stave off its decline, and Gorbachev saw no reason to dismantle the great empire.  Gorbachev did, however, permit more personal freedom than had ever existed in the USSR.  It was clear however, that if the United States wanted to send the Soviet Union to “the ash heap in history,” it wouldn’t be too hard, given the weak Soviet Economy. All the United States would have to do would be to repeal the treaties signed during the 1980s and engage in an arms race, and this arms race would probably dismantle the Soviets very fast.

By the end of his second term, despite the heavy losses he suffered in Congress, Jerry Brown was one of the most popular presidents of all time, largely due to the booming economy and international stability. He had recovered from the political backlash against his drug policy and his nuclear freeze. He exited the Oval Office with approval ratings of 63%. Instead of going back to his home in California, Jerry Brown traveled to Japan to study Buddhism. He would also visit Mother Teresa in Calcutta, India, helping her with her humanitarian work. He would not return to the United States of America until 1995, six years from his exit of the Oval Office.
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« Reply #97 on: April 02, 2010, 11:14:49 am »
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The 1988 Presidential Election


The Democratic Nomination

Jerry Brown unequivocally endorsed Jimmy Carter for the Democratic Nomination in 1988, and no major Democrats decided to challenge Carter. As a result, Carter was easily nominated at the Democratic National Convention. To set a precedent, Jimmy Carter would choose New York Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro as his Vice Presidential running mate. While she was not the most experienced out of all of those in his Vice Presidential shortlist, she was the first woman ever to be nominated for Vice President by a major party.


Jimmy Carter (D-GA)


Geraldine Ferraro (D-NY)

The Republican Nomination
After the Republican takeover of the Senate, Republicans geared up to take the White House. This time, no Rockefeller Republican stepped up to the plate, and the major Republicans who decided to run for the presidency were:

Barry Goldwater Jr. (R-CA)
Jack Kemp (R-NY)
Howard Baker (R-TN)
Pat Robertson (R-VA)
Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-KS)

Barry Goldwater Jr.’s candidacy got off to a great start when he managed to win the Iowa Caucus on a plurality of the vote, even though Kemp was widely expected to win it. Kemp however, reorganized his campaign, and managed to win decisively in New Hampshire. He then capitalized on the “Big Mo,” winning more and more primaries. Goldwater dropped out on February 28 after losing the Alaska Primaries to Kemp. He would endorse Kemp. The reason why Goldwater dropped out much earlier than he did in 1984 was because he knew that Kemp could win the nomination and that Kemp was much more acceptable than Lindsay and Robertson were in 1984. As a result, Goldwater won more primaries in 1984, simply because he stayed in the race longer. Goldwater did, however, decide to run for Governor of California in 1990. The South would be split up between Baker and Robertson. Kassebaum did not make a huge impact, and would endorse Baker after a dismal showing on March 8, when she only won the Massachusetts primary. Baker dropped out on March 31, when it was clear he couldn’t beat Kemp. Robertson would drop out on April 8, endorsing Kemp.  


Blue—Kemp
Red—Goldwater
Gray—Robertson
Yellow—Baker
Green—Kassebaum

By the end of primary season, Kemp was the assured nominee. There were no splits in the party, and every Republican that had run in 1988 endorsed Kemp. To appease moderates, Kemp would choose moderate Texas Senator George H.W. Bush as his running mate. As Texas law allowed, Bush would also pursue re-election in the Senate while simultaneously running for Vice President. Following a rousing keynote speech by Senator Ronald Reagan, the conservatives were pumped and were ready to send Kemp to the White House. Kemp’s conservatism was infectious among Republicans, and conservatism overtook the once Rockefeller dominated GOP.



Jack Kemp (R-NY)




George Bush (R-TX)



The Kemp/Bush Ticket on the Campaign Trail
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« Reply #98 on: April 02, 2010, 11:30:59 am »
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The General Election

It was clear that election season was going to be close. While the economy was great and Jimmy Carter had a link to Brown’s popularity, Jack Kemp refused to give up. Kemp campaigned all over the nation, making conservatism more and more popular among the electorate. The conservative movement, which had been stifled under Nelson Rockefeller’s administration, was beginning to experience resurgence. Day by day more and more people began to see themselves as conservatives. Kemp attacked the Brown Administration for their liberal policies on drugs, the environment, and the Cold War.  Carter would stress his connection with the popular Brown Administration: essentially running for Jerry Brown’s third term. Every poll, however, showed that Kemp and Carter were neck in neck. Both of them stressed their religion over the course of election season.

Carter hit a snag when, in an interview with Playboy Magazine, he said:  “I've looked on a lot of women with lust. I've committed adultery in my heart many times.... This is something that God recognizes, that I will do and have done, and God forgives me for it. “ This made Carter unpopular with women, and Carter’s momentum was stalled. Both Carter and Kemp were considered to have performed well at the Presidential Debates, without major game changes. At the Vice Presidential Debate, George H.W. Bush would lecture Geraldine Ferraro on the nature of the Cold War, and how dangerous Brown’s nuclear freeze was. To this, Ferraro responded: "Let me just say first of all, that I almost resent, Senator Bush, your patronizing attitude that you have to teach me about foreign policy." The Vice Presidential Debate however, would not be a major game changer, and males tended to think Bush won while females tended to think Ferraro won.

The mood of the night was tense on November 8, 1988.  States fell to the Kemp or Carter columns by tight margins. Carter would be dismayed to find that the West, which had gone so forcefully to Jerry Brown four years ago, would go to Kemp. Unfortunately for Kemp, Southerners decided to vote for their favorite son, Carter (though the South voted for Carter on tight margins), despite Bush’s presence on the Republican ticket. The only Southern state that Kemp/Bush carried was Virginia, and even that was by a close margin. By a close heartbreaker, Carter won Bush’s home state of Texas. Bush would however, win re-election as a Senator. It was a shame for the Kemp campaign because Kemp had 258 electoral votes, and with Texas’ 29 electoral votes Kemp would have won the Presidency. However, it was clear that Jack Kemp was winning the national popular vote, probably due to heavy turnout in Kemp states.

The election night hinged on Ohio, which flipped back and forth several times. Carter had 257 electoral votes; Kemp had 258 electoral votes. Everything depended on Ohio’s 23 electoral votes. After several recounts, it was announced that Jimmy Carter had carried the state, and with that the Presidency, despite having lost the popular vote by nearly three million votes. For the first time since 1888, the winner of the popular vote failed to win the election. Had 525 votes in Ohio switched from Carter to Kemp, Kemp would have won the Presidency. Had 2,563 votes in Texas switched from Carter to Kemp, Kemp would have won the Presidency with or without Ohio.

Kemp’s loss actually invigorated conservative Republicans just as much as a win would have: a clear majority of Americans supported conservatism in this election, and that conservatism would now be the clear ideology of the Republican Party. The Nelson Rockefeller wing of the Republican Party was no more. Not only that, but the Republicans had made gains in Congress. Republican congressmen were bitter and angry at Kemp’s loss. If Jimmy Carter thought that the Republicans in Congress would cooperate with him, he had another think coming.

On a lighter note, Geraldine Ferraro became the first woman ever to be elected Vice President. Carter would become the first incumbent Vice President to be elected since Martin Van Buren in 1836. Ultimately, the good economy and Carter’s connection to the popular Jerry Brown won Carter the election.



Jimmy Carter (D-GA)/Geraldine Ferraro (D-NY): 47.6% PV, 280 EV

Jack Kemp (R-NY)/George Bush (R-TX): 50.7% PV, 258 EV


The 1988 Congressional Elections
Republican Gains:
Connie Mack III (R-FL)
Trent Lott (R-MS)
Conrad Burns (R-MO)
Susan Engeleiter (R-WI)
Pete Dawkins (R-NJ)

Democratic Gains:
Joe Lieberman (D-CT)
Richard Bryan (D-NV)
Chuck Robb (D-VA)

Senate: 53 R (+2), 47 D (-2)
House: 271 D (-7), 164 R (+7)
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 11:07:01 pm by Han »Logged
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« Reply #99 on: April 02, 2010, 01:42:29 pm »

I'm hoping 3rd times the charm for Barry in 92!!!
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President Areus Ho'kee's Republican Party gains in the 1990 midterms, in Dust In The Wind - The Story of Thad O'Connor
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 Print 
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