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  U.S. Presidential Election Results
  2012 U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, Senator ON Progressive)
  60% R state bordering 60% D state
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Author Topic: 60% R state bordering 60% D state  (Read 951 times)
Benj
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« on: November 19, 2012, 01:03:33 pm »

This happened in 2012. Maryland was >60% D, and West Virginia was >60% R. The only prior time this happened in a Presidential election as far as I can tell was 1928, with >60% D Arkansas and >60% R Oklahoma. It also sort of happened in 1948, when some >60% D states in the South bordered >60% Thurmond states. I can't find any other examples.

Edit: Also happened in 1868, when >60% R Tennessee bordered >60% D Georgia and Kentucky. Weird result, that. In 1864, >60% D Kentucky bordered >60% R Missouri and West Virginia.

Just an interesting bit of trivia.
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Oldiesfreak1854
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2012, 01:18:30 pm »

Thurmond was a Democrat at that time who ran from the Dixiecrats, who had split off from the Democrats.
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mileslunn
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2012, 08:43:12 pm »

Although this is about those that have occurred, I could see a couple in the future.  Washington or Oregon vs. Idaho in a strong Democrat year; New Mexico vs. Oklahoma if the GOP continues to perform poorly amongst Latinos; and Kentucky vs. Illinois as in the last two elections the GOP was about 20 points higher in Kentucky than Illinois and likewise the Democrats 20 points higher in Illinois so under the perfect circumstances, i.e the third party vote is practically non-existent, the GOP barely gets over 60% in Kentucky while the Dems barely get over 60% in Illinois. 
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Oldiesfreak1854
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2012, 09:28:15 pm »

In theory, that could happen with Illinois vs. Kentucky, but that would be a strange (and interesting) election.
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