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Author Topic: The Big Bad Swedish Politics & News Thread  (Read 90535 times)
parochial boy
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« Reply #825 on: July 29, 2017, 12:12:57 pm »
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Supposing that the Alliance do push Löfven out (although I suppose that is getting less likely by the day) - would the Moderates still be expected to lead the coalition?

Surely Annie Löof wouldn't be too happy at being a junior coalition partner to a party the Centre are currently polling ahead of? And wouldn't Centre be worried about losing support if they did go into being a junior government partner?

I haven't seen any polls with C ahead of M.

My mistake, got carried away with recent polling movements...

But the question is still relevant I think - M are clearly no longer the dominant party within the alliance; and would stuggle to convince C that they should naturally lead a coalition
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« Reply #826 on: July 30, 2017, 05:24:01 am »
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I still expect M to bounce back a little when we approach the election. It isn't given that the largest party gets to lead the coalition either. In  1979 C led a coalition government with FP and M in it even though M was the largest party. Of course, in those days Sweden was so leftwing that a conservative PM was unthinkable and C and FP were closer together.

Today, I think it'd be much harder for SD to accept a C PM and they probably will need SD support.
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« Reply #827 on: August 04, 2017, 07:10:13 pm »
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4760606/amp/Sweden-ex-Chancellor-sorry-exposing-party.html

'I blacked out': Sweden's former chancellor apologises after exposing himself and challenging guests at a party to a penis measuring competition – but his ex-Playboy model fiancée defends him

@KTHopkins Anders. I love you. I think you are fantastic. Do not be ashamed. You rocked the party xx #StandwithAnders https://t.co/tGx9TlecDv https://t.co/bVWAzw29EY

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« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 07:29:34 pm by The Lord Marbury »Logged
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« Reply #828 on: August 09, 2017, 04:34:16 pm »
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Expressen/Demoskop poll:

Left: 7.4% (-0.6)
Social Democrats: 28.4% (+1.4)
Greens: 4.4% (-0.5)

Liberals: 6.4% (-0.3)
Centre: 12.9% (+1.0)
Moderate: 17.2% (+1.5)
Christian Democrats: 4.0% (+1.4)

Sweden Democrats: 16.6% (-3.5)
Feminist Initiative: 1.6% (-0.2)

Alliance: 40.5% (+3.6)
Red-Greens: 40.2% (+0.3)


Big drop for the Sweden Democrats, and the best result for the Social Democrats in a Demoskop poll since March 2015. The IT-scandal doesn't appear to have an especially negative impact on the government's standing in the polls.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 04:40:23 pm by The Lord Marbury »Logged
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« Reply #829 on: August 10, 2017, 08:39:56 am »
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Another poll, this time from SVT/Novus which seems to confirm some of the trends seen in the Demoskop poll. Though the SD drop is smaller and the S gain is bigger and there's no significant changes for the Alliance as a whole this time. Still no cause for celebration though, because in spite of  how little I care to admit it we in the left actually do need the Greens to stay in parliament.

Left: 7.6% (-0.8 )
Social Democrats: 29.3% (+2.0)
Greens: 3.9% (-0.6)

Liberals: 5.5% (-0.3)
Centre: 12.8% (+0.3)
Moderate: 15.2% (-0.7)
Christian Democrats: 4.3% (+1.0)

Sweden Democrats: 18.7% (-1.3)
Feminist Initiative: 1.6% (-0.2)

Alliance: 37.8% (+0.3)
Red-Greens: 40.6% (+0.8 )


« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 11:38:18 am by The Lord Marbury »Logged
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« Reply #830 on: August 21, 2017, 11:51:55 am »
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New poll from SvD/Sifo. Not exactly any big changes, though S is back at 30%.

Left: 6.4% (-1.3)
Social Democratic: 30.0% (+0.8 )
Green: 4.1% (+0.1)

Liberal: 6.2% (±0)
Centre: 12.4% (-1.0)
Moderate: 16.2% (+0.3)
Christian Democrats: 3.6% (+0.7)

Sweden Democrats: 18.3% (+0.3)
Others: 3.0% (+0.2)

Alliance: 38.4% (±0)
Red-Greens: 40.5% (-0.4)


Also in the news today, according to Expressen, the government and their Left Party budget partner is going for a Hultqvist-style strategy when it comes to the three tax hikes the Alliance are threatening votes of no confidence in individual cabinet members over. The planned changes in the threshold for national income tax and changes in 3:12 rules will be scrapped but the air travel tax will remain. However the Finance Minister's press secretary refuses to confirm any deal having been reached.

This is beyond ridiculous.

For the simple reason that the Alliance feel the need to show some kind of strength when they're unable unify over the issue of how they should govern when there's a Red-Green plurality in a hung parliament, they do this. Yes of course they don't like the particular policies put forward, but if a majority of the Riksdag can't tolerate a government's fiscal policy you bring it down by presenting an alternative budget or with a vote of no confidence in the Prime Minister. But because they can't agree on how to act after such a vote goes through they settle for this weird halfway point, which is taking out individual members of the cabinet. An instrument which in the past has only really been used when a cabinet member has done something extremely irresponsible, not for implementing a budget which the cabinet has collectively approved.
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« Reply #831 on: August 23, 2017, 06:37:25 am »
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http://www.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/katastrofsiffror-for-kinberg-batra-i-ny-dnipsos-matning/

https://www.svt.se/nyheter/inrikes/annu-ett-kommunalrad-kraver-batras-avgang

New DN/Ipsos poll and the results aren't great for AKB to say the least. Meanwhile SVT is reporting that a majority of Moderate municipal commissioners in Stockholm County lacks confidence in her ability to lead the party. Something tells me that her press conference today about wanting Sweden to set a target to spend 2% of GDP on defence won't get a lot of coverage, at least not for the reasons she wanted.

Who do you want to see as Prime Minister?

All voters:
Stefan Löfven (Social Democratic): 24%
Someone else: 20%
Don't know: 19%
Annie Lööf (Centre): 17%
Jimmie Åkesson (Sweden Democrat): 14%
Anna Kinberg Batra (Moderate): 6%

Support for the leader in their respective party:
Stefan Löfven (Social Democratic):78%
Annie Lööf (Centre): 76%
Jimmie Åkesson (Sweden Democrat): 70%
Anna Kinberg Batra (Moderate): 30%


Alliance voters:
Annie Lööf (Centre): 44%
Anna Kinberg Batra (Moderate): 17%
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 06:40:09 am by The Lord Marbury »Logged
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« Reply #832 on: August 23, 2017, 08:50:04 am »
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http://www.di.se/nyheter/ungdomsforbundet-kraver-anna-kinberg-batras-avgang/

MUF is demanding Anna Kinberg Batra's resignation, with their Chair Benjamin Dousa saying that the entire Moderate Youth League doesn't have confidence in Anna Kinberg Batra's leadership.

It's beginning to look like this is it for AKB. If she survives now it'll only be because the party can't find someone who's both willing to take over and happens to be an acceptable leader to the entire party.
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« Reply #833 on: August 23, 2017, 09:58:33 am »
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For the simple reason that the Alliance feel the need to show some kind of strength when they're unable unify over the issue of how they should govern when there's a Red-Green plurality in a hung parliament, they do this. Yes of course they don't like the particular policies put forward, but if a majority of the Riksdag can't tolerate a government's fiscal policy you bring it down by presenting an alternative budget or with a vote of no confidence in the Prime Minister. But because they can't agree on how to act after such a vote goes through they settle for this weird halfway point, which is taking out individual members of the cabinet. An instrument which in the past has only really been used when a cabinet member has done something extremely irresponsible, not for implementing a budget which the cabinet has collectively approved.

