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  Political Geography & Demographics (Moderator: muon2)
  "Language other than English spoken at home"
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ElectionsGuy
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« on: April 16, 2015, 05:37:09 pm »





I decided to do a map very similar to Retromike's on Hispanic population, except its language other than English that is spoken at home (many of these people can speak 2 or more languages) by county. Its in 30%, 50% and 70% incriments with light blue being 30-49.9%, dark blue being 50-69.9%, and purple being 70% or more. These numbers are straight from the census bureau

Disclaimer: I did not actually check every county, but I did check many. Basically I did check every county in the west, but once I got to the south and midwest I only checked a few (urban and higher than 20% minority counties) I made assumptions based on the following things:

urban/population dense centers
% Hispanic, Asian, Native American
Proximity to borders

If I missed a county, let me know.

What I noticed:

Rural Hispanic heavy counties (like those in Texas and Kansas) are more likely to speak another language (Spanish) at home than urban Hispanics and suburban Hispanics. These are likely counties full of jobs that black and whites are less likely to do, so they immigrate to those areas in search for work. They are more likely to be first generation immigrants than say, those near the Mexican border.

In general, this demographic correlates well with Hispanic and Asian population (which is why I did it the same way Retromike did it). Though in other instances other ethnicity and groups that are white need to be considered (French in Cajun country, Amish in Indiana/Ohio).

Native Americans in the Plains speak mainly English, in Arizona/New Mexico they speak other languages.
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memphis
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2015, 06:32:01 pm »

I'd be interested to see the percents in various places over time. Somewhere like NYC has been filled with non English speakers forever. Other places, like rural Minnesota, are much more English speaking than 100 years ago. Still other places, Metro Houston, for instance will have many more languages spoken today than in the past.
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Indy Texas
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2015, 08:09:43 pm »

I'd be interested to see the percents in various places over time. Somewhere like NYC has been filled with non English speakers forever. Other places, like rural Minnesota, are much more English speaking than 100 years ago. Still other places, Metro Houston, for instance will have many more languages spoken today than in the past.

German died a very quick, silent death in America in the early 20th century after decades of being fairly commonplace in the rural Midwest.
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Ebsy
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« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2015, 11:15:35 pm »

Bilingualism in the Midwest was strangled to death by public (and probably parochial) school teachers who would hit children for speaking any tongue other than English.
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