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Velasco
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« Reply #1175 on: October 24, 2016, 03:43:48 pm »

so, err, who is going to be PSOE's leader now?

I have not a clue. Right now I'm not following political affairs on a daily basis, although I'm not totally disconnected. I know that Pedro Sánchez intends to try and it seems that finally Susana Díaz is not going to take a step forward. From what I've been reading and /or hearing it wouldn't be strange a repetition of the 2014 contest between Pedro Sánchez and Eduardo Madina. This time Susana Díaz and the powerful Andalusia branch would be backing Madina against Sánchez, when in 2014 the Andalusian votes helped Sánchez to win the leadership. The problem was that Sánchez refused to be the puppet of Díaz; subsequently he lost the support of the 'barons' without doing anything to gain new allies in the party. Sánchez vs Madina again would be sad and fun to watch, all at once.
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Velasco
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« Reply #1176 on: October 24, 2016, 04:01:43 pm »

Now that I remember, even Josep Borrell has said that he doesn't rule out the possibility of running for leadership. Borrell is a very clever man who held various portfolios in times of Felipe González. Also (quote from Wikipedia) "in 1998 he ran against PSOE's General Secretary Joaquin Almunia in a primary election intended to determine who the party would nominate as its prime ministerial candidate in the 2000 General Elections, but due to internal pressures within the PSOE, Borrell resigned from candidacy in 1999". In the last days Mr Borrell, who is not in favour of allowing Rajoy to govern, made statements critical with the botched job made by the people who ousted Sánchez. I don't think he's going to run, but it would be certainly fun. It's clear that people like Mr Borrell is at a level above the mediocre politicians in the both sides in which is splitted the PSOE these days.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #1177 on: October 24, 2016, 05:13:18 pm »

It's pretty clear that the PSOE was screwed either way. The question for them is more how they got into this mess rather than which of the extremely unappealing options they eventually chose...
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #1178 on: October 24, 2016, 05:14:14 pm »

I've made this joke before, but what's Spanish for 'Country Party'? Would be a more accurate name by this point.
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Velasco
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« Reply #1179 on: October 26, 2016, 09:04:53 am »

Pedro Sánchez considers not attending Rajoy's investiture, fearing reprisals to rebel MPs from the PSOE's interim leadership in case former secretary general "leads" them. Sánchez is determined to "maintain the dignity", so he refuses to abstain as certain 'baron' asked him in a public statement. Also, he won't resign as MP because such move would weaken his position before an eventual leadership contest.

Eduardo Madina, the man who was defeated by Sánchez in 2014, won't run for leadership because "sequels are never good"

Francina Armengol, premier of the Balearic Islands and leader of the PSOE's regional branch, says that abstention is a "shame" and a "treason".

According to media speculations, between 15 and 20 socialist MPs might vote No to Rajoy.

Aware of the difficulties of governing in minority, Rajoy will try to attract PSOE to the deal between PP and Ciudadanos in his investiture speech.
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Velasco
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« Reply #1180 on: October 26, 2016, 10:37:30 am »

Investiture session begins at 18:00 (CET)

PSOE MPs must say "No" in the first vote and abstain in the second, allowing the election of Mr Rajoy.

PSOE spokesman Antonio Hernando warns that there's no room for dissidence.
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coloniac
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« Reply #1181 on: October 26, 2016, 01:03:42 pm »

I've made this joke before, but what's Spanish for 'Country Party'? Would be a more accurate name by this point.

Par'ido de lo' Pue'lo'
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Lumine
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« Reply #1182 on: October 27, 2016, 12:15:28 pm »
« Edited: October 27, 2016, 12:18:01 pm by Vice President Lumine »

Woah, the Podemos representatives just walked out of the investiture debate shortly before the vote is to begin.

EDIT: Never mind, just a small protest, they returned to vote.
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Velasco
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« Reply #1183 on: October 27, 2016, 07:37:09 pm »

El Diario:  "PSOE votes 'No' to Rajoy 48 hours before making him PM"

Today's vote: Yes 170 / No 180


Woah, the Podemos representatives just walked out of the investiture debate shortly before the vote is to begin.

EDIT: Never mind, just a small protest, they returned to vote.

Apparently the Podemos MPs walked out after serious allegations made by the PSOE spokesman, namely "using the name of Spain at the service of (foreign) dictators"

Pablo Iglesias proclaimed himself the only leader of the opposition against the 'Triple Alliance' made by PP, C's and PSOE. Also, he made some people angry. When the Podemos leader said that PP members are "future criminals", the secretary general of the conservatives Maria Dolores de Cospedal called Iglesias "scoundrel" from her bench. Cameras recorded Albert Rivera saying "what an asshole" after Iglesias recommended him to use Google in order to know what is the Burgundy Cross, implying that the leader of Ciudadanos is an ignorant. Iglesias said: "To this day the two crisis-proof traditional institutions are the Monarchy and the PNV, closely united by the Cross of Burgundy. Mr Rivera better searchs in Google".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_of_Burgundy#In_Spain
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Mike88
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« Reply #1184 on: October 29, 2016, 01:21:55 pm »

Rajoy invested: For: 170 Against: 111 Abs: 68
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Velasco
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« Reply #1185 on: October 30, 2016, 10:08:37 am »

PSOE: 68 abstain, 15 No, 1 resigned (Pedro Sánchez)
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« Reply #1186 on: October 31, 2016, 01:56:58 am »

PSOE: 68 abstain, 15 No, 1 resigned (Pedro Sánchez)

The 15 holdouts include the 7 members of PSC. I have a feeling, the will soon be sending Madrid officials to substitute for bulls in the reimposed Barcelona corrida.
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Nanwe
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« Reply #1187 on: November 03, 2016, 01:28:26 pm »
« Edited: November 03, 2016, 01:49:48 pm by Nanwe »

New government:
New ministers in italics

President: Mariano Rajoy Brey (PP)
Vice-president. Minister of the Presidency and of Territorial Administrations: Soraya Saénz de Santamaría (loses spokesperson role)
Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation: Alfonso Dastis Quecedo. Dastis is the former Spanish representative to the COREPER and former ambassador to the Netherlands.
Minister of Justice: Rafael Catalá.
Minister of Defence: María Dolores de Cospedal. Cospedal is, needless to say, the current general secretary of the PP and former President of Castilla-La Mancha
Minister of Finances and the Civil Service: Cristóbal Montoro
Minister of the Interior: Juan Ignacio Zoido. Former mayor of Sevilla.
Minister of Public Works: Íñigo de la Serna Hernáiz. Mayor of Santander since 2007.
Minister of Education, Culture and Sports. Government Spokersperson: Íñigo Méndez de Vigo (gains spokesperson role).
Minister of Labour and Social Security: Fátima Báñez
Ministry of Energy, Tourism and the Digital Agenda: Álvaro Nadal Belda. Current secretary of state of Economy.
Ministry of Agriculture, Fishing, Food and Environment: Isabel García Tejerina
Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness: Luis de Guindos (gains Industry)
Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality: Dolors Montserrat. Mayor of San Sadurní de Noya, Barcelona. Second spokesperson of the PP in the Congress.

Lots of contuinuism, as it was to be expected from Rajoy. The new ministers seem to be little-known figures, with the exception of Cospedal, who either respond to a technocratic profile (Dastis, Nadal Belda) or to a capacity to be popular despite adverse situation, like keeping the majority in your city even in 2015 (De la Serna Hernáiz) or being a centre-right mayor in Sevilla. So to some degree people who happen to have more conciliatory or wider appeal than the 'regular' PP. Also, although Soraya gains more power, she loses some and her biggest rival in the party (Cospedal) and his allies (Zoido) enter the cabinet. Monteserrat hailing from the PPC makes sure there are still Catalans in the cabinet after the dismissal of Fernández Díaz. It's all about the equilibrium with Rajoy, although the Sorayos have clearly crushed the G-8.

The re-creation of the ministry of Territorial Administrations points towards Rajoy seeking a new approach to Catalonia, which is about damn time. Not to be confused with a referendum, though. The new ministers are all younger (not young though, no Casado, Maroto, Levy, etc.), which I think will help in dealing with Ciudadanos and enforcing the government pact's agenda. It does seem like a more conciliatory government, although who knows, since the new figures are essentially unknown to the population. Perhaps pointing towards a generational renewal of the party, too.

EDIT: Hard to tell whether Guindos or Montoro will be more important as we don't know yet who'll hold the chair of the Delegated Commission for Economic Affairs, which coordinates all the ministries and activity of the economic area.
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Nanwe
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« Reply #1188 on: November 08, 2016, 06:24:34 am »

In other, interesting things, El País released an incredibly interesting analysis of the sociological background of all the Spanish ministers since the Suárez I government. According to it, your average Spanish ministry hails from the province of Madrid, is a former civil servant and he (because it's a he ofc) studied Law in university.

Quote
Spain has had 184 ministers between 1977 and 2015. The new Mariano Rajoy cabinets adds 6 new ones to the list. It's a small number, but enough to see what's their profile and what it says about Spanish democracy. The majority of the data comes from the tables that professor Juan Rodríguez Teruel (Universidad de Valencia) used in his book 'Los ministros de la España democrática'. These are the six main traits:

1. Civil Servants. A whooping 63.3% of all Spanish ministers have been civil servants. In the new Rajoy cabinet 69% are civil servants.

Img


The dominant role of the civil servants is a symptom of the complex relationship between parties and civil servants. Public servants have the advantage that they can return to their previous post. For others the return to their old work posts is more complicated.

Upper-level servants have an obvious advantage: They are the ones who best known the Civil Service. In other countries, technocrats are upper-level civil servants with a certain degree of independence. In Spain, the independence of bureaucrats is more dubious. In the upper levels of the Administration, promotions depend on political affinities. "It's a model in which confidence is political, whatever the professional merits. There are no expectations of having a neutral promotion" says Victor Lapuente, professor at the University of Gothenburg.

In Spain, those civil servants who wish to reach the highest ranks have to surrender to the political parties. In some cases, their politicisation is complete and they become party members. The problems of this system are clear. It's hard for civil servants to act as a check on the minister. In the UK and other Northern European countries, the system is the opposite. Civil servants are obligated to remain independent.

That is not an ideal system however: Civil servants have little incentives to listen to politicians. The best examples is the model of the British TV series Yes, Minister. Even though both systems have problems, academic literature points out that a more professional administrations with less political links implies a better governance and less corruption.

Amongst the remaining politicians there is another major group: Career politicians. Since the last González government, with Aznar's exception, they have always been ministers who only occupation was politics.

Img


The private sector is underrepresented, although somewhat more when PP politicians govern. Socialist presidents have a clear preference for university professors.

2. Madrileños. The majority of ministers in absolute numbers were born in Madrid: 57, or over a quarter of them. If that number is corrected by the regional population, the highest proportion is of riojanos (people from La Rioja) and castellano-leoneses (people from Castilla y León). The abundance of the first group may be luck - there have only been 3. But the important number is that there have been 23 ministers from Castilla y León.

Img


Geography is usually a minor matter, but not in this case, according to Rodríguez Teruel. "It shows that the political recruitment logic in Spain is very territorially conditioned" and adds "amongst the large countries, it would be hard to find others where the capital is so politically segregating".

The data only shows those ministers born in Madrid, but if one added those who studied or began their professional careers in the capital, the number would be higher: "Half or 60% of the ministers have usually lived in Madrid" says Rodríguez Teruel.

The origin also serves to see where the recruiting grounds of the two main Spanish parties area, as it varies little from their electoral strongholds.

3. Lawyers. Five of the 6 Spanish Prime Ministers have studied Law; only Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo was a civil engineer. In all governments since 1977, the number of Law graduates have surpassed 50%. In the new Rajoy government they are 77%. In other 23 advanced democracies, according to the data of Carlos III University professor, Silvia Claveria, only 33.42% of politicians are lawyers. In those 23 countries, lawyers are outnumbers by social sciences graduates.

Studying Law usually coincides with state entrance exams: "The preponderance of Law in Spain has a lot to do with [it] being a multipurpose degree" says Rodríguez Teruel.

The dominance of lawyers in the Spanish government has important consequences: "It gives a strong normative connotation to how politics are done in Spain. Problems are faced in a rigid manner, with little imagination" adds Rodríguez Teruel. The lack of other profiles can be a problem in those areas for which a different expertise is important, like in costs: " In Spain things are always done according to the law, but not always according to economic common sense" says Lapuente.

4. Men. The male majority is no surpise. In the developed world only 30% of the ministries are led by women, according to Clavería's data. The number is even worse when dealing with important ministries: Deputy Prime Ministers, Economy, Finance, Defence, Interior, and Foreign Affairs. The female ministers in these portfolios is only 16.5%.

In the new Rajoy government, 38% of ministers are female, far away from the 50% in the second Rodríguez Zapatero government. But 2 of them are in tough ministries, which represents 33%. "The new government doesn't reach parity, but it has placed a women in Defence, which is also unusual" says Claveria.

Claveria provides another significant number in gender disparity in advanced democracies: The male ministers without children are 9%, female ministers without children are 45%.

5. Very well-read. The ministers usually have graduate or higher level studies: At least a degree. In Spain after Francoism it has been always been this way. But it used to be something distinctive about southern Europe. "In the north, until the 80s, there was a 30% [of ministers] that did not go to university" says Rodríguez Teruel.

For once, the numbers of the north have evolved towards what was normal in the south: Ministers with tertiary education. It can not only be explained by taking into account the overall increase in the amount of university graduates. This seemingly good requisite for public career has a representation cost: "The access to the political elite is closing" says Rodríguez Teruel.

6. Deputies. In parliamentary systems, the majority of ministers are usually deputies. Not in Spain. The Spanish cipher is around 50% of ministers being deputies. In the new Rajoy government, the number is higher: 69%. During the Second Republic, 81% of ministers were members of Congress.

The relative importance of Congress in the Congress shows once more, the limited role of Parliament in Spanish politics: "It can reinforce the Government's preeminence, it looks beyond Parliament, paying more attention to other power sources" says Rodríguez Teruel. The increase in the number of ministers with seats could be a gesture of the president to the potentially larger role of Parliament in the Spanish political life from now on.

In Spain there is also a small quota of ministers who come straight from the local or regional power bases: "Their priority will not be to pay attention to the parliamentary game, but to speak to their voters or the region" says Rodríguez Teruel. The most important designation in this profile category is Íñigo de la Serna, who jumped from mayor of Santander to Public Works Minister.
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« Reply #1189 on: March 12, 2017, 12:22:56 am »

Rajoy may have topped "corruption? What does that have the economy?" with this fantastic analogy:

Quote
You have no longer an absolute majority … so the commission will get under way,” Rivera said before suggesting that former treasurers of the PP would have to give evidence to the commission via video link from their cells — likely a reference to Francisco Granados, a top PP official in Madrid, who has given testimony through video conference from prison.

Rajoy responded with a biblical reference, saying it would be better to look to the future “because, if we look back to the past too much, we risk the same fate as Lot’s wife … who turned into a pillar of salt” when she looked back at Sodom.

We should probably restart this thread tbh, as PSOE gets round to choosing a leader and the Catalonia crisis goes on and on.
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Mike88
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« Reply #1190 on: March 12, 2017, 08:20:03 am »

Rajoy may have topped "corruption? What does that have the economy?" with this fantastic analogy:

Quote
You have no longer an absolute majority … so the commission will get under way,” Rivera said before suggesting that former treasurers of the PP would have to give evidence to the commission via video link from their cells — likely a reference to Francisco Granados, a top PP official in Madrid, who has given testimony through video conference from prison.

Rajoy responded with a biblical reference, saying it would be better to look to the future “because, if we look back to the past too much, we risk the same fate as Lot’s wife … who turned into a pillar of salt” when she looked back at Sodom.

We should probably restart this thread tbh, as PSOE gets round to choosing a leader and the Catalonia crisis goes on and on.
I agree. Adding to what you said Crabcake, El Mundo newspaper is reporting that Rajoy doesn't have support to approve the budget in Parliament. Rajoy may actually be the luckiest politician in the world currently. If his budget isn't approved, probably another election may have to happen and with the PSOE leadership still very fresh and Podemos is complete civil war, Rajoy and the PP can simply say to the electorate: "they don't present an alternative, they don't let me govern the country. Had enough?".   
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coloniac
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« Reply #1191 on: March 12, 2017, 08:50:57 am »

Rajoy may have topped "corruption? What does that have the economy?" with this fantastic analogy:

Quote
You have no longer an absolute majority … so the commission will get under way,” Rivera said before suggesting that former treasurers of the PP would have to give evidence to the commission via video link from their cells — likely a reference to Francisco Granados, a top PP official in Madrid, who has given testimony through video conference from prison.

Rajoy responded with a biblical reference, saying it would be better to look to the future “because, if we look back to the past too much, we risk the same fate as Lot’s wife … who turned into a pillar of salt” when she looked back at Sodom.

We should probably restart this thread tbh, as PSOE gets round to choosing a leader and the Catalonia crisis goes on and on.
I agree. Adding to what you said Crabcake, El Mundo newspaper is reporting that Rajoy doesn't have support to approve the budget in Parliament. Rajoy may actually be the luckiest politician in the world currently. If his budget isn't approved, probably another election may have to happen and with the PSOE leadership still very fresh and Podemos is complete civil war, Rajoy and the PP can simply say to the electorate: "they don't present an alternative, they don't let me govern the country. Had enough?".  

PP is losing voters rapidly to C's in the polls though.
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Mike88
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« Reply #1192 on: March 12, 2017, 09:06:11 am »

That's true Rogier, although Spanish polls aren't very reliable. But the point i was stretching is that there is no alternative, at the moment, to Mr. Rajoy. Trying to block him could be counterproductive. Remember the 2016 election.

This hole Murcia scandal is what has stained the relations between the PP and C's. The C's wants the current President ousted and a new PP president sworn in or new elections. All of this because of the PP money schemes. If an election is held again in Murcia, polls show there would be a repetition of the 2015 election results.
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« Reply #1193 on: March 12, 2017, 01:18:06 pm »

That's true Rogier, although Spanish polls aren't very reliable. But the point i was stretching is that there is no alternative, at the moment, to Mr. Rajoy. Trying to block him could be counterproductive. Remember the 2016 election.

This hole Murcia scandal is what has stained the relations between the PP and C's. The C's wants the current President ousted and a new PP president sworn in or new elections. All of this because of the PP money schemes. If an election is held again in Murcia, polls show there would be a repetition of the 2015 election results.

Do you know who is going to run for the PSOE leadership, apart from Susana Diaz? Is she the favourite?
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Mike88
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« Reply #1194 on: March 12, 2017, 01:46:40 pm »

That's true Rogier, although Spanish polls aren't very reliable. But the point i was stretching is that there is no alternative, at the moment, to Mr. Rajoy. Trying to block him could be counterproductive. Remember the 2016 election.

This hole Murcia scandal is what has stained the relations between the PP and C's. The C's wants the current President ousted and a new PP president sworn in or new elections. All of this because of the PP money schemes. If an election is held again in Murcia, polls show there would be a repetition of the 2015 election results.

Do you know who is going to run for the PSOE leadership, apart from Susana Diaz? Is she the favourite?
Pedro Sanchéz, former PSOE leader, and Patxi Lopéz, former president of the Basque Country. At the moment polls are favouring Sanchéz and Lopéz. Susana Diaz is polling in third place, perhaps because she is delaying and delaying her announcement.

But i wouldn't read to much the polls. In 2014 Sanchéz was behind, but close, to Eduardo Madina and he end up winning by more 12 points. It will be an interesting race to watch as two moderate PSOE leaders face Sanchéz who wants an approximation with Podemos.
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« Reply #1195 on: March 12, 2017, 01:51:02 pm »

That's true Rogier, although Spanish polls aren't very reliable. But the point i was stretching is that there is no alternative, at the moment, to Mr. Rajoy. Trying to block him could be counterproductive. Remember the 2016 election.

This hole Murcia scandal is what has stained the relations between the PP and C's. The C's wants the current President ousted and a new PP president sworn in or new elections. All of this because of the PP money schemes. If an election is held again in Murcia, polls show there would be a repetition of the 2015 election results.

Do you know who is going to run for the PSOE leadership, apart from Susana Diaz? Is she the favourite?
Pedro Sanchéz, former PSOE leader, and Patxi Lopéz, former president of the Basque Country. At the moment polls are favouring Sanchéz and Lopéz. Susana Diaz is polling in third place, perhaps because she is delaying and delaying her announcement.

But i wouldn't read to much the polls. In 2014 Sanchéz was behind, but close, to Eduardo Madina and he end up winning by more 12 points. It will be an interesting race to watch as two moderate PSOE leaders face Sanchéz who wants an approximation with Podemos.

Moderate? Diaz would be in PP if she was living elsewhere than Andalusia.
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Velasco
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« Reply #1196 on: March 13, 2017, 01:54:58 pm »

Rajoy may have topped "corruption? What does that have the economy?" with this fantastic analogy:

Quote
You have no longer an absolute majority … so the commission will get under way,” Rivera said before suggesting that former treasurers of the PP would have to give evidence to the commission via video link from their cells — likely a reference to Francisco Granados, a top PP official in Madrid, who has given testimony through video conference from prison.

Rajoy responded with a biblical reference, saying it would be better to look to the future “because, if we look back to the past too much, we risk the same fate as Lot’s wife … who turned into a pillar of salt” when she looked back at Sodom.

We should probably restart this thread tbh, as PSOE gets round to choosing a leader and the Catalonia crisis goes on and on.
I agree. Adding to what you said Crabcake, El Mundo newspaper is reporting that Rajoy doesn't have support to approve the budget in Parliament. Rajoy may actually be the luckiest politician in the world currently. If his budget isn't approved, probably another election may have to happen and with the PSOE leadership still very fresh and Podemos is complete civil war, Rajoy and the PP can simply say to the electorate: "they don't present an alternative, they don't let me govern the country. Had enough?".   

PP is losing voters rapidly to C's in the polls though.

Mariano Rajoy must deal with C's and PNV in order to pass the budget. I think that Mr Rajoy will succeed, even though addressing the demands of the oranges and the Basque nationalists might require somewhat complicated balances. Given the lack of alternative, the possibility of calling a fresh election is like a nuclear button in Rajoy's hands. PSOE is in a pitiful state, while Podemos held a convention in January where it was staged the deep rift between Pablo Iglesias and Ïñigo Errejón supporters. Simultaneously, Mr Rajoy was acclaimed in the PP convention. I don't think that later polls indicate that PP is losing ground to C's.

 
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« Reply #1197 on: March 13, 2017, 02:15:51 pm »

That's true Rogier, although Spanish polls aren't very reliable. But the point i was stretching is that there is no alternative, at the moment, to Mr. Rajoy. Trying to block him could be counterproductive. Remember the 2016 election.

This hole Murcia scandal is what has stained the relations between the PP and C's. The C's wants the current President ousted and a new PP president sworn in or new elections. All of this because of the PP money schemes. If an election is held again in Murcia, polls show there would be a repetition of the 2015 election results.

Do you know who is going to run for the PSOE leadership, apart from Susana Diaz? Is she the favourite?
Pedro Sánchez, former PSOE leader, and Patxi López, former president of the Basque Country. At the moment polls are favouring Sánchez and López. Susana Diaz is polling in third place, perhaps because she is delaying and delaying her announcement.

But i wouldn't read to much the polls. In 2014 Sánchez was behind, but close, to Eduardo Madina and he end up winning by more 12 points. It will be an interesting race to watch as two moderate PSOE leaders face Sánchez who wants an approximation with Podemos.

I haven't seen polls on the PSOE leadership race. Susana Díaz is regarded the favourite and has the support of the party apparatus and is backed by most of regional leaders. However, there is concern among the advocates of Ms Díaz because Pedro Sánchez retains a considerable support among the angry grassroots. In a rally held in the Andalusian town of Cádiz, Sánchez gathered a sizeable crowd. In the screen behind the stand, it was played a video of Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo endorsing Sánchez. The polarisation between Díaz and Sánchez will likely relegate Patxi López to the third place.
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« Reply #1198 on: March 13, 2017, 02:30:01 pm »

I don't think that later polls indicate that PP is losing ground to C's.

I believe he was referring to the Metroscopia poll from last Saturday, which has the following numbers (compared with the poll from January):

31.2% ( -2.0%) PP
21.5% ( -0.2%) UP
19.0% ( -0.1%) PSOE
16.5% (+1.0%) C's
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« Reply #1199 on: March 13, 2017, 04:38:45 pm »

I don't think that later polls indicate that PP is losing ground to C's.

I believe he was referring to the Metroscopia poll from last Saturday, which has the following numbers (compared with the poll from January):

31.2% ( -2.0%) PP
21.5% ( -0.2%) UP
19.0% ( -0.1%) PSOE
16.5% (+1.0%) C's

OK, it's the last Metroscopia poll. Maybe Spanish polls are not among the more reliable, as I think you said previously. Metroscopia in particular has strange oscillations between one poll and another, as well it tends to overpoll Ciudadanos. According to other polls released recently (Invymark and Sigma Dos) C's is oscillating between 12% and 13% of the vote, while PP is between 33% and 34%.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinion_polling_for_the_next_Spanish_general_election
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