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November 17, 2017, 02:12:03 pm
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+  Atlas Forum
|-+  General Politics
| |-+  International General Discussion (Moderators: afleitch, Hash, Come grasp the mighty avatar of our admin)
| | |-+  The Great Nordic Thread
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Poll
Question: Will Iceland and Norway ever join the EU?
Iceland, but not Norway   -17 (13.6%)
Norway, but not Iceland   -10 (8%)
Both   -32 (25.6%)
None of them   -66 (52.8%)
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Total Voters: 125

Author Topic: The Great Nordic Thread  (Read 120899 times)
Lord Halifax
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« Reply #1000 on: October 04, 2017, 03:46:42 pm »
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Diouf
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« Reply #1001 on: October 06, 2017, 06:24:55 am »
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Bye bye Burqa - the right wing wins internal Liberal battle



After weeks and months of discussions, there is now a clear majority for a so-called masking ban; i.e. a ban on wearing the burqa and niqab in public. The issue reemerged in July when the ECHR decided that a similar ban in Belgium was in accordance with the European Convention on Human Rights. Until then, the legality of it had been doubtful, but now the question received new rounds of discussion in the other parties, pushed by a new proposal from DPP to introduce such a ban.

With the Conservatives in favour of the ban and the Liberal Alliance against, attention quickly shifted to the Liberals whose opinion would probably swing the government one way or another. This question made clear the dividing lines in the party on the question of immigrationa and what liberalism exactly is. MPs were making their opinion clear in public, while Lars Løkke has been treading water on this question. However, in the last week or so, it has become clear that the right wing had a majority in the party. The right wing has been personified by immigration spokesperson Marcus Knuth (right in the picture), a former Foreign Service diplomat, army captain and Lehman Brothers economist, who is the son of a well-known count from Lolland. Knuth stated after the German elections that Angela Merkel's immigration policies had been a disaster, and that he was happy AfD entered parliament in style, which would hopefully create a better balance in the German parliament. All this while forgetting to mention the success of the Liberals' official sister party FDP. This caused a tough response from EU spokesperson Jan E. Jørgensen (left in the picture), who has come to represent the left wing in the party. The Frederiksberg lawyer has been a significant player in local politics for a decade, but has risen to somewhat prominence in recent years as the favourite government MP for most left-wingers due to his socially liberal views on immigration. Some have even speculated whether he could follow MEP Jens Rohde to the Social Liberals, but he seems too loyal to the party after decades on intensive involvement.

A number of things probably helped sway the Liberals in the last week or so. A Megafon poll showed that 66% of Liberal voters agreed with a ban, while only 17% was opposed. Yesterday, the Social Democrats decided to support the ban. Finally, the Liberal Alliance has made clear that their opposition to a ban is not very strong; i.e. they would accept voting for a ban, if the Liberals decided so, without a huge fuss.

It will be interesting to see how many MPs end up defecting. Liberal MP Eva Kjer Hansen has already said that she will not vote in favour of the ban, and perhaps a few Liberal Alliance and Social Democrat MPs could do the same. Kjer Hansen was Minister of Agriculture in the Liberal-only government until the Conservatives made her leave due to accusations of fiddling with pollution numbers. Since then she has been quite mad, not less so since the Conservatives entered the government, and makes no attempt to hide it whenever a decision is not in accordance with her Liberal ideals.
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Helsinkian
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« Reply #1002 on: October 12, 2017, 07:48:25 am »
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It seems that the Finnish Presidential election next January will have little excitement, as the incumbent Niinistö still holds a massive lead and is set to win the election on the first round.

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Diouf
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« Reply #1003 on: November 12, 2017, 12:35:49 pm »
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Government agrees with DPP and Social Liberals on business package



After a long period with focus on the improved S-DPP relationsship, the government has succesfully lured the DPP back into the fold. First with an agreement on significantly lower car taxes, and now an agreement worth 2 billion DKK (0,3 bln euro) a year to improve conditions for businesses. Furthermore, the Social Liberals was included, so it is a broad deal across the blocs, while the Social Democrats stayed out/were kept out. This could help the government's narrative that the Social Democrats are unambitious and unwilling to cooperate on measures to improve the conditions for growth.

The deal includes a number of different aspects. Around 1/4 of the money is spent on the DPP's main focus; lower fees and excises on beers, sodas, sugarproducts and nuts to decrease the border shopping in Germany. The Social Liberals got measures to improve internet connections, longer periods with lower taxes for highly skilled foreigners, circular economy measures as well as incentives to use environmentally friendly heat pumps for busineses and households. The Liberals continue their focus on growth in remote areas with lower fees for camping sites, harbours, hotels and small producers of food and alcohol.  The main focus for the two smaller government parties have been to create a better "shareholder culture" with easier options to invest in shares and better conditions for those that do. The DPP logically rejected most of these things during negotiations, but the final agreement did include easier ways for businesses to allow employees to be paid in company shares, and the possibility for all citizens to create a "shareholder savings account", where you can keep shares worth max 50.000 DKK (7.000 euro) and pay a lower shareholder tax on value increases.

Around half of the deal is financed by giving less money to funding job centers in the municipalities, where unemployed persons take short courses in job seeking and meet their caseworker, while 400 mio DKK will be saved on less funds to DSB, the state-owned train transport company. The remaining money is saved on a number of small measures.
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