Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
April 24, 2019, 09:31:40 am
News: Please delete your old personal messages.

  Atlas Forum
  General Politics
  International General Discussion (Moderators: Gustaf, afleitch, Hash, Keyboard Jacobinism)
  Canada General Discussion: Trudeau II
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 66 67 68 69 70 [71] 72 73 Print
Poll
Question: Does uniting the right in Alberta mean the NDP is toast next election?
#1Absolutely they are done like dinner  
#2NDP still might win, but will be a steep hill to climb  
#3NDP will likely win, UCP too extreme  
#4NDP will definitely win  
Show Pie Chart
Partisan results

Total Voters: 30

Author Topic: Canada General Discussion: Trudeau II  (Read 148553 times)
RogueBeaver
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 19,530
Canada


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1750 on: January 10, 2019, 10:06:38 am »

Brison resigning from Cabinet and will retire from politics in October to spend more time with his family.
Logged
DC Al Fine
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 12,546
Canada


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1751 on: January 10, 2019, 11:39:00 am »

Kings-Hants might be a dark horse candidate for most surprising Tory pickup this fall.
Logged
RogueBeaver
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 19,530
Canada


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1752 on: January 11, 2019, 09:56:19 am »

Logged
PSOL
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,416


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1753 on: January 11, 2019, 02:26:38 pm »

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jan/11/canada-pipeline-indigenous-trudeau-treaty
Quote
Justin Trudeau was in campaign mode this week, striding around a school gymnasium, shirtsleeves rolled up and brow suitably furrowed as he addressed voters’ concerns at one of his annual town hall-style meetings.

A day earlier and nearly 800km away, another face of the federal government was on display as dozens of police – some heavily armed – stormed a makeshift barricade, arresting 14 indigenous protesters and prompting others to flee for safety on snowmobiles.

The protesters in northern British Columbia had camped out for days amid bitter cold and deep snow, manning a checkpoint to prevent construction vehicles from entering the territory of the Wet’suwet’en nation.

Their demonstrations, part of a fight against a multibillion-dollar natural gas pipeline, galvanized supporters across the country, and at his town hall meeting, the prime minister was forced to contend with a barrage of angry questions.
So what has been the reaction to this by the parties? Will this impact elections in B.C. Or nationally in 2019?
Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1754 on: January 11, 2019, 03:45:47 pm »

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jan/11/canada-pipeline-indigenous-trudeau-treaty
Quote
Justin Trudeau was in campaign mode this week, striding around a school gymnasium, shirtsleeves rolled up and brow suitably furrowed as he addressed voters’ concerns at one of his annual town hall-style meetings.

A day earlier and nearly 800km away, another face of the federal government was on display as dozens of police – some heavily armed – stormed a makeshift barricade, arresting 14 indigenous protesters and prompting others to flee for safety on snowmobiles.

The protesters in northern British Columbia had camped out for days amid bitter cold and deep snow, manning a checkpoint to prevent construction vehicles from entering the territory of the Wet’suwet’en nation.

Their demonstrations, part of a fight against a multibillion-dollar natural gas pipeline, galvanized supporters across the country, and at his town hall meeting, the prime minister was forced to contend with a barrage of angry questions.
So what has been the reaction to this by the parties? Will this impact elections in B.C. Or nationally in 2019?

With the exception of the Greens, all of the parties are a party to this (sorry.)  I suppose even the Greens in B.C could be seen as supporting this if they don't pull out of their agreement with the NDP.

Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.
Logged
DC Al Fine
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 12,546
Canada


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1755 on: January 14, 2019, 03:36:07 pm »

Cabinet shuffle, probably the last one before the election: David Lametti joins cabinet as Justice Minister. Wilson-Raybould to Veterans Affairs. Seamus O'Regan to Indigenous Services, Jane Philpott to Treasury replacing Scott Brison.

The government also made a new Minstry of Economic Development for Bernadette Jordan, who will be the NS cabinet minister now that Brison is gone.
Logged
RogueBeaver
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 19,530
Canada


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1756 on: January 26, 2019, 02:57:33 pm »

Logged
RogueBeaver
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 19,530
Canada


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1757 on: January 27, 2019, 07:13:40 pm »

Logged
Old School Republican
Computer89
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 15,905


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1758 on: January 29, 2019, 02:51:03 am »

Harper goes on Prager U : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFWE2jl5mwA&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2vlhsyxA3UGJJrG15E4f88L8CscC3QVIkDwywoM7Yz35uVQUchPPZFz0s
Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1759 on: January 29, 2019, 02:57:48 am »

Harper goes on Prager U : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFWE2jl5mwA&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2vlhsyxA3UGJJrG15E4f88L8CscC3QVIkDwywoM7Yz35uVQUchPPZFz0s

With most videos from Prager 'U', you end up knowing less facts than before you saw the video.
Logged
Old School Republican
Computer89
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 15,905


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1760 on: January 29, 2019, 02:59:26 am »

Harper goes on Prager U : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFWE2jl5mwA&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2vlhsyxA3UGJJrG15E4f88L8CscC3QVIkDwywoM7Yz35uVQUchPPZFz0s

With most videos from Prager 'U', you end up knowing less facts than before you saw the video.

Harper though almost always make a reasonable and intelligent point
Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1761 on: January 29, 2019, 03:27:12 am »

Harper goes on Prager U : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFWE2jl5mwA&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2vlhsyxA3UGJJrG15E4f88L8CscC3QVIkDwywoM7Yz35uVQUchPPZFz0s

With most videos from Prager 'U', you end up knowing less facts than before you saw the video.

Harper though almost always make a reasonable and intelligent point

I'm familiar with Harper's arguments because he wrote a book on it that had some discussion in the media. Even with some conservative leaning Canadian columnists (Andrew Coyne and Tristan Hopper at the National Post) the concept of the 'anywheres' was ridiculed.

Andrew Coyne: Stephen Harper comes across as banal in effort to claim mantle of populism
Harper’s book is largely an attempt to portray his own government, not as the cynical power-seeking machine it appeared to be, but as populist before its time.

I disagree in that Harper did market his government at the time as 'populist' but without using that word: a 'Tim Horton's conservative' and his signature tax cut was the reduction of the GST from 7% to 5% 

Canada has also benefited from our large resource economy: young people, not necessarily straight out of high school, but after maybe a 6 month certificate program can get a relatively well paying job in the oil patch or in mining.  For most other jobs, it's now almost impossible to get a high paying job roughly straight out of high school.

However, this does bring up the point.  The irony of Trump and the Congressional Republicans benefiting from the 'somewheres' revolt against the 'elites' is that it was Republican policies that led to the real elites (the 1% approximately) gaining a larger and larger share of national income.

I support free trade and oppose tariffs, but there was always a concern with a fallacy of composition/commons problem: each individual wealthy business owner benefited from taking nearly all of the gains from trade for themselves, but all together, they've poisoned the well a great deal for support of free trade.

Republican policies that enabled this include:
1.anti union policies like the so-called 'right to work.'
2.tax cuts that mostly benefit the wealthy
3.rising tuition rates
4.Inadequate social programs in order to ensure that corporations have a pool of unemployed to keep wages depressed
5.Opposition to campaign finance reform
Logged
Old School Republican
Computer89
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 15,905


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1762 on: January 29, 2019, 03:33:49 am »

Harper goes on Prager U : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFWE2jl5mwA&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2vlhsyxA3UGJJrG15E4f88L8CscC3QVIkDwywoM7Yz35uVQUchPPZFz0s

With most videos from Prager 'U', you end up knowing less facts than before you saw the video.

Harper though almost always make a reasonable and intelligent point

I'm familiar with Harper's arguments because he wrote a book on it that had some discussion in the media. Even with some conservative leaning Canadian columnists (Andrew Coyne and Tristan Hopper at the National Post) the concept of the 'anywheres' was ridiculed.

Andrew Coyne: Stephen Harper comes across as banal in effort to claim mantle of populism
Harper’s book is largely an attempt to portray his own government, not as the cynical power-seeking machine it appeared to be, but as populist before its time.

I disagree in that Harper did market his government at the time as 'populist' but without using that word: a 'Tim Horton's conservative' and his signature tax cut was the reduction of the GST from 7% to 5% 

Canada has also benefited from our large resource economy: young people, not necessarily straight out of high school, but after maybe a 6 month certificate program can get a relatively well paying job in the oil patch or in mining.  For most other jobs, it's now almost impossible to get a high paying job roughly straight out of high school.

However, this does bring up the point.  The irony of Trump and the Congressional Republicans benefiting from the 'somewheres' revolt against the 'elites' is that it was Republican policies that led to the real elites (the 1% approximately) gaining a larger and larger share of national income.

I support free trade and oppose tariffs, but there was always a concern with a fallacy of composition/commons problem: each individual wealthy business owner benefited from taking nearly all of the gains from trade for themselves, but all together, they've poisoned the well a great deal for support of free trade.

Republican policies that enabled this include:
1.anti union policies like the so-called 'right to work.'
2.tax cuts that mostly benefit the wealthy
3.rising tuition rates
4.Inadequate social programs in order to ensure that corporations have a pool of unemployed to keep wages depressed
5.Opposition to campaign finance reform



Harper did negotiate most of Canada's Free Trade Deals , and handled the 08 Recession better than America or Europe Did .
Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1763 on: January 29, 2019, 03:40:54 am »
« Edited: January 29, 2019, 03:44:24 am by 136or142 »

Harper goes on Prager U : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFWE2jl5mwA&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2vlhsyxA3UGJJrG15E4f88L8CscC3QVIkDwywoM7Yz35uVQUchPPZFz0s

With most videos from Prager 'U', you end up knowing less facts than before you saw the video.

Harper though almost always make a reasonable and intelligent point

I'm familiar with Harper's arguments because he wrote a book on it that had some discussion in the media. Even with some conservative leaning Canadian columnists (Andrew Coyne and Tristan Hopper at the National Post) the concept of the 'anywheres' was ridiculed.

Andrew Coyne: Stephen Harper comes across as banal in effort to claim mantle of populism
Harper’s book is largely an attempt to portray his own government, not as the cynical power-seeking machine it appeared to be, but as populist before its time.

I disagree in that Harper did market his government at the time as 'populist' but without using that word: a 'Tim Horton's conservative' and his signature tax cut was the reduction of the GST from 7% to 5%  

Canada has also benefited from our large resource economy: young people, not necessarily straight out of high school, but after maybe a 6 month certificate program can get a relatively well paying job in the oil patch or in mining.  For most other jobs, it's now almost impossible to get a high paying job roughly straight out of high school.

However, this does bring up the point.  The irony of Trump and the Congressional Republicans benefiting from the 'somewheres' revolt against the 'elites' is that it was Republican policies that led to the real elites (the 1% approximately) gaining a larger and larger share of national income.

I support free trade and oppose tariffs, but there was always a concern with a fallacy of composition/commons problem: each individual wealthy business owner benefited from taking nearly all of the gains from trade for themselves, but all together, they've poisoned the well a great deal for support of free trade.

Republican policies that enabled this include:
1.anti union policies like the so-called 'right to work.'
2.tax cuts that mostly benefit the wealthy
3.rising tuition rates
4.Inadequate social programs in order to ensure that corporations have a pool of unemployed to keep wages depressed
5.Opposition to campaign finance reform



Harper did negotiate most of Canada's Free Trade Deals , and handled the 08 Recession better than America or Europe Did .

Canada had a better regulated banking system that wasn't all that involved with the buying of the bundled mortgages.  Canada also has more conservative (as opposed to Conservative) bankers due to not having the capital to invest in the expensive high risk/high reward projects.  That's what the mergers were all about.  Had the mergers gone ahead, the banking culture almost certainly would have changed.

Thanks Finance Minister Paul Martin!

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/top-business-stories/ban-on-bank-mergers-helped-canada-withstand-crash-imf-says/article4600686/

Stephen Harper supported the chartered bank mergers and other financial deregulation.  Had he been Prime Minister in the late 1990s, Canada almost certainly would have been as bad off as the United States and Europe.
Logged
RogueBeaver
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 19,530
Canada


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1764 on: February 02, 2019, 04:32:07 pm »

Logged
warandwar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1765 on: February 02, 2019, 11:15:31 pm »


Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.

I don't care about these "representatives" of a "community" who say it's their "native" "land." My government committed a lot of genocides  to get it - that means we can do whatever we want to it!

Really, this situation is no different? The bourgeois democratic revolutions of the 1700s-1800s are "no different" than settlers pillaging their way through unceded Wet'suwet'en land in 2019?
Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1766 on: February 02, 2019, 11:32:12 pm »


Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.

I don't care about these "representatives" of a "community" who say it's their "native" "land." My government committed a lot of genocides  to get it - that means we can do whatever we want to it!

Really, this situation is no different? The bourgeois democratic revolutions of the 1700s-1800s are "no different" than settlers pillaging their way through unceded Wet'suwet'en land in 2019?

"Bourgeois democracy" yawn.  Sure thing, Stalin.
Logged
warandwar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1767 on: February 02, 2019, 11:48:02 pm »


Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.

I don't care about these "representatives" of a "community" who say it's their "native" "land." My government committed a lot of genocides  to get it - that means we can do whatever we want to it!

Really, this situation is no different? The bourgeois democratic revolutions of the 1700s-1800s are "no different" than settlers pillaging their way through unceded Wet'suwet'en land in 2019?

"Bourgeois democracy" yawn.  Sure thing, Stalin.

Huh?? Read a history book - it's what they were - the third estate led the revolutions (French, American, &c) that ended divine-right monarchies.
Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1768 on: February 02, 2019, 11:55:39 pm »


Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.

I don't care about these "representatives" of a "community" who say it's their "native" "land." My government committed a lot of genocides  to get it - that means we can do whatever we want to it!

Really, this situation is no different? The bourgeois democratic revolutions of the 1700s-1800s are "no different" than settlers pillaging their way through unceded Wet'suwet'en land in 2019?

"Bourgeois democracy" yawn.  Sure thing, Stalin.

Huh?? Read a history book - it's what they were - the third estate led the revolutions (French, American, &c) that ended divine-right monarchies.

Sure, and then the franchise was steadily expanded and so were respect for human rights.  What gives these hereditary chiefs any authority and how are these unelected leaders any different than kings or even dictators?

The elected chiefs have all come to agreements with the company.  It's easy for these hereditary chiefs to oppose everything since they don't have to stand for election or accomplish anything.

Do you support divine right monarchies?  Do you think indigenous people support divine right monarchies or that they are any less likely to want a say in how their communities are run?
Logged
warandwar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1769 on: February 03, 2019, 02:05:28 am »


Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.

I don't care about these "representatives" of a "community" who say it's their "native" "land." My government committed a lot of genocides  to get it - that means we can do whatever we want to it!

Really, this situation is no different? The bourgeois democratic revolutions of the 1700s-1800s are "no different" than settlers pillaging their way through unceded Wet'suwet'en land in 2019?

"Bourgeois democracy" yawn.  Sure thing, Stalin.

Huh?? Read a history book - it's what they were - the third estate led the revolutions (French, American, &c) that ended divine-right monarchies.

Sure, and then the franchise was steadily expanded and so were respect for human rights.  What gives these hereditary chiefs any authority and how are these unelected leaders any different than kings or even dictators?

The elected chiefs have all come to agreements with the company.  It's easy for these hereditary chiefs to oppose everything since they don't have to stand for election or accomplish anything.

Do you support divine right monarchies?  Do you think indigenous people support divine right monarchies or that they are any less likely to want a say in how their communities are run?

Not sure expansion of the franchise went alongside respect for human rights in a linear fashion! Many bumps in that road, I say that as a Jew...


Do you think the Wet'suwet'en are suffering under the yoke of dictators? Were the RCMP acting as liberators? C'mon bruh... saying traditional chiefs are dictators, when they're the ones who've got the barrels pointed at them...

Anyways, Most of your questions can be answered by this video.

Anyways
Logged
warandwar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1770 on: February 03, 2019, 02:09:59 am »


Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.

I don't care about these "representatives" of a "community" who say it's their "native" "land." My government committed a lot of genocides  to get it - that means we can do whatever we want to it!

Really, this situation is no different? The bourgeois democratic revolutions of the 1700s-1800s are "no different" than settlers pillaging their way through unceded Wet'suwet'en land in 2019?

"Bourgeois democracy" yawn.  Sure thing, Stalin.

Huh?? Read a history book - it's what they were - the third estate led the revolutions (French, American, &c) that ended divine-right monarchies.

Sure, and then the franchise was steadily expanded and so were respect for human rights.  What gives these hereditary chiefs any authority and how are these unelected leaders any different than kings or even dictators?

The elected chiefs have all come to agreements with the company.  It's easy for these hereditary chiefs to oppose everything since they don't have to stand for election or accomplish anything.

Do you support divine right monarchies?  Do you think indigenous people support divine right monarchies or that they are any less likely to want a say in how their communities are run?

Not sure expansion of the franchise went alongside respect for human rights in a linear fashion! Many bumps in that road, I say that as a Jew...


Do you think the Wet'suwet'en are suffering under the yoke of dictators? Were the RCMP acting as liberators? C'mon bruh... saying traditional chiefs are dictators, when they're the ones who've got the barrels pointed at them...

Anyways, Most of your questions can be answered by this video and these articles
 
Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1771 on: February 03, 2019, 10:31:36 am »


Speaking for myself, I don't care about these 'hereditary chiefs.'  There is a reason that the 'divine right of kings' was done away with, and this situation is no different.

I don't care about these "representatives" of a "community" who say it's their "native" "land." My government committed a lot of genocides  to get it - that means we can do whatever we want to it!

Really, this situation is no different? The bourgeois democratic revolutions of the 1700s-1800s are "no different" than settlers pillaging their way through unceded Wet'suwet'en land in 2019?

"Bourgeois democracy" yawn.  Sure thing, Stalin.

Huh?? Read a history book - it's what they were - the third estate led the revolutions (French, American, &c) that ended divine-right monarchies.

Sure, and then the franchise was steadily expanded and so were respect for human rights.  What gives these hereditary chiefs any authority and how are these unelected leaders any different than kings or even dictators?

The elected chiefs have all come to agreements with the company.  It's easy for these hereditary chiefs to oppose everything since they don't have to stand for election or accomplish anything.

Do you support divine right monarchies?  Do you think indigenous people support divine right monarchies or that they are any less likely to want a say in how their communities are run?

Not sure expansion of the franchise went alongside respect for human rights in a linear fashion! Many bumps in that road, I say that as a Jew...


Do you think the Wet'suwet'en are suffering under the yoke of dictators? Were the RCMP acting as liberators? C'mon bruh... saying traditional chiefs are dictators, when they're the ones who've got the barrels pointed at them...

Anyways, Most of your questions can be answered by this video.

Anyways

1.I don't know if the hereditary chiefs are considered to be dictators by the people they claim to represent or not since they don't have to face elections.

2.I don't know what the Supreme Court would say about hereditary chiefs these days. Since 1997 there has been a great deal of effort at reconciliation between indigenous peoples and British Columbia and the principle of representative elected band councils and chiefs seems to be generally accepted.  The indigenous people themselves also seem to clearly want elected representatives and not chiefs who claim some divine right.



Logged
warandwar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1772 on: February 03, 2019, 12:07:33 pm »

I really don't know why you keep calling hereditary chiefs "divine right" dude - it's just not what they are...I was an anthropology major - give me some credit here! (it's true that they're not elected in the "every four years, vote in a designated place" sense, but they're chosen through consensus at potlachs and can be recalled...)

hereditary chiefs have authority over unceded traditional land, court precedent (and UNDRIP!) points to consulting w/ hereditary chiefs as well as band councils, and Trudeau's government has stated they want to move to consulting w/ First Nations on a "nation-to-nation" basis - aside from all of this - a militarized response was clearly inappropriate and brings back bad memories of Lake Gustafson and Oka...

Logged
136or142
Adam T
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 7,004
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1773 on: February 03, 2019, 12:41:31 pm »
« Edited: February 03, 2019, 12:49:36 pm by 136or142 »

I really don't know why you keep calling hereditary chiefs "divine right" dude - it's just not what they are...I was an anthropology major - give me some credit here! (it's true that they're not elected in the "every four years, vote in a designated place" sense, but they're chosen through consensus at potlachs and can be recalled...)

hereditary chiefs have authority over unceded traditional land, court precedent (and UNDRIP!) points to consulting w/ hereditary chiefs as well as band councils, and Trudeau's government has stated they want to move to consulting w/ First Nations on a "nation-to-nation" basis - aside from all of this - a militarized response was clearly inappropriate and brings back bad memories of Lake Gustafson and Oka...



1.Hereditary chiefdom is passed down as an heir: just like a king.

http://fngovernance.org/resources_docs/TraditionalGovernance_Wetsuweten2.pdf

2."Militarized response" i.e maintaining the rule of law. This is a situation of hereditary chiefs claiming to speak on behalf of an area of land who are responsible to nobody and who have therefore have no incentive to negotiate or otherwise act responsibly.  

It has certainly been shown to not be the case that these hereditary chiefs speak on behalf of even the majority of the people on the land.  One thing mentioned in that link is the 'father clan' vs the 'mother clan' and how the 'father clan' is favored.  There was a Supreme Court decision just a few years ago striking down the preferential treatment given to children of the male member of indigenous tribes when an indigenous person marries a non native.

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1467227680166/1467227697623

With obviously recognizing the gross mistreatment indigenous people have received, that does not negate that indigenous people are not above nepotism, sexism or obstructionism among other negative things and that these things are more likely to occur when you have hereditary chiefs who, in fact, are no different than divine right kings.
Logged
Smid
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 6,133
Australia


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1774 on: February 06, 2019, 09:09:57 pm »
« Edited: February 06, 2019, 09:27:10 pm by Smid »

I just read of Paul Dewar's passing, another life taken too soon by cancer. May he rest in peace. Thinking of his family at this terribly tough time for them.

Edit: If I recall correctly, EarlAW used to be active on his riding committee, and perhaps would care to share a memory or two with us.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 66 67 68 69 70 [71] 72 73 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC