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Author Topic: Corporal punishment by county school district, 2009-2011  (Read 4213 times)
Fmr. Pres. Griff
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« on: November 19, 2014, 03:37:28 am »

Inspired by a thread on FC, and began digging through CRDC data from DoE to make it happen. This only assesses county public school districts, as the amount of time it would take me to cross-check each city school district to determine which county it belongs in (plus, having to figure out a "third way" of sorts to color-code counties that have mixed policies between city and county school systems) would be exponential. This map shows which counties have used corporal punishment on at least one child in the 2009-10/2010-2011 school years (red), which ones have not (blue) and which counties lack school districts that incorporate either the entire county, or non-municipal areas into one or more exclusive county public school systems (purple).

There were lots of individually-interesting results (such as counties that only spank the disabled, and counties that seem to spank several percentage points of their enrollees), but the DoE's format and layout is so slow to load and the spreadsheet export feature filters none of the 20-something other results that you have to exclude using the online interface that I wasn't really able to save the data into something that would be reusable to make other maps. Sad

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BaconBacon96
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2014, 04:20:33 am »

Seems to be a very Southern thing.
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2014, 05:31:53 am »

Inspired by a thread on FC, and began digging through CRDC data from DoE to make it happen. This only assesses county public school districts, as the amount of time it would take me to cross-check each city school district to determine which county it belongs in (plus, having to figure out a "third way" of sorts to color-code counties that have mixed policies between city and county school systems) would be exponential. This map shows which counties have used corporal punishment on at least one child in the 2009-10/2010-2011 school years (red), which ones have not (blue) and which counties lack school districts that incorporate either the entire county, or non-municipal areas into one or more exclusive county public school systems (purple).

There were lots of individually-interesting results (such as counties that only spank the disabled, and counties that seem to spank several percentage points of their enrollees), but the DoE's format and layout is so slow to load and the spreadsheet export feature filters none of the 20-something other results that you have to exclude using the online interface that I wasn't really able to save the data into something that would be reusable to make other maps. Sad


I don't understand how you determine which counties in Texas or Colorado are "county" school districts.  I think you are applying a Georgia or Florida concept to places where it is an alien concept.
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Fmr. Pres. Griff
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« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2014, 06:19:51 am »

Inspired by a thread on FC, and began digging through CRDC data from DoE to make it happen. This only assesses county public school districts, as the amount of time it would take me to cross-check each city school district to determine which county it belongs in (plus, having to figure out a "third way" of sorts to color-code counties that have mixed policies between city and county school systems) would be exponential. This map shows which counties have used corporal punishment on at least one child in the 2009-10/2010-2011 school years (red), which ones have not (blue) and which counties lack school districts that incorporate either the entire county, or non-municipal areas into one or more exclusive county public school systems (purple).

There were lots of individually-interesting results (such as counties that only spank the disabled, and counties that seem to spank several percentage points of their enrollees), but the DoE's format and layout is so slow to load and the spreadsheet export feature filters none of the 20-something other results that you have to exclude using the online interface that I wasn't really able to save the data into something that would be reusable to make other maps. Sad


I don't understand how you determine which counties in Texas or Colorado are "county" school districts.  I think you are applying a Georgia or Florida concept to places where it is an alien concept.

It's not a perfect concept obviously. Frankly, as I moved west, it was frustrating to not have a simple metric by which to match up each county with a district, which is why I had to then start using a third color for counties that didn't even have one school district that was easily identifiable with a county.

Colorado and a few other states had such near-uniformity in incidences that I extracted districts that had corporal punishment listed as occurring, identified which counties they were in, and then colored in the remaining areas the opposite.

In Texas, all I could do without losing sanity was match up the districts that shared a name with a county (roughly half of the counties). It appeared that there are districts that covered unincorporated areas of an entire county, as well as municipal districts (and maybe some that cover multiple counties?), that were all essentially "incorporated school districts". It was definitely a lot simpler along the Atlantic and the Gulf to do this.
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2014, 01:01:37 am »

The Census Bureau does have shapefiles of school district maps in each state.  They are in three different categories (unified, elementary and secondary), so you might have to make two maps - one for unified and elementary and one for unified and secondary.  But it would be possible to make a nationwide map if you really wanted to do so.
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Fmr. Pres. Griff
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2014, 01:40:14 am »

The Census Bureau does have shapefiles of school district maps in each state.  They are in three different categories (unified, elementary and secondary), so you might have to make two maps - one for unified and elementary and one for unified and secondary.  But it would be possible to make a nationwide map if you really wanted to do so.

All of the grayed-out states on the map have banned corporal punishment in public schools, but that could be useful in cleaning up the assessments in a few of the states mentioned above.
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« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2014, 08:11:34 pm »

I don't understand how you determine which counties in Texas or Colorado are "county" school districts.  I think you are applying a Georgia or Florida concept to places where it is an alien concept.

It's not a perfect concept obviously. Frankly, as I moved west, it was frustrating to not have a simple metric by which to match up each county with a district, which is why I had to then start using a third color for counties that didn't even have one school district that was easily identifiable with a county.

In Texas, all I could do without losing sanity was match up the districts that shared a name with a county (roughly half of the counties). It appeared that there are districts that covered unincorporated areas of an entire county, as well as municipal districts (and maybe some that cover multiple counties?), that were all essentially "incorporated school districts". It was definitely a lot simpler along the Atlantic and the Gulf to do this.
The problem is that in some cases it happens to be that the name of the county and a city or town in the county have the same name, but the school district is named for the town.  And there are lots of cities and towns in Texas that are not in the county of the same name.

ISD stands for "Independent School District", and in particular that they are independent of the county government.   Texas was a very rural state until the 20th century.  So you would have to have a school within walking distance (or perhaps horseback riding) distance for elementary school children.  But there might not be enough farmers or ranchers to support a school board.  There would be a one-room or two-room schoolhouse, and a couple of teachers.  But the administration would be by the county school board.  The county seat might have a high school, and more gifted children might board in town during the week to attend the high school.  Larger towns might form an Independent School District which they would provide funding.  The smaller schools were common schools.

Around the 1940s school districts began to be consolidated.   I found a history for the North Lamar ISD that showed that 44 districts were included (there were several levels of consolidations).   North Lamar covers about half of Lamar County).

Because school districts were originally created by county school boards, there is usually some conformance with county boundaries.   But consolidations may have occurred across lines, and some boundaries may have been adjusted to match roads.  Consolidation occurred after there were roads and vehicles to take students to and from school each day.

Sherman County is in northern tier of the panhandle.  Sherman ISD (Grayson County) is north of Dallas.

Ochiltree County and Perryton ISD are roughly the same.

Hemphill County is in the panhandle.  Hemphill ISD is in extreme Deep East Texas (Sabine County)

Hemphill County and Canadian ISD are roughly the same.

Roberts County and Miami ISD are roughly the same.

Moore County and Dumas ISD are roughly the same.

Hartley ISD is a relatively small district in Hartley County.  A case could be made that Dalhart ISD is a bi-county district in terms of students.   Dalhart is the county seat of Dallam County, but not Hartley County (neither is Hartley).  The county seat is Channing, which was one of the HQ of the XIT Ranch.  Incidentally, Dalhart is closer to Santa Fe, Denver, Oklahoma City, Topeka, Cheyenne, and Lincoln, than it is to Austin.

Wheeler ISD is just of several school districts in Wheeler County.   Shamrock is slightly larger than the town of Wheeler (Shamrock is on the interstate).

Collingsworth County and Wellington ISD are roughly the same.

Armstrong County and Claude ISD are roughly the same.

Childress County and Childress ISD are roughly the same, though the ISD is named after the town.

Hale Center is near the center of Hale County, but the county seat is in Plainview which has about 10 times the population.  Hale Center ISD is just one of several  districts in the county.

Floyd County and Floydada ISD are roughly the same.  Floydada was originally Floyd City, but the name was changed to avoid confusion with another Floyd, TX (in Hunt County).  The origin of the "ada" is uncertain.

Motley County and Motley County ISD are roughly the same.   The town of Matador has more than half the county population.  It may just be happenstance that the school district is named after the county rather the town, or perhaps smaller communities resisted submerging their identity to that of a rival community.   The athletic teams are known as the Matadors.

Cottle County and Paducah ISD are roughly the same.

King County and Guthrie ISD are roughly the same.

Lubbock ISD is named after the city, and is just one of several districts in Lubbock County.  Several of the districts are of moderate size due to population spillover.

Yoakum County is west of Lubbock.  Yoakum ISD is between Victoria and San Antonio.  Yoakum, TX is named for Benjamin Franklin Yoakum the nephew of the namesake of Yoakum County, Henderson King Yoakum.

Garza County and Post ISD are roughly the same.

Kent County and Jayton-Girard ISD are roughly the same.

Stonewall County and Aspermont ISD are roughly the same.

Scurry County is between Abilene and Lubbock.   Scurry-Rosser ISD is in Kaufman County east of Dallas.  They are named for different Scurry's (and one is named after the first name, and the other after the last name.

Borden County and Borden County ISD are roughly the same.

There are two Dawson ISD's.  One is in the northwest corner of Dawson County, between Big Spring and Lubbock.  It is based in the town of Welch.  The county seat is the much larger town of Lamesa (pronounced with a long e), roughly 40x the size of Welch.  I could find no explanation of why the small ISD in a corner of the county has the name of the county.  The other Dawson ISD is in Navarro County (pronounce Na-vair) southeast of Corsicana, and is based on the town of Dawson.

Gaines County and Seminole ISD are roughly the same, particularly when population is considered.

Andrews County and Andrews ISD are coterminous.  The ISD is named after the county seat, which has 6/7 of the county population.

El Paso ISD is named after the city.  It is just one of several in the county.  Ysleta ISD is also quite large.

Culberson County and Culberson County-Allemore ISD are roughly the same.  Until recently, Allemore ISD was the smallest in the state, and there would be an occasional story showing a girl on a swing, who constituted the third grade class, and fourth grad etc.

Presidio ISD is named after the city.   The bulk of Presidio County is in Marfa ISD, though most of students are in Presidio ISD.

Terlingua Common School District in Brewster County, west of Big Bend National Park, is one of the few remaining common school districts in the state.   Oddly, it operates a high school, which is attended by students from neighboring San Vicente ISD.   Historically, ISDs developed because the towns were willing to be taxed to support a high school.  Some of the initial consolidations were to create rural high school districts.

The city of Pecos is in Reeves County, the county to the northwest of Pecos County.  Reeves County and Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD are largely the same, though Barstow is neigboring Ward County.

Terrell County and Terrell County ISD are coterminous.

Wink-Loving ISD includes all of Loving County.   Wink is named after Winkler County (the name was truncated to satisfy postal authorities).   But the county seat and much larger town in Winkler County is Kermit, which is served by Kermit ISD.   Loving County is the only county in Texas without any school districts headquartered in the county, and has no schools.  Any children are bussed from Mentone to Wink.

Monahans-Wickett-Pyote ISD includes much of the area of Ward County, and most of the students.

Crane County and Crane ISD are coterminous.   Crane is the county seat and has about 2/3 of the county population.

Reagan County and Reagan County ISD are coterminous.
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2014, 08:12:52 pm »

Ector County and Ector County ISD are coterminous.   The town of Ector (and Ector ISD) are in Fannin County.   Ector County and Ector, TX are named after different person (Ector was the first name of an early settler in Ector, TX; while Ector County was named after a Confederate general.  It is a bit surprising that Ector County ISD is not named Odessa ISD, since Odessa is by far the largest city.

Midland County and Midland ISD are largely the same, the school district is named after the city of Midland which has the bulk of the population.  Midland was originally named Midway as the midpoint of the Dallas to El Paso railroad, it was changed to avoid confusion with existing post offices.

Glasscock County and Glasscock ISD are coterminous.   There is no town of Glasscock, so the district is named for the county.  The schools are in the county seat of Garden City, and include County in their names.

Sterling County and Sterling City ISD are coterminous.   Almost all the county population is in the county seat of Sterling City.

Reagan County and Reagan County ISD are coterminous.   Reagan is pronounced with a long e.

Irion County and Irion County ISD are coterminous.

Crockett County and Crockett County Consolidated Common School District are coterminous.  It may be an independent school district.  About 90% of the population live in Ozona, the county seat.  Be sure not to confuse with Crockett, TX and Crockett ISD, which are in Houston County, northeast of Huntsville.  Both county and city are named after David Crockett.

Schleicher County and Schleicher (County) ISD are coterminous.  The Texas Education Agency does not include "county" in the name, but the ISD web site does.  The schools are all named after Eldorado the county seat.  There is no town of Schleicer.

Sutton County and Sonora ISD are coterminous.  3/4 of the population lives in Sonora.

Menard County and Menard ISD are almost identical.  The school district is named after the town of Menard.

Kimble County and Junction ISD are largely the same.   The county seat of Junction has a little over half the population.

Coleman ISD is one of three school districts in Coleman County.  Coleman is the county seat and largest town.

San Saba ISD one of three schoold districts in San Saba County.  San Saba is the county seat and largest town.

Mason County and Mason ISD are largely the same.  Mason is the county seat with about half the population.

Llano County and Llano ISD are largely the same.  Llano is the county seat, and pronounce with an ell sound, rather than the Spanish elle.

Johnson City is the county seat of Blanco County.   Blanco is a town in the county.   Johnson City ISD and Blanco ISD roughly split the county, though Blanco ISD also has considerable territory in Kendall County.

Bandera ISD is one of three school districts in Bandera County and is named after the town of Bandera.

Medina Valley ISD is one of 5 districts in Medina County.  If it were named Castroville ISD you would not have counted it.

Uvalde Consolidated ISD is one of several districts in Uvalde County.  Is based in the town of Uvalde.

Kinney County and Brackett ISD are coterminous.  Brackettville is the county seat, and was renamed by the post office from Brackett.   It is somewhat odd that the school district retains the old name.

Maverick County and Eagle Pass ISD are coterminous.  Eagle Pass is the county seat and only city in the county.

Zavala County is north of Laredo and west of San Antonio.  Zavalla, TX and Zavalla ISD are in Angelina County which includes Lufkin.   Both are named after the first Vice President, though the Angelina County version is a mispelling with its doubled l.

Dimmit County is north of Laredo.  Dimmitt, TX and Dimmitt ISD are in Castro County in the panhandle.   Dimmit County and Dimmitt, TX are named after two different persons with the same last name.   Dimmit County accidentally dropped the 2nd 't'.   

Dimmitt County and Carrizo Springs ISD are coterminous.

La Salle County and Cotulla ISD are roughly the same.   Cotulla is a Polish name, so the ll are pronunced as in Texan.

McMullen County and McMullen County ISD are coterminous.  The county seat is Tilden.

United ISD and Laredo ISD are somewhat more like the city and county school districts that you are familiar with, with United ISD including most of Webb County, and Laredo ISD just a small area in the city.   But the growth of Laredo has resulted in spillover into United ISD, which now operats multiple high schools in Laredo.   There is also a Webb Consolidated ISD in the county, but it is relatively small population.

Zapata County and Zapata County ISD are coterminous.

Jim Hogg County and Jim Hogg ISD are coterminous.   90%+ of the population is in the county seat of Hebbronville in the extreme northern part of the county, and for which the schools are named.

Brooks County and Brooks County ISD are coterminous.  About 2/3 of the population is in the county seat of Falfurria in the extreme northern part of the county and for which the schools are named.

Hidalgo is a quite small town in Hidalgo County, and Hidalgo ISD is also quite small.

Cameron County is the southern tip of Texas.  Cameron, TX and Cameron ISD are in Milam County in central Texas.

Kenedy County abd Kenedy County-Wide Common School District are coterminous, but be sure not to confuse with Kenedy, TX and Kenedy ISD which are in Karnes County southeast of Texas.

Aransas County ISD is most of Aransas County, including the county seat of Rockport.  Don't confuse with Aransas Pass and Aransas Pass ISD which are largely in San Patricio County, but overlap into Aransas County, or Port Aransas and Port Aransas ISD which are in Nueces County.

Refugio ISD is one of three districts in Refugio County, and is named after the town.

Calhoun County and Calhoun County ISD are roughly the same.   Calhoun High School in Port Lavaca is home of the Fighting Sancrabs.

Goliad County and Goliad ISD are coterminous.  The school district is named after the county seat.

Victoria County and Victoria ISD are roughly the same.  Victoria ISD is named after the county seat.

Karnes City ISD is one of several districts in Karnes County.  Karnes City is the county seat, but Kenedy is slightly larger.

Wilson County is southeast of San Antonio.   Wilson, TX and Wilson ISD are in Lynn County south of Lubbock. 

Gonzales ISD is one of three districts in Gonzales County (plus parts of several others).  It is named after the town.

Comal ISD covers much of Comal County, but much of the population is in New Braunfels ISD.   Comal is just northeast of San Antonio so it is seeing suburban growth.

Hays Consolidated ISD is only a portion of Hay County.  The county seat and largest city is San Marcos (San Marcos ISD).    Hays Consolidated is just south of Austin and has seen considerable growth, particularly around Buda.   There is also a small town of Hays.

Caldwell County is south(east) of Austin.   Caldwell, TX and Caldwell ISD are in Burleson County, north of Bryan.

Bastrop ISD is one of several districts in Bastrop County.   Bastrop is the county seat, and it may have the most population, but that is because it is closest to Austin.

Burnet Consolidated ISD covers much of Burnet County, but it is a bit iffy to consider it the district for the county.   Burnet is the county seat, but it and Marble Falls have about the same population/

Lampasas County and Lampasas ISD are roughly the same, but the district is named after the county seat.

Eastland ISD is one of several districts in Eastland County.  Cisco and Ranger are comparable in size to Eastland.

Taylor County is the location of Abilene.   Taylor, TX and Taylor ISD are in Williamson County, northeast of Austin.

Stephens County and Breckenridge ISD are roughly the same.

Haskell Consolidated ISD covers a substantial portion of Haskell County.   Apparently it was offensive to name the girls athletics teams 'Indians'.   They are instead the 'Maidens'.

Throckmorton County and Throckmorton ISD are roughly the same.  About 1/2 the county population is in the county seat of Throckmorton.

Baylor County and Seymour ISD are almost identical.
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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2014, 08:15:09 pm »

Archer City ISD is just one of 4 districts in Archer County.

Crowell ISD covers the entirety of Foard County, plus extending into two others.

Montague ISD is one of 8 districts in Montague County.   Montague, though the county seat, is unincorporated and quite small.   Montague has two syllables, the second of which rhymes with Vague.

Jack County and Jacksboro ISD are substantially the same.

Denton ISD is just one of many districts in Denton County.   It is named for the city of Denton.

Hunt County includes Greenville and is northeast of Dallas.   Hunt, TX and Hunt ISD are in Kerr County, northwest of San Antonio.

Rockwall ISD covers about 2/3 of Rockwall County, including the areas adjacent to Dallas County.

Dallas ISD is one of several districts in Dallas County.  It is based in the city of Dallas.

Kaufman ISD is one of several districts in Kaufman County.

Johnson County is south of Fort Worth.  Johnson City and John City ISD are in Blanco County, west of Austin.

Henderson County is southwest of Dallas.   Henderson, TX and Henderson ISD are in Rusk County south of Tyler and Longview.

Navarro County includes Corsicana, south of Dallas.  Though the county includes the small town of Navarro, Navarro ISD is in Guadeloupe County.  It includes the town of Geronimo, but has a mailing address of Seguin.

Leon ISD is one of several districts in Leon County and is in the nortwestern corner.

Burleson County is west of Bryan.   Burleson, TX and Burleson ISD are south of Fort Worth.

Brazos County includes Bryan and College Station.   Brazos ISD is in Austin County west of Houston.  Both the county and school district are named for the Brazos River.

Colorado County is west of Houston.   Colorado City and Colorado City ISD are in Mitchell County west of Abilene.  Though 365 miles apart by road, the county and city are named for the Colorado River.

Wharton ISD is one of several districts in Wharton County.  Wharton is the county seat, though El Campo is a bit larger.

Matagorda is a rather small town in Matagorda County, and Matagorda ISD as a rather small district.

Fort Bend ISD is one of several districts in Fort Bend County.   The name may have been chosen to avoid choosing whether to name the district Missouri City, Sugar Land, or even Houston.

Austin County is west of Houston, and includes San Felipe (de Austin) the original Anglo settlement in Texas.   Austin, TX and Austin ISD are in Travis County in the central part of the state.

Waller, TX is on the Waller-Harris County line, and most of the population of Waller ISD is in Harris County due to it being closer to Houston, such that if one had to choose, Waller ISD is a Harris County district.  There are other districts in Waller County.

I'm not sure why you colored Harris County.  It has many districts, including several that are largely in the city of Houston.   Houston County is north about 100 miles.

Montgomery is a small town, increasing exurban/suburban in Montgomery County (the town is quite old).  Montgomery ISD is a growing district, but there are several that are larger.

Liberty ISD is one of several districts in Liberty County.  Liberty is the county seat, but far from the most dominant.

East Chambers ISD is the eastern and less populous portion of Chambers County.

You colored Galveston Bay purple.

Jefferson County is in the extreme southeast corner of Texas.   Jefferson, TX and Jefferson ISD are between Texarkana and Marshall in the northeast portion of the state.

Hardin-Jefferson ISD straddles the Hardin-Jefferson county line and is named for the two counties.   West Hardin Consolidated ISD is in the western portion of Hardin County.  There are other districts in the county.   Hardin, TX and Hardin ISD are in Liberty County, just to the west.

Newton ISD is one of three districts in Newton County, and is named after the county seat.

Jasper ISD is one of three districts in Jasper County, and is named after the county seat.

Tyler County is a rural county in southeast Texas.  Tyler, TX and Tyler ISD are in Smith County in northeast Texas.

Trinity ISD is one of four districts in Trinity County.

Houston County is 100 or so miles north of the city of Houston and Houston ISD.

Sabine County is in Deep East Texas.   Sabine ISD is in Gregg County, which includes Longview.  West Sabine ISD is in Sabine County, but it is a small portion.

Carthage ISD covers a substantial portion in the central part of Panola County.

Nacogdoches ISD is one of several districts in Nacogdoches County.  It is named for the county seat and largest city.

Cherokee County is in east Texas, south of Tyler.  Cherokee, TX and Cherokee ISD are in San Saba County in West Texas between Abilene, San Angelo, Austin, and Waco.

Anderson County is in east Texas, southwest of Tyler.  Andeson, TX and Anderson-Shiro Consolidated ISD are in Grimes County northwest of Houston.  Though much smaller than Navasota, Anderson is the county seat of Grimes County.

Rusk County is south of Tyler.  Rusk, TX and Rusk ISD are in Cherokee County just to the west.  Rusk is the county seat of Cherokee County.  Thomas Jefferson Rusk was Secretary of War, and first senator after the US and Texas merged.   Ted Cruz is the current senator in the Rusk succession.

Rains County and Rains ISD are almost identical.

Camp Cpunty and Pittsburg ISD are identical.

Franklin County is between Dallas and Texarkana.  Franklin, TX and Franklin ISD are in Robertson County, northwest of Bryan.   Franklin County and Mount Vernon County are roughly the same.

Marion County and Jefferson ISD are identical.

Bowie County is in the northeast corner of the state.  Bowie, TX and Bowie ISD are in Montague County between Sherman and Wichita Falls.

Lamar County is along the Red River east of Sherman.  Lamar Consolidated ISD is in Fort Bend County, based on Richmond and Rosenberg.   Mirabeau Bonaparte Lamar was from that area, and is the namesake of the county.

Delta County and Cooper ISD are roughly the same.
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2014, 08:36:41 pm »

The Census Bureau does have shapefiles of school district maps in each state.  They are in three different categories (unified, elementary and secondary), so you might have to make two maps - one for unified and elementary and one for unified and secondary.  But it would be possible to make a nationwide map if you really wanted to do so.

All of the grayed-out states on the map have banned corporal punishment in public schools, but that could be useful in cleaning up the assessments in a few of the states mentioned above.
I kind of got carried away in Texas (1050 or so school districts and 254 counties).

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has lots of data access tools, that might help.

The census might be a possibility if you want to determine which school districts are (mostly) in each county, and then color the counties on that basis.

Unfortunately American Fact Finder classifies this way:

County
     VTD (Election Precinct)
           School District

or

Congression District
      School District

or

State House District
    School District

It would probably be "easier" to go to the raw data files.
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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2014, 11:55:24 pm »

I guarantee you my home county would have been in red in 1986.
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« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2014, 12:56:25 am »

That looks very helpful, jim. Thanks! Our school districts here in Georgia were/are somewhat similar, but we only have school districts now that include all of the unincorporated areas of a given county, include a municipal area, or in some cases, consolidated districts that include all municipalities and unincorporated areas in a county.
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« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2014, 12:03:13 am »

Here is NC, it is county-based and, though around 20 do it, about half (actual, not rate) happens in Robeson County, which is (probably not coincidentally) the highest proportion of Native Americans.
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« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2014, 02:44:39 am »

Here is NC, it is county-based and, though around 20 do it, about half (actual, not rate) happens in Robeson County, which is (probably not coincidentally) the highest proportion of Native Americans.

When I was doing NC, I noticed Roberson's number and though "What?", and just so happened to glance to the side where the corporal punishment by race figures were. I saw that the number was overwhelmingly Native American, looked up and county's demographics and then it made sense. If I recall correctly, though, the county is only like 30% Native American, but the percentage of kids punished that were Native American was >90%.
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« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2014, 10:34:01 pm »

Here is NC, it is county-based and, though around 20 do it, about half (actual, not rate) happens in Robeson County, which is (probably not coincidentally) the highest proportion of Native Americans.

When I was doing NC, I noticed Roberson's number and though "What?", and just so happened to glance to the side where the corporal punishment by race figures were. I saw that the number was overwhelmingly Native American, looked up and county's demographics and then it made sense. If I recall correctly, though, the county is only like 30% Native American, but the percentage of kids punished that were Native American was >90%.

Which leads to Native Americans being about half of all NC corporal punishment victims, despite being only 2% of NC public school students.

I have never heard any sensible reason why punishments that are not used for criminals, are acceptable for schoolchildren (not supporting CP for criminals, but CP for schoolchildren is worse).
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