Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 19, 2019, 11:42:52 am
News: 2019 Gubernatorial Predictions are now active

  Atlas Forum
  Election Archive
  Election Archive
  2008 Elections
  Governor prospect
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Governor prospect  (Read 1703 times)
AuH2O
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,239


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« on: February 05, 2005, 02:12:42 am »
« edited: February 05, 2005, 02:14:37 am by AuH2O »

This is large excerpt from a "State of the State" address. I posted this in the 2008 area with reason. If you have time, read it (no googling!!!!) and then ask yourself this:

Is this someone thinking about taking a step towards national politics?

I just thought it was interesting and would like to hear other opinions.

--------------------------------


Itís an honor to be with you tonight to deliver my view of the state of our state, and if I were to boil it down, I would boil it down to a situation that is improving, but one in which we are not yet out of the woods.

The fact that our state economy and budget have been in the woods over the past few years is well known. And whether we agreed or not on each step taken to bring us through this financial storm is irrelevant to the larger fact that each of you in this chamber deserves a degree of credit for your part in bringing us through this storm.

It is my hope that that we will walk away from this experience and take steps over the next year to avoid repeating what we have just been through. Toward that end, tonight I will lay out why I believe our economy is still at risk, and why I believe it is essential we carefully prioritize what we spend Ė and, in fact, limit what we spend Ė so that we can begin to get our state finances in order. Iíll then walk through five steps, two in great detail, that I think are key to strengthening our economy and raising incomes. In each choice I lay out, I think tonight is a time for choosing.

Reforms, versus the way things have always been. Spend whatever comes in, or limit our spending so that we can first pay back money borrowed in rough times. Bold steps built around changes in things that help us compete, or just more money at the problem.

There are many categories of our state government that need further reform beyond the five I will discuss tonight: higher education, highway funding, domestic violence and adoption policy are just a few. But I believe this list of five requires our most immediate effort this year. Iíll readily admit I donít have all the answers, no one does, but these five propositions have proven to be answers in other states, so I think they are worthy of your action.

I do know if we work together not as Republicans and Democrats, but as [edited], we can make a real difference in more than the budget and the economy Ė but actually in peopleís lives. In each of the choices Iíll outline, I ask that we take the road less traveled in politics, and make changes and reforms in the way things have been done for too long in our state.

Letís first look at our economy, and I think if you look beyond our borders to the national and international landscape, there are substantial threats looming that necessitate change.

One, weíre at war.

I donít know how the situation in Iraq sorts itself out, but I do know the war spreads a gray cloud over what happens next in any economy until it is settled. Wars are expensive, both to the soldier and the taxpayer. On the taxpayer front, weíre now spending $6 billion per month in Iraq, this stateís budget for the entire year, and for the soldiers in the field, the costs are far greater. Twenty-nine [edited-- no disrespect meant to the servicepeople that gave their lives] have now been killed in the fighting overseas.

Iíve asked Staff Sgt. Charles K. Boone to join us for the State of the State. He returned from Iraq in December and was awarded the Purple Heart for the injuries he sustained as he was fired upon while pulling fellow soldiers from a burning vehicle that had been hit in their convoy. I ask that he stand and be recognized for his valor and that you applaud his service, along with the service of every soldier, sailor, airman and marine.

Two, our federal government seems to have lost its ability to simply set priorities.

The federal deficit was $422 billion this year. Add to that, the United Statesí current account deficit is on its way to more than $650 billion this year Ė about six percent of the countryís GDP and thatís relevant because a five percent reading for any third-world nation normally is enough to trigger an IMF intervention.

Our net international debt is approaching 300 percent of annual exports. Again relevant because countries like Brazil and Argentina saw their net indebtedness rise to only
slightly more, around 400 percent of their national exports, at the height of their financial crisis.

As a consequence of all of this, weíre seeing a dollar thatís on increasingly shaky ground.

Those are just the current events facing our national economy. More disturbing, frankly, are the longer trends. Robert Samuelson of the Washington Post recently wrote a fascinating column talking about four long-term trends, all of which negatively impact the driver of our national economy, consumer spending. His points were the following:

One, the economy is bound to lose the stimulus of rising consumer debt.

Household debt, which ranges from home mortgages to credit cards, now totals about $10 trillion, or roughly 115 percent of personal income. In 1945, debt was about 20 percent of disposable income. For six decades consumer debt and spending have risen faster than income. Debt, as we all know, canít permanently rise faster than income, and given their age, baby boomers must at some point soon begin to repay mortgages and save for retirement, which will mean less consumer spending.

Second, the benefits of defeating double-digit inflation are fading.

In 1979, inflation peaked at 13 percent. Now itís 1 to 3 percent, depending on the measure. The steep decline led to big drops in interest rates and big increases in stock prices. Stocks are now 12 times higher than their 1982 level, and with that some people felt wealthier and spent Ė others were able to borrow and spend Ė but mortgage rates canít fall again from 15 percent, which means once again, lower consumer spending.

Third, the welfare state, what I call government transfer payments, at the federal level is growing costlier. Itís been covered in the past by defense shrinking as a share of the federal budget, but now as baby boomers retire and we look at higher defense spending based on global engagements, paying for future benefits will require higher taxes, bigger budget deficits or deeper cuts in other programs, all of which could hurt economic growth and consumer spending.

Four, the global trading system has become less cohesive, and, in many ways, more threatening.

Let me just make this point: the end of the Cold War Ė and the addition of the former Soviet Union, India and China into the trading system Ė has effectively doubled the global labor force from 1.5 billion to 3 billion.

-------------------------
Logged
Rob
Bob
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 6,285
United States
Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -9.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2005, 02:19:14 am »

It's a good speech, and it does sound like someone who's testing the waters for a national race. He makes a lot of good points, whoever he is.
Logged
12th Doctor
supersoulty
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 20,602
Ukraine


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2005, 02:40:48 am »

I muat admit, I Googled.  Very interesting, though.  Your right, he is possitioning himself.  Whether he can be credable is another issue.
Logged
Sam Spade
SamSpade
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 27,655


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2005, 02:52:05 am »

Yep, I know who it is.  He's probably one of the five best governors out there right now and I would hope he would run for President.  Geography could be a problem.  Oh well.
Logged
AuH2O
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,239


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2005, 01:33:39 pm »

They could always stick him with a VP like Romney or Pawlenty to balance it out.
Logged
nick
nickshepDEM
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 6,910


Political Matrix
E: -0.52, S: 3.65

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2005, 01:42:25 pm »

He will be a strong candidate.  One of 3 or so potential candidates I would rather not see get the Republican nomination.
Logged
A18
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 23,808
Political Matrix
E: 9.23, S: -6.35

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2005, 08:53:28 pm »

If he runs, I'll probably vote for him in the primary.
Logged
AuH2O
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,239


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2005, 02:42:32 am »

http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/10829713.htm

OK, props please. I wrote my post before this article was written and without having heard a word about the "buzz" around Sanford's speech.
Logged
Rob
Bob
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 6,285
United States
Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -9.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2005, 02:46:09 am »

Sanford would be a great candidate. He's a much better Republican than Bush, too.  I really hope the race is Bayh vs. Sanford- both would be good presidents.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC