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tack50
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« on: March 26, 2017, 02:03:20 pm »

Pregunta tíos, why have Ada Colau and Podem fallen out, only for her new party to join the Podemos national structure again?


No idea, Podemos's coalitions are very heterogeneous. From what I've heard it might have to do with Colau&co. being more pro independence than Podem. (which is part of Podemos, which can't really defend independence because it's a national party)
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tack50
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2017, 02:45:57 pm »

The CUP, Candidatura de Unidad Popular, a far-left anti capitalist party, tried to occupy the headquarters of the PP Catalonia in Barcelona. The youth wing of the party, barricaded themselves in front of the PP headquarters and tried to get in. The goal of the protest was to demand a referendum of Catalonia Independence.

The spokesperson of the party and lead figure in the party, Anna Gabriel, went to the scene to support the protest.


Regardless of their positions, these kind of acts are shameful. Sad
Why are you expecting anti- capitalists to play by the ridiculous notions of what constitutes political activity in a capitalist society?
Not to mention, if Spain would just allow a referendum, none of this would be happening.
The problem is that the constitution bars any attempt that threatens the territorial union of Spain. To change that, i believe all autonomous regions must say yes to the constitutional change and that's not going to happen. It's a difficult situation to be resolved.

No; autonomous regions don't have to ratify the change (in fact they play no role at all). The process to reform the constitution would require the "aggravated" reform process (equivalent to rewriting the constitution, though partial ammendments can also be proposed through this method) as it'd require repealing or ammending article 2:

The Constitution is based on the indissoluble unity of the Spanish Nation, the
common and indivisible homeland of all Spaniards,
and it recognizes and guarantees the
right to self-government of the nationalities and regions of which it is composed and the
solidarity among them all.


To reform or repeal article 2 the following process must be followed:

  • First the Congress of Deputies and the Senate must approve the ammendment by a 2/3 majority each
  • Then both houses are dissolved and a new general election is called
  • After the general election both newly elected houses must ratify the ammendment
  • Finally a referendum in all of Spain is called (no special requirements, just more "yes" than "no" votes)

After that Catalonia could hold their referendum. Not like it matters as that process would basically require PP's approval, which they'd never give. Spain's unity and all.

In theory a non-binding referendum could be passed against the government's will with a PSOE+Podemos+ERC+PDECat+PNV abstaining, but again, PSOE would never opt for that, and I'd be surprised if Catalan nationalists were happy with a non binding referendum (I guess Congress could pass a binding one, then have it inmediately shot down by the constitutional court)
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tack50
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2017, 04:05:45 pm »

There is a fundamental contradiction in the Constitution though, in that it has allowed both Article 2 and the possibility of seperatists to win a majority in the Generalitat to co-exist. The separatist majority is as legal as Article 2.

It's not like there was an alternative. I think some countries do ban parties whose objective is independence, but Spain doesn't.

Also, Catalonia's flirt with independence is very recient. The Basque Country was the most pro independnece of the 2 traditionally.

Finally, there are regionalist parties that do not want independence. The best examples of this being the centre-right CC (Canary Islands) with 1/15 Canarian seats and the centre-left wing PRC from Cantabria (no seats, but they do hold the governor there)
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tack50
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« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2017, 01:09:18 pm »

Apparently things are slowly but surely progressing in Murcia. Maybe they'll get rid of the allegedly corrupt PP governor there after all?

Then again if they go to new elections either it's a hung parliament and there's another PP+Cs government, even if the governor might be judged for corruption, or it's a PP absolute majority (Murcia is very conservative, PP came within 1 seat of an overall majority)

A PSOE+Cs+Podemos government wouldn't last more than 10 minutes considering how much Cs and Podemos hate each other, and there's no way PSOE+Podemos gets a majority in Murcia
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tack50
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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2017, 02:05:46 pm »

Apparently things are slowly but surely progressing in Murcia. Maybe they'll get rid of the allegedly corrupt PP governor there after all?

Then again if they go to new elections either it's a hung parliament and there's another PP+Cs government, even if the governor might be judged for corruption, or it's a PP absolute majority (Murcia is very conservative, PP came within 1 seat of an overall majority)

A PSOE+Cs+Podemos government wouldn't last more than 10 minutes considering how much Cs and Podemos hate each other, and there's no way PSOE+Podemos gets a majority in Murcia
Indeed, the last poll for Murcia, from earlier this month, shows the PP gaining more than C's and PSOE and Podemos getting a lower result than in 2011:

39.1% PP
22.9% PSOE
12.9% C's
12.0% Podemos
 3.6% IU

The poll was made in the beginning of this scandal. Giving a big margin of error, due to Spain's not so accurate polls, could we be seeing parts of the electorate swinging to the PP because they want a more stable government, even thought the electorate knows they are sleaze?

Probably, and I'd argue there was something similar to some extent between December 2015 and June 2016 at the national level(though lower turnout and Podemos losing a big chunk of voters were more important factors)

Interestingly though, Murcia actually reformed their electoral law in 2015, right after the regional election. Now they only have a single at-large constituency with a 3% hurdle, as opposed to the previous 5 constituencies with a 5% hurdle.

With the poll you posted, that would yield this parliament:

PP 20 (-2)

PSOE 12 (-1)
Cs 6 (+2).
Podemos 6 (=)
IU 1 (+1)

So, almost certainly a hung parliament. Back on the day PP could get the 48% or so required for an overall majority, but probably not now, especially not with such a candidate.
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tack50
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2017, 07:06:04 am »

Apparently things are slowly but surely progressing in Murcia. Maybe they'll get rid of the allegedly corrupt PP governor there after all?

Then again if they go to new elections either it's a hung parliament and there's another PP+Cs government, even if the governor might be judged for corruption, or it's a PP absolute majority (Murcia is very conservative, PP came within 1 seat of an overall majority)

A PSOE+Cs+Podemos government wouldn't last more than 10 minutes considering how much Cs and Podemos hate each other, and there's no way PSOE+Podemos gets a majority in Murcia
Indeed, the last poll for Murcia, from earlier this month, shows the PP gaining more than C's and PSOE and Podemos getting a lower result than in 2011:

39.1% PP
22.9% PSOE
12.9% C's
12.0% Podemos
 3.6% IU

The poll was made in the beginning of this scandal. Giving a big margin of error, due to Spain's not so accurate polls, could we be seeing parts of the electorate swinging to the PP because they want a more stable government, even thought the electorate knows they are sleaze?

Probably, and I'd argue there was something similar to some extent between December 2015 and June 2016 at the national level(though lower turnout and Podemos losing a big chunk of voters were more important factors)

Interestingly though, Murcia actually reformed their electoral law in 2015, right after the regional election. Now they only have a single at-large constituency with a 3% hurdle, as opposed to the previous 5 constituencies with a 5% hurdle.

With the poll you posted, that would yield this parliament:

PP 20 (-2)

PSOE 12 (-1)
Cs 6 (+2).
Podemos 6 (=)
IU 1 (+1)

So, almost certainly a hung parliament. Back on the day PP could get the 48% or so required for an overall majority, but probably not now, especially not with such a candidate.

Depends on who the PP candidate would be after the election, no? C's won't want to govern with PSOE and Podemos (or IU), but it would be a huge problem for them if they support Pedro Antonio Sánchez. A friend from Murcia says the main reason why Sánchez doesn't go is because Válcarcel (former Murcia President) has too many things to cover that could go public if Sánchez speaks or something along those lines.

No idea about that, but if PP are willing do drop Sánchez (the national branch have actually told them to do so, but the regional branch refuses) the Cs+PP pact will start again. If not, hung parliament and repated elections until either PP drops their candidate, PSOE+IU+Podemos get a majority, or PP gets a majority.
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tack50
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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2017, 07:10:28 am »

Also, there is finally a date for the PSOE primaries. Here's the calendar:

20th April-4th of May: Candidates collect signatures to become formal candidates
28th of April: Census closes
21st of May: the day people vote

Also, the governor of Castille La Mancha has said he and many others will link their future to the result of the primaries.

After that I am hoping Sanchez wins in a landslide, if only to see their reaction XD
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tack50
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« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2017, 06:20:18 am »

Could anybody tell me something about the relationship between C's and the far right? I read something about it and found it incredibly weird that any far right person would be attracted to them.

It's not. But like UPyD, the party is not terribly favourable to decentralisation (although C's not as much as UPyD) and in Spain centralisation is very strongly associated to the right-wing, so a party that does not support the status quo but even talks of revoking certain regional powers (like the concierto in Navarra and the Basque Country) is perceived as to the right of the PP in those parts. The exception being Catalonia for obvious reasons.

Also, in the case of Galicia, it did not help that they picked as candidate a women tied to the very right-wing Interconomía/Libertad Digital media group.

In any case, people who you would usually consider far-right are usually loyal voters of the PP, even if they are not too happy to vote for 'Maricomplejines' Rajoy. The PP makes sure not to allow the growth of any party to its right.

Yeah. The closest thing to a far-right party is VOX, which came within 1500 votes of getting a seat in the 2014 European Parliament elections (got 1.57% of the vote), but since then they've gone downhill fast. Currently they have 0.2% of the vote and only 22 councillors in town halls (out of more than 67 000).

There might be demand for a party further right than PP, and a poll found out that if former Prime Minister Aznar (a Rajoy critic from the right) founded his own party and ran again he would get up to 15% of the vote and 51 seats. (coming in 4th; behind PP, PSOE and Podemos, but above Cs).

However Rajoy and the PP seem to be very good at avoiding the formation of far right parties, probably appealing to "if you don't vote for us Podemos wins so vote tactically for us". Had VOX kept their results from 2014, they'd have 1 seat for Madrid (they got 3.7% of the vote there)
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tack50
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« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2017, 04:45:47 am »

And the governor of Murcia, Pedro Antonio Sánchez finally resigned. That means PP will hold the Murcia governor for the remaining of the term, and that the no confidence vote will almost certainly fail (Cs probably abstains or votes no now).

No idea who the new governor will be though, as he will remain as PP leader in the region (not a rare arrangement, many times parties have one person as regional leader but another as governor candidate).
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tack50
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« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2017, 02:16:08 pm »

There have been lots of interesting developments concerning Gibraltar reciently. Basically Spain will get veto powers on any Brexit deal on Gibraltar.

The UK has become very angry about it, and there have been some interesting headlines in British "newspapers" like The Sun, and comments about going to war!
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tack50
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« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2017, 08:36:36 am »
« Edited: April 16, 2017, 08:41:30 am by tack50 »

Poll by El País/Metroscopia about Catalonia:

Would you be in favour of a UDI?


Yes: 33%
No: 62%

In case of a completely legal and negotiated with Spain referendum, what would you vote?

Independence: 44%
Remain: 49%

If it was clear that Catalonia would end up outside the EU in case of independence, what would you vote?

Independence: 40%
Remain: 53%

If there was a 3rd option where Catalonia would remain part of Spain but would get more devolved and fixed powers, what would you vote?


Indepencence: 31%
Status Quo: 19%
More devolution: 46%

Do you think it's ok for Catalonia's integration in Spain to get an agreement where the constitution would give it some differentiated powers?


Catalonia: Yes: 70% No: 27%
Rest of Spain: Yes: 33% No: 61%

Regional election poll

PDECat: 11%
ERC: 29.2% (total JxSi: +0.7)
Cs: 16% (-1.2)
Catalunya Si que es Pot: 16% (+7.1)
PSC-PSOE: 13% (+0.3)
PP: 5.8% (-2.7)
CUP: 4.1% (-4.1)
Others: 4.9% (+0.6)

http://elpais.com/elpais/2017/04/11/media/1491901157_109575.html
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tack50
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2017, 05:05:46 am »

Any reason for the change of heart? The pro-independence camp had a fairly solid lead after Rajoy ''won'' again.
What happened to IC-V?

IC-V is part of the Catalunya si que es pot coalition, alongside Podemos. And idk why independence has fallen slightly. I guess backlash against Rajoy dying down+the pro-independence coalition going through a hard time? (a leaked audio of a PDECat leader reciently saying that if the "proces" failed they should go back towards being pro autonomy and against independence, like pre-2012)
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tack50
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« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2017, 03:29:00 pm »
« Edited: April 19, 2017, 03:32:40 pm by tack50 »

Got bored and with spare free time and decided what would happen if in Spain we elected Congress like the UK/US instead of proportionally. Also without reapportioning anything (so seats in say, Soria would have less people than those in Madrid) Decided to start with the Canary Islands. With this map of districts here are the 2011, 2015 and 2016 results:

Image Link

Las Palmas
2011:
PP 8 (clean sweep)

2015:
Podemos: 4 (Lanzarote, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria*3)
PP: 4 (Fuerteventura and Agüimes, Gran Canaria South, Gran Canaria West, Telde and Ingenio)

2016:
PP 8 (clean sweep)

Santa Cruz de Tenerife

2011:
PP 7 (clean sweep)

2015:
PP 6
PSOE 1 (Tenerife South West)

2016:
PP 7 (clean sweep)

Conclusion: PP sweeps 2016 (split in the left) and 2011 (PP landslide) as expected. Podemos is surprisingly competitive in Las Palmas! (they could have also taken the Fuerteventura seat). PSOE surprisingly bad (only narrowly takes 1 seat in Tenerife, might have also taken the La Palma/La Gomera/El Hierro seat with some serious effort)

Of course it's just fiction as if we did that we'd have a (much stronger) 2 party system, but still nice to look at it.
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tack50
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« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2017, 02:44:58 am »


People's Party proposal for electoral reform in Madrid to shift to a MMP system: http://imgur.com/kazeImb

How likely is electoral reform to pass?
Didn't know about Madrid, but many other places are trying to pass reforms. Murcia passed a reform as part of the PP+Cs deal (went from 5 constituencies to a single at-large one; with the hurdle being reduced from 5% to 3%)

Another place where electoral reform is being discussed is in the Canary Islands, where the minor islands get as much of a voice as the 2 large ones even though they only have 20% of the people. However parties can't agree on a reform so I don't have much hope for that one. A proposal was to include 10 extra at large legislators to make the system more proportional, but PP and NC rejected that. Others want to keep the system as is (maybe lowering the hurdles from 6 to 3% regional and from 30 to 15% in an island). NC proposed increasing the number of legislators in GC/TF from 15 to 22, and in FV from 7 to 8.

At the national level I also remember electoral reform being discussed but I don't think it will pass unless the 4 main parties agree on a big constitutional reform package, which isn't likely to happen.
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tack50
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« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2017, 05:41:20 am »

In other news, former governor of Madrid Ignacio Gonzalez (2012-2015) has been sent to jail tonight. Yet another PP politician that goes to jail.
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tack50
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« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2017, 05:54:25 am »


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Yeah, the communties are very limited in that aspect. Other than the ones I discussed, I guess other than de-gerrymandering Castille La Mancha (not likely to happen as that backfired so bad PP was actually hurt by it, not helped! Maybe Podemos can pressure but Garcia-Page is one of the most anti-Podemos PSOE governors.) I can't think of any meaningful reforms. Maybe have the Basque Country give different numbers of seats per province (not sure if PNV is helped or hurt by it)? Or in general make the system more proportional everywhere?


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Sure, there's no perfect solution (although in the Canary Islands, people do care, at least in Gran Canaria). The at-large constituency was expanding parliament (from 60 to 70 iirc). And yeah, most proposals are the old "make Spain 1 at large constituency" or the like, which require a constitutional reform anyways. The only one that didn't that I've seen was Cs proposal (Expand parliament to 400 members, use the remaining 50 to make it proportional, like MMP).

Also, since when does VOX want FPTP? Do they want to never ever get elected? I can see why some people would want that, it does have advantages like politicians being able to defy their party without being forced out of the list, but also has lots of disadvantages. We also use sort of FPTP in the Senate and it's not like the politicians there defy their parties that much.

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Yeah. I personally don't think a referendum would be a problem for a simple reform (would most likely pass like 65-35 at least if it's popular and everyone endorses it). But I can see why a referendum is not something others want to do.

And yes, we don't have an opposition at the moment. PSOE will have to work with the government sometimes so they would be a weird opposition. Podemos as you say does not know how to do institutional politics (Iglesias did mean it when they said they'd be in the streets: see their "tramabus"). I guess if Errejón had won they would bee a lot better off. Cs same as PSOE but even more with the government.

I guess ERC and Rufián are the leaders of the opposition now? XD
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tack50
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« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2017, 01:20:23 pm »
« Edited: April 24, 2017, 01:22:06 pm by tack50 »

Esperanza Aguirre resigns as councillor in Madrid's town hall

http://www.elmundo.es/espana/2017/04/24/58fe097c22601dcb318b4617.html

Well, I guess she'll be resigning for now, but she has often resigned, then returned to politics. It wouldn't surprise me at all if she was a candidate for something in 2019 or 2020 (though no idea of what, there's no chance she runs for mayor again and Cifuentes will definitely run for reelection as governor). I also don't see her as candidate for the European elections. Maybe she'll run as a regular backbencher MP?

Edit: She is 65, would be 67 in 2019. Probably will just retire.
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tack50
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« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2017, 04:48:32 am »
« Edited: April 27, 2017, 05:33:08 am by tack50 »

Big news: Podemos will present a no confidence vote against Rajoy

http://www.elperiodico.com/es/noticias/politica/podemos-plantea-mocion-censura-contra-rajoy-6000718

I guess it's a way to try and influence the PSOE primary? (forcing them to reiterate their support towards a corrupt PP government). Though the PSOE could vote yes if they are sure that Catalan parties or the PNV will abstain (a no confidence vote requires 50%+1). Maybe they just want some headlines?

I seriously doubt this is actually intended to put Iglesias as PM.

Edit: I was right. PSOE has said they won't support it, so it's going nowhere. The best paralel is the 1987 no confidence vote, when PSOE had an absolute majority and it was a worthless no confidence vote.
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« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2017, 12:12:46 pm »
« Edited: May 02, 2017, 12:16:33 pm by tack50 »

Weird polling for Madrid's regional assembly:

El País/Metroscopia

PP: 36 seats (25,7%) (-12 seats, -7.3%)
Podemos: 35 seats (24,9%) (+8 seats, +6.3%)
Ciudadanos: 31 seats (22.6%)(+14 seats, +10,5%)
PSOE: 27 seats (19.7%) (-10 seats, -5.7%)

PP+Cs still hold a majority, and expanded a bit. Also, there's a sorpasso not just from Podemos, but also from Cs! Huge changes overall, I'm not sure if it's all that reliable.

http://elpais.com/elpais/2017/04/30/media/1493576170_430043.html

La Razón/NC Report

PP: 51 seats (35.9%) (-3 seats, +2.8%)
PSOE: 34 seats (24,6%) (-3 seats, -0.8%)
Podemos: 26 seats (18,1%) (-1 seat, -0.5%)
Cs: 18 seats (13,1%) (+1 seat, +0.9%)

http://www.larazon.es/local/madrid/cifuentes-sube-tres-escanos-tras-la-crisis-de-la-operacion-lezo-FC15063053

PP and Cs also increase their majority slightly.

This one is a lot closer to the national average, and I don't think Madrid will deviate all that much from the national average for a general election. It's not the first place that comes to mind when talking about "dual voting" (the Basque Country is a great example, with PNV winning regional elections and Podemos winning general ones)

In any case I'd say Madrid is lean PP for 2019's regional election, maybe even likely PP (Cifuentes is doing a good job at distancing herself from the recient corruption cases). If PSOE was not able to win in 2015 or in 2003 (the second election) or 2007, it's definitely not winning now, and even with Errejón as Podemos' candidate a Podemos victory is also unlikely.
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tack50
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« Reply #19 on: May 03, 2017, 03:49:18 am »

How are the podemos inspired mayors/local groups holding up in popularity?

Old polls but anyways (keep in mind approval ratings in Spain are usually given as a 1-10 score instead of regual approval/disapproval):

Manuela Carmena, Madrid (March 2016): +6 approval rating
Ada Colau, Barcelona (January 2017): 5,1/10 score
Jose María "Kichi", Cádiz (June 2016): 4,7/10 score

From what I can tell, they are all doing reasonably well for Spanish politicians. Just being above water or at least close to a 5/10 is already an achievement. Rajoy is at a 3/10 for comparison


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tack50
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« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2017, 06:11:38 am »
« Edited: May 04, 2017, 08:09:11 am by tack50 »

Surprise in the PSOE primaries!

Susana Diaz wins the collection of endorsements, but by a smaller margin than expected especially considering she has basically the entire party leadership with her.

She collects 62000, Pedro Sánchez 57000 (beating his 2014 record) and Patxi López 12000 (though he refused to make this step a preliminary primary)

I guess this means the PSOE primary is too close to call?

http://www.elmundo.es/espana/2017/05/04/590aef9fe5fdea4b338b4657.html

For reference you need 5% of the party to endorse you (9500 people). And in 2014 the endorsements were:

Pedro Sánchez: 41000 (ended up with 49% of the final vote)
Eduardo Madina: 25000 (ended up with 36% of the final vote)
Antonio Perez-Tapias: 10000 (ended up with 15% of the final vote)

Edit: Apparently the amount of endorsements this time is equal to 70%! of the total PSOE members (and almost equivalent to the amount of voters in 2014)

So either the primaries will have ridiculously high turnout (90% or more, which considering the circumstances might happen) or the result won't vary much from the endorsements collection.

Only other option for an upset is Patxi López dropping out for some reason, but again isn't likely to happen.
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« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2017, 05:27:12 am »
« Edited: May 09, 2017, 05:30:07 am by tack50 »

I've heard a lot about Macron being similar to Rivera and the Cs - how apt is this comparison? Does Macron's victory in France bode well for Cs in Spain at all?

Yeah, Macron is basically French Albert Rivera/Cs. Both are centrist pro-EU liberals. Cs does have an extra anti corruption platform (at least in theory, depending on who you ask it's not all that enforced, although they did manage to kick out the corrupt governor in Murcia reciently) which I don't think Macron has, and an anti Catalan independence platform (not an issue in French Catalonia/Basque Country).

As for whether Macron's victory will help Cs, I don't know but I'm leaning on no. It definitely won't hurt either though. He seems to be using it as publicity for his liberal platform and being proud of France electing a liberal though, so maybe it will help him slightly?

For all what's worth I don't see any scenario leading to a "Prime Minister Rivera", or even to a Cs governor (Catalonia would be their best bet in a wide anti independence movement, but that seems extremely unlikely)
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« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2017, 04:29:38 am »
« Edited: May 14, 2017, 04:40:00 am by tack50 »

Multiscenario poll by El Mundo-Sigma Dos depending on who wins the PSOE primaries:
Image Link


http://www.elmundo.es/espana/2017/05/14/591750e9468aebac518b4590.html

Interesting to see that it's Pedro Sánchez who would perform the best, getting 2011-like results, back when Podemos/Cs did not exist! instead of Patxi López as common wisdom would have it. Then again 2011 was a terrible result for PSOE. Maybe the 2 party system is coming back? (PSOE+PP easily get more than 55% even with Susana Díaz, while back in 2015 they weren't able to even get 50%)

Generic poll (without mentioning the candidate):

Image Link

Other than PSOE making a comeback (unsurprising considering Podemos' circus) and Cs making small gains (unsurprising considering the "Operación Lezo") the other thing that sticks out to me is PDECat getting half the votes than in 2015! Maybe Catalan nationalism is dying out? (ERC is stable, not rising). Seems weird considering nationalists in the Canary Islands and the Basque Country are getting tons of concessions (though maybe that's the cause as PDECat voters would prefer a deal with Rajoy in exchange for money like back in the days of Aznar?)
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« Reply #23 on: May 15, 2017, 04:51:58 pm »


Former governor of the Basque Country, and I think he is usually well considered (though he lost reelection in 2012, but then again, so did all PSOE governors at the time except in Andalucia and Asturias).

Interestingly he became governor in a PP+PSOE coalition, with the objectives of fighting terrorism and the like (and ETA dissolved under his watch, so mission accomplished there I guess).

As for the position in the party, he used to support Sánchez but has moved on and is running between Sanchez and Diaz. He is considered a good candidate, but without a chance, and since the leadership election is FPTP this has led to the "train crash" (as Lopez puts it) between Diaz supporters and Sanchez supporters.
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Spain


« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2017, 05:16:20 pm »

From what I understood, the PSOE primary debate was...rough to say the least.
Sanchez may not be a politically genius, but Susana Diaz makes it soooo easy to hate her.
From what I can discern, Susana Diaz is everything people hate about Hillary Clinton multiplied by 100.

Yeah, I've often seen stuff like "Susana Diaz seems to want to become Spanish Hillary. Didn't she learn anything?".

Also, her region has been in quite a bad shape under her tenure as governor. Then again it's Andalucía, no one expects it to be in good shape but still. Her branch of the party is also the most corrupt PSOE branch by far (at the rates of PP in Madrid or Valencia). Her 2 predecessors are being judged for corruption.

The more I think about it, the more the PSOE primary reminds me of the US Democratic primary, with Diaz=Hillary, Sanchez=Sanders and Lopez=The minor candidates (O Malley?). Then again there are also huge differences (while Sanchez is running as an anti-establishment candidate like Sanders, he was part of the establishment. Also all Americans were able to vote in the Democratic primary while only around 200k PSOE members can vote in this one. And Patxi Lopez has a lot more traction than O Malley and the like ever got)
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