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  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, Senator ON Progressive)
  Was 1920 a landslide?
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Question: Was 1920 a landslide? Was 1964 a landslide?
#1
Yes / Yes
 
#2
Yes / No
 
#3
No / Yes
 
#4
No / No
 
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Total Voters: 16

Author Topic: Was 1920 a landslide?  (Read 1050 times)
A18
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« on: December 14, 2004, 03:14:03 pm »

No. Harding got 60% of the popular vote, but lost 11 states, several by very sizeable margins.

Same thing as 1964, really.
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Dave from Michigan
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« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2004, 03:16:51 pm »

they both were landslides, and  didn't they both lose mostly southern states.
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J-Mann
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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2004, 03:24:59 pm »

No. Harding got 60% of the popular vote, but lost 11 states, several by very sizeable margins.

Same thing as 1964, really.

If Bush would have won 60% of the vote and 39 states, I'm betting you would be calling that a landslide.  Harding lost the South, which Republicans just didn't win at that time.
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Redefeatbush04
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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2004, 03:26:46 pm »

Electoral Landslides: 1936, 1964, 1972, 1980, 1984
Popular Landslides:  1920, 1936, 1964, 1972

I define Electoral landslides as 90%+ of EC vote
I define Popular Landslides as 60% + of popular vote
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Gustaf
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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2004, 03:27:40 pm »

I'd say yes. The South was too small electorally to stop it frm being a landslide.
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A18
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« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2004, 03:30:57 pm »

I'd say yes. The South was too small electorally to stop it frm being a landslide.

Well, he got only 404 EVs.
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A18
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« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2004, 07:53:12 pm »

No. Harding got 60% of the popular vote, but lost 11 states, several by very sizeable margins.

Same thing as 1964, really.

If Bush would have won 60% of the vote and 39 states, I'm betting you would be calling that a landslide.  Harding lost the South, which Republicans just didn't win at that time.

A candidate could lose the election and get 60% of the vote. Would you consider that a landslide?
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