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President Johnson
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« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2017, 02:52:56 pm »

The fall campaign

September 15, 1968: President Johnson to address Vietnam policy

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After spending almost a week on the campaign trail, President Johnson presented his plans for a new Vietnam policy during a speech in Cleveland, Ohio.

The president presented the following plan:

- Beginning in 1969, the number of U.S. troops will be reduced by at least 50,000.
- Further reductions in 1970 and 1971. No specific numbers given.
- 90% of the air strikes remain halted as long as the talks continue (the halt was ordered in March).
- US and South Vietnamese Force will start a ground offensive in 1969, should the peace talks not move in the right direction.
- The saved costs (for troop reduction) will be used for additional equipment deliveries and further training missions for South Vietnamese forces.
- The US will use all diplomatic efforts, including USSR and China, to end the war. These efforts will take place behind the scenes. The main goal is to reduce or halt Soviet and Chinese aid the north.

President Johnson also stated that he intends to bring all troops home within his next four years, if reelected. Possibly by 1971. He also made it clear, that the more the North would reduce their military actions and be willing to talk in Paris, the more American troops would leave the country and come back home. He cited directly to North Vietnamese casualties during the war and the heavy losses in the Tet Offensive and directly urged the North Vietnamese leadership to cooperate.

The press largely covered the speech positive and pointed out that this strategy was basically a compromise between Democratic hawks and doves. Some observers expressed their doubts, citing that earlier diplomatic efforts failed. Others concluded that North Vietnam was now willing to negotiate, at least to win some time after their devastating losses during the Tet Offensive.

Richard Nixon immediately responded to the president’s plan. Interestingly he publically agreed to some of the points LBJ made. However, the Republican candidate denounced the seriousness of the proposals. “The Johnson Administration had enough time to implement the steps outlined. They haven’t. Therefore I sincerely conclude that this is nothing but campaign rhetoric. All their efforts for peace have failed and will continue to fail. A Republican government will end the war with honor and make sure that America’s standing in the world won’t be weakened”. Shortly after, Bobby Kennedy attacked back and denounced Nixon’s comments. “It is nice when Mr. Nixon agrees on the policies we have put out. Unlike him, we have made specific proposals, put before the American people, that are reasonable”. His GOP counterpart John Tower criticized that Johnson was putting himself in a weak position, because it looked like “the US wants to leave at any price. All the North has to do, is wait until we’re gone”.

On the domestic front, Republicans again stressed a law and order policy. Nixon stated that the rule of law has been “perverted” under Democratic leadership.

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Republican presidential candidate Richard Nixon on the campaign trail in Chicago

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President Johnson campaigns with his running mate, Senator Bobby Kennedy, in Ohio


Gallup Polls released on September 30, 1968:

National polling

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%


State polls (potential battlegrounds)

California:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Florida:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Illinois:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Michigan:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

New Jersey:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

New York:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 52%
Richard Nixon (R): 41%

North Carolina:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 43%

Ohio:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 43%

Pennsylvania:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 42%

Texas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Virginia:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 42%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Washington:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Wisconsin:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 43%
Disapprove: 49%


The president’s speech did not just halt the downward-spiral after the DNC riots, his numbers were on the rise again as the campaign was heading into October. Nevertheless, the race again turned into Nixon’s favor by mid-October. Public observers cited two main reasons for this trend: First, the Vietnam peace talks seemed stalled. On October 12, a leak in the Democratic campaign exposed that even Bobby Kennedy had grown increasingly skeptical of the North Vietnamese as he had been briefed with the president on the talks. Although the vice-presidential nominee denounced the leak the following day and insisted that he sees no “pure military solution”, the incident did not help the Democrats. Some journalists suggested this would alienate the doves, already lukewarm in their support for a ticket headed by Johnson, even further and causing them to stay home on election day. Second, the Republican camp launched a new series of campaign advertisements on TV and radio. The ads focused on Vietnam and law and order. By mid-October, the Republicans outspent Democrats on ads by about twenty percent. Nevertheless, some Democratic strategists confirmed in backroom talks that their number of ads would increase within the last two weeks. 

Interesting was also the targeting of states. Nixon took some moderate stances on racial issues. He mainly avoided the topic during his speeches in an effort to keep states of the Deep South, that Barry Goldwater carried in 1964. The Republican campaign also made efforts to win Texas, homestate of both President Johnson and Nixon’s running mate, Senator John Tower, after some polls showed a potential vulnerability of the Democratic ticket. Nevertheless, most political analysts rated the Lone-Star-State still as reliably Democratic. The Johnson/Kennedy ticket heavily targeted Nixon’s homestate of California (although the Republican nominee had his formal residence in New York in 1968). Polls from the nation’s largest state showed a close race. Usually leaning Republican in the past decades, Bobby Kennedy proved to be a very popular figure in the state. Aware of the polls, the vice presidential candidate made several campaign stumps in California. He gave 18 speeches in September alone. The president also gave seven; two more were joint appearances of Johnson and Kennedy. Democrats also heavily targeted Ohio, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. The latter came as a surprise, but LBJ decided to increase efforts when polls showed a tight race.


Gallup polls released on October 15, 1968:

National polling

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%


State polls (potential battlegrounds)

California:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Florida:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 41%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Illinois:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Michigan:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

New Jersey:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

North Carolina:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Ohio:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Pennsylvania:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 43%

Texas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Virginia:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 41%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Washington:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Wisconsin:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 42%
Disapprove: 50%


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President Johnson shakes hands with supporters in New Jersey

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Richard Nixon with his famous V-Sign


October 17, 1968: Thronberry confirmed

Three months after his nomination, Homer Thornberry is confirmed by the US Senate with 77 votes in favor to be the next Chief Justice of the United States. The Texan was sworn in during a small White House ceremony by Vice President Hubert Humphrey. President Johnson thanked retiring Chief Justice Earl Warren for his long service and his archievements for civil rights and liberties.

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Chief Justice Homer Thornberry
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« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2017, 02:19:27 pm »
« Edited: September 23, 2017, 06:44:28 am by President Johnson »

Writers note: I accidently deleted the following two topics; I added them here in short form:

October 19, 1968: President Johnson to announce trip to Moscow in December

Secretary of State Dean Rusk announces that President Johnson will travel to the USSR as first sitting president to discuss the Vietnam War and other world affairs with the Soviet Leadership.

October 31, 1968: President Johnson addresses the Vietnam War

President Johnson announces, in what the press called an October Surprise, the complete bombing halt in Vietnam.



The final days of the 1968 campaign

As we’re now heading into November, the Nixon/Tower campaign began to panic. Tied or ahead in the polls by mid-October, the newly announced Moscow trip, the bombing halt and the increased number of ads seem to pay off for the LBJ/RFK ticket. The tight was slightly turning into the Democrats favor, but Richard Nixon was still anything but beaten. As final polls indicated, he is expected to keep most states of the Deep South that Barry Goldwater flipped Republican four years earlier for the first time in almost a century. As President Johnson himself predicted when he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, the pro-civil rights stance hurt national Democrats long term in the Deep South. In addition, a lot of Southern Democrats at the state level, such as Alabama's George Wallace or Georgia Governor Lester Maddox, refused to endorse his campaign. Maddox didn't hesitate to criticize the president publically for many years. He also attacked Bobby Kennedy as an "out of touch elitist, who doesn't give a damn for state rights" and would be "the worst vice president I have ever seen".

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United in their opposition to the Johnson/Kennedy campaign: Governors George Wallace (D-AL) and Lester Maddox (D-GA). However, they didn't endorse Nixon either

Ultimately, the election will come down to the states that seem to be very competitive in most polls. They are: Ohio, New Jersey, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Oregon and California. They are pure toss-up. Especially California will be interesting to watch. It is very close in polls and both campaigns invested a lot of time, effort and money into the Golden State, where 40 electoral votes are up for grabs. The state may decide the election. Although leaning Republican, the Johnson/Kennedy has also a decent chance to win Tennessee, Virginia and Florida. Possibly Oklahoma and New Mexico. On the other hand, the Nixon/Tower ticket has a shot at winning Texas, Washington and Pennsylvania.


Gallup and the New York Times released a map on November 1, that reflects the state of the race.



Light red/blue = Lean Democratic/Republican
Standard red/blue = Likely Democratic/Republican
Dark red/blue = Solid Democratic/Republican


Totals:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 181 electoral votes
Richard Nixon (R): 181 electoral votes
Tossup: 176 electoral votes



November 2, 1968: The Bombshell!

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_______________________________________________________
New York City   Saturday, November 2nd, 1968
_______________________________________________________


PARIS PEACE TALKS POTENTIAL SUBJECT TO SABOTAGE ACTS, LINKS TO NIXON CAMPAIGN

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Washington, DC – The New York Times received sensible documents from members of the intelligence community that suggest possible acts of sabotage regarding the Paris peace talks. According to the anonyms sources within the intelligence, intelligence officials are reviewing such possible actions. The documents raise serious questions, whether the Paris Peace negotiations are the target of sabotage acts. This concerns the part of South Vietnam, whose government currently refuses to negotiate with the Communist regime and the Liberation front.

[…]

According to the documents, a Vietnamese woman named Anna Chenault, a confidant of South Vietnamese President Thieu and U.S. resident, was in contact with members of the Richard Nixon presidential campaign at least since July of this year. The document further states that the Nixon campaign offered President Thieu a so-called “better deal” with the North under a Nixon Administration than the conditions of the Johnson Administration. A Nixon Administration would give the guarantees to the South, the Democratic government is currently refusing. The only thing the Nixon campaign would expect from Thieu in return, is making sure that there would be no agreement as long as Lyndon Johnson is in office. Such an agreement would be bad for South Vietnam and likely assure President Johnson’s reelection. Neither is in President Thieu’s interest. The contacts were, according to the source, intensified after Robert Kennedy joined the Johnson campaign. After RFK’s nomination, the South Vietnamese lost any confidence that President Johnson is willing to increase American efforts and stay in the South for a much longer time.

The document also mentions a FBI wire-tapped telephone call between Ms. Chenault an unidentified Nixon confidant from mid-October. The confidant, supposedly Mr. John Haldeman, told Ms. Chenault to “hold on” and that polls “are currently going into the right direction”. Although no further details provided, this can be interpreted as a message to President Thieu to hold on [refusing to participate in the talks] until after the presidential election on November 5, because any positive news on the Paris Peace talks would benefit the Johnson campaign. It is likely that President Johnson has been informed about the phone call by Director J. Edgar Hoover. Yet, we have no reliable information what the president’s response was. He may have pressured Thieu to join the talks, and after the South Vietnamese didn’t answer the call positively, the president ordered the complete bombing halt. This can be interpreted as a message to both North and South Vietnam. The bombing halt puts some pressure on the South at the battlefield and demonstrates to the North, that the U.S. is serious about a permanent solution.

As of this Saturday, neither a member of the Nixon campaign, the South Vietnamese government nor Ms. Chenault’s office was available for a comment to the New York Times.




The same afternoon, the Republican campaign put out a brief statement and vigorously denounced the report and the idea that the Nixon camp played any role in potential sabotage acts. “Although Mr. Nixon favors a different approach, he is not against diplomatic efforts to find a solution for the Vietnamese problem. If there are any attempts to undermine these talks, Mr. Nixon and his campaign denounce such acts. We can assure the American public that our campaign is not involved any actions to undermine the negotiations of the sitting administration. If there were such attempts and Mr. Nixon is elected, he will do everything he can to stop it and hold the responsible people accountable”, the statement reads.

It remains to be seen if and how this late report plays out on election day. When asked for comment at a California rally, President Johnson declined. “We are at a very important point of talks. Any attempts to sabotage acts will not be tolerated and appropriate steps taken against it. These steps will take place in secret. Therefore, I hope you can understand that I’m not prepared to make any additional comments on it. Especially on the question ,whether such attempts took place and if so, by who”, the president told a reporter. Bobby Kennedy took on Nixon by much tougher language: “If this is true, it is treason. Treason! America deserves better”, the vice presidential candidate said during a North Carolina trip. Republican officials, including Senator Tower, suggested that the leak was “no accident” and accused the Johnson Administration of “dirty tricks” in a last-minute effort to swing the election. “It is obvious that the President of the United States himself is responsible for these false reports. We hold him accountable on Tuesday”, said Tower. Surprising was a joint statement released by Governors Rockefeller and Reagan, Nixon’s former rivals, saying that the report is “concerning”. However, both expressed their believe that Nixon himself is not engaged in any sabotage act. Political analysts suggested both are preparing to lead a post-Nixon GOP. Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) joined the two powerful governors in their statement.
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« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2017, 02:21:10 pm »

Writer's note: Once again, I had to split the previos post and the polls listed here (too long for one post). Feel free to comment.


The final Gallup polls, conducted November 1 – 3, 1968 (before NYT-Article)

The polls still show a tight race, but the number of undecides has dropped to an all-time low. For the first time in almost fourteen months, President Johnson's approval rating has recovered to net positive, but still short of a majority.

National polling

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%


State polls (potential battlegrounds)

Arkansas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

California:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Florida:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 50%

Illinois:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Iowa:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 49%

Michigan:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Missouri:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

New Jersey:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 51%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

North Carolina:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Ohio:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Oklahoma:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 50%

Oregon:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Pennsylvania:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 51%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Texas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 54%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Virginia:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 50%

Washington:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Wisconsin:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 47%
Disapprove: 45%


Next: ★★★ CBS News Coverage of Election night, 1968 ★★★
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« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2017, 05:34:20 pm »

Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!
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« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2017, 05:36:39 pm »

Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!
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« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2017, 09:42:19 am »

Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!

Agreed.

Nixon would probably have been toast with that news out before election day.

Johnson 1968! Kennedy 1972!
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« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2017, 12:24:41 pm »
« Edited: September 17, 2017, 03:52:56 am by President Johnson »

★★★ United States presidential election –
Tuesday, November 5, 1968 ★★★


CBS News Coverage of Election night 1968. With Walter Cronkite.

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WALTER CRONKITE: “Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen. It is my pleasure to welcome you to our CBS News coverage of the U.S. presidential election of 1968. I’m Walter Cronkite, your moderator for tonight and I thank you very much for choosing our program. Our country seldom saw a campaign like this with so many ups and downs. Today is the big decision. Who will lead America into the 1970s? Incumbent President Lyndon Baines Johnson or former Vice President Richard Milhous Nixon? Which effects will recent developments have on the election? This and more, we’re going to find out today. […]

We’re beginning our program with a short look at the poll closing times in each states:

Img


I also want to show you the blank electoral map for this election. All the gray will be filled with color tonight. States carried by the Democratic ticket of Lyndon B. Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy will be red, states won by the Republican ticket of Richard Nixon and John Tower will be displayed in blue. States whose polls have closed, but are too close or early to call will be painted in green.”



Now, we take a short break before the first results will come in. Stay with us.”


6 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to our coverage of election night, 1968. It is six o’clock Eastern Standard Time, and polls have closed in Kentucky and Indiana. We can project that Richard Nixon has carried the state of Indiana and its 13 electoral votes. Kentucky, as of now, is to early too call. It trended towards the Republican ticket according to our analysts, but we can’t make a reliable projection this early.”



Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 13 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 0 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


7 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News and our coverage of the presidential election of 1968 between President Lyndon B. Johnson, the Democratic nominee for reelection to the presidency, and former Vice President Richard Nixon, the Republican nominee for president. Polls have closed in five more states. We’re beginning in the North: CBS projects that Richard Nixon has carried the state of Vermont. We can also surely say that he won South Carolina as well. As it looks like, Mr. Nixon is hitting his expectations in the Deep South. He won this important state by a clear margin. Polls are now also closed in Virginia, Georgia and Florida. These states are too early to call right now. But according to our analysts and reporters down there, we received word that he’s ahead in Georgia as well. We do not have such data for the other states I mentioned. Both are expected to be relatively close, with a slight lean towards Mr. Nixon. Our map now looks as follows:



Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 24 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 0 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


Mr. Nixon is ahead with 24 electoral votes. The Democratic ticket has not won any state as of now. But it is still a long night and we won’t be able to declare a winner unless someone has won 270 electoral votes. We’re back after a short break.”


7.30 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News, coverage of election night 1968. I’m your moderator, Walter Cronkite. […] After the polls closed more than one hour ago, we can now declare Richard Nixon the winner in Kentucky. That will add nine electoral votes to his tally.

Now, at half past seven, we have three more states with closed voting stations. Among them the important swing state of Ohio, which is, of course, too early to call. We expect a tight race there. The same in North Carolina, which is highly competitive as well. Not so in West Virginia, which we already call for President Johnson, who wins his first seven electoral votes.”



Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 33 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 7 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


8 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “We continue our program of coverage of election night 1968. At eight o’clock we have polls closing in several states, where a combined of more than 100 electoral votes are at stake. […]

I again want to begin in the North, in New England. The state of Maine has been called for Richard Nixon. Not surprising, President Johnson carried Rhode Island and Connecticut and secured these electoral votes. He also won the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the original homestate of his running mate Bobby Kennedy, where 14 electoral votes are available. They will go to the Democratic column. The Democratic ticket won a decisive victory in the state, taking over 60% of the vote. Another New England state has also been reported, and that is New Hampshire. We project, that the Nixon/Tower ticket won the state by a clear margin.

And we have more states to report, among them several big ones in the Northeast, Midwest and the South. These are Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. All these states are too early or close to call. We can, however, declare that Alabama and Mississippi are won by the Republican ticket. Richard Nixon worked hard to keep these states in the GOP column and he succeeded. He also defeated Democrats in Tennessee, a state, where Mr. Johnson had some hope to be in a competitive position, similar to North Carolina. But Mr. Nixon is that much ahead, that we project him the winner in Tennessee. We are also certain that he won Kansas and the Dakotas. And as I hear right now, President Johnson has reportedly won Delaware. He is also the clear winner in the District of Columbia. This is our updated map: Richard Nixon is ahead with 84 electoral votes. Lyndon B. Johnson received 39 electoral votes so far. But of course, it’s still early into this night and we are far away from the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency. We take a short break before polls close in Arkansas at 8.30 p.m..”



Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 84 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 39 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call
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« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2017, 01:10:01 pm »

Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!

Agreed.

Nixon would probably have been toast with that news out before election day.

Johnson 1968! Kennedy Humphrey 1972!
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« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2017, 05:49:26 am »
« Edited: September 17, 2017, 03:59:56 am by President Johnson »

★★★ CBS News Coverage of Election night 1968, with Walter Cronkite, continues ★★★
Img


8.30 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “It is 8.30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, and you’re on CBS News for coverage of election night 1968. At this time, only polls in Arkansas close. According to our reporters down there, we can’t call the upper southern state yet. It is expected to be relatively close. But we have three major projections to make! And, according to our sources, Richard Nixon carried both, Virginia and Georgia. These are important wins for the Republican hopeful.

And now the major surprise: We have received word that the state of Texas has already been called for Lyndon Johnson. This is stunning. Not surprising that he won his homestate, but that this is so early for the president. Projections indicate that Mr. Johnson will end up with at least 55% of the vote in Texas. This may be a setback for the Nixon campaign. Of course, Texas was not included in most of Mr. Nixon's calculations to the magic 270 electoral votes, but Republicans have reason to be disappointed that the state is not anywhere as close as they hoped. It seems that John Tower at the second spot had no significant effect in the Lone-Star-State. In short: A respectable win for President Johnson. It might be a trend, but we have to see what the night brings. Here you see our updated map”



Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 108 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 64 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


9 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News election night 1968. It is nine o’clock and we have polls closed in several more states. Among them the state with the most electoral votes: New York. We can already call the Empire State for Lyndon B. Johnson and add these 43 electoral votes to his tally. The state currently awards the highest number of electoral votes, although California gained the title of the nation's most populous state in 1962. But as electoral votes are allocated only each ten years after the United States Census, the current composition of the electoral college reflects the resuts of the 1960 census. As the next census is set for 1970, we'll have a new electoral college composition in the next election, which will take place four years from now, in November 1972. California will then have more electoral votes up for grabs than any other state in America. According to our team in New York, President Johnson and Senator Kennedy, who is representing the state in the senate since 1965, are likely to crack 60% mark in the state. This is seriously affecting the national popular vote. While RFK won his senate contest with 53% of the vote in 1964, LBJ received over 68% at the same time and carried every county. This of course won't happen this time, but his showing is certainly encouraging for Democrats. As we hear from our colleagues out in New York City, African American turnout is at a record high. This group has become the most pro-Democratic ones. Both President Johnson and Senator Kennedy have record-high approval ratings among blacks, due to their pro-civil rights policies. Bobby Kennedy earned a great deal of respect for his speech back in April, when Dr. King was shot to death in Memphis, Tennessee. And the president, of course, has become a cheerleader for many African Americans for his leadership to pass civil rights legislation, which many believe, had not been possible without LBJ's political skills to get it done. And probably because he, as a Texan through and through, surprised many to come out as a staunch pro-civil-rights president, maybe to most pro-civil-rights president this country has seen so far.

In Minnesota, a Democratic stronghold, and home of Vice President Humphrey, we also have a clear winner. Ten more votes go to Lyndon Johnson and his running mate Bobby Kennedy. Nevertheless, Richard Nixon is also winning some of these states: Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska and Louisiana. Polls also closed in Wisconsin and New Mexico. Both are too early to call.

And I just hear from my studio colleagues, that President Johnson has another very big win: He is the apparent victor in Pennsylvania and is securing all its 29 electoral votes. Very important win for the incumbent. And, wait, I have also just got word about Maryland. According to our correspondents, the state of Maryland has voted for the Democratic ticket. That means, Lyndon Johnson gets another ten electoral votes, that brings him in the lead with 156 votes. Richard Nixon is trailing at 132 electoral votes now.”



President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 156 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 132 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call
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« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2017, 06:01:19 am »

9.30 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Now, at 9.30 p.m., we have no new states with polls closed. But before we are tunring to them, CBS has two important projections for you: The state of Florida is awarding its 14 electoral votes to Richard Nixon, who won the Sunshine state by at least high single digits. However, the Republican ticket can’t narrow the gap in the overall electoral vote count, because we are sure yet, that the Johnson/Kennedy emerges victorious in Michigan. Another 21 electoral votes. The map now shows the president at 177 electoral votes and Mr. Nixon at 146. We take a short break and be back soon.”



President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 177 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 146 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


10 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back, as we continue our program of coverage of election night 1968. Before we are coming to the states where polls are closing, we can project more of the previous states: Richard Nixon reportedly won New Mexico. Meanwhile, President Johnson won another key state: He is the winner in the state of New Jersey. Another important victory, as he clinches these 17 electoral votes.

As we are moving more towards the West, we can already project that Montana, Utah, Nevada and Arizona voted for Richard Nixon. He carries all of these four. However, as these states are barely populated, the wins there only add a modest number of electoral votes to his column. Polls are also closed in Iowa now, but we are unable to call this battleground so soon. As we take a look at our map, oh wait, I hear some news on an important other state. […] It is now official: The state of Wisconsin has been called. The winner there is President Lyndon Johnson. He secured these twelve electoral votes, too. Let’s take a look at the map: LBJ is at this point ahead with 206 electoral votes, to Dick Nixon’s 166”.



President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 206 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 166 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


WALTER CRONKITE: “We are still not anywhere close to the 270 electoral votes, but as I look at this map for the moment, Richard Nixon must now start winning important swing states, if he wants to be president. Besides the battlegrounds, he is pretty much maxed out at this point. Johnson and Kennedy, on the other hand, could end this by winning two or three more swing states. I hear that Nixon is leading in North Carolina, Missouri and Oklahoma. Ohio is running about even. LBJ is ahead in Illinois and, surprisingly, in Arkansas. If Nixon manages to win the states he’s currently ahead plus Ohio, he still needs to take his native of California and one of the other West Coast states, Washington and Oregon, or, Iowa, in order be elected 37th president. But if Mr. Nixon loses only Ohio and doesn’t make this up with Illinois, where he is currently trailing, even California alone won’t save him. If LBJ is carrying Ohio in addition to Illinois and Arkansas, where he’s currently ahead, the incumbent is at 268 electoral votes, assuming we add Hawaii to his tally, too, which he is expected to win. But as of now, it’s too early to make any projection who will be sworn in as president on January 20, 1969. Mr. Nixon has still a reasonable path to victory and Democrats at the LBJ Ranch shouldn’t be overconfident. We take a quick break continue our program, as the night now enters its decisive phase. Stay tuned!”
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« Reply #35 on: September 17, 2017, 04:29:56 am »

10.37 p.m. – BREAKING: PRESIDENT JOHNSON WINS ILLINOIS
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According to CBS Studio Chicago, the Johnson/Kennedy ticket wins Illinois and its critical 26 electoral votes. President now leading his challenger 232 to 166 electoral votes (270 needed to win)

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WALTER CRONKITE: “We interrupt the break for a very important call. It has just been reported, that President Lyndon B. Johnson has carried the state of Illinois and its pivotal 26 electoral votes. This victory is very, very important for the LBJ/RFK ticket and will bring some relief to the LBJ Ranch, where the president is assembled with his family and friends, his running mate Robert Kennedy and his family, as well as other high-profile Democratic politicians. Mr. Johnson has won 232 electoral votes so far, Mr. Nixon is at 166. I’m sure there is some panic breaking out at the Nixon headquarters in New York right now. I assume, the GOP analysts will run through various scenarios, how their standard-bearer can still climb to 270. I say this is still possible, but the path just got narrower by losing Illinois. We come back after the break soon for more projections, when the Western states close their polls in roughly 15 minutes. Stay with us.”



President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 232 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 166 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


11 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Here we are again for coverage of CBS News, election night 1968. My name is Walter Cronkite. It is now 11 p.m. Eastern Standard Time and we have more projections as polls just closed at the West Coast. First, we have now verified information about Oklahoma, where the voting came to an end three hours ago. And according to all our sources, Richard Nixon has defeated Lyndon Johnson in that state. Democrats had some hope that they could win these eight electoral votes in the northern neighbor state of the president’s native, Texas. We have mixed information on Arkansas, but our colleagues have now called the state for the president, as has the New York Times. Other networks still rate Arkansas as undecided, but we are sure that the Democratic ticket is victorious down there. We add the state’s six electoral votes to LBJ’s tally.


CBS reports: Democrats maintain majority in congress


Now polls are closed in California, where 40 electoral votes are at stake, in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. As of now, we can only declare Richard Nixon the winner in Idaho. However, Senator Frank Church won reelection to his seat there. I can also say right now, that Democrats maintain their majority in both congressional chambers. The three coastal states in West are too early to call. The electoral map now looks like this.”



President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 238 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 178 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


WALTER CRONKITE: “Slowly but steady, Richard Nixon’s path to 270 electoral votes is getting narrower. They have now every reason become increasingly nervous at the Republican headquarters. Their candidate has, at this point, not much room for error anymore. Mr. Nixon absolutely must win California to hang on. If Mr. Johnson emerges victorious in the Golden State, where his campaign invested plenty of money and efforts, he climbs to 278 electoral votes and will return to the Oval Office for four more years. All signs are also pointing in the direction that the president is well on his way to carry Hawaii, where voting still takes place at this hour, what would give him four additional votes. […] And I just heard that LBJ’s win in Arkansas, although close, has been confirmed, so the incumbent stays at 238 votes in the electoral college. At least for the moment.

I also received some updates for the remaining states: The race in North Carolina is still very close and we are not able to make a projection. Mr. Nixon is still ahead overall, but his lead has declined in the past hour. Reports stated that some ballots had to be recounted after an electricy blackout. So, we might have to wait at least one more hour for a call in North Carolina. In Ohio, there race is very tight. We heard that the Republican ticket is now leading by about 500 votes statewide. However, only 72% of the votes are in as counting moves on slower than expected. So, the outcome is wide open, but we have to point out that the urban areas have reported less than rural ones at the moment, what could benefit the Johnson campaign. In Missouri, Mr. Johnson has taken the lead after St. Louis' votes now came in by larger numbers, but Mr. Nixon has still a 50% chance to secure these 12 important electoral votes. In Iowa, Lyndon Johnson is currently ahead by a healthy margin, but the rural counties have been reporting slower than urban counties. So, we think that the Republican ticket has still a decent shot of winning in that state. In California, we are not able not say who is leading as the counting just begun. Nevertheless, our correspondents report that Mr. Johnson is exceeding expectations in the Bay Area at this moment. Possible that Bobby Kennedy is playing a bigger factor as usual here. The Democratic vice presidential nominee proved to be popular in the Golden State, what caused the president to send his running mate to California for many speeches. That might pay off right now, despite the fact that the Nixon campaign increased their efforts in the past few weeks to play on the defense here. Mr. Johnson’s apparent showing in the Bay Area is not encouraging news for the Nixon camp. We will see how that plays out in the end. Our prediction from Sunday gives the state narrowly to Richard Nixon. On the remaining states, we haven’t enough data to give you serious information. As soon as we have, we let you know. Now, we’re back right after a short break. Thank you for your continued interest in our program.”


11.20 p.m.

11.20 p.m. – BREAKING: PRESIDENT JOHNSON TAKES MISSOURI
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Reports: President Johnson declared winner in Missouri and its 12 electoral votes. LBJ now at 250 electoral votes, 20 short of reelection; Nixon stuck at 178 (270 needed to win)

WALTER CRONKITE: “As we continue our program, we have more bad news for the Nixon campaign: President Lyndon Johnson has been declared the winner of the contest in Missouri. The twelve electoral votes of Harry S. Truman’s homestate go to the Democratic column. Our projection now sees the Johnson/Kennedy team at 250 electoral votes, 20 short of victory. If we add Hawaii to the president’s tally and Alaska to Mr. Nixon’s, LBJ only needs to win either California, Ohio or North Carolina alone; or a combination of Iowa, Oregon and Washington state to hit the 270 mark. According to our reporters at the Nixon headquarters, the Republican supporters went silent after Missouri has been called. At the LBJ Ranch, everything is quiet. The president probably wants to wait until he is undeniable reelected before he is coming out at all. We know that he’s assembled in the Ranch’s living room with his family, close friends and Bobby Kennedy, joined by his wife Ethel. It is still possible that Mr. Nixon pulls off an upset, but we find this increasingly doubtful.

