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  Election What-ifs? (Moderators: Keyboard Jacobinism, Apocrypha)
  The liberal Republic
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President Johnson
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« Reply #100 on: November 19, 2017, 05:59:41 am »

Fascinating and Brilliant TL. I always wondered what would have happened if Kennedy had joined LBJ in 1964 (rather than '68 as in this) and it gives a good portrayal.

That's a fascinating question. I would have prefered RFK as VP in 1964, although Humphrey was also a great guy. They didn't like each other on a personal level because they were different and RFK opposed his borther's 1960 decision to pick Johnson for the VP spot, but they had much in common politically. Especially on civil rights, where Bobby had likely more in common with LBJ than his brother (according to Nicholas Katzenbach).
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« Reply #101 on: November 19, 2017, 06:44:29 am »

June 8, 1971: Revenue Act of 1971 signed into law

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On June 8, 1971, President Johnson signs the tax bill into law


It may sound obscure, but President Johnson’s heart attack and momentum resulting from it obviously helped him in passing a tax bill. Although inflation and unemployment’s raise slowed down over the last two months, the president vigorously pushed for a tax bill without major cuts to social programs. Under the Revenue Act of 1971, lower and middle incomes received a 20% tax break. On the other hand, spending cuts for the military were possible due the ongoing withdrawal in Vietnam. Funds for space exploration were also cut. The legislation passed the house 230 – 202 and the senate 55 – 45.


June 29, 1971: 26th Amendment enacted

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After more than 38 states ratified the 26th Amendment of the U.S. constitution, it could be enacted during a White House ceremony given by Vice President Kennedy. The amendment lowers the majority age from 21 to 18 in the United States and therefore making it possible for 18 year olds to vote. It remains to be seen how that plays out in the 1972 election.

According to a Gallup poll, the amendment is supported by 83% of Americans. The numbers also show virtually no difference between Democrats and Republicans. Both sides support the measure by a wide margin.


Gallup poll, released June 30, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 55%
Disapprove: 39%


July 4, 1971: Pentagon Papers leaked!

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The United States is already withdrawing from the Vietnam, but the issue became a big headline in the news again, and in a fashion, the administration won't like. The New York Times began publishing excerpts on this Independence Day 1971. The July 4 article is named "Vietnam Archive: Pentagon Study Traces Three Decades of Growing US Involvement”. The so-called Pentagon Papers are a Department of Defense history of the United States' political-military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. After the release, Street protests followed. One media observer wrote that  “the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations systematically lied, not only to the public but also to Congress”.

It was quickly revealed that a former employee of the Pentagon named Daniel Ellsberg was behind the publications. President Johnson declined for any public comment, but was, according to White House insiders, furious about the leak. He is quoted with the words "I want that SOB on a silver tablet and throw the traitor in jail". Members of the administration including Attorney General Ramsey Clark argued Ellsberg and his friend Russo were guilty of a felony under the Espionage Act of 1917, because they had no authority to publish classified documents. White House Chief of Staff Paul Nitze threatened the New York Times with a lawsuit if they continue to publish content of the secret papers.


Further developments regarding the Pentagon Papers during July 1971:

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President Johnson, visibly angry, during a press statement: "Publication of top-secret material is illegal and will be punished"


After the Times continued to publish material in the following days, the mood in the White House became increasingly exasperated. Nevertheless, no significant statements were made public. The president’s press team only commented that “appropriate steps will be taken”. Even Vice President Kennedy remained silent on the issue. Some anti-war protesters hoped the vice president would come out and criticize the previous administration of President Johnson, but also the administration of his brother. When asked by a reporter, RFK only commented that “leaking restricted material is dangerous”.

After failing to persuade the Times to voluntarily cease publication on July 15, Attorney General Ramsey Clark obtained a federal court injunction forcing the Times to cease publication after three articles. The newspaper appealed the injunction, and the case New York Times Co. v. United States quickly rose through the U.S. legal system to the Supreme Court. On July 21, 1971, the Washington Post began publishing its own series of articles based upon the Pentagon Papers; Ellsberg had given portions to the D.C. based newspaper. The next day, President Johnson himself demanded publically the suspension of material. “There is a reason these papers are classified as top secret. Any publication violates existing law and will be punished under the law”, he stated.

On July 31, the Supreme Court rejected the administration’s lawsuit in a five – four decision. The court argued that that the government failed to meet the heavy burden of proof required for prior restraint injunction. As White House interns told, the president was furious and demanded FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, his personal friend, to take action against Ellsberg and other leakers. "I'm sick and tired of this crap", he reportely said to Hoover, who agreed.


July 31, 1971: A lot of new polling!

The Pentagon Papers obviously put an end to the president's rise in the polls. Although he's a member of the administration and didn't distance himself from the Pentogan Papers, RFK continues lead the Democratic field for 1972. He also maintains a fair approval rating.

Gallup polls, released July 31, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 48%
Disapprove: 45%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of foreign policy?
Approve: 50%
Disapprove: 43%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 45%
Disapprove: 47%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 41%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 25%
Former Governor George Wallace: 14%
Senator George McGovern: 7%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 5%
Undecided/others: 11%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 26%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 25%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 14%
Governor George Romney: 11%
Senator Richard Schweiker1: 6%
Undecided/Others: 13%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

This time, only Robert Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey were polled among Democrats.

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
George Romney: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 45%
George Romney: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 47%
Spiro Agnew: 44%
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Sir Mohamed
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« Reply #102 on: November 20, 2017, 09:45:02 am »

Great updates! I liked how RFK handled his brief acting presidency. Pentagon Papers are also interesting.
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Parrotguy
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« Reply #103 on: November 21, 2017, 07:27:33 am »

Great updates! I liked how RFK handled his brief acting presidency. Pentagon Papers are also interesting.
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Representative LouisvilleThunder
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« Reply #104 on: November 22, 2017, 10:18:56 am »

This is one of the best timelines I ever read. Keep it up!
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Kingpoleon
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« Reply #105 on: November 22, 2017, 05:40:55 pm »

Run, Rocky, Run!
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President Johnson
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« Reply #106 on: November 24, 2017, 01:01:41 pm »

Great updates! I liked how RFK handled his brief acting presidency. Pentagon Papers are also interesting.

This is one of the best timelines I ever read. Keep it up!

Thanks guys!
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President Johnson
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« Reply #107 on: November 24, 2017, 01:10:10 pm »
« Edited: November 24, 2017, 01:16:08 pm by President Johnson »

August 1971: Further publications of Pentagon Papers, Ellsberg on the run

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After all legal options to halt the publications of the Pentagon Papers failed, the major newspapers continued to make them public. Meanwhile, Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the material, has disappeared. Administration- and FBI officials urged him to report to legal authorities. The administration remained largely silent on the material itsself. National Security Advisor Walt Rostow pointed out that the motive for intervention in Vietnam has always been to promote peace and resist aggresion by the communist regime in North Vietnam. When asked why he backs off from this discussion, President Johnson said he would be open to debate the issue after emotions "cool down" and an objective discussion is possible. "So far, I have nothing to say what I didn't already say", he added.


August 9, 1971: Secretary Katzenbach: Negotiations with USSR will last to February 1972; President Johnson to invite Soviet leadership

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In 1969, the United States and Soviet Union begun arms limitation negotiations in Geneva as a direct result of President Johnson’s Moscow visit in December 1968. The talks were originally scheduled for completion this summer. Now, both sides agreed to prolong the talks until February 1972. As Secretary of State Katzenbach and Foreign Minister Gromyko confirmed, “substantial progress to limit conventional weapon systems were made”. However, a few more months are needed to work out the details. The Soviet Leadership reassured the Johnson Administration their willingness to complete the treaty before the 1972 presidential campaign goes into its decisive phase.

The next day, President Johnson officially invited Secretary General Brezhnev to the United States for the signing ceremony early next year. The Soviet leader accepted the offer, after the signing ceremony was originally planned for Geneva.

Some media observers called the announcement as a move by the administration, to distract from the Pentagon Papers.


August 31, 1971: Number of U.S. troops in Vietnam sinks below 50,000; plans for draft ending legislation in the making

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U.S. troops leaving Vietnam


47,150 American soldiers were left in Vietnam by late August 1971. As the Pentagon confirmed, the withdrawal plans are ahead of schedule. July and August 1971 had the fewest U.S. casualties in Vietnam since late 1964. Secretary Clifford also confirmed that the cease fire is largely effective.

The administration is also reportedly in the final stages on working out legislation for a suspension of the draft. President Johnson intends to renew structures in the army, so that a voluntary army becomes an attractive employer.


Gallup polls, released August 31, 1971

For the first time in three years, President Johnson's net approval rating went negative. The main reason is obviously the publication of the Pentagon Papers, which hurts public confidence in government.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 46%
Disapprove: 48%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

(only candidates listed with at least 5% support)


Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 27%
Former Governor George Wallace: 15%
Senator George McGovern: 8%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 6%
Undecided/others: 8%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 28%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 24%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 15%
Former Governor George Romney: 12%
Senator Richard Schweiker: 5%
Undecided/Others: 16%


General election match-ups


Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
George Romney: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

Hubert Humphrey: 41%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 42%
George Romney: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


September 3, 1971: Governor Spiro Agnew runs for president!

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“I am running for president to seek new policies. To strengthen and improve the American standing at home and abroad. To fight crime, to make government more efficient and the servant of the people, to promote growth and prosperity”, said Governor Spiro Agnew (R-MD) upon announcing his run for the presidency. Governor Agnew served since 1967 as the chief executive of Maryland and governed as a pragmatist. As a pro-civil-rights Republican with a conservative leaning economic philosophy, he may appeal to both major factions of his party. In his speech, he also found harsh words for government leakers and called Daniel Ellsberg a traitor.

However, it remains to be seen how he will perform between the two overwhelming favorites, his colleagues Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller. Both have not officially announced their campaigns so far, but are expected to do so in the closing months of this year (anything else would be a huge surprise). In 1968, Governor Agnew first endorsed Rockefeller and then switched to Nixon, who seriously considered him for the second spot on the GOP ticket until picking John Tower in the end. As of now it is unclear from which side – the Gipper or Rocky – the man from Maryland will take more support. Before his announcement, Agnew polled in low double digits, but at third place. He could be the kingmaker in the end, or, what would be a great upset, beat Rockefeller and Reagan from the middle.

As insiders reported, the bipartisan commission on reforming the presidential primaries will soon present its results. It's almost certain at this point that each state will hold a primary or caucus in one form or another.
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President Johnson
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« Reply #108 on: November 25, 2017, 06:41:31 am »
« Edited: November 27, 2017, 03:52:46 pm by President Johnson »

September 8, 1971: Congress passes and President Johnsons signs first post-Vietnam budget

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President Johnson signs the budget into law

At the end of one month long negotiations, congress adopted the first post-Vietnam budget, that President Johnson approved with his signature on September 8, 1971. The president and his chief of staff formed a broad coalition of the center to enact the budget. Some left-leaning members of congress like Senator George McGovern (D-SD) voted against the budget because they opposed the freeze in domestic spending and demanded more budget cuts for the military. The Pentagon’s funds were cut by 15% for fiscal year 1972. Conservatives like James L. Buckley (Con-NY) or Barry Goldwater (R-AZ) also voted against the bill since they called for more cuts in social programs. Nevertheless, the budget is expected not to exceed 4.5 billion dollars in the red.


September 9 – 13, 1971: Attica Prison Riot in New York State – challenge for Governor Rockefeller

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Governor Nelson Rockefeller: Did he go too far with his tough stance in Attica?

Attica State Prison, New York: On September 9, 1971, about 1,000 of the Attica prison's approximately 2,200 inmates rioted and took control of the prison, taking 42 staff hostage. The involved prisoners demanded better treatment and more rights after a series of incidents in other state prisons that resulted in the killing of other prisoners. Negotiations between the authorities and involved men first seemed to move through successfully, as some of their demands were agreed to. Nevertheless, legal authorities and Governor Nelson Rockefeller rejected calls for a complete amnesty from criminal prosecution for the prison takeover. On September 13, Governor Rockefeller ordered the state police took back control of the prison by the use violence. When the uprising was over, at least 43 people were dead, including 10 correctional officers and civilian employees, and 33 inmates.

With his tough stance, Governor Rockefeller, reportedly preparing for a 1972 presidential run, alienated many liberals in the country. However, President Johnson publically supported the governor’s decision, as did most conservatives of his party, like rival Ronald Reagan. Vice President Kennedy said some demands of the prisoners were justified, but rejected their use of violence. Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey denounced Rocky’s decision and criticized that the governor refused to go to Attica in person.

Whether the incident will have an effect on Mr. Rockefeller’s presidential ambitions has to be seen.


September 20, 1971: Bipartisan commission to reform presidential primaries finishes work successfully

The bipartisan commission to reform the nominating process during presidential primaries under the leadership of Vice President Kennedy and Nevada Governor Laxalt presented their results this September 20, shorty before the 1972 presidential campaign will take steam. The two chairmen, joined by other high-profile Democrats and Republicans across the spectrum, introduced the following plan to the American public:

- Both major parties will hold primaries and caucuses in all U.S. states including the District of Columbia.

- During primaries and caucuses delegates for the nominating conventions will be awared.

- The method of allocating will be determined by each state under state law. The same is applying to the dates of the primaries. However, the time frame is from February to June.

- The commission held various meetings with all 50 state governors and members of the state legislature to ensure a fast and swift implementation. Some states already worked out legislation that is ready for passage. Vice President Kennedy urged states to enact such laws not later than December this year.

- The National Party Committees support the plan and lobby for passage.

The public overwhelmingly supports the reformed process. A Gallup poll from late September found that 85% of the American electorate supports the plan. 83% of Democrats and 86% of Republicans are in favor. The media also reported favorably about the results and praised the commission members for their bipartisanship, knowing that some members might soon battle each other for the nomination and later the White House.

President Johnson publically praised his vice president for his role in the process. When asked whether this is an endorsement for Bobby, he said “no”, but added “Bobby would make a great president”.

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Governor Reagan and Vice President Kennedy joke about their presidential ambitions at the press conference

"When will you announce to run for president?" a reporter promptly asked the vice president before the press conference came to an end. "This is not the time to talk about personal ambitions", the vice president responded with a smile. "Why aren't you asking me the same question?", Governor Reagan joked. A laughter was going through the room. Kennedy looked at Reagan "You are going to run, governor?". The Gipper smiled and just said "You will find out November 7, 1972". Again, a laughter was going through the room at Capitol Hill. "Let's come back to the subject", commented a laughing Governor Laxalt...


Gallup polls, released September 30, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 45%
Disapprove: 49%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Polls showed little move on the Democratic side. Vice President Kennedy is still the favorite for the nomination and possibly the presidency, with Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey in a strong second place. On the Republican side, Governor Rockefeller lost support and Governor Ronald Reagan surged to first place again. After his announcement, Governor Spiro Agnew received extensive media attention and gained in the polls, where is now just a few points behind Rocky. Possibly his support among the liberal wing surged after Rocky's setback in Attica. Senator Richard Schweiker, a liberal, could not benefit from this trend, though it is not certain that he will even run for office. Senator Schweiker has largely avoided any comments about potential presidential ambitions. Nevertheless, he may become relevant for the vice presidential spot once the nominee is determined. Especially if a conservative is heading the ticket.

(Only candidates listed with at least 5% support)


Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 24%
Former Governor George Wallace: 15%
Senator George McGovern: 10%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 5%
Undecided/others: 8%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 29%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 24%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 21%
Former Governor George Romney: 13%
Undecided/Others: 13%

No general election match-ups were polled this month.


October 1, 1971: General William Westmoreland runs for the Republican nomination!

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General Westmoreland on television: "I'm running to rebuild America's strenght"

This came as surprise to almost the entire political and media elite: General William Westmoreland announced on this first day in October that will seek the Republican nomination for president. Mr. Westmoreland was commanding general in Vietnam from 1964 to 1968. He was dismissed by President Johnson in 1968 and became Chief of Staff of the Army until his resignation last year. Obvouisly, he wants to become Eisenhower 2.0 by running, though Ike was much more popular at the time of his election to the White House in 1952. Westmoreland, who critics label as “General Waste-more-men”, was the architect of the failed military strategy in Vietnam until 1968. In his announcement speech, the general sharply criticized the moderated policies towards the USSR and Red China and advocated a strong defense policy, opposing budget cuts for the Pentagon by the Johnson Administration. Domestically, General Westmoreland called for budget cuts across the board, except defense, and tax reliefs for businesses.

It remains to be seen how his low-budget campaign with a small staff will perform against the GOP favorites. A New York Times journalist described the campaign as “PR-Stunt” and suggested the general has actually an eye on the vice presidency or the Pentagon under a Ronald Reagan administration. Westmoreland was not included in any poll so far.
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Jaguar4life
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« Reply #109 on: November 25, 2017, 11:44:39 am »

Westmoreland 72!!
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Parrotguy
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« Reply #110 on: November 25, 2017, 11:52:17 am »

This is amazing. Go Bobby or Rocky!
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President Johnson
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« Reply #111 on: November 26, 2017, 07:08:00 am »
« Edited: November 26, 2017, 11:36:50 am by President Johnson »

Autumn is heating up!


October 5, 1971: All the way with HHH – Senator Hubert Humphrey launches presidential campaign!

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Compassion and equal rights were the premises by Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey upon launching his 1972 presidential campaign

“Today, my fellow Americans, I announce my candidacy for the presidency of the United States”, were his first words. Nobody was really surprised when Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey announced his candidacy for president at a rally in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he once served as mayor before entering the U.S. senate. In his address, joined by a crowd of over 5,000 enthusiastic supporters, the former vice president spoke about his record in the senate and as President Johnson’s second-in-command between 1965 and 1969. He mentioned civil rights, education and social safety. Senator Humphrey presented himself as a true liberal from Minnesota, driven by “compassion and a joy for politics”, who wants to continue LBJ’s agenda. “Let us fight for an all-inclusive America”, Senator Humphrey told his supporters. His speech was mainly positive, as he didn’t mention the Republicans at all. He also praised his fellow Democrats and emphasized the need to go through a “fair nominating process” and “a united force in the general election”.

After sitting Vice President Robert Kennedy, Senator Humphrey is the second most likely nominee of his party and Bobby’s most formidable opponent. RFK hasn’t declared his candidacy and avoided comments on the subject, but he is expected to throw his hat in the ring within the next weeks or months.

Right after his announcement, Senator Humphrey received the endorsement of several notable unions accross the country.


October 15, 1971: President Johnson signs landmark Armed Forces Modernization Act

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A suspension of the draft and a modernization of the armed forces is the main content of the act, President Johnson signs into law on October 15, 1971

Finally, with a 274 – 145 vote in the House and a 64 – 35 vote in the Senate, congress approved the Armed Forces Modernization Act of 1971. The passed version is almost the same than proposed by the Johnson Administration. The law, going into effect on January 1, 1972, sets the framework the end the military draft that exists since 1940. The law requires to suspend the military draft between December 31, 1973 and December 31, 1976. The president is authorized to determine the exact date through executive action. The bill also includes provisions for a reform process within the armed forces to make them an attractive employer. That includes a higher number of vacation days and certain other privileges for servants and their direct relatives.

President Johnson signed the landmark legislation on October 15, 1971 at a White House ceremony. The president noted that he intends to issue a decree within the next few months to determine the formal date after discussions with the Pentagon. He also thanked congress in particular and praised Vice President Kennedy, who was a staunch advocate for his step ever since 1968, for his role in the process.  


October 25, 1971: Senator George McGovern enters presidential contest!

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Senator George McGovern (D-SC) at his campaign kick-off rally

Senator George McGovern (D-SD) was well known for his critics of President Johnson’s Vietnam pre-1969 policy and a staunch liberal. Not surprising to political observers, he declared his candidacy for the Democratic nomination next year this October 25. In his speech, the senator emphasized the need to increase efforts in the war on poverty and a greater access to health care. Senator McGovern also positioned himself as a dove on foreign policy. He praised President Johnson’s post-1969 foreign policy, but also said “the U.S. sent confusing signals around the world these past ten years”. He added: “I stand for a policy that intends to work for peace by bold action”. However, he didn’t outline specific policy proposals in his speech. Senator McGovern is an outsider for the nomination and appeals to a similar voter group than Eugene McCarthy did four years ago.


October 26, 1971: The Gipper is in! Governor Reagan to seek presidency

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A new direction demands Governor Ronald Reagan (R-CA) at his first campaign event

“My fellow Americans: With a deep awareness of the trust millions of you put in me in one form or another, I announce my intention to seek the Republican nomination for President of the United States”, told Governor Ronald Reagan to a crowd by launching his campaign at an event in San Diego, California. Surrounded by at least 7,000 cheering supporters, Governor Reagan focused on his criticism of the Johnson Administration. “Today, America has taken a direction, that was neither intended by our founders, nor does it solve our true problems. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy tell us that government programs, funded by the working men and women and business, are the solution to everything. The actual result is an unpreceded bureaucracy, taxes that go through the roof and a rising unemployment and inflation. I offer a different path. A path of prosperity, self determination and freedom […]”. On foreign policy: “What Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy have done on the world stage is dangerous. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy bear the responsibility for weakened defense, a selling out of American values to forces of evil that hold their people in slavery. In return, we get nothing but empty words and a so-called peace treaty in Paris, that won’t be lasting for half a decade […]”. The Gipper finished his speech: “Ladies and Gentlemen: It is time to take the responsibility in our own hands and return the true national greatness, so that America can be that shining city upon a hill.”

Political observers around the country, including liberal ones, described Governor Reagan’s campaign announcement as a “pure success”. The Gipper hold an authentic speech and his supporters were fired up by his words. He’s definitely the greatest favorite for the nomination, along with New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller. Rocky is, as unofficial sources claim, announcing his candidacy in the final weeks of this year after the New York State Legislature has adjourned the current session. Once Rocky is in, the stage is set for the battle for the future of the Republican Party. And it won’t be an easy fight for either side. With an unforeseeable outcome.


October 31, 1971: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

The recent legislative success to end the draft obviously benefits President Johnson. With regard to the upcoming presidential campaign, Hubert Humphrey experiences a surge in the polls after his announcement. On the Republican side, Ronald Reagan widens his previous lead and polls best among Republicans for general election now.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 45%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

(only declared candidates or potential contenders with at least 5% support listed)

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 31%
Former Governor George Wallace: 11%
Senator George McGovern: 11%
Undecided/others: 12%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 33%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 25%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 22%
Governor George Romney: 7%
General William Westmoreland1: 6%
Undecided/Others: 7%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
William Westmoreland: 39%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%

Hubert Humphrey: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 43%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
William Westmoreland: 39%


George McGovern: 41%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

George McGovern: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

George McGovern: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

George McGovern: 40%
William Westmoreland: 40%
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« Reply #112 on: November 27, 2017, 10:46:12 am »

Terrific updates! Having watched some Reagan speeches, his announcement reads very authentic. Now go RFK!

LOL at General Wastemoremen Tongue
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« Reply #113 on: November 29, 2017, 02:13:25 pm »
« Edited: December 04, 2017, 02:09:37 pm by President Johnson »

BREAKING: October 31, 1971 – Daniel Ellsberg surrenders to legal authorities

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Pentagon Papers leader Daniel Ellsberg talking to reports after his surrender to legal authorities; October 31, 1971

Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg surrendered to legal authorities in Boston, Massachusetts. Upon his appearance before the district attorney, he said: "I felt that as an American citizen, as a responsible citizen, I could no longer cooperate in concealing this information from the American public. I did this clearly at my own jeopardy and I am prepared to answer to all the consequences of this decision."

The White House formally declined to comment. Only the Jutsice Department put out a brief statement, saying Mr. Ellsberg will face a fair trial under the rule of law. So far, President Johnson successfully avoided public questions on the issue, though his approval ratings dropped significantly after the leak.


November 9, 1971: Governor Paul Laxalt not to run for president – endorses Reagan

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Governor Paul Laxalt and candidate Ronald Reagan at a fundraiser of the Reagan campaign; November 9, 1971

Governor Paul Laxalt (R-NV) was considered a potential contender for the Republican nomination, as he had been a very visible figure for a few years now. He was praised as co-chair of the commission for reforming the nomination process and is considered a moderate to conservative Republican. But he has also become personal friends with Ronald Reagan. In fact, the two worked together to protect Lake Tahoe at the California-Nevada border. Now, Governor Laxalt publically endorsed his friend at a Las Vegas fundraising dinner for the Gipper. If elected, Governor Laxalt would certainly play a role in a possible Reagan Administration.


November 22, 1971: Lyndon Johnson becomes second-longest serving president in history

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Eight years passed since LBJ first took the presidential oath (l) abroad Air Force One on November 22, 1963, after President Kennedy was shot. On November 22, 1971 President Johnson (r) remembered his predecessor during a speech.

November 22, 1971 is the 2,922nd day of Lyndon Johnson's presidency. He's now in office for exactly eight years, a normal two-term tenure. By crossing this mark, only Franklin D. Roosevelt has been president for a longer time (1933-1945). And LBJ, if he completes his term, is likely to remain in second place as long as the 22nd amendment isn't repealed: Only a vice president ascending to office - as he did - after half of the ongoing term is up but before November 22 of the year prior to the next election could exceed President Johnson's time in office. And that only if he or she manages to win the next two elections.

Eight years have passed since President John F. Kennedy was shot in Dallas, Texas. On this day, President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy attended a ceremony at Arlington National Cemetry, where JFK rests, and remembered the fallen leader, whose name still insprires Americans and foreigners likewise.


November 30, 1971: Economy bounces back

Good news for the Democrats? Over the summer and fall 1971 a mild recession occurred in the United States that now apparently ended. November proved to the third consecutive month with economic growth. Unemployment peaked at 7% in September 1971, but dropped to 6.5% in October and further to 6.2% in November. President Johnson claimed measures enacted by his administration are responsible for the improving numbers. Governor Reagan responded that the recovery was “not of significance” and that he would soon put out a specific economic plan for his presidential campaign. Vice President Kennedy, who reportedly prepares for his own White House bid, contradicted the governor’s statement.


Gallup poll, November 30, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 46%
Disapprove: 47%


December 2, 1971: President Johnson orders all U.S. troops to end hostage actions in Vietnam

With the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam going into its final stage, President Lyndon Johnson issued a directive that all (American) hostile actions shall cease. Although the number of troops has been reduced step by step since 1969, American forces remained active in battle along with the South Vietnamese allies. The latter have now taken the main burden of the war and will now take over entirely. However, hostile actions by the North dropped significantly.


December 12, 1971: George Wallace: I will decide presidential run in January

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Former Governor George Wallace: Will he or won't he?

George Wallace long planned a presidential run in 1972, but after his return to the Governor’s Mansion in Alabama was prevented by Governor Albert Brewer in 1970 it seemed as his appeal would not go far enough to launch a national campaign. The populist Democrat, who moderated his views on segregation, now said, he wants to decide by January whether to join the race. Former Georgia Governor Lester Maddox, who has similar views, actively pushes Wallace to join the race. "Reagan is bad, Rockefeller and Humphrey are even worse and Kennedy is the worst of possible presidents. Make no mistake about it", said the Georgia politician, "therefore, we need Wallace in ’72."


Writer's note: I added the event of the eight anniversity of Lyndon Johnson's first swearing in belated.
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« Reply #114 on: November 29, 2017, 03:03:23 pm »

December 28, 1971: Rocky throws his hat into the ring!

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Governor Nelson Rockefeller at his announcement speech rally

“We want Rocky! We want Rocky!” screamed an enthusiastic crowd of over 5,000 in New York as Governor Nelson Rockefeller walked on the podium. “My fellow Americans: Next year’s election will determine the president who will preside over the bicentennial of our great nation. It will determine, who will lead this greatest country on the face of the earth into the third century of its proud national history. The next election will determine in what kind of future our children and grandchildren will live. I want this future to be one of peace, prosperity and freedom. These three words are the cornerstone of our campaign. […] I believe that I can carry out this vision for America. As I have done in 13 years of service to the great state of New York as its governor. Now, therefore, I hereby declare my candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination. I am running to offer this positive vision of optimism and compassion to our citizens. I will seek the support of each and every one of you, to serve for you and the public good”, said the governor upon entering the presidential contest.

This is Governor Rockefeller's third serious run for the presidency and, according to observers and insiders, his best chance to finally capture the Republican nomination. A feat he hasn't accomplished before for various reasons (in 1964, the brief remarriage with his wife Happy hurt him, in 1968 his campaign was poorly organized as he entered the race too late - similar to Reagan). His effort this time is also more professional than in 1964 and 1968. Like Reagan, the Rockefeller campaign is organized in every state and able to manage a serious groundgame in order to compete in the primaries. Prediction markets give both Rocky and the Gipper each a 45% chance for the nomination, with another 10% going to other candidates (Governor Spiro Agnew takes the lion's share here).


George Romney: Rockefeller for president!

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Former Governor George Romney: "I will support Nelson Rockefeller for president"

Just hours after Rocky’s announcement, former Governor George Romney (R-MI) endorsed his fellow liberal Republican during a radio interview. That, of course, eliminates himself from the contest. “Governor Rockefeller is the right man at the right time. I’m proud to call myself a Rockefeller Republican”, he said. Journalists wrote that the former governor of Michigan is very likely to join a possible Rockefeller Administration in an important position.


State of the presidential race by the year’s end

By the end of 1971, all major candidates who were expected to run, officially entered the presidential contest. Only Vice President Robert Kennedy, the Democratic frontrunner, hasn’t formally announced his candidacy. According to members of his team, he’ll start campaigning by sometime in January. His toughest rival will he his predecessor in the vice presidency, Senator Hubert Humphrey. Both are representatives of the party’s liberal wing. Humphrey has rallied most unions behind him, while RFK is expected to take the lion’s share of black support. Political observers expect one of these two to be the nominee, though the possibility of a deadlocked convention has been raised after former Governor George Wallace publically flirted with a run. This could be the case, should RFK and HHH as well as Senator McGovern, the clear underdog, split the liberal vote and Wallace picks up enough support to prevent an outright majority at the convention floor. Interesting will also be, what President Johnson is going to do. So far, he didn’t address the campaign and gave no endorsement. It is unlikely that he will do so before the candidate is nominated, but he may play a role behind the scenes or hint his preferences in public speeches. After his reelection in 1968, political observers expected him to support Humphrey in 1972, but he worked surprisingly well with Vice President Kennedy over the course of the last three years. RFK, without a doubt, played a much bigger role in the vice presidency than Humphrey did under LBJ. Therefore, it seems possible that the president would be comfortable with either of these two. Nevertheless, he is also known for his high regard of Governor Rockefeller.

On the Republican side, the long awaited battle between governors Reagan and Rockefeller has begun. Unlike the Democrats, the two frontrunners already took aim at each other: “I welcome the challenge by Governor Rockefeller”, said Reagan the day after the Rockefeller announcement, “I believe the economic policies my worthy New York colleague has pursued so far are not significantly different from the policies that existed too long in this country and led to a gigantic bureaucracy and out of control taxation”. Rocky promptly responded by criticizing Reagan’s previous statements on taxes. “Fellows like me don’t need a tax break. The average worker needs one”, the New York governor stated. Meanwhile, Governor Agnew, polling in a strong third place, focused his message on “law and order on our streets” and more deregulation. He also empathized the need for a tougher stance against the communist block and accused the Johnson Administration on being “weak on communism”. A similar tone was set by General Westmoreland who vehemently rejected the Paris Peace Accords, labeling them as “a capitulation in the making, that is to be blamed on President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy”. Westmoreland, whose campaign was only barely mentioned in the news so far, also tried to get attention by personally attacking Nelson Rockefeller as a “secret Democrat”. The New York Governor, on new year’s eve, responded by calling the general “classless”. Rockefeller also denounced Westmoreland’s proposal to increase defense spending by 40% as a joke. Rocky promised to release a plan how to balance the budget by 1976 in the coming months. The Gipper also expressed his determination to balance the federal budget by 1976, largely through spending cuts and economic growth.

The race overall seems, at this early stage, wide open and is expected to be a toss-up in any case. That can be interpreted as good news for both parties: Democrats could very well win a fourth consecutive term in office. And Republicans have a decent shot at winning back the presidency after twelve years of JFK and LBJ.


December 31, 1971: A ton of new polls at new year's eve! Released by Gallup

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 47%
Disapprove: 46%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

(only declared candidates or potential contenders with at least 5% support listed)

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 28%
Former Governor George Wallace: 14%
Senator George McGovern: 9%
Undecided/others: 13%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 31%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 28%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 19%
General William Westmoreland: 8%
Undecided/Others: 14%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Spiro Agnew: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
William Westmoreland: 38%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 41%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Spiro Agnew: 43%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
William Westmoreland: 39%


George McGovern: 40%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

George McGovern: 39%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%

George McGovern: 40%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

George McGovern: 41%
William Westmoreland: 40%


Next: Heading into 1972 and the upcoming election cycle, President Johnson’s final year in office… stay tuned!
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« Reply #115 on: November 30, 2017, 04:39:07 am »

This is amazing. Can't wait to see how it goes!
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« Reply #116 on: December 03, 2017, 06:40:41 am »
« Edited: December 03, 2017, 02:41:54 pm by President Johnson »

January 3, 1972: Richard Nixon endorses Rockefeller and joins the campaign trail!



Senator Robert Taft Jr. (R-OH) gave the 1972 response to President Johnson’s State of the Union Address

Senator Robert Taft (R-OH) was selected to for a rebuttal to the president’s address. Taft’s selection was a victory of the conservative wing, since the liberals and moderates wanted Edward Brooke (R-MA), the first popularly elected black senator, to give the speech.

“No word about the ongoing drug crisis on our streets and the military. Instead, the president praised the end of the draft and proposed a new expensive social program such as socialized healthcare. This bad news for America. The good news is, that we are going to have an election this year that gives us the chance to replace King Johnson with a Republican”, said Taft, the son of legendary senator and conservative icon Robert Taft and grandson of former president William Howard Taft. In his remarks, the Ohio senator, who is in office since 1971, also sharply criticized the Johnson Administration for being too weak on the Soviets. Although he welcomed negotiations, he emphasized to be more aggressive at Moscow. “The president seeks an equal balance”, said Taft, “but there can’t be a balance. America must stand tall against the forces of communism in order to liberate all nations dominated by the Soviets.”
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« Reply #117 on: December 03, 2017, 11:59:40 am »

January 17, 1972: Vice President Bobby Kennedy kicks off presidential campaign!

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Vice President Kennedy, the Democratic frontrunner, is now officially in the race. "I want to continue the JFK/LBJ agenda and be a voice for progress", he said upon entering the contest.

He already filled in for all primaries and caucuses last month, but now it is finally official: Bobby Kennedy runs for president this year. He kicked off his campaign at rally in New York City joined by an enthusiastic crowd of approximately 10,000 people. “My fellow Americans: Grateful for all the support you have given to me in over a decade of public service, I once more ask for your support to change world”, the vice president said, “in 11 years now, under the leadership of my beloved brother, President John Kennedy, and President Lyndon Johnson, we have come so far as a nation. At home and abroad, we made unimagined progress that will be remembered for generations. But renewing our nation is not a mission that is completed one day, it is a lasting process that goes on, far beyond a single presidency. We must constantly work for reforms: implanting new ones as well as improving those existing. This is and has always been the American way of life. To continue this work, America needs a champion who will take the burning torch of this great nation and move forward. I want to be your champion.”

Bobby Kennedy enters the presidential contest as the clear frontrunner for the Democratic nomination. He has been an active vice president under a president he had a difficult relationship before. Bobby also has experience in congress and at the Justice Department. The name Kennedy is still somewhat of a myth, what certainly helps RFK. In his speech, he praised the achievements of the Kennedy/Johnson years. He expressed his staunch support for universal healthcare and urged early passage of a bill. “I tell the Republicans: If they don’t pass it during this year, I’ll try again as president.”

Just shortly after his announcement, RFK picked up many notable endorsements from Democrats across the nation. He also received support from dozens of black leaders and civil rights activists.


January 22, 1972: Wallace ’72 – former Governor George Wallace enters Democratic primary

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Former Governor George Wallace at his first rally: The colorful Southerner runs as a populist and representative of the old conservative wing

“Can you find a true voice for the average American in this field of Democratic candidates?”, asked former Governor George Wallace his supporters at a rally in Montgomery, Alabama. “No! We need Wallace! We want Wallace! Wallace! Wallace!” answered a cheering crowd. Wallace continued: “I can't either! And that is why I, today and here in wonderful Montgomery, declare my candidacy for President of the United States!” [Massive applause]. “It is time to reclaim the power in our country. For all too long we had some bureaucrats telling us what to do. For all too long we have seen an erosion in public confidence and an erosion in states rights. For all too long, we have seen the lawlessness of hippies and other demonstrators! I seek a new approach to governing and be a voice for everyday citizens in this country. This is our land, and we will take it back from DC!”, the former governor added.

After forgoing a candidacy in 1968, George Wallace seeks the presidency in 1972 and challenges Vice President Kennedy and Senator Humphrey from the right. The colorful populist, who moderated his stances on segregation, has still a lot of fans across America, especially in the South. The voices who wrote him off following the narrow defeat in the 1970 gubernatorial primary are now proven wrong, although it is unclear how much support he will get in the primaries. But a certain appeal to his Anti-Washington and pro state’s rights message is certainly there. The nomination of Wallace is unlikely at this point, though he may garner enough votes in the new primary system to prevent the favorites Kennedy and Humphrey, whom he labeled as “out of touch elitists”, from an outright majority.


January 29, 1972: President Johnson: Kennedy or Humphrey should be the nominee

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When he briefly sat down with a female journalist, President Johnson said he prefered either Robert Kennedy or Hubert Humphrey as the Democratic nominee and next president.

The press called it “unexpected and surprising” right after President Johnson expressed his thoughts on the presidential campaign. If there is something like a “non endorsement”, he gave one for Wallace and McGovern. When asked by a female journalist at the White House who his choice for president would be, President Johnson answered that he heavily favors Robert Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey. “Both of these men are excellent candidates. I think either of them should be the nominee and I have no doubt each would make an outstanding president. Voters who want my policies to continue beyond January 1973 should cast their vote for Robert Kennedy or Hubert Humphrey”, said the chief executive. When asked about the Republicans, LBJ declined. 

The New York Times commented that LBJ obviously isn't willing just to "sit out" his remaining time in office. After surprising the public with this comment, he also left many stunned by pushing for universal healthcare. "Johnson is still a power hungry man. He wants to lead as long he is president", the article reads.


January 30, 1972: Last Vietnam soldiers return home

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President Lyndon B. Johnson greets homecoming U.S. soldiers from Vietnam; January 30, 1972

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Upon his arrival, a G.I. is welcomed by his girlfriend at Andrews Air Force Base

A year after the signing of the Paris Peace Accords, the last American soldiers returned home to the United States. They were welcomed home at Andrews Air Force Base by President Lyndon Johnson. The commander-in-chief thanked the young men for their service and sacrifice and promised his administration will do everything possible to help veterans. “America’s brightest finally returned home and we owe you deep respect”, he said. Images of the last troops welcomed home by parents, spouses, girlfriends and other relatives went through the entire media and sparked deep emotions on many sides. Some also felt abandoned, as this was not a “hero’s welcome” like in World War II.

Nevertheless, about 10,000 U.S. military advisors remain in South Vietnam to train South Vietnamese forces and assist them. Their role, however, is limited to assistance and training, as agreed to in the Paris treaty. They also won’t take action in battle and stay on South Vietnamese territory.


January 31, 1972: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

President Johnson's State of the Union Address made surpringly positive news that led to an improvement of his numbers. After Vice President Kennedy announced his presidential campaign, his numbers also surged for both the primary and the general election. George Wallace also imoproves his standing. Meanwhile, Hubert Humphrey's numbers dropped nationally, but his campaign heavily focuses on Iowa, where the first caucus will be held in February 1st. On the Republican side, Governor Reagan and Rockefeller lead the field and are at dead heat nationally as well as in Iowa.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 50%
Disapprove: 44%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race


Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 37%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 26%
Former Governor George Wallace: 18%
Senator George McGovern: 9%
Undecided/others: 10%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 32%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 31%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 18%
General William Westmoreland: 8%
Undecided/Others: 12%


Iowa Democratic caucus

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 33%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 30%
Former Governor George Wallace: 15%
Senator George McGovern: 13%
Undecided/others: 9%


Iowa Republican Caucus

Governor Ronald Reagan: 35%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 20%
General William Westmoreland: 5%
Undecided/Others: 5%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Spiro Agnew: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
William Westmoreland: 38%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 43%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 45%
Spiro Agnew: 42%

Hubert Humphrey: 46%
William Westmoreland: 37%


George McGovern: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

George McGovern: 40%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

George McGovern: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

George McGovern: 43%
William Westmoreland: 40%


Next: The Iowa Caucus on February 1, 1972!

Writer’s note: The primary calendar is the same as in our days. In the TL, the states implemented caucus and primary rules right after the Kennedy/Laxalt Commission finished its work.
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« Reply #118 on: December 03, 2017, 01:49:23 pm »

I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?
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« Reply #119 on: December 03, 2017, 02:12:54 pm »

I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?
He was the third African-American senator, during Reconstruction there were 2 from Mississippi. Though, even today he is still the longest serving African-American senator.
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« Reply #120 on: December 03, 2017, 02:40:38 pm »
« Edited: December 03, 2017, 02:42:21 pm by President Johnson »

I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?
He was the third African-American senator, during Reconstruction there were 2 from Mississippi. Though, even today he is still the longest serving African-American senator.

Thanks for the note. I thought he was the first overall. But he was the first popularly elected African American senator, according to Wikipedia. Corrected that now. Smiley
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« Reply #121 on: December 03, 2017, 03:32:05 pm »

I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?
He was the third African-American senator, during Reconstruction there were 2 from Mississippi. Though, even today he is still the longest serving African-American senator.

Thanks for the note. I thought he was the first overall. But he was the first popularly elected African American senator, according to Wikipedia. Corrected that now. Smiley
Yes, first popularly elected as the other two were elected long before the 17th Amendment
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« Reply #122 on: December 04, 2017, 02:44:41 pm »

February 1, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Humphrey and Reagan emerge victorious in Iowa; Agnew strong third in Republican Caucus ★★★

The primary session for election 1972 has begun. These are the popular vote results:

Democratic Caucus
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 33.3%
Robert F. Kennedy: 31.4%
George Wallace: 18.4%
George McGovern: 15.8%

A mid-westerner wins in the Mid-West: Hubert Humphrey beats Robert Kennedy by roughly two percent in Iowa. Not too surprising, since the former vice president’s campaign heavily focused on the neighboring state of his native Minnesota to gain early momentum. Iowa was a must-win for Humphrey, who celebrated his victory. The Kennedy campaign downplayed the defeat and pointed out how close RFK came. Both George Wallace and McGovern exceeded expectations. Especially Wallace garnered over 18% of the vote, proving that his appeal goes beyond the South.

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Senator Hubert Humphrey talks to the press after defeating Vice President Kennedy in the Iowa Democratic Caucus: "I am stunned and thankful for Democrats' support"


Republican Caucus
✓ Ronald Reagan: 35.8%
Nelson Rockefeller: 26.1%
Spiro Agnew: 25.7%
William Westmoreland: 9.5%

The Republican Caucus produced two winners: The first is Ronald Wilson Reagan, who not just won Iowa, but also managed to secure a near ten point win over his rival Nelson Rockefeller. Rocky’s support in the state was obviously overestimated in the polls. The second winner is Spiro Theodore Agnew, who almost came in second with over a fourth of the total vote. He exceeded expectations by a significant margin and enjoys some momentum after his performance. William Westmoreland got almost ten percent of the vote and did better than expected. However, it is highly unlikely that he comes anywhere close to the nomination.

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Governor Reagan with supporters after winning the Republican Iowa Caucus, February 1, 1972


Gallup Polls for the New Hampshire Primary on February 8, 1972

The first primary of the 1972 election will take place one week after the Iowa Caucus and is expected to be more in Kennedy’s and Rockefeller’s favor.


Democratic Primary Poll

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 34%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 29%
Senator George McGovern: 18%
Former Governor George Wallace: 9%
Undecided/others: 10%


Republican Primary Poll

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 54%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 21%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 17%
General William Westmoreland: 1%
Undecided/others: 7%
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« Reply #123 on: December 04, 2017, 02:49:46 pm »

Go Agnew!
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« Reply #124 on: December 04, 2017, 06:10:30 pm »

Go Reagan!
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