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| |-+  International General Discussion (Moderators: Gustaf, afleitch, Hash)
| | |-+  The Great Nordic Thread
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Poll
Question: Will Iceland and Norway ever join the EU?
Iceland, but not Norway   -18 (12.5%)
Norway, but not Iceland   -11 (7.6%)
Both   -35 (24.3%)
None of them   -80 (55.6%)
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Total Voters: 144

Author Topic: The Great Nordic Thread  (Read 135935 times)
Diouf
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« Reply #1100 on: September 19, 2018, 07:22:40 am »

The party started out in 2007 as the New Alliance, a very Macronista-style party. Two of the founders were MEP; one Conservative in EPP and one Social Liberal in ALDE. By 2009, the party had completely collapsed and two of the three founders had left the party, which the remaining founder Anders Samuelsen turned the party into the Liberal Alliance. They were now primarily focused on right-wing economic reforms. In the 2009 EP campaing, the young student Benjamin Dickow seemed quite EU-positive, although wanting radical reforms of the budget (stop spending on CAP etc.), and the party was in an electoral alliance with Liberals and Conservatives. The party was so far from getting a seat, so I'm not sure they even thought much about where to sit, but ALDE would have seemed logical. As the party started to re-establish itself, it became more Eurosceptic. The focus was still on cutting costs and bureaucracy, but they also started to use the terms of sovereignty and self-determination. So in the 2014 EP election, the party deemed itself so far from Liberals and Conservatives that they ran on their own. When asked, the party said they would prefer a new group of somewhat Eurosceptic liberals, but that was never going to happen. They had some contacts with the AECR, so they would probably have joined ECR. In the 2015 EU justice opt-in campaign, they campaigned for no. However, since entering government in the end of 2016, the Euroscepticism has been toned down. They have decided to run in an electoral alliance with the Liberals and Conservatives at EP 2019, so in that way they are back among the standard pro-European centre-right parties. This makes it harder to predict where they will end up. With British Conservatives out of ECR, that group is probably less attractive for them, but neither EPP nor ALDE is a fantastic fit either. I guess their campaign answer will be the same:"We hope to build a new group".
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Aboa
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« Reply #1101 on: September 20, 2018, 03:24:56 pm »

The party started out in 2007 as the New Alliance, a very Macronista-style party. Two of the founders were MEP; one Conservative in EPP and one Social Liberal in ALDE. By 2009, the party had completely collapsed and two of the three founders had left the party, which the remaining founder Anders Samuelsen turned the party into the Liberal Alliance. They were now primarily focused on right-wing economic reforms. In the 2009 EP campaing, the young student Benjamin Dickow seemed quite EU-positive, although wanting radical reforms of the budget (stop spending on CAP etc.), and the party was in an electoral alliance with Liberals and Conservatives. The party was so far from getting a seat, so I'm not sure they even thought much about where to sit, but ALDE would have seemed logical. As the party started to re-establish itself, it became more Eurosceptic. The focus was still on cutting costs and bureaucracy, but they also started to use the terms of sovereignty and self-determination. So in the 2014 EP election, the party deemed itself so far from Liberals and Conservatives that they ran on their own. When asked, the party said they would prefer a new group of somewhat Eurosceptic liberals, but that was never going to happen. They had some contacts with the AECR, so they would probably have joined ECR. In the 2015 EU justice opt-in campaign, they campaigned for no. However, since entering government in the end of 2016, the Euroscepticism has been toned down. They have decided to run in an electoral alliance with the Liberals and Conservatives at EP 2019, so in that way they are back among the standard pro-European centre-right parties. This makes it harder to predict where they will end up. With British Conservatives out of ECR, that group is probably less attractive for them, but neither EPP nor ALDE is a fantastic fit either. I guess their campaign answer will be the same:"We hope to build a new group".
Well they wouldn't be the first somewhat badly fitting Nordic party to join ALDE.
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Helsinkian
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« Reply #1102 on: Today at 09:14:47 am »

A while ago Finland's Foreign Minister Timo Soini (Blue Reform) attended a pro-life rally while visiting Canada on official business. This caused a controversy back home and the red-green opposition (SDP, Left Alliance, Greens) and the Swedish People's Party brought a confidence vote to the parliament floor against Soini on the grounds that his anti-abortion activism is contrary to Finland's official policy.

Today that motion failed. Christian Democrats voted with the government. Finns Party abstained. Before the vote some NCP MPs hinted that they might vote against Soini but in the end these rebels just did not vote.
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DavidB.
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« Reply #1103 on: Today at 10:02:01 am »

As for LA, I think they would have been much more willing to join ECR if DF had not been there...
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