Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
January 29, 2020, 12:19:57 pm
News: 2020 Presidential Predictions (Primary) are now active.

  Atlas Forum
  General Politics
  Political Geography & Demographics (Moderator: muon2)
  what would each states' map look like if redistricting power was taken away
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: what would each states' map look like if redistricting power was taken away  (Read 1271 times)
freepcrusher
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,801
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« on: June 03, 2011, 10:55:32 pm »

from the legislature? Here is Indiana.

Logged
muon2
Moderator
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 15,486


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2011, 11:05:54 pm »

Are there specific criteria used by the non-legislative mapper? If so, then the priority among those priorities matters as well.
Logged
Bacon King
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 18,390
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2011, 11:32:47 pm »

Taken away from the legislature and given to who, exactly?
Logged
dpmapper
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 317
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2011, 11:38:36 pm »

from the legislature? Here is Indiana.



You're nuts if you think that Newton/Jasper/Benton counties belong with Gary more than Michigan City does. 
Logged
minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
Lewis Trondheim
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 58,239
India


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2011, 04:33:59 am »

Michigan City belongs with South Bend more than with Gary - especially as South Bend needs more population to be brought up to par. Newton and Jasper don't belong anywhere else more than with Lake County. Besides, that link is pretty old IIRC. I've more of an issue with the Indy map. I could very well see a commission split the city given what the alternatives are.
Logged
freepcrusher
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,801
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2011, 12:46:29 pm »

Here is Alabama. And to answer previous questions, this map would ascribe to the rule that each district cannot have more than two county splits.

Logged
freepcrusher
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,801
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2011, 04:11:16 pm »

Here is Arizona. I know they already do a commission, but here is my map with minimal county splits. By the way, I know the map bleeds on to the other one at the bottom of the screen. In case your wondering Santa Cruz county is in the 8th under this map


Logged
freepcrusher
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,801
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2011, 09:05:41 pm »

Here is Arkansas

Logged
dpmapper
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 317
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2011, 09:22:22 pm »

Here is Alabama. And to answer previous questions, this map would ascribe to the rule that each district cannot have more than two county splits.


That doesn't really answer the question.  Just minimizing the number of county splits still allows for a ton of choice. 
Logged
muon2
Moderator
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 15,486


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2011, 09:31:35 pm »

Here is Alabama. And to answer previous questions, this map would ascribe to the rule that each district cannot have more than two county splits.


That doesn't really answer the question.  Just minimizing the number of county splits still allows for a ton of choice. 

For instance, AL and AZ have VRA issues. Are these addressed in your maps? If so, by what measures?

Other factors include compactness and cores of previous districts. Are they factors? Do you have a maximum population variance? Non-legislative commissions generally have to answer these during their deliberations.
Logged
BigSkyBob
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,419


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2011, 10:33:38 pm »

Here is Alabama. And to answer previous questions, this map would ascribe to the rule that each district cannot have more than two county splits.


That doesn't really answer the question.  Just minimizing the number of county splits still allows for a ton of choice. 

For instance, AL and AZ have VRA issues. Are these addressed in your maps? If so, by what measures?

Other factors include compactness and cores of previous districts. Are they factors? Do you have a maximum population variance? Non-legislative commissions generally have to answer these during their deliberations.

If the question is what district should or ought to be, then the question of what they currently are is totally irrelevent.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC