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  Is this every federal law?
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Author Topic: Is this every federal law?  (Read 11318 times)
A18
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« on: November 23, 2004, 10:54:36 pm »

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/uscode/

Is every federal law in the United States Code?
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True Federalist
Ernest
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« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2004, 11:52:41 pm »
« Edited: November 24, 2004, 12:06:02 am by SE Gov. Ernest »

No.

If you want every Federal Law, you have to go to the United States Statutes at Large.  However,  those laws that act on a continuing basis of general interest are classified to the United States Code.  So budget bills, laws that tell the executive to name some federal building after someone, etc., don't get put in the code.

There is also the Code of Federal Regulations, the Harmonized Tarriff Schedule, and the Treaties and Other International Acts Series.
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A18
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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2004, 12:11:39 am »

Thanks. Smiley But any Act of significance is generally going to be an amendment to the United States Code, correct?
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True Federalist
Ernest
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2004, 01:08:04 am »

Depends on the law.  Some portions of the Code are what are known as positive law and so amendments to those portions of the law are made by directly citing the relevant code. Others aren't so it gets more complicated for those because then the US Code only serves as an index into the real law and so to amend those would require amending the underlying Statute at Law, not the US Code directly.  Generally, the amending law tries to be helpful and assign a suggested position in the US Code in such cases, but it isn't an absolute requirement.
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A18
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« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2004, 04:23:32 am »

So is statute amended or is new statute added?
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True Federalist
Ernest
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« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2004, 03:01:14 pm »

It all depends on what the law is trying to do and where it would go in the code.  In theory, they could even create new titles, but except for merging Title 34, Navy with Title 10, Army and Air Force to form Title 10, Armed Forces in 1956, they've stuck with the 50 titles established when the United States Code was first published in 1926.
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Bono
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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2004, 04:38:48 pm »

U. S. Statutes at Large.
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A18
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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2004, 04:42:08 pm »

All of that's from the 1800s. What about modern statutes?
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Bono
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2004, 04:58:23 pm »

U. S. Statutes at Large
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True Federalist
Ernest
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2015, 10:48:59 pm »

Finally found a site that has all of the old Statutes at Law

http://constitution.org/uslaw/sal/sal.htm

The other two links provide no coverage for 1876-1950, this one covers up till early 2013.
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Swedge
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« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2016, 12:16:59 pm »

I'm afraid not.
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The_Doctor
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« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2017, 10:45:00 pm »

out of curiosity, how are old statutes treated? If an 1840 statute was on the books, do judges still treat that as existing law or do we hold they are not necessarily applicable? (Even though, de jure, they do?)

I've been fascinated at how the legal system treats the old outdated laws that no longer really operate. I know that sodomy was technically on the South's books but they were considered antiquated law by the early 2000s.
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jafcontact
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« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2019, 12:37:38 pm »

Hmmm I wonder what the oldest statute is
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