Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 12, 2019, 10:08:35 pm
News: 2020 Gubernatorial Predictions are now active.

  Atlas Forum
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  Election What-ifs? (Moderators: Kutasoff Hedzoff, Apocrypha)
  Post random maps here (search mode)
Pages: 1 [2] Print
Author Topic: Post random maps here  (Read 846510 times)
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #25 on: August 08, 2014, 12:48:29 pm »

Charting A Different Course

1936



President Franklin Roosevelt of New York and Vice President John Garner of Texas (Democratic Party): 500
Governor Floyd Olson of Minnesota and Senator Robert La Follette, Jr. of Wisconsin (American Labor Party): 23
Governor Alf Landon of Kansas and Frank Knox of Illinois (Republican Party): 8

1940



President Franklin Roosevelt of New York and House Speaker William Bankhead of Alabama (Democratic Party): 379
New York City Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia of New York and Congressman Francis Shoemaker of Minnesota (American Labor Party): 81
Wendell Willkie of Indiana and Senator Charles McNary of Oregon (Republican Party): 71

1944



President Franklin Roosevelt of New York and Director of the Office of War Mobilization James Byrnes of South Carolina (Democratic Party): 355
Governor Charles Poletti of New York and Governor Elmer Benson of Minnesota (American Labor Party): 99
General Douglas MacArthur of New York and Governor John Bricker of Ohio (Republican Party): 77

1948



President James Byrnes of South Carolina and Senator Alben Barkley of Kentucky (Democratic Party): 228
Henry Wallace of Iowa and Senator Glen Taylor of Idaho (American Labor Party): 188
Governor Thomas Dewey of New York and Governor Earl Warren of California (Republican Party): 115

Election thrown to the House of Representatives, which re-elects incumbent President Byrnes.

1952



General Dwight Eisenhower of New York and Senator John Sparkman of Alabama (Democratic Party): 441*
Governor Maurice Tobin of Massachusetts and Senator James Murray of Montana (American Labor Party): 90

1956



President Dwight Eisenhower of New York and Vice President John Sparkman of Alabama (Democratic Party): 457
Governor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. of New York and Senator Walter A. O'Brien, Jr. of Massachusetts (American Labor Party): 74

1960



Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Senator Richard M. Nixon of California (Democratic Party): 225
Senator Mike Mansfield of Montana and Senator Paul Douglas of Illinois (American Labor Party): 312

1964



President Paul Douglas of Illinois and Senator Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota (American Labor Party): 486
Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona and Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota (Democratic Party): 52

1968



Richard Nixon of California and Governor George Wallace of Alabama (Democratic Party): 303
Vice President Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota and Senator Abraham Ribicoff of Connecticut (American Labor Party): 192
Governor Patrick Lucey of Wisconsin and Senator Mark Hatfield of Oregon (Peace and Prosperity Party): 43
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2014, 01:42:55 pm »

1972



President Richard Nixon of California and Vice President George Wallace of Alabama (Democratic Party): 517
Senator George McGovern of South Dakota and Senator Mike Gravel of Alaska (American Labor Party): 17

1976



Governor Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia and Senator Frank Church of Idaho (American Labor Party): 297
President George Wallace of Alabama and Senator Bob Dole of Kansas (Democratic Party): 237

1980



Ronald Reagan of California and Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas (Democratic Party): 490
President Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia and Vice President Frank Church of Idaho (American Labor Party): 48

1984



President Lloyd Bentsen of Texas and Vice President George Bush of Connecticut (Democratic Party): 525
Frank Church of Idaho and Senator Walter Mondale of Minnesota (American Labor Party): 13

1988



Vice President George Bush of Texas and Senator Al Gore of Tennessee (Democratic Party): 426
Governor William A. O'Neill of Connecticut and Senator Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico (American Labor Party): 112

1992



Governor Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts and Jesse Jackson of South Carolina (American Labor Party): 371
President George Bush of Connecticut and Vice President Al Gore of Tennessee (Democratic Party): 167

1996



President Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts and Vice President Jesse Jackson of South Carolina (American Labor Party): 379
Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas and Congressman Jack Kemp of New York (Democratic Party): 159

2000



Al Gore of Tennessee and Senator Jack Danforth of Missouri (Democratic Party): 271
Vice President Jesse Jackson of South Carolina and Governor Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire (American Labor Party): 267

2004



President Jack Danforth of Missouri and Vice President John Edwards of North Carolina (Democratic Party): 286
Governor Howard Dean of Vermont and Governor Chris Gregoire of Washington (American Labor Party): 252

2008



Senator John McCain of Arizona and Senator Joe Biden of Delaware (Democratic Party): 172
Senator Barack Obama of Illinois and Governor Bill Richardson of New Mexico (American Labor Party): 366

2012



President Barack Obama of Illinois and Vice President Bill Richardson of Nex Mexico (American Labor Party): 337
Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York and Congressman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin (Democratic Party): 201
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2014, 01:32:49 pm »

Modified Political Decapitation

The candidates that finished first and second in a state are removed in this series. In the event that only two candidates are on the ballot, only the first place finisher is removed. Some of the candidates and party names have been modified to make this make a bit more sense.

1840



James G. Birney (Liberty): 144
Martin Van Buren (Democratic): 102
William H. Harrison (Whig)Sad 48

No electoral majority. House of Representatives votes to re-elect President Van Buren.

1844



James G. Birney (Liberty): 175
Henry Clay (Whig): 67
James K. Polk (Democratic): 33

1848



James G. Birney (Liberty): 200
Zachary Taylor (Whig): 46
Lewis Cass (Democratic): 44

1852



John Parker Hale (Liberty): 228
Winfield Scott (Whig): 56
Franklin Pierce (Democratic): 12

1856



Millard Fillmore (American/Whig): 281
John C. Fremont (Liberty): 15
James Buchanan (Democratic): 0

1860



Stephen Douglas (People's): 238
John Bell (Constitutional Union): 55
Abraham Lincoln (Liberty): 10

Presidents of the United States
8. Martin Van Buren (Democratic): March 4, 1837 - March 4, 1845
9. James G. Birney (Liberty): March 4, 1845 - March 4, 1853
10. John P. Hale (Liberty): March 4, 1853 - March 4, 1857
11. Millard Fillmore (Whig/American): March 4, 1857 - March 4, 1861
12. Stephen Douglas (People's): March 4, 1861 - June 3, 1861*
13. John Breckinridge (People's): June 3, 1861 -

*Died in office.
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2014, 02:03:47 pm »

1864



George B. McClellan (Democratic): 197
Abraham Lincoln (National Union): 21*
John C. Fremont (Liberty)Sad 15

*Merger of conservative elements of the Liberty Party with the Constitutional Union Party (which was, itself, a merger of the Whig and American parties in 1860).

1868



George B. McClellan (Democratic): 186
Ulysses S. Grant (Unionist): 80
Various candidates (Liberty): 28

1872



Charles O'Conor (People's (Reform)/Liberty): 227
Horace Greeley (People's): 94
Ulysses Grant (Unionist): 31

1876



Peter Cooper (Liberal): 248
Charles O'Conor (Reform): 71
Samuel Tilden (People's): 50

1876 saw a general political realignment that virtually swept away the previous party alignment of the country. After decades of instability in the ranks, the Liberty Party finally collapsed, with its remaining conservative elements merging with the reform faction of the People's Party and the Unionists to form the new Reform Party. The remnants of the Liberty Party merged with political radicals in the Greenback movement, as well as left-leaning members of both the People's and Unionist parties to form the Liberal Party, a new party committed to justice for the farmer and the petty producer.

1880



James B. Weaver (Liberal): 332
James A. Garfield (Reform/People's): 37
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2015, 10:40:56 am »

2016



Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York and Sherrod Brown of Ohio (Democratic Party)
Jeb Bush of Florida and Scott Brown of New Hampshire (Republican Party)

2020



President Jeb Bush of Florida and Vice President Scott Brown of New Hampshire (Republican Party)
Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tom Perriello of Virginia (Democratic Party)

2024



President Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Vice President Tom Perriello of Virginia (Democratic Party)
Rand Paul of Kentucky and Mia Love of Utah (Republican Party)
Raymond Cooke of Alabama and Beth Fort of Massachusetts (Tea Party)*

2028



Vice President Tom Perriello of Virginia and Cory Booker of New Jersey (Democratic Party)
Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania and Brian Calley of Michigan (Republican Party)

2032



President Tom Perriello of Virginia and Vice President Cory Booker of New Jersey (Democratic Party)
Victoria Pope of Missouri and Tony Castellano of Oregon (Republican Party)*

2036



Victoria Pope of Missouri and Tony Castellano of Oregon (Republican Party)*
Carrie Henderson of New Jersey and Harold Phillips of Minnesota (Democratic Party)*
Fred Hammond of Oklahoma and Joanne Parker of Missouri (Progressive Party)*

2040



Vice President Tony Castellano of Oregon and Jess Messer of South Carolina (Republican Party)*
Bill Anderson of Tennessee and Vanessa Capps of Connecticut (Democratic Party)*
Vincent Steele of New Jersey and Brenda Gold of Kentucky (We the People)*

2044



President Bill Anderson of Tennessee and Vice President Vanessa Capps of Connecticut (Democratic Party)*
Ken Jones of Virginia and Jim McCall of Tennessee (Republican Party)*
Izalea Ford of Georgia and Russ Gardner of Texas (We the People)*

2048



President Ken Jones of Virginia and Vice President Jim McCall of Tennessee (Republican Party)*
Ilene Viveros of Pennsylvania and Daniel Pearson of Oklahoma (Workers Party)*
Bill Anderson of Tennessee and Anthony Granger of Washington (Progressive Party/Democratic Party)*

2052



Vice President Jim McCall of Tennessee and Joe Holliday of Alaska (Republican Party)*
Kim Weber of Michigan and Michael Workman of New York (Workers')*
Elsie Rogers of New York and Tiffany Tong of California (Progressive Alliance)*
Sandy Lambert of California and Richard Gilchrist of Idaho (Life, Liberty, and Property)*

*Fictional person
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2015, 12:50:18 am »

1948



President James Byrnes of South Carolina and Governor Fielding L. Wright of Mississippi (States' Rights Democratic): 104
General Dwight Eisenhower of New York and Senator Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky (Democratic): 271
Governor Thomas Dewey of New York and Governor Earl Warren of California (Republican): 156

1952



President Dwight Eisenhower of New York and Vice President Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky (Democratic): 460
Senator Bob Taft of Ohio and Senator Richard M. Nixon of California (Republican): 0
Senator Richard Russell of Georgia and Senator John Sparkman of Alabama (States' Rights Democratic): 71

1956



Adlai Stevenson of Illinois and Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts (Democratic): 286
Harold Stassen of Minnesota and Governor Christian Herter of Massachusetts (Republican): 139
Happy Chandler of Kentucky and Luther Hodges of North Carolina (States' Rights): 106

1960



President Adlai Stevenson of Illinois and Vice President John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts (Democratic): 246
Senator Richard Nixon of California and Senator Henry Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts (Republican): 220
Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas and Rear Admiral John G. Crommelin of Alabama (States' Rights): 71

No electoral college majority. House and Senate re-elect the incumbents.

1964



President John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Governor George Wallace of Alabama (Democratic): 533
Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona and Congressman William Miller of New York (Republican): 5
Clifton DeBerry of Illinois and Ed Shaw of Michigan (Socialist Workers): 0

1968



Vice President George Wallace of Alabama and Senator Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota (Democratic): 376
Governor Richard Nixon of California and Governor Spiro Agnew of Maryland (Republican): 162
Dick Gregory and Mark Lane (Peace and Freedom): 0

1972



President George Wallace of Alabama and Vice President Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota (Democratic): 538
Governor Ronald Reagan of California and Congressman John Ashbrook of Ohio (Republican): 0
Senator George McGovern of South Dakota and Congressman Pete McCloskey of California (Peace and Freedom): 0

1976



Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy of New York and Governor Jimmy Carter of Georgia (Democratic): 127
Senator George H.W. Bush of Texas and Senator Bob Dole of Kansas (Republican): 278
Brigadier General Hugh Hester of North Carolina and Staughton Lynd of Ohio (Labor): 133

1980



President George H.W. Bush of Texas and Vice President Bob Dole of Kansas (Republican): 0
Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union Vice President Tony Mazzocchi of Oklahoma and Matilde Zimmermann of New York (Labor): 514
Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts and Governor Cliff Finch of Mississippi (Democratic): 24
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2015, 05:05:08 pm »

America with a Labor Party



Shading indicates the degree to which public opinion in the state indicated supports either the Labor or the Republican party.
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #32 on: February 04, 2015, 08:14:11 am »

Continuing on from my previous post, this is (roughly) the level of support among voters at the state level for the Labor Party. Percentages are a bit off here because some states (the ones marked at >30%) are in fact states where the Labor Party only gets >20%, and so on and so forth. So assume the shading indicates 10% less support than the state actually gives to the LP.

Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #33 on: February 21, 2015, 06:08:50 pm »

1840



Martin Van Buren (Democratic): 53
William Henry Harrison (Whig): 168
James G. Birney (Liberty)Sad 73

1844



Henry Clay (Whig): 87
James G. Birney (Liberty): 38
James K. Polk (Democratic): 150

1848



Lewis Cass (Democratic): 118
Zachary Taylor (Whig): 109
Gerrit Smith (Liberty): 36
Martin Van Buren (Free Soil): 27

The House elects Cass president by a single vote over Taylor, who ends up with the combined backing of the (most of the) Free Soil party and the American party in that chamber. The Democratic Party controlled Senate easily confirms William O. Butler for the position of Vice President.

1852



Franklin Pierce (Democratic): 236
Winfield Scott (Whig): 24
William Goodell (Liberty): 0
John Parker Hale (Free Soil): 36

1856



James Buchanan (Democratic): 135
John C. Fremont (Republican): 114
George Law (American / Whig): 47

The Democratic Party controlled House of Representatives elects James Buchanan as President. Likewise, the Senate votes for John C. Breckinridge to take up the office of Vice Resident.

1860



Stephen Douglas (Democratic:) 16
Abraham Lincoln (Republican): 176
John Bell (Constitutional Union): 57
John C. Breckinridge (Southern Democrat): 54

8. Martin Van Buren (Democratic-NY) 1837-41
9. William H. Harrison (Whig-OH) 1841
10. John Tyler (Whig, then Independent-VA) 1841-45
11. James K. Polk (Democratic-TN) 1845-49
12. Lewis Cass (Democratic-MI) 1849-53
13. Franklin Pierce (Democratic-NH) 1853-57
14. James Buchanan (Democratic-PA) 1857-61
15. Abraham Lincoln (Republican-IL) 1861-

9. Richard M. Johnson (Democratic-KY) 1837-41
10. John Tyler (Whig-VA) 1841
11. George M. Dallas (Democratic-PA) 1845-49
12. William O. Butler (Democratic-KY) 1849-53
13. William R. King (Democratic-AL) 1853
14. John C. Breckinridge (Democratic-KY) 1857-61
15. Hannibal Hamlin (Republican-ME) 1861-
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #34 on: February 21, 2015, 07:39:40 pm »

1864



Abraham Lincoln (National Union): 192
George B. McClellan (Democratic): 21
John C. Fremont (Radical Democrat): 20

1868



Ulysses S. Grant (Republican-IL): 190
Horatio Seymour (Democratic-NY): 80
Benjamin Wade (Radical Democrat-OH): 24

1872



Ulysses S. Grant (Republican-IL): 257
Horace Greeley (Liberal Republican / Democratic-NY): 66
Thaddeus Stephens (Radical Democrat-PA): 29

1876



Rutherford B. Hayes (Republican-OH): 137
Samuel J. Tilden (Liberal-NY): 169
Peter Cooper (Radical Democrat-NY): 63

The Liberal Party controlled House of Representatives elects Tilden, while the Republican-controlled Senate elects William Wheeler as Vice President.

1880



Samuel J. Tilden (Liberal-NY): 133
Ulysses S. Grant (Republican-IL): 186
James B. Weaver (Radical Democrat-IA): 50

1884



James G. Blaine (Republican-ME): 145
Grover Cleveland (Liberal-NY): 219
Benjamin Butler (Radical Democrat-MA): 37

1888



Grover Cleveland (Liberal-NY): 132
Benjamin Harrison (Republican-IN): 220
Alson Streeter (Radical Democrat-IL): 49

1892



Benjamin Harrison (Republican-IN): 103
Grover Cleveland (Liberal-NY): 219
James B. Weaver (Radical Democrat-IA): 23
Simon Wing (Socialist Labor-MA): 99

The Liberal controlled House elects Cleveland president. Radical Democrats in the Senate swing their support to Adlai Stevenson for Vice President.

1896



John M. Palmer (Liberal-IL): 129
William McKinley (Republican-OH): 217
Charles Matchett (Socialist Labor-NY): 56
Thomas Watson (Radical Democrat-GA): 45

The Republican-controlled House elects McKinley president. In the Senate, a deal brokered between the Radical Democrats and the Liberals results in the election of Simon Bolivar Buckner, a former Confederate general and member of the Liberal Party from Kentucky, as Vice President.

15. Abraham Lincoln (Republican, then National Union-IL) 1861-65
16. Andrew Johnson (National Union, then Independent-TN) 1865-68
17. Benjamin Wade (Radical Democrat-OH) 1868-69
18. Ulysses S. Grant (Republican-IL) 1869-77
19. Samuel J. Tilden (Liberal-NY) 1877-81
20. Ulysses S. Grant (Republican-IL) 1881
21. Chester A. Arthur (Republican-NY) 1881-85
22. Grover Cleveland (Liberal-NY) 1885-89
23. Benjamin Harrison (Republican-IN) 1889-93
24. Grover Cleveland (Liberal-NY) 1893-97
25. William McKinley (Republican-OH) 1897-

15. Hannibal Hamlin (Republican-ME) 1861-65
16. Andrew Johnson (National Union-TN) 1865
17. Schuyler Colfax (Republican-IN) 1869-73
18. Henry Wilson (Republican-MA) 1873-75
19. William A. Wheeler (Republican-NY) 1877-81
20. Chester A. Arthur (Republican-NY) 1881
21. Thomas A. Hendricks (Liberal-IN) 1885
22. Levi P. Morton (Republican-NY) 1889-93
23. Adlai Stevenson (Liberal-IL) 1893-97
24. Simon B. Buckner (Liberal-KY) 1897-
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2015, 09:07:36 pm »

1900



William McKinley (Republican-OH): 208
Augustus Van Wyck (Liberal-NY): 90
Eugene Debs (Socialist Labor-IN): 84
Wharton Barker (Radical Democrat-PA): 65

The House and Senate, both controlled by the Republicans, vote for McKinley and Roosevelt for President and Vice President, respectively. Following this, the third election in a row in which the House ultimately chose the winner, the electoral college was abolished via constitutional amendment. Henceforth, presidential elections would be determined by popular vote, with a runoff if no candidate received a majority of the popular vote.

1904



Theodore Roosevelt (Republican-NY): 50.2%
Alton Palmer (Liberal-NY): 18.1%
Eugene Debs (Socialist Labor-IN): 20.2%
Thomas Watson (Radical Democrat-GA): 11.6%

1908



William H. Taft (Republican-OH): 53.0%
William D. Haywood (Socialist Labor-UT): 16.8%
George Gray (Liberal-DE): 17.6%
Thomas Watson (Radical Democrat-GA): 12.6%

1912



William H. Taft (Republican-OH): 0.8%
Judson Harmon (Liberal-OH): 64.2%
Eugene Debs (Socialist Labor / Radical Democrat-IN): 18.3%
Theodore Roosevelt (Progressive-NY): 16.8%

1916

Round One



Judson Harmon (Liberal-OH): 36.3%
John W. Weeks (Progressive / Republican-MA): 40.5%
Allan Benson (Social Democratic-NY): 23.2%

Round Two



Judson Harmon (Liberal-OH): 52.0%
John W. Weeks (Progressive / Republican-MA): 48.0%

1920



James Cox (Liberal-OH): 23.9%
Leonard Wood (Progressive Republican-NH): 55.6%
Parley P. Christensen (Social Democratic-UT): 19.2%
Eugene V. Debs (Workers-IN): 1.3%

1924

Round One



Leonard Wood (Progressive Republican-NH): 49.7%
John Davis (Liberal-WV): 25.6%
Robert La Follette (Social Democratic-WI): 23.4%
William Z. Foster (Workers-IL): 1.3%

Round Two



Leonard Wood (Progressive Republican-NH): 74.4%
John Davis (Liberal-WV): 25.6%

1928



Herbert Hoover (Progressive Republican-IA): 65.7%
Al Smith (Liberal-NY): 12.1%
Norman Thomas (Social Democratic-NY): 18.6%
William Z. Foster (Workers'-IL): 3.6%

1932

Round One



Herbert Hoover (Progressive Republican-IA): 9.6%
Norman Thomas (Social Democratic-NY): 39.0%
Al Smith (Liberal-NY): 44.3%
William Z. Foster (Workers-IL): 7.0%

Round Two



Norman Thomas (Social Democratic-NY): 52.9%
Al Smith (Liberal-NY): 47.1%

25. William McKinley (Republican-OH) 1897-1901
26. Theodore Roosevelt (Republican-NY) 1901-09
27. William H. Taft (Republican-OH) 1909-13
28. Judson Harmon (Liberal-OH) 1913-1921
29. Leonard Wood (Progressive Republican-NH) 1921-27
30. Herbert Hoover (Progressive Republican-IA) 1927-33
31. Norman Thomas (Social Democratic-NY) 1933-

24. Simon B. Buckner (Liberal-KY) 1897-1901
25. Theodore Roosevelt (Republican-NY) 1901
26. Charles W. Fairbanks (Republican-IN) 1905-09
27. James S. Sherman (Republican-NY) 1909-12
28. Eugene N. Foss (Liberal-MA) 1913-1921
29. Herbert Hoover (Progressive Republcan-IA) 1921-27
30. Charles Curtis (Progressive Republican-KS) 1929-33
31. James H. Maurer (Social Democratic-PA) 1933-
Logged
TNF
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 13,469


« Reply #36 on: July 12, 2015, 10:46:09 pm »

1864



Abraham Lincoln of Illinois and Andrew Johnson of Tennessee (National Union): 44% of the popular vote / 48 electoral votes
George McClellan of New Jersey and George Pendleton of Ohio (Democratic): 55% of the popular vote / 185 electoral votes

1868



Horatio Seymour of New York and Francis Blair, Jr. of Missouri (Democratic): 52% of the popular vote / 124 electoral votes
Ulysses S. Grant of Illinois and Schuyler Colfax of Indiana (Republican): 47% of the popular vote / 97 electoral votes

1872



Samuel J. Tilden of New York and Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana (Democratic): 55% of the popular vote / 166 electoral votes
Rutherford B. Hayes of Ohio and Henry Wilson of Massachusetts (Republican): 43% of the popular vote / 88 electoral votes

1876



Winfield S. Hancock of Pennsylvania and William H. English of Indiana (Democratic): 47% of the popular vote / 26 electoral votes
James A. Garfield of Ohio and William Wheeler of New York (Republican): 50% of the popular vote / 231 electoral votes

1880



James A. Garfield of Ohio and Chester A. Arthur of New York (Republican): 48% of the popular vote / 169 electoral votes
Grover Cleveland of New York and Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana (Democratic): 48% of the popular vote / 88 electoral votes
James Weaver of Iowa and Frank Fogg of Maine (Greenback): 3% of the popular vote / 0 electoral votes

1884



James G. Blaine of Maine and John A. Logan of Illinois (Republican): 48% of the popular vote / 218 electoral votes
Grover Cleveland of New York and Allen G. Thurman of Ohio (Democratic): 48% of the popular vote / 57 electoral votes
Benjamin Butler of Massachusetts and Jesse Harper of Illinois (Greenback): 1% of the popular vote / 0 electoral votes

1888



James G. Blaine of Maine and Levi P. Morton of New York (Republican): 48% of the popular vote / 239 electoral votes
Grover Cleveland of New York and Adlai Stevenson of Illinois (Democratic): 47% of the popular vote / 36 electoral votes

1892



Benjamin Harrison of Indiana and Whitelaw Reid of New York (Republican): 46% of the popular vote / 265 electoral votes
John M. Palmer of Illinois and Arthur Sewall of Maine (Democratic): 43% of the popular vote / 25 electoral votes
James B. Weaver of Iowa and James H. Kyle of South Dakota (People's): 8% of the popular vote / 23 electoral votes
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] Print 
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC