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Velasco
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« Reply #300 on: June 13, 2015, 04:21:27 pm »

Mayors in provincial and regional capitals (and a handful of important towns/cities) after this morning:

Region of Madrid: Manuela Carmena (Ahora Madrid) elected Mayor of Madrid with the support of PSOE. PP councilors voted for Esperanza Aguirre and C's councilors for Begoña Villacís. Pablo Iglesias and Podemos' top members attended the opening session of the Madrid City Council. The nomination of Carmena was cheered by some people in the audience: "¡Sí se puede!" ("yes, it can be done").

Catalonia:

Ada Colau (BComú) was proclaimed Mayor of Barcelona with the support of 21 out of 41 councilors, including 10 from BComú, 5 from ERC, 4 from the PSC and 1 (out of 3) from the CUP. Colau said her nomination is the proof that "the impossible is possible".

Carles Puigdemont (CiU) was elected Mayor of Girona, Àngel Ros (PSC) Mayor of Lleida and Josep Félix Ballesteros (PSC) Mayor of Tarragona. All of them were elected without a majority and proclaimed mayors because their respective lists placed first in the elections.

Region of Valencia:

Joan Ribó (Compromís) elected Mayor of Valencia with the support of PSOE and València en Comú (Podemos). Former mayor Rita Barberá (PP) resigned yesterday as member of the City Council and didn't attend the proclamation of the new mayor.

In Alicante Gabriel Echávarri (PSOE) will govern in coalition with Guanyar Alacant (Podemos, IU and others) and Compromís. Castellón will be governed by Amparo Marco (PSOE) with the support of Compromís and Castelló en Moviment.

Andalusia:

Juan Espadas (PSOE) elected Mayor of Seville with the support of Podemos and IU.

Francisco de la Torre (PP) elected Mayor of Málaga with the support of C's.

In Almería the local branch of C's agreed with socialists on voting the PSOE candidate, but the party's national executive rectified that decision and orange councilors finally abstained, so Juan Carlos Pérez Navas (PP) was elected mayor.

PSOE gets the mayoralty of Córdoba for the first time in the present democratic period (the city has been governed previously by PCE, IU and PP). Socialist candidate Isabel Ambrosio was supported by IU and the Podemos outfit.

The abstention of the 4 C's councilors allowed the investiture of José Torres Hurtado (PP) as Mayor of Granada, who got 11 votes from his municipal group. The socialist candidate got the votes of PSOE and Vamos Granada (Podemos) totalling 11 councilors as well. The IU councilor voted for himself. PP gets the mayoralty on having been the list with the most votes in the elections.

José María González (Podemos) replaces Teófila Martínez (PP) as Mayor of Cádiz with the support of PSOE ad IU.

Gabriel Cruz (PSOE) elected Mayor of Huelva.

José Enrique Fernández Moya (PP) elected Mayor of Jaén; C's councilors abstained.

In Marbella José Bernal (PSOE) replaces Ángeles Muñoz (PP) in the mayoralty. PP fell short from a majority by only one seat. Bernal was supported by the rest of forces represented in the City Hall (PSOE, IU, Podemos and independents).

Aragon:

Criminal lawyer Pedro Santisteve (Zaragoza en Común) was proclaimed Mayor of Zaragoza with the support of PSOE and the centre-left regionalist CHA. PSOE gets the mayoralty of Huesca, while PP holds Teruel.

Asturias:

Carmen Moriyon (FAC) was proclaimed Mayor of Gijón without a majority. PSOE and the Podemos outfit Xixón Sí Puede (XSP) failed to reach an agreement in that city. As said before, XSP voted in assembly not supporting the socialists.

The big surprise was the proclamation of Wenceslao López (PSOE) as Mayor of Oviedo. Socialists only placed third behind PP and Somos Oviedo (Podemos). The Podemos outfit led by Ana Taboada, PSOE and IU reached a previous agreement to govern. However, PSOE withdrew support to Taboada in retaliation for events in Gijón. Both Podemos and IU decided to back unilaterally the PSOE candidate in order to prevent that PP holds the mayoralty.

Balearic Islands:

PSOE and the eco-nationalist MÉS will replace each other in the mayoralty of Palma de Mallorca. The socialist candidate was elected with the support of MÉS and Som Palma (Podemos) and will govern until 2017. MÉS will get the mayoralty in the 2017-2019 period. This kind of agreements is known in Spain as "time sharing mayoralties". PSOE gets the mayoralty of Eivissa (the official name of Ibiza).

Canaries:

Augusto Hidalgo (PSOE) proclaimed Mayor of Las Palmas with the support of the local Podemos outfit and the centre-left regionalist New Canaries. The Canary Coalition (CC) holds the mayoralty of Santa Cruz the Tenerife with the support of PP. Socialists didn't like that move, because CC and PSOE are negotiating a coalition government in the Canary Islands and the deal includes supporting each other's lists in the different municipalities.

Cantabria:

Ïñigo de la Serna (PP) reelected Mayor of Santander without a majority.

Castile-La Mancha:

PSOE gets the mayoralties in Toledo and Ciudad Real. PP holds Albacete, Cuenca and Guadalajara.

Castile and León:

Óscar Puente (PSOE) proclaimed Mayor of Valladolid with the support of IU and Podemos. Francisco Guarido (IU) was elected Mayor of Zamora with the support of PSOE; Zamora will be the only provincial capital governed by IU. PP holds Salamanca, Burgos, León and Palencia. PSOE holds Soria with a majority and gets Segovia in minority.

Extremadura:

PP holds the two provincial capitals: Cáceres and Badajoz. Mérida, the regional capital, goes to PSOE.

Galicia:

Xulio Ferreiro, candidate of the Marea Atlántica ("Atlantic Tide", includes the AGE and Podemos), was proclaimed Mayor of A Coruña with the support of PSOE, although Ferreiro wants to govern in minority.

Martiño Noriega (Compostela Aberta) will govern in Santiago de Compostela , the regional capital). Ferrol will be governed by another "popular unity list".

Abel Caballero (PSOE) will govern in Vigo with a comfortable majority. In Lugo Lara Méndez (PSOE) was proclaimed mayor. Méndez was the number two in the list and replaced the top candidate José López Orozco, who was vetoed by leftist forces. Miguel Anxo Fernández Lores (BNG) holds the mayoralty in Pontevedra. PP gets the mayoralty of Ourense in minority, due to the  lack of an alternative majority.

Region of Murcia:

José Ballesta (PP) elected Mayor of Murcia without a majority.

Independent José López elected Mayor of Cartagena with the support of PSOE. López will be replaced by socialist candidate Ana Belén Castejón in 2017. Another "time sharing agreement". PP, C's and the Podemos local outfit will be in the opposition.

La Rioja:

PP holds Logroño without a majority.

Navarre:

Joseba Asirón (EH Bildu) proclaimed Mayor of Pamplona with the support of Geroa Bai (independents and PNV), Aranzadi (Podemos) and IU.

Basque Country:

Juan Mari Aburto (PNV) elected Mayor of Bilbao with the support of PSOE.

Eneko Goia (PNV) elected Mayor of San Sebastián without a majority.

Gorka Urtaran (PNV) elected Mayor of Vitoria with the support of EH Bildu, Podemos and IU-Equo. PNV and PSOE had a previous agreement extended to all the Basque Country, in order to support each party's best placed candidates in the municipalities. However, a PNV councilor didn't support the socialist candidate in Andoain (a town in Gipuzkoa) allowing the proclamation of a Bildu mayor. PSOE withdrew support in Vitoria as retaliation. PNV was the third party behind PP and EH Bildu in the local elections. The Bildu support is not the result of a formal agreement, they voted for the PNV candidate to oust PP's Javier Maroto from the mayoralty.  

PP holds the autonomous city of Ceuta (majority), Opening session was suspended in Melilla due to denounces of alleged fraud in mail vote. PP will likely hold.
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Velasco
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« Reply #301 on: June 14, 2015, 02:00:02 am »

Valencia 2015: leading party by municipality in the regional elections.


The Valencian elections provided the most entertaining results by far. Let's say the Comunidad Valenciana or País Valencià is a diverse region. The end of PP hegemony has brought a fragmented but fascinating landscape.  I made a table with the results in the 20 most populous municipalities here:

https://saintbrendansisland.wordpress.com/2015/06/14/eleccions-a-les-corts-valencianes-2015/
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« Reply #302 on: June 28, 2015, 09:22:10 am »

I missed this, but news from Catalonia: The CiU alliance has broken down after 37 years due to the independence issue (UDC opposes independence).
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Velasco
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« Reply #303 on: June 28, 2015, 11:02:43 am »

I missed this, but news from Catalonia: The CiU alliance has broken down after 37 years due to the independence issue (UDC opposes independence).

Yes, that happened past week. Sorry for not updating, but it'd be good that someone was paying attention. Thank you for mentioning the issue, CrabCake.

"The end of an era: Catalan nationalist bloc CiU breaks up after 37 years"

http://elpais.com/elpais/2015/06/18/inenglish/1434637443_661020.html

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Velasco
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« Reply #304 on: July 03, 2015, 08:19:58 am »

The last poll conducted by CEO in Catalonia shows a downward trend in support to independence.  According to that survey 50% would vote "no" in an eventual referendum, while 42.9% would vote "yes" to independence. With regard to the March survey released by the same sociological institute, dependent on Catalan government, "yes" is 1.2% down and "no" increases 2%. On the elections scheduled in September, 58.1% will decide voting position depending on party proposals to confront the crisis, while 21.1% will decide depending on the relationship between Catalonia and Spain. Answers reflect that Artur Mas pretension to call elections as a plebiscite on independence is not getting through. The poll doesn't provide a vote estimation for the next Catalan elections because, according to CEO' s chief Jordi Arguelaguer, the break down of CiU and the reconfiguration in the left make it impossible. ICV and Podemos agreed recently running a join list in September (Joan Coscubiela, ICV deputy in the Spanish Congress, will stand as pre-candidate), as well Pablo Iglesias stated the alliance will work in the next general election.

Link to CEO poll (there's an abstract in English):

http://ceo.gencat.cat/ceop/AppJava/pages/home/fitxaEstudi.html?colId=5468&lastTitle=Bar%F2metre+d%27Opini%F3+Pol%EDtica+%28BOP%29.+2a+onada+2015

CEO released the "direct vote intention", that is raw polling data without further elaboration. In the Catalan elections CiU and ERC are tied at 13.3%, while Podemos comes third at 10.8%. As for the general election, Podemos comes first (18.1%) followed by ERC (13%), PSC (11%) and CiU (10.8%). The poll doesn't ask for CDC and UDC separately, nor asks for the join list between Podemos and ICV.
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« Reply #305 on: July 07, 2015, 03:55:17 pm »

Btw Velasco, has the indirect portion of the Senate been elected by the regions yet? Or is that done at some later date?

PP doing fairly well in current polls. A hypothetical PP-C coalition could have a healthy majority. Greek effect?
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Velasco
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« Reply #306 on: July 18, 2015, 06:14:28 pm »
« Edited: July 19, 2015, 08:48:31 am by Velasco »

Btw Velasco, has the indirect portion of the Senate been elected by the regions yet? Or is that done at some later date?

The Spanish Senate is an irrelevant legislative body and I usually don't pay too much attention. I checked the list of members returned by regions in the Spanish Senate website. The new Andalusian Parliament (elected in March 2015) has appointed 9 senators (PSOE 5, PP 3, Podemos 1)  Apparently the regions which held elections in May haven't elected their representatives. Probably they will be appointed in the next session of the respective regional legislatures, beginning in September.

PP doing fairly well in current polls. A hypothetical PP-C coalition could have a healthy majority. Greek effect?

I haven't been following last polls in detail. Which ones predict a PP-C's majority?

On average, I think the trend doesn't point to a result like that. I'm not sure if Greece will have an impact in the Spanish election (I tend to think that it'd be very limited, in any case).

The Wikipedia poll summary as of July 2015 says that PP is approx. at 26%, PSOE 23%, Podemos 20% and C's around 13%. The Electograph "poll of polls" gives the following result: PP 27.6%, PSOE 24.4%, Podemos 18.9%, C's 12.5%, IU 3.6%.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinion_polling_for_the_Spanish_general_election,_2015#National

http://www.electograph.com/p/electograph-poll-of-polls.html

More important will be the repercussion of the next parliamentary election in Catalonia.

CDC (the Artur Mas party), ERC, pro-independence associations and elements of the 'civil society' will assemble a joint list. In case the joint independence list wins the election, which is very likely, the different parties and associations are committed to proclaim independence unilaterally within a period of 6 or 8 months. Probably that declaration of independence will have the support of the left-wing CUP in the next Parliament of Catalonia. The top candidate will be Raül Romeva, formerly in ICV and MEP until 2014. The former spokeswoman of the Catalan National Assembly (ANC) Carme Forcadell and Muriel Casals ( from Òmnium Cultural) will be the numbers two and three of that list. Artur Mas will be placed in the fourth place, but he's actually the candidate to be the head of the government. ERC leader Oriol Junqueras will be the number five.

http://elpais.com/elpais/2015/07/15/inenglish/1436951774_704766.html

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Spanish PM Mariano Rajoy stated that "there will be no Catalan independence"

http://elpais.com/elpais/2015/07/16/inenglish/1437061423_262494.html

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At this point everything points to the continuation of the paralysis until the next Spanish election takes place and a new administration takes office earlier next year.

You can check last polls for the Catalan elections here:

http://www.electograph.com/search/label/A_Cat

Feedback/La Vanguardia (July 2015)

CDC 22% (32-34 seats), Catalunya, sí que es pot (CSP= Podemos+ ICV+EUiA) 16.5% (20-22), C's 16% (22), ERC 15% (22), PSC 9.6% (13), PP 7.3% (9-10), CUP 7% (9-10), UDC 4.2% (3-6).

*A joint list including all pro-independence forces would get 46.7%, according to Feedback. However, that assumption is not realistic because the CUP will run in its own.

GAPS / Òmnium Cultural (July 2015)

Joint list (CDC-ERC) 32% (52 seats), CSP 20% (26), C's 16% (20), PSC 9% (12), PP 9% (12), CUP 8% (10), UDC 4% (3).

GESOP/El Periódico (June 2015)

CDC 22.4% (33-35 seats), Podemos+ICV+EUiA+Procés Constituent 22.4% (30-31), C's 14.9% (19-20), ERC 12.9% (19-20), CUP 8.2% (11-12), PSC 7% (8-9), PP 6% (6-7), UDC 4.6% (6-7)
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« Reply #307 on: July 19, 2015, 07:44:32 am »

Could somone update me on the election of new regional presidents!
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Velasco
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« Reply #308 on: July 19, 2015, 11:45:57 am »
« Edited: July 21, 2015, 02:13:56 am by Velasco »

OK, let's try a brief summary of the new regional governments.

Aragon:: Javier Lambán (PSOE) was elected Premier with the support of Podemos, the Aragonese Union (CHA) and IU, totalling 35 votes. PP, C's and the Aragonese Party (PAR) voted against the investiture, totalling 32 votes. Notably, C's spokeswoman Susana Gaspar deemed the deal between leftist forces in the regional legislature as a "pact with the Devil" The negotiation was difficult because Pablo Echenique (Podemos) felt vindicated to be premier, given that the purple party came only 1% behind the socialists in the regional election. Lambán heads a minority government which has 9 ministers (8 from PSOE and 1 from CHA). The new administration needs the support of Podemos and IU to pass legislation.

Asturias: Javier Fernández (PSOE), incumbent since 2012, is seeking to continue as regional premier. A deal between PSOE and Podemos was the only option for Fernández to get a majority in the investiture. However, the socialists and the purple party have a poor relationship in the region. Podemos rejected to vote for the socialist candidate for Mayor of Gijón, because of his involvement in suspected irregularities in the management of the port of El Musel. Gijón is the most populated city in the region; the mayoralty was retained by the right-wing regionalist FAC in minority. PSOE reached an agreement with the IU regional branch led by Gaspar Llamazares, which was approved by the IU membership today. The deal doesn't imply a coalition government; both parties agreed on specific measures (electoral reform, transparency law and a commission of inquiry on El Musel). PSOE (14) and IU (5) fall short from a majority in the 45 member regional legislature. Javier Fernández could be elected premier in a second vote, providing that Podemos (9) and C's (3) abstain. Rival candidate Mercedes Fernández (PP) only counts with the support of her party (11 seats) and Foro Asturias (FAC, 3 seats). The first investiture vote will take place this upcoming week.  

Balearic Islands: Francina Armengol (PSOE) was elected Premier with the support of Podemos and MÉS, a left-wing catalanist party. Podemos didn't join the regional government, which is comprised by 11 members from PSOE and MÉS. PSOE holds the premiership and gets 6 cabinet members, while MÉS gets 4 cabinet members including Deputy Premier Biel Barceló.

Canary Islands: Fernando Clavijo (CC) heads a coalition government with PSOE. CC gets the premiership and 6 cabinet members; PSOE gets 4 cabinet members including Deputy Premier Patricia Hernández. PSOE holds the presidency of the regional parliament.

Cantabria: Miguel Ángel Revilla of the Cantabria Regionalist Party (PRC) was elected Premier with the support of PSOE and the abstention of Podemos. The regional coalition government has 9 members: PRC gets the premiership and 4 cabinet members, PSOE gets 4 cabinet members including Deputy Premier Eva Díaz Tezanos.

Castile and León: Juan Vicente Herrera (PP) was reelected Premier in a second vote with the support of his party (42 seats) and the abstention of C's (5). PSOE (25), Podemos (10), IU (1) and the León regionalist UPyL (1) voted against the investiture. PP will govern in minority, trying to reach agreements on specific measures with C's in order to pass legislation.

Castile-La Mancha: Emiliano García-Page (PSOE) was elected Premier with the support of his party (15 seats) and Podemos (2). PP (16) voted against the investiture. García-Page, a former Mayor of Toledo, will govern in minority replacing María Dolores de Cospedal, the powerful and controversial woman who remains as secretary general of PP.

Extremadura: Guillermo Fernández Vara (PSOE) was proclaimed Premier with the support of his party (30 seats) and Podemos (6). PP (28) and C's (1) abstained. In the investiture, the Podemos spokesman said that Fernández Vara's discourse was increasingly resembling theirs, stating that Podemos will support the new minority government as long as it's committed with "the defence of the civil rights against the austerity policy" of the Spanish government. Fernández Vara promised that Extremadura will be the first region "free of evictions".

Madrid: Cristina Cifuentes (PP) was elected Premier on June 24 with the support of her party (48 seats) and C's (17). PSOE (37) and Podemos (27) voted against. Cifuentes will govern in minority and C's spokesman Ignacio Aguado warned her that they will be vigilant on the implementation of the 76 point agreement signed between the blue and the orange parties.

Murcia: Pedro Antonio Sánchez (PP) was elected Premier with the support of his party (26 seats) and C's (4). PSOE (13) and Podemos (6) voted against the investiture. PP and C's reached an agreement similar to that in Madrid. The newly elected premier has to face a lawsuit on alleged faults including prevarication, embezzlemen of public funds, fraud against administration and falsification of public documents. Mr Sánchez promised to resign in case he's formally charged.

Navarre: Uxue Barkos (Geroa Bai, independent) will be elected Premier in the investiture session that will take place tomorrow morning. Geroa Bai, EH Bildu, Podemos and IU signed a deal on past Friday. According to the signatories, the agreement has a "historical value" and "lays the foundations for change". The new government will have 2 deputy premiers: Manu Ayerdi (Geroa Bai, PNV) will assume the management of economic policies and independent Miguel Laparra, an university professor, will be in charge of social policies. The government will have 9 cabinet members, chosen by Mrs Barkos between the candidates proposed by the different parties. The appointment of María José Beaumont (EH Bildu) with a portfolio including Interior has created controversy, given past links between the abertzale left and ETA.

The Navarrese mess, probably one of my last contributions here:



La Rioja: Ignacio Ceniceros (PP) failed to pass the first investiture vote which took place on July 1, but was elected in a second vote on July 3 without a majority. Ceniceros was supported by his party, while C's regional parliamentarians abstained.

Valencia: Ximo Puig (PSOE) was elected Premier with the support of Compromís and Podemos and took office on June 27. The new regional government is comprised by the Premier, a Deputy Premier (Mónica Oltra, Compromís) and 8 cabinet members (3 PSOE, 3 Compromís and 2 independents).
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RodPresident
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« Reply #309 on: July 20, 2015, 05:17:10 am »

Any chance if CSP gets a good second place or first of getting to form government with support of PSC, CUP and C's?
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Thomas from NJ
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« Reply #310 on: July 20, 2015, 07:53:45 pm »

I have changed the thread title, since the local and regional elections of May 24th have obviously already taken place.
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Velasco
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« Reply #311 on: July 21, 2015, 02:09:15 am »

Any chance if CSP gets a good second place or first of getting to form government with support of PSC, CUP and C's?

It's totally impossible to see the CUP siding with C's and PSC. Another question would be that CSP had chances of placing first as BComú did in Barcelona, but that is not going to happen. The joint CDC-ERC list*, that is going to be called "Juntos por el Sí" (something like "Together for Yes"), is going to win in all likelihood and Artur Mas will remain as premier, but probably the sovereignist ticket will fall short from a majority. However, there will be a likely pro-independence majority in the next Catalan Parliament adding the CUP. In order to give some legitimacy to an unilateral declaration of independence, it would be important that the joint list and the CUP add a majority of the popular vote (and maybe they will fall short). The CSP is in favour of a referendum, as well the UDC, but I don't see the left and the party of Duran i Lleida supporting the projects of Artur Mas. C's, PSC and PP are against to call a referendum.

*Former FC Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola will run in the "Together" ticket placing in the last place of the list:

http://elpais.com/elpais/2015/07/20/inenglish/1437408521_513427.html

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I have changed the thread title, since the local and regional elections of May 24th have obviously already taken place.

OK, well done. You will have to decide where to place the Catalan elections scheduled in September: here or in a single thread.


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Thomas from NJ
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« Reply #312 on: July 21, 2015, 10:31:56 am »

I changed the title again. When the Catalan elections are over, then I'll change it so it mentions the general election.
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« Reply #313 on: July 21, 2015, 10:46:46 am »

Maybe you could just call it Spanish Elections and Politics like the general discussion threads about German, Italian, Dutch, Austrian and Swiss politics, that way you wouldn't have to update the thread title.
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Thomas from NJ
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« Reply #314 on: July 21, 2015, 10:50:37 am »

Yeah, that's a good idea.
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Velasco
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« Reply #315 on: July 22, 2015, 05:44:55 am »

More fun from Catalonia.

http://elpais.com/elpais/2015/07/21/inenglish/1437471078_289683.html

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Steps toward the declaration of independence:

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« Reply #316 on: July 22, 2015, 05:50:10 am »

What would the Spanish government do if Catalonia actually issued a UDI?
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Grand Wizard Lizard of the Klan
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« Reply #317 on: July 22, 2015, 06:06:41 am »

Is there any possibility that govt/His Majesty King of Spain will use army to secure Catalonia and beat up potential traitors?
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« Reply #318 on: July 22, 2015, 06:10:02 am »

Do the ERC and CUP want a greater Catalonia (with the Balearics, Valencia etc) or do they recognise that as impronable.
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« Reply #319 on: July 22, 2015, 06:20:38 am »

The best solution is to divide Spain into Aragon and Castile in permanent personal union.
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Velasco
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« Reply #320 on: July 22, 2015, 09:59:12 am »

What would the Spanish government do if Catalonia actually issued a UDI?

Probably the central government will refer resolutions adopted by the Parliament of Catalonia, in order to implement the "road map" to independence, to the Spanish Constitutional Court. This has been the modus operandi of the Rajoy administration to date. But the leaders of the secessionist bloc now threaten with issuing the UDI immediately, in case the Spanish government puts obstacles. At this point, we enter into uncharted territory. Article 155 of the Spanish Constitution says that if a region is not abiding its obligations under the existing legal framework, the central government can take the "necessary measures" to enforce said obligations. Such "measures" would be implemented  after lodging a complaint to the regional premier and, in case the request is not granted, they need the approval of the Spanish Senate. The problem is that article has never been implemented and "measures" are not developed in the text. Jurists don't coincide in the interpretation of the article, but say the Spanish government should only intervene as a last resort and advocate for the principle of minimum intervention. The consequences of a suspension of the regional autonomy, for instance, are totally unpredictable. A professor of constitutional law says that implementing article 155 would be the end of the current model of regional autonomy.

Do the ERC and CUP want a greater Catalonia (with the Balearics, Valencia etc) or do they recognise that as impronable.

On paper, both want the Països Catalans ("Catalan Countries"). In practice, it's possible that they see the Greater Catalonia as a long term project. It's something like Euskal Herria (the union of Euskadi, Navarre and the French Basque Country).

The best solution is to divide Spain into Aragon and Castile in permanent personal union.

Spain was a personal union of crowns under the Hapsburgs. It was a very disfunctional model. By 1640 revolts erupted in Portugal, Andalusia and Catalonia. Catalans call the uprising against the minister of Felipe IV (the Count-Duke of Olivares) Guerra dels Segadors and the Catalan anthem refers to those events. For sure Felipe VI doesn't want a repetition of history, so I don't think he's going to send the Army.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalan_Revolt

Btw, Felipe VI and Artur Mas met recently. According to Miguel Ángel Revilla, premier of Cantabria, the King told him that the attitude of Artur Mas is "irreconcilable". No room for negotiation, apparently.   
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« Reply #321 on: July 22, 2015, 10:17:00 am »

That is pretty sad that rampaging nationalism is going to win again.
Sorry for a little bit offtop but I was just curious if this is even possible for king to use army in case of rebellion.
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« Reply #322 on: July 22, 2015, 12:54:22 pm »

Sorry, but the king cannot use the army. He's the supreme commander of the armed forces, but Spain is a constitutional monarchy and that title is merely symbolic: the Spanish government holds the executive power. On the other hand, sending the army would be the surest way to lose Catalonia. After the revolt in the XVII century there was a complicated conflict involving France and several battles, but Catalonia returned to Spain basically through negotiation... except the Roussillon and part of the Cerdagne, a patch of the Catalan Countries which was lost to the French neighbours.
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« Reply #323 on: July 22, 2015, 01:16:37 pm »

Yes, I don't think Artur Mas will go the way of poor Lluis Companys
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« Reply #324 on: July 22, 2015, 01:45:45 pm »
« Edited: July 23, 2015, 10:45:09 am by Velasco »

There's an estimation for the Parliament of Catalonia released by Público.

Junts pel Sí (CDC+ERC) 39.2% 59 (-3)* seats

Catalunya Sí que es Pot (Podem+ICV+EUiA) 17% 23 (+10) seats

Ciutadans (C's) 15.7% 21 (+12) seats

PSC 7.6% 10 (-10) seats

CUP 7.2% 10 (+7) seats

PP 6.7% 9 (-10) seats

UDC 3.6% 3 (-6) seats

*Currently CDC 37, ERC 21 and DC 4. The latter (Democràcia Catalana: "Catalan Democracy") is a splinter of the UDC

The secessionist bloc (Junts pel Sí+CUP) adds 46.4% of the vote and 69 seats (majority 68). The anti-secessionist parties (C's, PSC and PP) add 30% of the vote and 40 seats. The "Third Way" parties (CSP, UDC) 20.6% and 26 seats.

In other news, the map of regional governments is already completed. Socialist Javier Fernández was elected premier of Asturias in a third vote. Uxue Barkos was proclaimed premier of Navarre.  

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