And… and.. while we are still waiting for calls in Ohio and North Carolina, I just got word that the state of Iowa has a declared victor. Accordingly, President Johnson has captured this mid-western state as well and adds another nine electoral college votes to his column. He now stands at 259 electoral votes, not far away anymore from the 270 needed to decide the election. We have also received some unconfirmed information that Republican Senate Leader Everett Dirksen of Illinois told a Washington Post reporter just moments ago, that he thinks a Nixon victory is very unlikely. We’ll see. CBS News comes back soon.”



President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 259 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 178 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call
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« Reply #36 on: September 17, 2017, 04:41:39 am »

11.47 p.m. – BREAKING: PRESIDENT JOHNSON REELECTED; WINS CRITICAL OHIO CONTEST

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CBS reports: Incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson defeats Republican challenger Richard Nixon and wins reelection to a third (second full) term in office. Johnson/Kennedy ticket declared winner in Ohio, now at 285 electoral votes (270 needed to win)

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WALTER CRONKITE: “Now we have the news the whole world has been waiting for: President Johnson is the winner in Ohio, and with it, the winner of the 1968 presidential election. His victory in Ohio, which is once again the kingmaker, adds 26 more electoral votes to his tally, which stands at 285 now. 15 more than the number he needed to secure the election. All major networks called the state in Mr. Johnson’s favor, who is hitting 50% of the vote there. Therefore, Lyndon Baines Johnson will remain the 36th President of the United States of America. And coming January 20, Robert Francis Kennedy will become the 39th Vice President of the United States. […] While President Johnson will continue to lead our country, I think it’s fair to say that the stunning political career of Richard Milhous Nixon is now over. Having lost the presidency twice, and the California governorship in between, I don’t see him running for office again. But we’ll see, Mr. Nixon is expected to give a speech soon. We will come back in a few minutes for polls closing in Hawaii and Alaska. Stay tuned!”



✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 285 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 178 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


12 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News election night 1968. I’m your moderator Walter Cronkite. […] The last two states just closed their polls and we project, as expected, that Richard Nixon’s wins the state of Alaska and Lyndon Johnson is the winner in Hawaii. We also have two battleground states to call: After a longer than usual ballot counting, President Johnson has also edged out a narrow victory in North Carolina. With 13 more electoral votes, he has now collected 302 electoral votes. Oregon gives its six electoral votes to Richard Nixon, who managed to win relatively close victory here. That means, only California and Washington state aren’t called for a candidate yet, but we expect this to happen within the next 30 minutes. According to our sources, Mr. Nixon is slightly ahead in his original home state, but his lead gets smaller as counting proceeds. However, even if he manages to outperform the Democratic ticket, these 40 electoral votes won’t give him the election anymore. Here is our current map”



✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 302 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 187 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call
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« Reply #37 on: September 17, 2017, 01:26:17 pm »

LBJ and RFK!
LBJ and RFK!
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« Reply #38 on: September 17, 2017, 03:37:56 pm »

12.15 a.m. – RICHARD NIXON CONCEDES PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

WALTER CRONKITE: “My fellow viewers, welcome back to the program. As I just learned, Richard Nixon went out before his supporters to give remarks on the election outcome. Let’s switch to the Nixon headquarters.”

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[Applause]

CROWD: “Nixon! Nixon! We want Nixon!”

RICHARD NIXON: “Thank you all. Thank you. [Crowd applauds, Nixon smiles].

I just called President Lyndon Johnson and congratulated him on his victory. I congratulated the president and his running mate, Robert Kennedy, and wished them all the best. I hope that President Johnson and Vice President-elect Kennedy will be successful in guiding our country through these difficult times, because we face tremendous challenges. I offered them my full cooperation.

I also want to use the opportunity to speak here tonight to thank you all. My wife, Pat, who has been outstanding. My running mate, Senator John Tower, who will continue to be a voice for our visions in the United States Senate. And I want to thank all my supporters and the millions of Americans who put their trust in me. I also want to apologize to all of you. That I let you down, that I could not win this election. You did the best you could, and I'm very proud of you. Being the Republican Party’s standard bearer twice has been the honor of my life […]

Now let us leave all the division behind us and work for the America we all deserve. We have seen enough division, it is time for unity in America. Thank you all. Thank you”.

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Richard Nixon steps off the podium after his concession speech; once again with his V-sign


12.35 a.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Good morning America. It is Wednesday, November 6, 1968. We are at the final moments of our election night coverage. Of course, the presidential contest is already decided, but we have two last calls to make. Accordingly, Lyndon Johnson and Bobby Kennedy have more reason to celebrate: The Democratic ticket has won both Washington state and California, by close margins, respectively. That means, President Johnson has pulled off a decisive electoral college victory, as he comes in with 351 electoral votes, compared to Richard Nixon’s 187. As ballots are still being counted, we have no final reliable numbers for the national popular vote. At the moment, the president is at approximately 51% of the votes nationally. But this is not the end result.

The final map of the 1968 election looks like this:



✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 351 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 187 electoral votes


And now, we hear from our correspondent at the LBJ Ranch that Robert Kennedy, now vice president-elect, came out of the house and is giving his remarks, before President Johnson is addressing the nation.”

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Senator Robert F. Kennedy, now vice president-elect, giving his remarks at the victory party at the LBJ Ranch

[Crowd applauds]

CROWD: “Bobby! Bobby! Bobby! We love you, Bobby!”

VICE PRESIDENT-ELECT KENNEDY: “Thank you very much. [Smiles] Thank you all. What a night! We did it! Easily! I cannot tell you how deeply I moved I am for the trust the American people put in us. Serving as the vice president of this wonderful country is a great honor. I will never forget this day, when you placed this confidence in me. And I will do everything I can to benefit our country in the coming four years by working with the president on equal rights, safety, prosperity and peace. That we fulfill the New Frontier and the Great Society, that was begun by my beloved brother eight years ago and that Lyndon Johnson continued with passion and true leadership. Now, let me introduce the man, who served his country with distinction and pride for many years and who will continue to do so. A man, who is compassionate about all of his fellow citizens. Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my pleasure to present to you the President of the United States: Lyndon Baines Johnson.”

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President Lyndon B. Johnson as he comes out of the ranch house to give his remarks, joined by his wife

[Applause]

CROWD: “LBJ! LBJ! Four more years! Four more years! All the way with LBJ!”

THE PRESIDENT: “My dear wife, Lady Bird, my wonderful daughters Lynda and Luci, Mr. Vice President-elect, members of the press, my good friends here in Texas, and my fellow Americans. I want to thank you all for your incredible support. First of all, let me thank the American people, who made this possible. I want to thank all the voters who gave me their support. And I also want to thank the voters who trusted Mr. Nixon. Be assured, that I will work hard to earn your trust, too. I want to be the president of all Americans, blacks and whites alike. Northerners and Southerners alike. […] I also want to express my thank to my family and friends and to my running mate, Bobby Kennedy, who will be, that I am sure, a wonderful vice president for our land. I also want to thank the man who stood at my side the past four years, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. Hubert, you earned a great place in history. Let me also thank Mr. Nixon for his kind words, who just called me to congratulate us to an outstanding victory.

[…]

Today, we celebrate our victory and the victory of democracy. But tomorrow, we will be back at work to fulfill the Great Society and bring about peace in Vietnam. And around the globe. Thank you again, good night, god bless you and god bless the United States of America.”



WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to our studio. These were the remarks by our current and future president and our next vice president. It is a stunning victory these two men won tonight. It was expected to be a closer race than it turned out now. It is likely that the development of recent days, the president's announced trip to Moscow, the bombing halt and the news of potential sabotage acts in Paris played a great role and swung this election to the Democrats. There will be lot to analyze how Richard Nixon not just lost this election, but why he couldn't get beyond these 187 electoral votes. The Johnson/Kennedy ticket clinched 351 electoral votes and has, according to our projections, won over 51% of the popular vote nationwide. The Republican ticket stands at about 47% at the moment. We will know the exact results in a few days.

Today is a new chapter in American history. We are at a crossroads both at home at the domestic front, was well as abroad. In Vietnam and our relations with the communist world. And we will see how President Johnson is managing all these different challenges. And we will also see how his administration will perform with Robert Kennedy as vice president. How RFK's role will be. That mainly depends on his relation with the president. Although the two men teamed up an unprecedented effort to win this election, we should not forget that they have battled each other just a few months ago. And despite the fact that they have much in common politically, their personal relationship in these past years weren't that friendly. But they surprised us all, by forming a ticket and seemingly working well together throughout the campaign. All I can say: The next four years will be an interesting time to watch.

For now, we finish our election coverage. It was a pleasure for me to guide you through this stunning election night. Thank you very much for your attention and confidence and I hope you will continue turn in our CBS program. Good night, and God bless you all.”


Next: The election results in detail, including results by state, post-election polls and political developments... stay tuned!
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« Reply #39 on: September 17, 2017, 05:13:12 pm »

This is amazing!!

What's Congress looking like after this election?
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« Reply #40 on: September 18, 2017, 02:58:52 pm »
« Edited: September 18, 2017, 04:26:44 pm by President Johnson »

★★★ Results of the 1968 elections ★★★

Final results of the presidential election


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✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 351 electoral votes (65.2% of the electoral vote); 52.0% of the popular vote
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 187 electoral votes (34.8% of the electoral vote); 46.9% of the popular vote


Results by state

Writers note: I didn’t just make these numbers up. I used the real 1968 numbers of total votes cast per state, and multiplied them with the percentage points below. The national result above is the result of the state results and not just a made up number.

Alabama
✓ Nixon: 58.7%
Johnson: 36.5%

Alaska
✓ Nixon: 53.9%
Johnson: 45.7%

Arizona
✓ Nixon: 54.3%
Johnson: 44.9%

Arkansas
✓ Johnson: 50.1%
Nixon: 47.7%

California
✓ Johnson: 50.7%
Nixon: 48.8%

Colorado
✓ Nixon: 53.3%
Johnson: 45.4%

Connecticut
✓ Johnson: 60.8%
Nixon: 38.8%

Delaware
✓ Johnson: 54.5%
Nixon: 45.0%

Florida
✓ Nixon: 52.8%
Johnson: 46.0%

Georgia
✓ Nixon: 53.8%
Johnson 44.2%

Hawaii
✓ Johnson: 68.8%
Nixon: 30.3%

Idaho
✓ Nixon: 56.9%
Johnson: 41.8%

Illinois
✓ Johnson: 52.4%
Nixon: 46.8%

Indiana
✓ Nixon: 53.7%
Johnson: 45.8%

Iowa
✓ Johnson: 50.8%
Nixon: 48.0%

Kansas
✓ Nixon: 59.4%
Johnson: 39.8%

Kentucky
✓ Nixon: 52.0%
Johnson: 47.4%

Louisiana
✓ Nixon: 57.1%
Johnson: 41.9%

Maine
✓ Nixon: 52.0%
Johnson: 47.0%

Maryland
✓ Johnson: 55.1%
Nixon: 44.1%

Massachusetts
✓ Johnson: 65.1%
Nixon: 34.2%

Michigan
✓ Johnson: 54.8%
Nixon: 44.6%

Minnesota
✓ Johnson: 61.1%
Nixon: 38.4%

Mississippi
✓ Nixon: 55.6%
Johnson: 40.6%

Missouri
✓ Johnson: 49.9%
Nixon: 49.1%

Montana
✓ Nixon: 54.6%
Johnson: 44.7%

Nebraska
✓ Nixon: 60.1%
Johnson: 38.7%

Nevada
✓ Nixon: 52.7%
Johnson: 46.4%

New Hampshire
✓ Nixon: 53.5%
Johnson: 45.8%

New Jersey
✓ Johnson: 52.9%
Nixon: 45.8%

New Mexico
✓ Nixon: 52.3%
Johnson: 47.0%

New York
✓ Johnson: 62.0%
Nixon: 36.5%

North Carolina
✓ Johnson: 49.8%
Nixon: 49.6%

North Dakota
✓ Nixon: 56.9%
Johnson: 42.8%

Ohio
✓ Johnson: 50.5%
Nixon: 48.7%

Oklahoma
✓ Nixon: 51.9%
Johnson: 47.6%

Oregon
✓ Nixon: 51.1%
Johnson: 48.1%

Pennsylvania
✓ Johnson: 54.2%
Nixon: 45.1%

Rhode Island
✓ Johnson: 72.2%
Nixon: 27.4%

South Carolina
✓ Nixon: 54.4%
Johnson: 41.8%

South Dakota
✓ Nixon: 53.9%
Johnson: 44.2%

Tennessee
✓ Nixon: 52.4%
Johnson: 46.0%

Texas
✓ Johnson: 56.5%
Nixon: 42.2%

Utah
✓ Nixon: 61.1%
Johnson: 37.8%

Vermont
✓ Nixon: 53.0%
Johnson: 46.1%

Virginia
✓ Nixon: 52.4%
Johnson: 46.4%

Washington
✓ Johnson: 52.8%
Nixon: 46.2%

West Virginia
✓ Johnson: 56.7%
Nixon: 42.5%

Wisconsin
✓ Johnson: 51.8%
Nixon: 47.6%

Wyoming
✓ Nixon: 60.9%
Johnson: 38.7%


Congressional elections

Senate:  60 Democratic, 40 Republican

Republican gains: OR, AZ, OK, FL, PA
Democratic gains: CA, IA

House of Representatives:  253 Democratic, 182 Republican (net change: +5 Democrats)


Congressional Leadership:
Senate President: Hubert Humphrey (D-MN), until January 20, 1969; Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY), starting January 20, 1969
Senate Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield (D-MT)
Senate Minority Leader: Everett Dirksen (R-IL)

Speaker of the House: John McCormack (D-MA)
House Majority Leader: Carl Albert (D-OK)
House Minority Leader: Gerald Ford (R-MI)


Note: The senate composition is as of January 3, 1969, the opening of the 91st congress. The Republicans are expected to pick up, at least temporarily, the seat of Robert F. Kennedy, who will resign from the senate, by January 20 at latest, to assume the office of vice president. Mr. Kennedy's replacement will be appointed by New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, a (liberal) Republican. The new senator is scheduled to serve until the next regular election on November 3, 1970.


Writer’s note: Senate candidates are the same as IRL.
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« Reply #41 on: September 20, 2017, 05:15:48 am »

November 11, 1968: President Johnson returns to Washington

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The president is back at his desk in the Oval Office

On the Monday after the election, President Johnson flew back to Washington D.C. Vice President-elect Kennedy also returned to the nation’s capital. He is expected to participate in all major meetings of the administration and to finish some last minute business at his senate office. However, RFK's aides told the pres that he intends to remain a senator until shortly before the inaugural. The president will hold a series of meetings to discuss various topics, including the setup of his administration. The next day, the chief-executive issued a statement, declaring that he doesn’t intent replace any member of the cabinet for now. Other discussions were held on Vietnam. Already on the day after the election, the North Vietnamese leadership congratulated the president on his reelection and expressed their hope, a “fair solution” can be found for the Vietnamese problem. Aides to Bobby Kennedy said that the administration wants to increase pressure on South Vietnam to bring an agreement about. Meanwhile, the White House is preparing for LBJ’s trip to the USSR, scheduled for early December. Administration officials also announced that the president will make major decisions regarding Vietnam after his return. Possibly even before inauguration day.

As the administration was discussing plans for Vietnam, rumors in Washington began to swirl that the president has instructed the Justice Department to take a closer look at the potential sabotage acts regarding the peace talks. Administration officials such as Attorney General Ramsey Clark denied for comment, but added that involved government agencies may come up with a statement soon.


November 14, 1968: Reagan slams Nixon for election loss

Usually he wanted to talk about California politics at his press conference, but then Governor Ronald Reagan responded in an emotional speech when asked to comment the election outcome and Richard Nixon’s defeat. The leader of the GOP’s conservative wing faulted Nixon for the election loss and found tough words on the former candidate.

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Governor Ronald Reagan hold Richard Nixon personally accoutable for the election defeat, demands new visions and leadership

GOVERNOR REAGAN: “If you ask me, I think that the main responsibility of this election loss bears Mr. Nixon himself. His campaign, which was not appropriately addressing the concerns of many Americans, is the to be blamed for the shameful defeat the Republican Party suffered at the polls. His proposals on Vietnam were not concrete enough, lacked imagination of American power and basically repeated the appeasement course the administration of President Johnson has taken. Under these circumstances, the voters chose to stick with present administration which at least pretends to make progress. We have to see how this progress turns it. I believe it will further lead to American decline on the world stage. If Mr. Kennedy gets his way, we will be out of Vietnam very soon and communism will once again be triumphal over the free world. This would send devastating signals to our allies and around the world. If they can’t depend on American strength, there is nobody else left in the defense of freedom. The same at the domestic front: Mr. Nixon talked about law and order, but he didn’t tell us what he exactly would change. He didn’t address the increasing costs of social welfare programs that are funded on the backs of taxpayers. He didn’t denounce the endless desires of Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy to expand the welfare state even further, what will bankrupt our country’s treasury. Because of Mr. Nixon’s failure we have to stick with the liberalism and big government philosophy of Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy for another four years, which I believe is hurting our country. We will further depart from ideals of our founding fathers and I urge everybody to oppose this course […]

The Republican Party desperately needs to get its act together. This requires new leadership and new visions. I will do everything I can to bring this about. We have no time to lose. Thank you.”
 

Conservatives applauded Mr. Reagan’s ad-hoc speech. When asked for comment on the harsh remarks, Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York, