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  What Book Are You Currently Reading?
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Author Topic: What Book Are You Currently Reading?  (Read 336167 times)
TNF
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« Reply #1150 on: December 15, 2014, 12:40:24 am »

Finished a few days ago:

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Finishing up now:

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Next up:

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Old School Republican
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« Reply #1151 on: December 16, 2014, 12:24:51 am »

The NAtional Debt by Robert Kelly
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Gustaf
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« Reply #1152 on: December 20, 2014, 10:25:56 am »

Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie. After that I'll be working through a big stack of books that I accumulated as birthday presents recently.

What did you think? I'm a big Rushdie fan but that wasn't one of my favourites.
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Murica!
whyshouldigiveyoumyname?
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« Reply #1153 on: December 22, 2014, 11:25:10 pm »

For Whom the Bell Tolls by Earnest Hemingway. And Yes I somehow haven't read it yet.
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Nathan
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« Reply #1154 on: December 26, 2014, 07:45:00 am »

I've just started Froth on the Daydream by Boris Vian, one of my Christmas presents. It sure is...something. 'The kitchen mice liked to dance to the sounds made by the rays of the sun as they bounced off the taps, and then run after the little bubbles that the rays burst into when they hit the ground like sprays of golden mercury.' 'He decorated the centre of the table with a pharmaceutical jar in which a pair of embryonic chickens seemed to be dancing Nijinsky's choreography for The Spectre of the Rose.' 'But you know I never read anything but Jean Pulse Heartre.' (Biographical note: Apparently the author's wife cheated on him with Sartre.) Those sentences happened. And I'm only in the first chapter!
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TNF
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« Reply #1155 on: December 26, 2014, 09:33:04 am »

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Libertarian Socialist Dem
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« Reply #1156 on: December 27, 2014, 07:49:44 pm »

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt
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politicus
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« Reply #1157 on: December 28, 2014, 10:37:15 am »

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt

Good one. Do you enjoy it?
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anvi
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« Reply #1158 on: December 28, 2014, 11:23:21 am »

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt

Good one. Do you enjoy it?

I loved this book too.  Hilarious and revealing.  I didn't like the follow-up 'Tis very much, but, especially given what I do for a living, really appreciated Teacher Man that came next.
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checkers
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« Reply #1159 on: December 29, 2014, 04:00:14 am »
« Edited: December 29, 2014, 04:07:29 am by beatrice »

Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie. After that I'll be working through a big stack of books that I accumulated as birthday presents recently.

What did you think? I'm a big Rushdie fan but that wasn't one of my favourites.

Loved it. It was my first of his books though, so I imagine that a lot of what I liked so much about it - the prose, the imaginativeness of the magic realism and how that integrated with the politics of the region - are general Rushdie, so maybe it would have been more disappointing had I come to it after reading his other works. What didn't you like about it?
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Mopolis
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« Reply #1160 on: December 30, 2014, 12:07:26 pm »

I recently picked up a translation of P. Boissonnade's Life and Work in Medieval Europe from a Salvation Army store (it seemed interesting enough to invest $.65 in). Has anyone here read it?
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« Reply #1161 on: December 30, 2014, 02:27:38 pm »

I bought Halperin and Heilemann's Double Down book on the 2012 election a few weeks ago, and I'm really enjoying it so far. Game Change was excellent in 2008, so I definitely wanted to read their latest one.
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Libertarian Socialist Dem
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« Reply #1162 on: December 30, 2014, 03:52:52 pm »

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt

Good one. Do you enjoy it?

Loving every page of it, it's a classic tragicomedy.
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TNF
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« Reply #1163 on: December 31, 2014, 11:19:28 am »

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« Reply #1164 on: January 02, 2015, 04:44:40 pm »

Just read the very short Ginga Tetsudō no Yoru by Kenji Miyazawa.
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« Reply #1165 on: January 02, 2015, 04:50:22 pm »

Just read the very short Ginga Tetsudō no Yoru by Kenji Miyazawa.

!!!!!!!

What did you think? Miyazawa is one of my favorites.
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National Progressive
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« Reply #1166 on: January 02, 2015, 05:21:56 pm »

Speaking of Japanese literature currently reading Botchan by Umeji Soseki.
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Nathan
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« Reply #1167 on: January 02, 2015, 05:37:32 pm »

Speaking of Japanese literature currently reading Botchan by Umeji Soseki.

Nastume Soseki. Umeji Sasaki is the translator. (Botchan's an absolute delight. If you like it maybe also try Wagahai wa neko de aru.)
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Vega
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« Reply #1168 on: January 02, 2015, 05:40:01 pm »

Thanks to Mikado, I'm reading Unfinished Empire: The Global Expansion of Britain by John Darwin.
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أندرو
afleitch
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« Reply #1169 on: January 02, 2015, 05:46:02 pm »

Just read the very short Ginga Tetsudō no Yoru by Kenji Miyazawa.

!!!!!!!

What did you think? Miyazawa is one of my favorites.

It was lovely. I was sent it by e-mail; it's a 'good' translation as I don't know Japanese and I trust the opinion of the person who sent it to me!

I didn't read it to discern what are obviously multiple syncretic metaphors. That takes the fun out of reading the story. So I read it at face value, then read it again. I think there are a number of different  ways to look at the story and I think that's wonderful. I suppose I do get a bit of free thought and humanism from it and I suppose I should outline why.

Campanella (which must surely be a nod to the Campanella who 'inadvertently' (wink wink) made one of the greatest cases for free thought of his era) is beautifully written, even if there's very little we know about him other than his immense kindness. Given the name, we seem to be looking at two sides of the same person in Campanella and Giovanni. I see a bit of 'free thinking' within Giovanni, especially when he is awed by the fossil hunter. The 'Christians' seem to depart the train at the 'Northern Cross' and the Southern Cross which is interesting because the Southern Cross was imposed as a sign by a Christian west and Cygnus has at various times been co-opted but deep down is linked to the story of Phaethon and Cycnus; the themes of drowning and brotherly devotion coming through there. That might just be me though.

The exchange between Giovanni and Kaoru on the nature of god is very curt. I laughed as it's essentially a shortened but word for word version of what I talked about on the forum a few weeks ago. Giovanni seems more interested in the journey rather than what each stop is, but he was sorry to say goodbye to them. Campanella does not have the same ticket, but he never get's off the train. He never takes any of the stops. He's happy for the company and he vanishes, blissfully it seems in the 'nothingness' of the coal sack. Every end, every happiness, every 'duty' is on that train and it keeps going.

So it is what it is. And it was beautiful.
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National Progressive
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« Reply #1170 on: January 03, 2015, 04:20:54 am »

Speaking of Japanese literature currently reading Botchan by Umeji Soseki.

Nastume Soseki. Umeji Sasaki is the translator. (Botchan's an absolute delight. If you like it maybe also try Wagahai wa neko de aru.)

Excuse me for my gross error. I do hope to read some more East Asian literature over the next few months.
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« Reply #1171 on: January 04, 2015, 04:02:32 pm »

afleitch, I think you'd enjoy some of Miyazawa's poetry. It's circumspectly spiritual in a way that can't really be called religious as such (although Miyazawa personally was devoutly Buddhist) and shows a firm and actually really beautiful grounding in an understanding of the natural sciences--particularly agricultural science, which was Miyazawa's day job.
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anvi
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« Reply #1172 on: January 05, 2015, 09:24:01 pm »

At the moment I'm reading through Seven Elements that Changed the World by John Browne.  With the exception of a few parts so far that are a little hoaky, it's an interesting read.  Unexpected to find a book by a former BP exec who believes in anthropogenic climate change and thinks multiple things should be done to address its challenges.

In coming months I'd like to get to two other books, Becoming Richard Pryor by Scott Saul, a bio of the early years of one of my favorite comedians, and Circling Around the Midnight Sun by James Raffan, which is about the peoples who live around the Arctic Circle.
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Representative Joe Mad
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« Reply #1173 on: January 05, 2015, 11:15:44 pm »

Reading A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, America's First Presidential Campaign (quite a mouthful) by Edward J. Larson.  Rooney recommended it as a good book that took place in early US history, and so far it hasn't disappointed.  It is making me realize how little I know about the early history of my nation.  Hamilton's and Adams' monarchical sympathies, Jefferson's fears of encroaching tyranny, outrage at standing armies and the Alien and Sedition Acts.  Some good stuff here.
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TNF
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« Reply #1174 on: January 06, 2015, 10:25:38 pm »

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Reading in anticipation of a talk I'm attending on Marxism and Anarchism this weekend.
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