I agree, that this constant drama with Alliance taking down individual ministers etc is a weird charade to try to cover for the fact that they are keeping the centre-left government in power. But with their big disagreements internally, it is perhaps not a bad strategy per se to try to wear down the government while not having to face the dilemma of how to take over power. Hopefully a new Moderate leader (who could that be?) can say clearly that they need to cooperate with the Sweden Democrats, whether in a Danish or Norwegian model. AKB has, if nothing else, at least been a useful figure in starting this process. A new leader can then take the step fully. If the Centre Party and/or Liberals reject this, then the Moderates must let go of the whole Alliance project and try to clearly align two sides in Sweden according to the cultural differences, which is likely to be a succesful strategy.
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« Reply #834 on: August 23, 2017, 05:14:32 pm »
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For the simple reason that the Alliance feel the need to show some kind of strength when they're unable unify over the issue of how they should govern when there's a Red-Green plurality in a hung parliament, they do this. Yes of course they don't like the particular policies put forward, but if a majority of the Riksdag can't tolerate a government's fiscal policy you bring it down by presenting an alternative budget or with a vote of no confidence in the Prime Minister. But because they can't agree on how to act after such a vote goes through they settle for this weird halfway point, which is taking out individual members of the cabinet. An instrument which in the past has only really been used when a cabinet member has done something extremely irresponsible, not for implementing a budget which the cabinet has collectively approved.

I agree, that this constant drama with Alliance taking down individual ministers etc is a weird charade to try to cover for the fact that they are keeping the centre-left government in power. But with their big disagreements internally, it is perhaps not a bad strategy per se to try to wear down the government while not having to face the dilemma of how to take over power. Hopefully a new Moderate leader (who could that be?) can say clearly that they need to cooperate with the Sweden Democrats, whether in a Danish or Norwegian model. AKB has, if nothing else, at least been a useful figure in starting this process. A new leader can then take the step fully. If the Centre Party and/or Liberals reject this, then the Moderates must let go of the whole Alliance project and try to clearly align two sides in Sweden according to the cultural differences, which is likely to be a succesful strategy.

Well it's a bad strategy for anyone who's thinking long term. It the Alliance sets a precedence that's it's fine for a parliamentary majority to bring down individual cabinet members because of a budget that the government has approved collectively, you can bet that the Social Democrats won't shirk from using the same tool against a centre-right government should the situation ever arise. Thus continuing the escalation in conflict and worsening of cross-party relations.

I cannot in any way see the Moderates putting such an ultimatum against the two centrist parties, they've already seen what happened to their poll numbers when they opened up for working with SD in January, openly confronting C and L over SD cooperation would be tantamount to giving up on those Reinfeldt liberals in Stockholm who've already moved over to C without any guarantee of winning back a significant number of voters from SD. I can't see any leader doing that. Maybe if Hanif Bali somehow got the leadership, but right now the only realistic way I see that happening is if you only allow his Twitter followers to vote.

The problem here is that the same municipal politicians who wanted AKB to move closer to SD are now blaming her for the party's bad poll numbers, failing to take into account that the big drop in Stockholm County in particular kicked off with AKB's opening to SD. Admittedly the party had stagnated and been in a slow decline for the past few months prior, but SD announcement opened the floodgates.

In terms of successor, I don't see a lot of impressive figures on the horizon. But I guess those you've got are...

Ulf Kristersson, 53 (Spokesperson on Economic Policy)
Fredrik Reinfeldt old nemesis in the youth league who saw himself and his neo-liberal/libertarian wing being defeated for the chairmanship of the Moderate Youth League in 1993 by Reinfeldt and his conservatives. Is better in the debates than Batra, but that's not saying much, and he didn't want the job in 2015 so the question is if that has changed now. As Economic Policy Spokesperson he's also strongly associated with the AKB leadership, so the question is if he's the most attractive option if you want to give the impression of a fresh start. He also has an old scandal from 2008 when he was Stockholm's Municipal Commissioner for Social Affairs where he rented an apartment from a charity which was reserved for severely ill or homeless individuals.

Elisabeth Svantesson, 49 (Spokesperson on Employment Policy)
Seen by party members as a good speaker who comes off straightforward in interviews, and was one of the people who was out early signaling a shift in the party's migration and integration policies. On the negative side she's known for presenting zero new propostions before parliament during her time as Employment Minister, something which her opponent both now and then, Ylva Johansson, never fails to bring up. She also has a background some controversial conservative christian organisations, such as Livets Ord (Swedish branch of Word of Faith) and the anti-abortion group Yes to Life, with there being some clips from debate shows from the late 80s/early 90s where she argued against abortion and homosexuality. She also joined the party as an adult, which means that she doesn't have a network of old friends and potential supporters from the youth league.

Johan Forssell, 37 (Spokesperson on Social Security Policy)
Former Chair of the Moderate Youth League and Chief of Staff in the Prime Minister's Office who's been an MP since 2010. On M's conservative side and one of the proponents of a stricter immigration policy. Not that well known and may be seen as too young and unproven which could rule him out.

Wild cards (don't really see any of them getting):

Mikael Odenberg, 63 (fmr. Minister for Defence)
The former Defence Minister has made himself known as a critic of Kinberg Batra, both when it comes to the now-dead December Agreement and her opening towards SD. Is liked by a lot of people for his principled resignation from the Reinfeldt Cabinet over defence cuts, but probably isn't enough to get the leadership. Doesn't do himself any favours with his support for Peter Hultqvist and opening for coalition between the Moderates and Social Democrats, and he has also said he doesn't think the party wants someone his age.

Carl Bildt, 68 (fmr. Prime Minister, fmr. Minister for Foreign Affairs)
Probably the most experienced politician the party has along with Reinfeldt, having been Prime Minister 91-94 and Foreign Minister 06-14. Very skilled in debates and interviews. But while he is well liked for his performance on the foreign policy arena, his track record of domestic achievements are marred in the economic crisis of the 1990s. His controversial involvements with companies like Gazprom and Lundin Oil are there in the background too. Probably doesn't feel like coming back to the mud-slining of Swedish domestic politics after spending 20 years trying to be a statesman.

Anders Borg, 49 (fmr. Minister for Finance)
Popular former Finance Minister who would've easily gotten the job in 2015 if he wanted it, and probably could've gotten it this spring if the coup against AKB had succeeded then. But recent scandals involving sexist slurs and indecent exposure have definitely ruled him out of any leadership role in the Moderates for the foreseeable future.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 05:19:20 pm by The Lord Marbury »Logged
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« Reply #835 on: August 25, 2017, 03:02:47 am »
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Anna Kinberg Batra has announced that she will step down as leader of the Moderates, whilst at the same time being quite harsh towards her critics, accusing them of engaging in self-injury over the past few days.
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« Reply #836 on: August 25, 2017, 04:16:17 am »
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Maybe there's some small superficial similarities but I don't think it goes any further than that.

My guess is that the job is Ulf Kristersson's if he wants it, though Elisabeth Svantesson has apparently grown in popularity among rank and file Moderates out in the country in the past years. Forssell suffers from the problem that he is still quite obscure and his lack of experience, especially considering he's not even been a member of the party board, could be a downside when the party is electing a new leader so close to an election.
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« Reply #837 on: August 28, 2017, 10:57:16 am »
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Mikael Odenberg, 63 (fmr. Minister for Defence)
The former Defence Minister has made himself known as a critic of Kinberg Batra, both when it comes to the now-dead December Agreement and her opening towards SD. Is liked by a lot of people for his principled resignation from the Reinfeldt Cabinet over defence cuts, but probably isn't enough to get the leadership. Doesn't do himself any favours with his support for Peter Hultqvist and opening for coalition between the Moderates and Social Democrats, and he has also said he doesn't think the party wants someone his age.

Odenberg has somewhat surprisingly announced that he is open to becoming the new Moderate leader. Not sure if he actually stands a chance though, but it is interesting to know there is an actual contender outside of Elisabeth Svantesson and Ulf Kristersson which both have the inspiring personality of a blank sheet of paper. 
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« Reply #838 on: August 28, 2017, 11:06:53 am »
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What was the December Agreement?
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« Reply #839 on: August 29, 2017, 04:45:06 am »
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What was the December Agreement?

It was an agreement where the centre-right pledged to allow left-wing budgets if they had a plurality, in exchange for the left doing the same after next election. PLus some other stuff, but that was the big one.

I honestly think Odenberg would be the right choice but they won't make it. It's a little bizarre, because a lot of M-people are acting as if AKB was the problem when the problem is very clearly one of policy. And yet there is no discussion on policy.
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« Reply #840 on: August 29, 2017, 06:14:44 am »
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What was the December Agreement?

It was an agreement where the centre-right pledged to allow left-wing budgets if they had a plurality, in exchange for the left doing the same after next election. PLus some other stuff, but that was the big one.

I honestly think Odenberg would be the right choice but they won't make it. It's a little bizarre, because a lot of M-people are acting as if AKB was the problem when the problem is very clearly one of policy. And yet there is no discussion on policy.

What are the main problems with M policy then? Being open towards working with the Sweden Democrats or are there other problems as well?
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« Reply #841 on: August 29, 2017, 08:53:25 am »
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What was the December Agreement?

It was an agreement where the centre-right pledged to allow left-wing budgets if they had a plurality, in exchange for the left doing the same after next election. PLus some other stuff, but that was the big one.

I honestly think Odenberg would be the right choice but they won't make it. It's a little bizarre, because a lot of M-people are acting as if AKB was the problem when the problem is very clearly one of policy. And yet there is no discussion on policy.

What are the main problems with M policy then? Being open towards working with the Sweden Democrats or are there other problems as well?

M used to favour restrictive immigration policy. In government, under Reinfeldt, they 180ed on this pursuing a super-liberal line and in the process alienated much of their base which switched to SD. Now they're trying to regain those voters by being SD-lite, in the process alienating their liberal voters who are now deserting them for C.

They're caught between a rock and a hard place on this and it's difficult for them to get credibility. That's inherent to the situation and not created by AKB. 
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« Reply #842 on: August 29, 2017, 01:14:17 pm »
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Can't say that something like that agreement would happen here... Thanks for that.
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« Reply #843 on: September 02, 2017, 01:52:16 pm »
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The way the polls are moving, I will now say that if Venstre gets above the threshold, things are looking very good for the current four majority parties, even if the Greens cross the threshold as well. A recent Respons poll for Aftenposten has this scenario with a 88-81 lead for the current majority parties.

Frp is getting a great deal of attention on their key issue of immigration, which means that they are reaching the 16.3% or above from 2013 in several polls in these days. First, Sylvi Listhaug got a great deal of attention with her proposal to stop following the ECHR's rulings, then Støre decided to make his attack on Solberg for "making Norway a colder and harder place" due to taking Frp into government and accepting Listhaug's rhetoric and proposals, and the finally, there has been a lot of talk about Listhaug's recent trip to Sweden. The Swedish immigration minister Helene Fritzon cancelled on her just before their planned meeting, so instead Listhaug went to the crime-infested ghetto of Rinkeby to illustrate the failed Swedish immigration policies that Norway should try to avoid.

I quote this from the norwegian election threat to ask swedish posters if Rinkeby is in fact an evidence of "failed" swedish immigration policies. I know crime, poverty and unemployment is high there, but is not surprising given the kind of people are there (poor immigrants/refugees from abroad+some poor swedes) and the government are doing good policies there. I read that the schools there are doing great things to integrate the population and despite the difficulties, there are clear advances to integrate people into swedish society. But I don't really know and it could be great to know something from a svensk.
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« Reply #844 on: September 14, 2017, 09:07:24 am »
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The Centre Party and the Liberals are pulling out of the confidence motion against Defence Minister Peter Hultqvist, while the Christian Democrats are still supporting it. No word from the Moderates yet.

So the big move of showing strength and unity in July by bringing down a few cabinet members have resulted in yet another instance of Alliance parties openly disagreeing with each other. Stefan Löfven really couldn't have hoped for a worse opposition.
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« Reply #845 on: September 20, 2017, 02:41:04 am »
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sverigesradio.se/sida/artikel.aspx?programid=2054&artikel=6781702

The Red-Green government's final state budget of the term, negotiated with the Left Party, has been released. Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson is currently holding her press conference. The unexpectedly strong growth is really a godsend for the government, they can spend 40 billion on new reforms that'll be appealing to voters ahead of the next election while they'll still be able to run 40 billion SEK budget surplus as well. According to the Finance Minister the national debt is dropping to its lowest level since 1977.

Quote
Where the money is going:

The child benefit will be raised by SEK 200 per month, per child. The government will spend an extra SEK 4.5 billion to pay for this.

Lower tax for pensioners. The proposal, costing SEK 4.4 billion, will give lower tax to three quarters of all pensioners. Those with the lowest pension will benefit most from this, getting up to SEK 410 more per month.

Education, job subsidies and support for local councils who offer unemployed people entry-level jobs. This costs SEK 4.3 billion. People who are new in Sweden will be obliged to do training.

Another SEK 2.7 billion annually to defence until 2020.

Police will get SEK 2 billion extra during 2018, increasing further the following two years.

More money for prisons, juvenile detentions centres and customs. SEK 748 million for more pre-trial detention, and for the customs to do more checks regarding illegal weapons and narcotics.

Extra money for schools based on how deprived the area is. Next year the government will spend SEK 1.5 billion on this, increasing yearly up to 6 SEK billion in 2020.

Vulnerable areas in big-city suburbs as well as in the country-side will get SEK 500 million. This is a demand from the Left Party, which will support the Social Democrat-Green government’s budget in the parliamentary vote. Municipalities will be able to apply for this money to support areas where there is high unemployment, low education and few people taking part in elections. The money should go to jobs, education, services and social support. The funds should be available to apply for over the next ten years, and is supposed to be increased to SEK 2.5 billion annually by 2020.

Extra support for more remote areas, under the slogan "all of Sweden shall live". SEK 1.2 billion to services and improved living conditions in more remote areas, green jobs all around the country, small businesses, education and infrastructure, including better roads and public transport. The green jobs shall go to people who have been long-term unemployed.

A tax rebate for trade union fees will be re-introduced from July 2019. This is expected to cost SEK 2.7 billion per year, and mean that millions of Swedes will pay SEK 100 less per month.

Cheaper electric bikes, more electric charging stations and subsidises to household solar electricity. An extra SEK 2.8 million is to be spent on environment and climate proposals during 2018. Plus SEK 600 million to clean up the seas from pharmaceutical waste, toxic waste and old shipwrecks, plus plastic waste.

Tax increases:

Increased tax on certain savings accounts.

A new tax on airline travel will be introduced.
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« Reply #846 on: September 20, 2017, 04:04:49 am »
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The way the polls are moving, I will now say that if Venstre gets above the threshold, things are looking very good for the current four majority parties, even if the Greens cross the threshold as well. A recent Respons poll for Aftenposten has this scenario with a 88-81 lead for the current majority parties.

Frp is getting a great deal of attention on their key issue of immigration, which means that they are reaching the 16.3% or above from 2013 in several polls in these days. First, Sylvi Listhaug got a great deal of attention with her proposal to stop following the ECHR's rulings, then Støre decided to make his attack on Solberg for "making Norway a colder and harder place" due to taking Frp into government and accepting Listhaug's rhetoric and proposals, and the finally, there has been a lot of talk about Listhaug's recent trip to Sweden. The Swedish immigration minister Helene Fritzon cancelled on her just before their planned meeting, so instead Listhaug went to the crime-infested ghetto of Rinkeby to illustrate the failed Swedish immigration policies that Norway should try to avoid.

I quote this from the norwegian election threat to ask swedish posters if Rinkeby is in fact an evidence of "failed" swedish immigration policies. I know crime, poverty and unemployment is high there, but is not surprising given the kind of people are there (poor immigrants/refugees from abroad+some poor swedes) and the government are doing good policies there. I read that the schools there are doing great things to integrate the population and despite the difficulties, there are clear advances to integrate people into swedish society. But I don't really know and it could be great to know something from a svensk.

Well, the debate is very polarized. Rinkeby is pretty bad by normal Swedish standards but it's not Somalia, or even Detroit as some people would have you think.

In terms of it being evidence of failed immigration policy, I don't know. Sweden has had a policy of taking in very large numbers of refugees with very low human capital. I think integration efforts have been decent, given that, but it was probably never going to lead to anything other than the outcome we have in in those areas. I guess you can view it as a failure in the sense that our political leaders seem to have actually not understood what the obvious consequences would be, but it's a bit like calling a budget deficit "evidence of failed spending policy".

Sweden doesn't really have integration in the sense that people who come here remain underemployed and segregated for their entire lives and so do their children. From that perspective integration in the longer term is a monumental failure, obviously.
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This place really has become a cesspool of degenerate whores...

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In MN for fantasy stuff, member of the most recently dissolved centrist party.
The Lord Marbury
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« Reply #847 on: September 21, 2017, 02:53:34 pm »
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The Moderate nominating committee have proposed that the party elect current economic policy spokesperson Ulf Kristersson as the party's new leader on October 1st, meaning that excluding any extraordinary circumstances like a sudden scandal he will get the job. Not exactly a fresh start, given that he was pretty much the number 2 man during AKB's entire leadership, but he's at least a somewhat better communicator than her so maybe they figure that it will be enough. My guess is that it won't be, but we'll just have to wait and see.

DN/Ipsos have a new poll out showing that the number of people who believe that the next government will be led by the Moderates have dropped by 32 points in the past year. Kristersson certainly has his work cut out for him.

Do you think the next government, after the 2018 election, will be led by....?

The Moderate Party
September 2016: 48%
March 2017: 27%
June 2017: 24%
September 2017: 16%


The Social Democrats
September 2016: 24%
March 2017: 31%
June 2017: 38%
September 2017: 39%


Another party
September 2016: 10%
March 2017: 22%
June 2017: 19%
September 2017: 15%


Unsure/don't know
September 2016: 18%
March 2017: 20%
June 2017: 20%
September 2017: 30%
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The Lord Marbury
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« Reply #848 on: September 25, 2017, 07:33:44 pm »
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Hanna Wigh, Member of the Riksdag since 2014 announced that she's leaving the Sweden Democrats yesterday and will remain in parliament as an independent, becoming the second Sweden Democrat MP to do so since the last election after Jimmie Åkesson's mother-in-law Margareta Larsson in 2015. Another Sweden Democrat MP, Anna Hagwall, was expelled from the party in 2016 after a string of anti-semitic statements.

Wigh, along with several other now-former members of the Sweden Democrats were the main focus of yesterday's episode of TV4's investigative journalism show Kalla Fakta (Cold Facts). In the episode she talked about how she was sexually harassed by a party colleague and was pressured by leading members of the party to keep quiet. An unnamed MP who was one of the individuals who had urged her to keep quiet also later assaulted her. In her own words: "He had a hand on my throat and pressed me against the wall. Then he put his other free hand inside my trousers and pushed up a finger. Then he told me we should see each other outside of parliament at some point."

She and other former members also talk in the episode about how internal reports of misuse of funds, which later led to a conviction of fraud and a 1 year prison sentence for MP Anders Forsberg, went ignored. And when they went to the police with these reports they were harassed by other party members. Hanna Wigh also used a hidden camera to record a conversation with Party Secretary Richard Jomshof where he criticised her for speaking out in the media in 2016 about mistreatment of women in the party.

Anders Forsberg, while no longer an MP, now works as a consultant for the party.

As usual, Jimmie Åkesson claims to know nothing at all about these incidents.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2017, 07:35:43 pm by The Lord Marbury »Logged
The Lord Marbury
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« Reply #849 on: October 15, 2017, 01:17:37 am »
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New poll from Sifo.





Looks like the recent scandals, coupled with the leadership change in the Moderates and a shift in political debate and voter priorities which has brought traditional left/right conflicts more to the forefront haven't been good to the Sweden Democrats. This is the lowest support they've had in a Sifo poll since May 2015, and it doesn't seem to be an outlier since two recent polls by Demoskop and Inizio have also recorded a drop for SD.
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