Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
June 17, 2019, 02:23:36 pm
News: 2019 Gubernatorial Predictions are now active

  Atlas Forum
  Election Archive
  Election Archive
  2004 U.S. Presidential Election
  the future of the republican party?
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Print
Author Topic: the future of the republican party?  (Read 8505 times)
No more McShame
FuturePrez R-AZ
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,091


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #25 on: November 01, 2004, 10:27:00 pm »

If Republicans were playing to win comfortably in 2000, they might have stuck behind McCain.  What happened in the SC 2000 primary was the ugly side of the right wing coming out.  The same one that may very well prevent a Guliani run in 2008.  Going into 2000, did anyone really think GWB was going to beat McCain? GWB was the underdog.

I disagree, McCain ran as the "outsider".  Bush was favored by most in the party and was also much better funded.
Logged
Erc
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 5,743
Slovenia


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #26 on: November 01, 2004, 10:35:01 pm »

Not that I was following it all that closely, but I thought Bush had the nomination locked when Liz Dole pulled out...I'd never heard of this McCain guy, and didn't think he had a snowball's chance in hell.  I was quite surprised he did as well as he did, and actually cheered for him a bit...until he lost the SC primary methinks.
Logged
raggage
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 505


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #27 on: November 01, 2004, 10:58:27 pm »

Personally I'd like to see two moderates from either side go againsts each other, eg Bayh v McCain
Logged
Swing low, sweet chariot. Comin' for to carry me home.
jmfcst
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 18,238
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2004, 11:23:49 pm »

For one thing, there's a difference between being "moral" and the religious right. 

Yeah, right!  Next you're going to tell us that "moral" was not spoken of by the founders of the GOP in the context of Christian morality.
Logged
StevenNick
StevenNick99
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,910


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #29 on: November 01, 2004, 11:49:19 pm »

Hell, the GOP could benefit from a Bush loss.

Not could, would.

Only to the extent that Kerry would be so bad for the country.

But, honestly, I think a Bush win will be very good for the party and for the country.  If Bush is able to accomplish even some small pieces of his legislative agenda in the next four years, he could revolutionize politics in this country.  Social Security reform and/or tax reform would change the debate in this country.  It would be a significant blow to big government liberalism and the idea that the government can and should be the one to "take care" of the citizens.  It could create a whole new generation of conservatives voters.  Youth voters would adore the republican party for finally fixing the system that was bound to be an albatross around our necks.  Low-income citizens would have some kind of investable account in their name that they could use to build wealth.  Minorities who have in the past lacked the same economic opportunities as whites would have great opportunity to invest and build a nest egg.  Workers could retire at a time of their choosing.  And if social security reform were accompanied with at least some basic tax reform, this country could experience the biggest investment boom in our history.  All of this would probably translate into growing republican majorities.
Logged
muon2
Modadmin
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 15,172


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #30 on: November 02, 2004, 12:00:32 am »

I've given up.  I am a "big tent Republican"; that is all talk in the party now, there is no genuine "big tent".  "Big tent" doesn't mean lots of entitlement programs (which I'm against), but it does mean tolerance... not just begrudgingly tolerant, but openly and abundantly tolerant. 
"Big tent" Republicanism does still turn up. I was at a major fundraiser in my staunch GOP county and the guest speaker was Christy Whitman. Her speech included talk about fiscal conservatism. She mostly talked about the "big tent" but preferred to use the metaphor of a "big umbrella" instead. The umbrella had no door to keep people out.
Logged
senorboogie woogie
Rookie
*
Posts: 23


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #31 on: November 02, 2004, 12:04:43 am »

Nominate Ron Paul for President? That would be a good start!

Ther two parties are controlled by big money and special interests, but every four years, the two parties trot out various candidates, and these candidates are chosen by political party members from the US, and in some states, open primaries.

The Republicans will purge (or at very least shout down) the neo-cons and adapt a more centerist position, like John McCain, Bill Weld, Guiliani, Whitman and others. To quote Nixon, there is a "silent majority" of Republicans that dislike Bush, his administration and his worldviews. But they cannot dissent in public, because this will split the party, making Kerry's victory either. Besides, all these people owe favors to one another and will not stab each other in the back if there a possibility of a future gain (I don't understand why McCain did than nominating speech for him, Mac wants or owes something to the White House).

Send W, Cheney, Rumsfeld down the same river that Nixon travelled. This will happen, especially if Kerry wins. If Kerry wins, the moderates will take control. Unfortunately, McCain is too old, and he is good friends with John Kerry (which is an excellent thing).

I would also like to see the libertarian wing of the Republican Party get stronger. LPs should join the Republicans and change it from the inside, and making Ron Paul their guide. The Lib. wing can keep reminding the majority that we are a party of limited government and personal responsibility.

The same question was asked after the 1964 elections. Goldwater conservatism was seen as reactionary and scary, and the hard right loss the race and were sent to the aisles in favor of moderates, and because of this, won the next 5 out of 6 elections, although they were a minority party in Congress. The Democrats lost because 5 out of 6 because they kept nominating neo-liberals who were too leftist, especially 1972, 1984, and 1988. BUT, they won in 1976, 1992, and 1996, because they ran moderates.

So, I believe that the Republican Party will realign itself to the Center, especially if Kerry wins tomorrow.

Senor
Logged
J-Mann
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,196
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #32 on: November 02, 2004, 12:40:51 am »

Personally I'd like to see two moderates from either side go againsts each other, eg Bayh v McCain

Blechh!  Heck no!  Remember four years ago?  All of these stupid undecided voters complaining that the two candidates were too similar.  Bayh and McCain have their differences, for sure, but most of the public is not astute enough to pick up on them.  I think it's better for the parties to maintain an ideological distance from each other during elections.  They can turn to compromises and moderation when they're in power.
Logged
alcaeus
Rookie
*
Posts: 47


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #33 on: November 02, 2004, 12:54:08 am »



   The Republican Party is in for a split, and vicious infighting whether Bush loses or wins.

    The deficit just does not sit well with many Republicans.

   Longer term, I believe the Republican Party today is where the Whig Party was in the late 1840s.   It can't hold up its promises for banking and the markets, as the Whig Party couldn't, and it has chosen to rely on foreign invasions and the hope that spoils from wars will  sustain its popularity.   Bush is a parallel to Zachary Taylor.  The Republican Party today will let our entrenched domestic problems drive it into oblivion.
Logged
A18
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 23,811
Political Matrix
E: 9.23, S: -6.35

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #34 on: November 02, 2004, 05:16:26 am »

despite claims of being a 'mjaority' party, the republicans havent won the national popular vote since 1988--16 years!!

what happens if bush loses the popular vote and the election tomorrow?  will the republican party descend into chaos with leadership struggles?



Uh, that's 3 elections.
Logged
Defarge
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,602


Political Matrix
E: -3.13, S: -0.72

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #35 on: November 02, 2004, 06:34:51 am »

The Republican Party will endure if Bush loses.  It's just a question of how they will deal with it and set themselves up for 2008.  Will Guliani and Pataki lead the party towards the center, or will Republicans decide that Bush wasn't conservative enough?  I think the former's more likely, but then again I'm not really someone who can predict what Republicans do.
Logged
patrick1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,874


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #36 on: November 02, 2004, 06:41:30 am »

The Republican party must make a full-fledged effort to more of the Hispanic vote.
If they do not they will get killed demographically in the future.  George P. Bush anyone.  LOL
Logged
A18
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 23,811
Political Matrix
E: 9.23, S: -6.35

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #37 on: November 02, 2004, 06:57:16 am »

The Republican party must make a full-fledged effort to more of the Hispanic vote.
If they do not they will get killed demographically in the future.  George P. Bush anyone.  LOL

Yes, but it would also help to stop giving illegal immigrants amnesty after amnesty.
Logged
Platypus
hughento
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 21,480
Australia


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #38 on: November 02, 2004, 07:16:48 am »

Giuliani/Snowe 2008?

That's a good republican ticket, one that the world will comprehend. Born again christians don't float outside the US-rightly or wrongly-in western countries.
Logged
National Progressive
General Mung Beans
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,183
Korea, Republic of


Political Matrix
E: -6.58, S: -1.91

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #39 on: May 29, 2015, 03:54:44 am »

i fear that the republican party, with its radical elements, is becoming more like the democratic party of old....in other words, unable to win a national election, but is able to stay alive due to its strength in certain parts of the country, which results in congressional majorities.

Wow this was pretty damn accurate.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC