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| | |-+  Which of the Nordic countries is most conservative?
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Question: ?
Denmark   -6 (12.2%)
Finland   -24 (49%)
Iceland   -13 (26.5%)
Norway   -5 (10.2%)
Sweden   -1 (2%)
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Total Voters: 49

Author Topic: Which of the Nordic countries is most conservative?  (Read 2611 times)
TDAS04
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« Reply #25 on: September 06, 2015, 11:54:00 am »
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To clarify, I did mean which is most conservative in the way Americans define the term.  Pro-business economics, traditionalist social beliefs, emphasis on culturally conformity, maybe a tough "law-and-order" mentality, etc.  Maybe that's vague, but I did mean a combination of all of those.  That may be complicated, but it should make the question more debatable.

The problem is that while that combination is not meaningless outside USA, it's neither very meaningful, especially not as a short hand for conservatism. As example all Nordic countries value cultural conformity (Sweden most of all ironic), all of them are rather pro-business (but real pro-business, not Republican faux pro-business), traditionalist belief depend a lot on how you define them. Of course law and order as in long prison sentence we're all softies, while the Nordic states are very jealous about anybody threaten their monopoly of force.

I see your point.  I should have clarified that I meant something like the Republican version "of pro-business".  Yes, Scandinavia is pro-business, regardless of what American conservatives say.

Could it be said that Scandinavia shares some of the same conservatism (or whatever you call it) found in places such as Vermont and Minnesota (the latter of which has much Scandinavian influence)?  People in such places tend to be conservative in many personal aspects (they actually conserve money and resources, like simple design and fashion, make use of space, are not exuberant with their wealth, etc.), yet they may be more socially liberal and tolerant when it comes to others' private lives.
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politicus
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« Reply #26 on: September 06, 2015, 11:59:48 am »
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To clarify, I did mean which is most conservative in the way Americans define the term.  Pro-business economics, traditionalist social beliefs, emphasis on culturally conformity, maybe a tough "law-and-order" mentality, etc.  Maybe that's vague, but I did mean a combination of all of those.  That may be complicated, but it should make the question more debatable.

The problem is that while that combination is not meaningless outside USA, it's neither very meaningful, especially not as a short hand for conservatism. As example all Nordic countries value cultural conformity (Sweden most of all ironic), all of them are rather pro-business (but real pro-business, not Republican faux pro-business), traditionalist belief depend a lot on how you define them. Of course law and order as in long prison sentence we're all softies, while the Nordic states are very jealous about anybody threaten their monopoly of force.

I see your point.  I should have clarified that I meant something like the Republican version "of pro-business".  Yes, Scandinavia is pro-business, regardless of what American conservatives say.

Could it be said that Scandinavia shares some of the same conservatism (or whatever you call it) found in places such as Vermont and Minnesota (the latter of which has much Scandinavian influence)?  People in such places tend to be conservative in many personal aspects (they actually conserve money and resources, like simple design and fashion, make use of space, are not exuberant with their wealth, etc.), yet they may be more socially liberal and tolerant when it comes to others' private lives.

That would at least fit a lot of traditional bourgeois families. People with old money are quite often very low key in Scandinavia (probably most extreme in Norway).
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DavidB.
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« Reply #27 on: September 06, 2015, 12:01:04 pm »
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rather pro-business (but real pro-business, not Republican faux pro-business)
How would you define the difference?
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« Reply #28 on: September 06, 2015, 12:17:05 pm »
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Republican policies are not really pro-business, just pro-businesses that give them lots of support and donations. I would definitely argue that effectively banning Tesla from setting up marketplaces and dealerships in a state, a policy that has been implemented only by Republican state legislatures and officials, is not a "pro-business" position.
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ingemann
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« Reply #29 on: September 06, 2015, 01:00:00 pm »
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rather pro-business (but real pro-business, not Republican faux pro-business)
How would you define the difference?

BRTD is correct, the Republicans are like the Democrats a special interest party, and the supporter often use Republicans (or sometimes the Democrats) to sabotage their competition. In Scandinavia we don't see that to any degree, there's more a idea of a rising tide raise all boats, so the many of the different companies have organised themselves to collective (in Denmark in DA and DI) negotiate with the unions and get the politicians to push policies which are good for them all. On the other side many of the unions which are also organised in a unified organisation (in Denmark in LO) also have interest in high employment, so they also push policies, which increase growth. Sometimes they even agree to push the same policies.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2015, 01:02:26 pm by ingemann »Logged
Lechasseur
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« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2017, 04:52:54 pm »
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1. Finland
2. Denmark
3. Norway
4. Iceland
5. Sweden
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mileslunn
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« Reply #31 on: August 12, 2017, 11:10:00 pm »
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Fiscally I would say Iceland, while socially I would say Finland.  Iceland until 2009 had a flat tax and still has a fairly low top marginal rate compared to most Nordic Countries (it is 46.4% while Sweden is 57%) as well as on the nationalization front they probably have the lowest levels of state ownership mind you all of them are market economies with only a few essential industries like railways, post office etc. still being under government ownership.  On the welfare state I think they are also slightly less generous than the other Nordic Countries.  I would put Sweden as the least conservative of them.  In terms of parties that gets tougher as you have multiple parties and the spectrum is not quite is neat as say in much of the English speaking world where you have a more two party system thus making it easier to make comparisons.  Also whether labeling a party on the right or left depends on from which perspective.  I can see from the perspective of the English speaking world parties such as the Progressive Party in Iceland, Liberal Party of Norway, Liberal People's Party in Sweden, Centre Party of Sweden, and Centre Party of Finland are not right wing parties at all.  Maybe in the Nordic Countries they consider them on the right but I would place those parties similar to the US Democrats, the Liberal Democrats in the UK, and Liberal Party of Canada on the political spectrum.  Even the supposed right wing ones like Independence Party of Iceland, Conservative Party of Norway, Moderate Party of Sweden, Conservative People's Party of Denmark, Venestre of Denmark, National Rally of Finland are more centre-right in the mold of the CDU/CSU of Germany as opposed to the Conservative parties in the English speaking world.  Sweden Democrats and Finns Party seem more like Marine Le Pen in France as it right wing socially but left wing fiscally as opposed to the GOP. 
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