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  What Book Are You Currently Reading?
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Author Topic: What Book Are You Currently Reading?  (Read 334503 times)
Miles
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« Reply #300 on: January 31, 2012, 08:34:51 pm »

I met the author when he came to LSU last month.

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Miamiu1027
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« Reply #301 on: February 01, 2012, 05:50:21 am »
« Edited: February 01, 2012, 05:55:50 am by © Tweed »

'The Breathing Method', a novella by Stephen King.  I took a hint from the 1996 The Get Up Kids song, one of my favorites.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS3Xc4FN9fw
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Gustaf
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« Reply #302 on: February 01, 2012, 05:54:05 am »

The Corrections, by Jonathan Franzen. Great book, although I prefer Freedom so far. Interesting development of his style when you compare them.
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Insula Dei
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« Reply #303 on: February 01, 2012, 07:03:55 am »

The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, and frankly, I'm excited. There are some poems that don't work for me at all, but others are pretty close to poetic perfection as far as I'm concerned.

Elaborate, do! I have strong and occasionally somewhat conflicting opinions on Stevens.

Well, in general whenever Stevens goes for the can with French and German words (which generally happens in the more lighthearted of his poems) the poem in casu almost certainly will fall short as far as I'm concerned. But when Stevens goes for the more heavyhanded (well, not that heavyhanded) angle, he sometimes can really hit a homerun.

My favourite poems mostly are, I notice now, from his first volume, Harmonium, with such little jewels as Tea at the palaz of Hoon (the last stanza of which just begs to be quoted in a mediocre paper on idealism), the quite well-known The Emperor of Ice-Cream, Cortège for Rosenbloom which is an awful lot of fun,....

In the latter half of the volume Stevens strikes me as even more in control, but for some reason less interesting to me. The amount of metapoetical reflection is probably a contributor to that, as well as (very prosaically, I know) the growing length of the poems. I can get a bit worn out when I'm reading longer shreds of lyrical poetry. Though perhaps my favourite Stevens poem of all must be The search for Sound free from Motion, which combines the virtues of total poetic control with the absolute sheer beauty of the lines that read 'All afternoon the grammaphone / parl-parled the West-Indian weather'. I'm really sort of in love with that poem.

Of the longer ones The Owl in the Sarcophagus stands out as being the most emotionally pure of his poems. I also like the mobilisation of ancient imagery (which is mostly just implied) to talk about the 'mythology of modern death'.

I hope you forgive me the general rambling tone of this post, but you asked yourself for an elaboration Wink And feel free to share any of your thoughts!
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Hugo Award nominee
Nathan
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« Reply #304 on: February 01, 2012, 03:52:15 pm »

Do you have any thoughts on The Auroras of Autumn or Final Soliloquy of the Interior Paramour?

My favorite early/short Stevens poems are Earthly Anecdote, Indian River, and Depression before Spring. I never really liked The Emperor of Ice-Cream all that much for some reason I can't really pin down.
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J. J.
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« Reply #305 on: February 01, 2012, 07:11:58 pm »

Cannon's Rules of Order
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Oakvale
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« Reply #306 on: February 01, 2012, 07:13:52 pm »

I just started Mike Doughty's (of Soul Coughing fame) memoir, The Book Of Drugs. I'm really enjoying it so far. It manages to be harrowing and kind of funny at the same time.
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Ye Olde Europe
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« Reply #307 on: February 04, 2012, 11:58:07 am »

The Shining by Stephen King
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minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
Lewis Trondheim
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« Reply #308 on: February 04, 2012, 12:23:05 pm »

Andreas Maier & Christine Büchner, Bullau. Versuch über Natur and Jörg Heinisch, Mehr als nur der 12. Mann: Ein Streifzug durch die Fanszene von Eintracht Frankfurt
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Lief 🐋
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« Reply #309 on: February 05, 2012, 01:23:56 am »

Is that an academic paper on the fan culture of Eintracht Frankfurt? That sounds pretty cool. Didn't know anyone wrote about things like that.
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minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
Lewis Trondheim
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« Reply #310 on: February 05, 2012, 04:39:15 am »

Is that an academic paper on the fan culture of Eintracht Frankfurt? That sounds pretty cool. Didn't know anyone wrote about things like that.
No, it's a fullscale nonfiction book. And not particularly academic. (And not as well put together as the same publishers' books on, say, Eintracht Frankfurt's 59-60 European run. Or the quite academic one on the club's pre-45 history. Both of which I own, while I checked this one out of the city library.)

But such academic papers exist as well, of course.
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Kaine for Senate '18
benconstine
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« Reply #311 on: February 05, 2012, 11:39:58 am »

Lord of Discipline by Pat Conroy
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Scott
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« Reply #312 on: February 09, 2012, 03:32:14 pm »

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I'm feeling sorta open-minded today, so.
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Gustaf
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« Reply #313 on: February 12, 2012, 07:04:11 am »

Finished The Corrections, which was good but a bit depressing. Then I read The Imperfectionists.

Now, it is time for Heidegger if the plan holds up.
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You kip if you want to...
change08
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« Reply #314 on: February 14, 2012, 12:09:52 pm »

1984
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Miamiu1027
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« Reply #315 on: February 14, 2012, 03:56:16 pm »

just picked up Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals' Abuse of Science by Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont.  they reputedly go through and tear Lacan, Kristeva, etc. a new asshole.  I don't plan to read the whole thing, just to amuse myself.
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Beet
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« Reply #316 on: February 15, 2012, 01:13:28 am »

The Hunger Games
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homelycooking
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« Reply #317 on: February 15, 2012, 10:26:40 am »

The Satanic Verses
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Insula Dei
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« Reply #318 on: February 15, 2012, 10:45:38 am »

The Satanic Verses

How do you like it? It's been a while since I read it, but I still have quite good memories of it. Might be my favourite Rushdie novel (for some reason I can't finish Midnight's Children, I still liked Shalimar the Clown a lot, though.

I'm currently on a bit of a Louis Paul Boon binge. Tremendous writer and great man, even if he might accurately be described, in the words of a friend of mine, as a bit of an 'outdated Flemish socialist'. Just finished his war memoir Mijn Kleine Oorlog (which *google google* is availabe in English as My Little War). Next up is semi-historical work Het Geuzenboek which deals with the Eighty Year's War, but rather than looking at the birth of the Republic in the north, Boon focuses on the end of the uprising in the South, with all the doom and gloom that should accompany such a theme.
Maybe afterwards I'll have a go at his magnum opus: the diptych De Kapellekensbaan-Zomer te Ter-Muren. Both of which are mainly concerned with the rise of socialism in Flanders from the late 19th century onwards.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #319 on: February 15, 2012, 01:11:39 pm »

Very short book then?
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Insula Dei
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« Reply #320 on: February 15, 2012, 03:15:50 pm »

Very short book then?

My Little War?

Yes, very. About a hundred pages*, depending in what version the translation uses: the slightly shorter and 'harsher' 1946 version, or the slightly longer and 'cleaner' 1960s version. (Main difference would be the tidying up of the language though, as the early Boon is much more radical in choosing an undeniably Flemish language, which is an important part of Boon's greatness. You wouldn't notice that in translation, I suppose. In fact I'm having some doubts about the possibility of a good translation of any Boon novel, but I'm not going to criticize what I haven't read.)

*: Descibing it as a 'memoir' might be a bit misleading. 'Impressions' would be a better fit.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #321 on: February 15, 2012, 07:47:04 pm »

No, it were a little (unfunny) joke. You mentioned two books dealing with the rise of Socialism in Flanders. Thus the joke.
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Hash
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« Reply #322 on: February 16, 2012, 08:34:52 am »

Game Change
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minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
Lewis Trondheim
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« Reply #323 on: February 17, 2012, 07:21:44 am »

No, it were a little (unfunny) joke. You mentioned two books dealing with the rise of Socialism in Flanders. Thus the joke.
The rise of socialism in Flanders from the late 19th century onwards has been and will continue to be slow but inexorable. The book deals with the entire period from humble beginnings in the 19th century to unanimous socialist victories - in free and fair elections - in the 74th century, and deals with every episode in painstaking detail. It has 374,597,816 pages.
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homelycooking
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« Reply #324 on: February 18, 2012, 11:10:40 am »

How do you like it? It's been a while since I read it, but I still have quite good memories of it. Might be my favourite Rushdie novel (for some reason I can't finish Midnight's Children, I still liked Shalimar the Clown a lot, though.

I'm enjoying it immensely. Rushdie's writing is beautiful, and there's a fantastic magic realist element to the plot. I can see why it would offend certain Muslims, though...
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