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Author Topic: Georgia 1992  (Read 3823 times)
Plankton5165
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« Reply #25 on: April 20, 2017, 10:21:56 pm »
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't they also used to call states before their polls even closed?
Maybe. Not since 2004 however. Only one certain case--the state of Florida for Al Gore in 2000.

They handed Michigan's 18 electoral votes to the Democrats at 8:00 three times.

In 1988, they projected a very close state for Dukakis at poll closing time, it was New York.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 10:28:36 pm by Plankton5165 »Logged
Barnes
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« Reply #26 on: April 20, 2017, 10:43:56 pm »
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Yeah, flawed exit polls + Democratic media bias. They also called NH for Clinton at poll closing time, and it was very close as well. Not to mention that they projected Democrat Wyche Fowler as the winner in the GA Senate race (Fowler later lost to Republican Paul Coverdell in the runoff).

The Georgia senate race was too close to call.

Georgia has a law that requires the winner of a GE race (including Presidential electors) to achieve 50% to avoid a runoff.  Georgia was projected for Clinton early, but taken off the board later on after reporters learned that there was a runoff  (Fowler was close to 50%, but Clinton won Georgia with 43% as Bush refused a runoff.) 

Georgia has never had any such law applying to presidential elections.
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Bacon! 🔥
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« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2017, 10:49:28 pm »
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Yeah, flawed exit polls + Democratic media bias. They also called NH for Clinton at poll closing time, and it was very close as well. Not to mention that they projected Democrat Wyche Fowler as the winner in the GA Senate race (Fowler later lost to Republican Paul Coverdell in the runoff).

The Georgia senate race was too close to call.

Georgia has a law that requires the winner of a GE race (including Presidential electors) to achieve 50% to avoid a runoff.  Georgia was projected for Clinton early, but taken off the board later on after reporters learned that there was a runoff  (Fowler was close to 50%, but Clinton won Georgia with 43% as Bush refused a runoff.) 

Georgia has never had any such law applying to presidential elections.

Fun fact: when Georgia originally adopted its runoff law, it actually did apply to Presidential elections! This remained the case until the law was changed in March of 1968 to exempt them from the runoff requirement (otherwise a runoff would have been required after that year's election. This wasn't a coincidence - Wallace supporters in the General Assembly were expecting a win and didn't want a runoff to jeopardize it)
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Barnes
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« Reply #28 on: April 20, 2017, 11:05:07 pm »
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Yeah, flawed exit polls + Democratic media bias. They also called NH for Clinton at poll closing time, and it was very close as well. Not to mention that they projected Democrat Wyche Fowler as the winner in the GA Senate race (Fowler later lost to Republican Paul Coverdell in the runoff).

The Georgia senate race was too close to call.

Georgia has a law that requires the winner of a GE race (including Presidential electors) to achieve 50% to avoid a runoff.  Georgia was projected for Clinton early, but taken off the board later on after reporters learned that there was a runoff  (Fowler was close to 50%, but Clinton won Georgia with 43% as Bush refused a runoff.) 

Georgia has never had any such law applying to presidential elections.

Fun fact: when Georgia originally adopted its runoff law, it actually did apply to Presidential elections! This remained the case until the law was changed in March of 1968 to exempt them from the runoff requirement (otherwise a runoff would have been required after that year's election. This wasn't a coincidence - Wallace supporters in the General Assembly were expecting a win and didn't want a runoff to jeopardize it)

Now that is news to me! Do you know the year that runoffs were extended to the general election? For primaries it dates back to 1915 but of course they were also using County Unit until 1963; and the 1966 governor's race had to be decided by the General Assembly not through a runoff.
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Barnes
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« Reply #29 on: April 20, 2017, 11:18:17 pm »
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I've found the 1968 law in question and it appears the original act which is amended took effect in 1965 meaning the runoff provision was never actually applicable to a presidential race. But what a fascinating tidbit of history.

http://metis.galib.uga.edu/ssp/cgi-bin/legis-idx.pl?sessionid=4948683c-01c50f8e43-0428&type=law&byte=295414869

As to the 1992 point, again, there was no possibility of a runoff for presidential electors.
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