Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 12, 2019, 10:54:27 am
News: 2020 U.S. Senate Predictions are now active.

  Atlas Forum
  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  International Elections (Moderators: Gustaf, Hash, Austere Religious Scholar)
  Israeli election and demographic maps (search mode)
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Israeli election and demographic maps  (Read 54376 times)
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« on: October 20, 2012, 10:45:03 am »

Very interesting indeed! After looking through this segmentation I had some questions:
- that labour dot in Jerusalem which appears in every diagram is that rehavya? I can't think of another in-city Jerusalem neighborhood that will see a left victory
- do you have data specifically for Haifa city not metro?
- do you have a segmentation of IDf voting?
- is there a way to get data from 1992 general election?
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2014, 06:21:30 am »

http://www.madlan.co.il/elections/2013

This site has a more detailed in city results
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2015, 01:41:41 pm »

Tell us about the Labor and Yesh Atid settlements.
Labour ones are mainly Kibbutzim from the 70s not very right wing and they keep saying they'll leave with the agreement (and the right reimbursement) YA ones are mainly secular settlements, but you need to understand that he probably won all of them with <30% of the vote not really centrist place but they probably tilted because the 2013 elections were not on the Palestinian matter at all.
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2015, 09:20:25 am »

it's a shame we don't have maps who show swings. I think it was the most polarizing election since the 90's
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2015, 10:11:33 am »

it's a shame we don't have maps who show swings. I think it was the most polarizing election since the 90's

swings are problematic with the way Israeli politics work, but I was thinking of doing a map of coalition versus opposition, I wonder if I should include Yachad with the coalition though (because they would mostly be in the coalition, and if they didn't exist their voters would overwhelmingly voted for coalition parties).
A bit problematic due to centre party issues. I think a swing map for ZU and Likud is preferable or at most with Meretz\JH+Liberman
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2016, 11:27:41 am »

Why is there so much grey ground ? Are they some kind of unincorporated territories ?
Most of the grey one is state\JNF owned with no town in it usually reservoirs and IDF training areas.
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2016, 11:53:35 am »

if there was map for Tel Aviv wards it would have been some of the strongest north-south divide within a city
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2016, 02:48:18 pm »

I'm a bit late, but is it not a little surprising that the towns on the edge of the Gaza strip went for the Zionist Union?

I would have thought they would be strongly Likud given the rocket attacks and, I believe, a demographic that is largely Sephardi Jews, who tend to be reliably conservative.
All those Zionist Union places near Gaza are mostly Ashkenazi Kibbutzim or Moshvim and not towns, all the urban places in the area went heavily for the right. Being next to Gaza has little effect, demographics are far more important.
Not exactly Ashkenazi, the Meretz Kibbutzim there are mostly Argentinians and other south americans  Wink
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2016, 04:20:43 am »


Not exactly Ashkenazi, the Meretz Kibbutzim there are mostly Argentinians and other south americans  Wink

Most South American Jews are Ashkenazi.
Ethnically, they're not Ashkenazi in customs and such from what I saw. But this comment was basically a pun
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2016, 03:24:08 am »

I'm very curious about the few settlements that voted left in the last few cycles. What is their stance on the peace process and on giving up land?
Either kibbutzim deep inside who won't might leaving with a peace settlement and a nice reimbursement. Others are really on the border and expect to be in with every permenant settlement as part of land swapping
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2016, 06:07:18 pm »

The urban south was such a massacre for the opposition, here is a list of all the localities with 10K+ votes:

Ashdod (113,203): 81.36-17.15
Beer Sheva (97,153): 76.6-21.77
Ashkelon (64,324): 81.13-17.13
Kiryat Gat (26,483): 84.83-13.98
Eilat (22,829): 65.34-30.8
Dimona (16,111): 81.15-17.25
Rahat (15,245): 2.26-95.08 (Bedouin city)
Netivot (14,603): 95.64-3.53
Ofakim (12,453): 89.87-8.86
Arad (12,297): 66.06-31.16
Sderot: (10,767): 86.63-12.09
Kiryat Malakhi (10,742): 89.78-9

Where׳s the shock there? I expected YA to get more in Ashdod and Zara's to be tighter but most of those cities (bar for 2 they aren't even real cities) are both Sephardi and in a fast process of "religiousizing"
Logged
Hnv1
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,765


« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2016, 01:48:59 pm »
« Edited: July 09, 2016, 01:52:52 pm by Hnv1 »

The urban south was such a massacre for the opposition, here is a list of all the localities with 10K+ votes:

Ashdod (113,203): 81.36-17.15
Beer Sheva (97,153): 76.6-21.77
Ashkelon (64,324): 81.13-17.13
Kiryat Gat (26,483): 84.83-13.98
Eilat (22,829): 65.34-30.8
Dimona (16,111): 81.15-17.25
Rahat (15,245): 2.26-95.08 (Bedouin city)
Netivot (14,603): 95.64-3.53
Ofakim (12,453): 89.87-8.86
Arad (12,297): 66.06-31.16
Sderot: (10,767): 86.63-12.09
Kiryat Malakhi (10,742): 89.78-9

Where׳s the shock there? I expected YA to get more in Ashdod and Zara's to be tighter but most of those cities (bar for 2 they aren't even real cities) are both Sephardi and in a fast process of "religiousizing"

I didn't say it was shocking, but I did think it was interesting enough to merit a post. What was interesting to me wasn't who won but just how lopsided the margins were compared to left strongholds (outside the Arab cities. The left pretty easily won some wealthy cities in the centre, but even at the most extreme, Ramat Hasharon at 68-31, it still isn't the 80%+ you see in Ashdod or Askelon.
Well you need to take the Kulano vote out of the left-right equation there. For instance in Haifa a lot of Kulano voters are by no means right wing voters some were even pretty left. In the periphery Kulano voters were very much Likud voters who disliked Bibi.

It was the same with Kadima voters in the periphery and the affluent towns.

Also the left "strongholds" are less homogenous, most had estates built in the 50's to house Sephardis, and then had Russians come out in droves in the 90's. And to add to that you had the white flight of the 80's and 90's to affluent suburban "moshavim" like Even Yehuda that disturbed the demographic balance in those cities
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC