Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 20, 2019, 04:36:56 am
News: 2020 Presidential Predictions (General) are now active.

  Atlas Forum
  General Politics
  International General Discussion (Moderators: Gustaf, afleitch, Hash, Kenny-chan kawaii princesu)
  The Great Nordic Thread
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 [12] 13 14 15 16 17 ... 46 Print
Poll
Question: Will Iceland and Norway ever join the EU?
#1Iceland, but not Norway  
#2Norway, but not Iceland  
#3Both  
#4None of them  
Show Pie Chart
Partisan results

Total Voters: 153

Author Topic: The Great Nordic Thread  (Read 157432 times)
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #275 on: June 03, 2014, 12:46:43 pm »
« edited: June 03, 2014, 06:02:37 pm by politicus »

According to political editor at the Danish newspaper Politiken Mette Østergaard Liberal leader Lars Løkke Rasmussen will withdraw as chairman after tonight's meeting in the party's main board. That was to be expected, but she also says that he will support former Minister of Defence Søren Gade as chairman instead of Deputy Chairman Kristian Jensen, whom Løkke has totally sidelined and consider a nerd. Jensen is more in touch with the party's rural and Grundtvigian roots (mum and dad were free school teachers, he does gymnastics in his spare time and his wife is scouting instructor etc.) and has the support of the Liberal core areas in Mid- and Western Jutland, but goes by the name Kristian Kedelig (Boring) and is not well liked in the capital area.

Gade is Chairiman of the organization Ariculture and Foods after he had to withdraw as Minister of Defence after the Jægerbog-scandal (a former Danish special force member giving away supposedly confident info in a book) and is set to testify before an investigative commission later this year. But apparently he has assured Løkke that there will no problems in that regard.

He is a likable, empathetic guy, who is able to connect well with "ordinary people" and a much better communicator than Jensen.

Østergaard cites a source very close to Løkke and she is normally very well informed.

EDIT: Well, this time she wasn't!
Logged
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #276 on: June 03, 2014, 01:22:17 pm »
« Edited: June 03, 2014, 02:18:48 pm by politicus »

Very interesting poll. I didn't expect to see the Social Democrats do so well, or Venstre do so badly.

If Danish Peoples Party actually became bigger than Venstre in a real election, how would that change the dynamics on the Danish right?


Actually it may lead to a situation in which DPP is no longer to the right, but somewhere in the middle - perhaps as the main rival to the Liberals. The problem for DPP in this scenario is that they would have no allies, but that could change in the next 10-12 years with a new generation of SDs taking over.

Another interesting question is how much DPP will and can moderate on immigration policy in order to be perceived as more moderate.

In a new Epinion poll from DR they are actually the biggest party.

SD 21,4%
 

Social Liberals 7,3%



Conservatives 5,8%



SPP 7,2%



Liberal Alliance 5,4%



Christian Democrats 0,3%



DPP 23,8%



Liberals 20,1%



Red Green Alliance 8,7%



Logged
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #277 on: June 03, 2014, 06:00:49 pm »

After a more than 7 hour marathon meeting in the Liberals main board Party Chairman Lars Løkke Rasmussen survived the challenge from his critics, and stays on as leader. His opponents failed to get the necessary votes to call an extraordinary congress.

This is really good news for SD and Helle Thorning-Schmidt and might give her unpopular government a chance to survive.
Logged
You kip if you want to...
change08
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8,948
United Kingdom
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #278 on: June 03, 2014, 06:27:24 pm »

After a more than 7 hour marathon meeting in the Liberals main board Party Chairman Lars Løkke Rasmussen survived the challenge from his critics, and stays on as leader. His opponents failed to get the necessary votes to call an extraordinary congress.

This is really good news for SD and Helle Thorning-Schmidt and might give her unpopular government a chance to survive.

Wow! I was really getting the impression he was doomed.
Logged
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #279 on: June 04, 2014, 08:26:03 am »

After a more than 7 hour marathon meeting in the Liberals main board Party Chairman Lars Løkke Rasmussen survived the challenge from his critics, and stays on as leader. His opponents failed to get the necessary votes to call an extraordinary congress.

This is really good news for SD and Helle Thorning-Schmidt and might give her unpopular government a chance to survive.

Wow! I was really getting the impression he was doomed.

So was virtually everybody else. But I suppose the lack of faith in Kristian Jensens leadership abilities and the manoeuvre of bringing Søren Gade in as a potential challenger to Jensen did the trick. Even if it would have been rather odd for them to have a chairman who isn't in the Folketing a competitive election between Gade and Jensen would either have meant a Gade victory or Jensen winning with such a slim margin that his position would have been untenable from day one. Apparently Jensen and most of his supporters didn't want to risk that.

Still, some things have been said that cant be withdrawn.  The Liberals in Viborg in central Jutland made a statement saying that Løkke Rasmussen was "not the sort of man you would want to invite into your house", and I can see the SD campaign people making posters with "Would you invite this man into your house?" with a picture of Christiansborg Castle, as it is the house of parliament.

Logged
Tayya
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 400
Sweden


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #280 on: June 04, 2014, 08:58:25 am »

Wasn't "Liberal leader Lars gets in trouble after extravagant lifestyle scandals" also in Borgen? Danish politicians really are rip-offs.
Logged
ingemann
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,901


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #281 on: June 04, 2014, 10:28:04 am »

Wasn't "Liberal leader Lars gets in trouble after extravagant lifestyle scandals" also in Borgen? Danish politicians really are rip-offs.

Lars Løkke Rasmussen have been an important player in Danish politics for decades and he has always been sleazy (as 17 year old leader of Venstre's youth, he cheapted a band out of 30 000 Dkr/4000-5000$, based on him being to young to sign the contract). As County Major he was well known for his willingness to use tax money on himself and his drinking friends. So it's more likely that Borgen's character are the rip-off.

As for his success in staying, I think no one expected him to say "that's a nice party you have there... it would be a shame if something happened to it".
Logged
Hash
Hashemite
Moderator
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 31,882
Cuba


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #282 on: June 04, 2014, 12:12:19 pm »

Wasn't "Liberal leader Lars gets in trouble after extravagant lifestyle scandals" also in Borgen? Danish politicians really are rip-offs.

It seems as if the last 3 years of Danish politics have more or less been ripped directly out of Borgen.
Logged
Filuwaúrdjan
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 62,714
United Kingdom


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #283 on: June 04, 2014, 01:03:03 pm »

Truly we live in a postmodern world.
Logged
Tayya
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 400
Sweden


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #284 on: June 06, 2014, 08:29:47 am »

Wasn't "Liberal leader Lars gets in trouble after extravagant lifestyle scandals" also in Borgen? Danish politicians really are rip-offs.

Lars Løkke Rasmussen have been an important player in Danish politics for decades and he has always been sleazy (as 17 year old leader of Venstre's youth, he cheapted a band out of 30 000 Dkr/4000-5000$, based on him being to young to sign the contract). As County Major he was well known for his willingness to use tax money on himself and his drinking friends. So it's more likely that Borgen's character are the rip-off.

As for his success in staying, I think no one expected him to say "that's a nice party you have there... it would be a shame if something happened to it".

Yeah, Mr. Hesselboe was perhaps the most obvious parallell to our timeline. Still, considering everything else that has happened since 2011, it fits very well into the narrative of the Borgen writers looking into the future, taking a couple of headlines and mixing them around.
Logged
Silent Hunter
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,913
United Kingdom


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #285 on: June 06, 2014, 12:49:30 pm »

Wasn't "Liberal leader Lars gets in trouble after extravagant lifestyle scandals" also in Borgen? Danish politicians really are rip-offs.

No, it was misuse of corporate credit card to calm down his agitated wife.
Logged
Tayya
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 400
Sweden


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #286 on: June 06, 2014, 12:58:55 pm »

Wasn't "Liberal leader Lars gets in trouble after extravagant lifestyle scandals" also in Borgen? Danish politicians really are rip-offs.

No, it was misuse of corporate credit card to calm down his agitated wife.

Yeah, so I guess it was technically his wife's extravagant lifestyle that caused the trouble, but let's not try too hard to make Danish politics different from Borgen, okay? Tongue
Logged
Heimdal
HenryH
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 290


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #287 on: June 07, 2014, 10:59:38 am »

Very interesting poll. I didn’t expect to see the Social Democrats do so well, or Venstre do so badly.

If Danish Peoples Party actually became bigger than Venstre in a real election, how would that change the dynamics on the Danish right?


I have no idea and if someone say they do, they're wrong.

DPP are between two point, the untouchable and the mainstream, last time such a party became the biggest was the SocDem in the early part of the century. So there are little precedence for how the voters and the Right will react to DPP being biggest. I doubt the Right would give DPP the PM position, on the other hand if DPP are the biggest party, it would look weird, as avoidance of responsability (from DPP side) and as an insult (from the other party in government) if they didn't became part of the government.


It might not be such a big transition after all.

I have heard that the DPP isn't that far to the right in terms of economic and social policy. In the respect that they support the Danish welfare state, and accepts the need for high tax rates to fund these social programs (Their sister party in Norway is far more ambivalent on this point. They want the welfare state, but not the tax rates that are needed to pay for it). On these issues they should be able to find a lot of common ground with the Social Democrats.

The DPP obviously differs from other parties (maybe especially on the left) on immigration policy. But is this all that controversial today? The impression from Norway is that DPP and Fogh Rasmussen largely won these battles in the early 2000s.
Logged
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #288 on: June 07, 2014, 11:21:00 am »
« Edited: June 07, 2014, 03:55:45 pm by politicus »

Very interesting poll. I didn't expect to see the Social Democrats do so well, or Venstre do so badly.

If Danish Peoples Party actually became bigger than Venstre in a real election, how would that change the dynamics on the Danish right?


I have no idea and if someone say they do, they're wrong.

DPP are between two point, the untouchable and the mainstream, last time such a party became the biggest was the SocDem in the early part of the century. So there are little precedence for how the voters and the Right will react to DPP being biggest. I doubt the Right would give DPP the PM position, on the other hand if DPP are the biggest party, it would look weird, as avoidance of responsibility (from DPP side) and as an insult (from the other party in government) if they didn't became part of the government.


It might not be such a big transition after all.

I have heard that the DPP isn't that far to the right in terms of economic and social policy. In the respect that they support the Danish welfare state, and accepts the need for high tax rates to fund these social programs (Their sister party in Norway is far more ambivalent on this point. They want the welfare state, but not the tax rates that are needed to pay for it). On these issues they should be able to find a lot of common ground with the Social Democrats.

The DPP obviously differs from other parties (maybe especially on the left) on immigration policy. But is this all that controversial today? The impression from Norway is that DPP and Fogh Rasmussen largely won these battles in the early 2000s.


Well, I tried to at least partially answer this above: https://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=150978.msg4184279#msg4184279

DPP is basically centrists on economics, but they are right wingers on immigration, law and order, education and culture and euro-sceptics. The party is also anti-green and they have a Christian Right type spokesperson on family policies.

Regarding cooperation with SD:

DPP is increasingly seen as a partner for the left on welfare issues and social policies, and on law and order the difference to SD isn't that great

It is not possible to tighten immigration policies in DK without breaking international conventions, which no other party than DPP is willing to. The only area that can be tightened is access to citizenship. In reality DPP leadership has accepted this, but the party faithfull obviously wants more and since immigration is the raison de etre for DPP they have to keep pushing for more. Since SD has accepted the core of the centre-rights immigration policy the de facto immigration policy is not what blocks a cooperation with SD. But DPPs rhetoric and official policy on immigration and their lack of focus on integration of minorities already in Denmark is a problem for SD,

As mentioned earlier the general view in DK is that it will take a new SD leader generation (= at least 10-12 years) before DPP and SD will be able to cooperate. And DPP will have to moderate on non-economic issues, perhaps with the exception of law and order. They would also basically have to accept status quo on immigration as government policy and tone down their rhetoric (which they have already done -  but they may need to tone it down even more).

DPP could probably fairly easily moderate on environmental issues, but the rest might be harder.
Logged
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #289 on: June 07, 2014, 11:52:56 am »
« Edited: June 07, 2014, 12:12:40 pm by politicus »

First Danish poll (from Gallup) after Lars Løkkes survival is quite good for the Liberals - all things considered. Its a Liberal-SD tie with DPP not far behind, but it looks like their Euro-wave might be declining.

The government and left wing is at 46,1% combined, while the centre-right is at 52,6% (or 53,3% if you include the Christian Democrats).

Its the first poll in a very long time where SF/SPP is above the Red-Greens. Actually SF is now only 1,1% below the election result. If SF survives the "getting into government and out again"-experience without losing voters this will be a major triumph for new SF-leader Pia Olsen Dyhr.

Conservatives and Liberal Alliance have been unable to profit from the Liberal crisis, which shows just how far the Conservatives are from their previous status as one of the two big centre-right parties. Since there is virtually no ideological difference between Cons and Libs these days, it should have been possible for them to capture at least 2-3 percentage points of critical Liberal voters.


SD: 22,4%

Social Liberals: 8,7%

Conservatives: 5,5%

SPP: 7,9%

Liberal Alliance 4,3%

Christian Democrats 0,7%

DPP: 20,9%

Liberals : 21,9%

Red-Greens: 7,1%
Logged
Lurker
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 706
Norway
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #290 on: June 07, 2014, 04:24:35 pm »

First Danish poll (from Gallup) after Lars Løkkes survival is quite good for the Liberals - all things considered. Its a Liberal-SD tie with DPP not far behind, but it looks like their Euro-wave might be declining.

The government and left wing is at 46,1% combined, while the centre-right is at 52,6% (or 53,3% if you include the Christian Democrats).

Its the first poll in a very long time where SF/SPP is above the Red-Greens. Actually SF is now only 1,1% below the election result. If SF survives the "getting into government and out again"-experience without losing voters this will be a major triumph for new SF-leader Pia Olsen Dyhr.

Conservatives and Liberal Alliance have been unable to profit from the Liberal crisis, which shows just how far the Conservatives are from their previous status as one of the two big centre-right parties. Since there is virtually no ideological difference between Cons and Libs these days, it should have been possible for them to capture at least 2-3 percentage points of critical Liberal voters.


SD: 22,4%

Social Liberals: 8,7%

Conservatives: 5,5%

SPP: 7,9%

Liberal Alliance 4,3%

Christian Democrats 0,7%

DPP: 20,9%

Liberals : 21,9%

Red-Greens: 7,1%

Where would you place Liberal Alliance? Isn't this the most right-wing party economically, despite having (some of) its "roots" in Radikale Venstre? Are LA interested in joining a centre-right govt after the next election?
Logged
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #291 on: June 07, 2014, 04:34:49 pm »

First Danish poll (from Gallup) after Lars Løkkes survival is quite good for the Liberals - all things considered. Its a Liberal-SD tie with DPP not far behind, but it looks like their Euro-wave might be declining.

The government and left wing is at 46,1% combined, while the centre-right is at 52,6% (or 53,3% if you include the Christian Democrats).

Its the first poll in a very long time where SF/SPP is above the Red-Greens. Actually SF is now only 1,1% below the election result. If SF survives the "getting into government and out again"-experience without losing voters this will be a major triumph for new SF-leader Pia Olsen Dyhr.

Conservatives and Liberal Alliance have been unable to profit from the Liberal crisis, which shows just how far the Conservatives are from their previous status as one of the two big centre-right parties. Since there is virtually no ideological difference between Cons and Libs these days, it should have been possible for them to capture at least 2-3 percentage points of critical Liberal voters.


SD: 22,4%

Social Liberals: 8,7%

Conservatives: 5,5%

SPP: 7,9%

Liberal Alliance 4,3%

Christian Democrats 0,7%

DPP: 20,9%

Liberals : 21,9%

Red-Greens: 7,1%

Where would you place Liberal Alliance? Isn't this the most right-wing party economically, despite having (some of) its "roots" in Radikale Venstre? Are LA interested in joining a centre-right govt after the next election?

LA is clearly the most economically right wing party. They don't want to join a government, since they prefer to influence it from the outside and stay ideologically pure.

A Liberal one party government is what everybody expects. Since the Liberals don't want DPP as partners (and DPP don't want to join, thinking they get more influence outside - citing the SF-experience). And Løkke has stated that he sees no point in including any of the small parties.
Logged
Swedish Austerity Cheese
JOHN91043353
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,343
Sweden


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #292 on: June 14, 2014, 09:04:52 am »

Alex Stubb has been elected NCP leader and will be new prime minister.

Is he a native Finnish or Swedish speaker? Wikipedia seemed a bit unclear on the subject. 
Logged
politicus
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,197
Denmark


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #293 on: June 26, 2014, 05:14:56 pm »
« Edited: June 26, 2014, 11:00:57 pm by politicus »

New MMR poll has the Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugssons Progress Party at a mere 9,5%, the lowest since april 2009.
Bright Future is getting closer to the lead with 21,8%, clearly ahead of SDA with 16,5%.

Government: 34,5%

IP 25%
PP 9,5%


Opposition: 58%

BF 21,8%
SDA 16,5%
LG 11,4%
Pirates 8,3%
Logged
Swedish Austerity Cheese
JOHN91043353
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,343
Sweden


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #294 on: July 15, 2014, 05:35:15 am »

So, since all sources seem to point towards the dear Gucci Helle as next in line for Van Rompuy's cushy EU job, who is likely to replace her as Prime Minister in Denmark? I don't really know who's up and coming in the Social Democratic party on your side of Öresund.
Logged
ingemann
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,901


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #295 on: July 15, 2014, 10:35:47 am »
« Edited: July 15, 2014, 11:24:15 am by ingemann »

So, since all sources seem to point towards the dear Gucci Helle as next in line for Van Rompuy's cushy EU job, who is likely to replace her as Prime Minister in Denmark? I don't really know who's up and coming in the Social Democratic party on your side of Öresund.

Mette Frederiksen (36) our minister of employment, she have a lot of thing going for her, she have had the sh**ttiest ministery, she have had to implement the most unpopular policies of this government. All her dirty laundry are more or less in the open, she has apoligised for her hypocrisy in sending her children in private school, while she was against private schools a decade ago (her apoligy).

...and people still love her, in fact she's more popular than ever.

And of course she look like this.

Image Link

So no one will call her something like Gucci Helle.

And she have made the right alliance in the part, so I doubt there will be a serious candidate going against her, when the party elect her.

My own opinion of her are that she's intelligent, competent and unlikely to have any skeleton in the closet. Also she has a broad appeal to the different segments who tradional vote Social Democratic. Her electoral district is Ballerup; a working class suburb to Copenhagen.  
Logged
swl
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 578
France


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #296 on: July 15, 2014, 11:22:48 am »
« Edited: July 15, 2014, 11:25:46 am by swl »

Is it me or heads of state/goverment in Europe are getting younger and younger? We would have three 30-something and they are quite a few in their 40s...
Logged
ingemann
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,901


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #297 on: July 15, 2014, 11:30:18 am »

Is it me or heads of states in Europe are getting younger and younger? We would have three 30-something and they are quite a few in their 40s...

No it's not you, I personal think it's a natural effect of politician entering politic younger and younger. Of course here's it's something of a accident, the "crown princes" of the Social Democrats was Nick Hækkerup and Nicolai Wammen, who are both in their forties. But because MF have been so successful as a minister and those two less so, she have jumped ahead of them.
Logged
Lurker
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 706
Norway
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #298 on: July 15, 2014, 11:54:23 am »

A 36-year-old prime minister would be pretty damn impressive. Would probably be the youngest Head of Government of a democratic country?

Her quotes about private schools does make her a massive hypocrite though. It's stuff like that which leads to contempt for politicians. She seems to want one set of rule for herself and another set for everyone else.
Logged
ingemann
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,901


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #299 on: July 15, 2014, 12:03:02 pm »

A 36-year-old prime minister would be pretty damn impressive. Would probably be the youngest Head of Government of a democratic country?

Her quotes about private schools does make her a massive hypocrite though. It's stuff like that which leads to contempt for politicians. She seems to want one set of rule for herself and another set for everyone else.

Yes

Of course she made them in her early twenties, and when she send (first of) her children in private school, she did so after the child have gone to a public school (and from what I been told about the school from people living in the district, I understand her), and she openly told it and didn't attempt to hide it.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 [12] 13 14 15 16 17 ... 46 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC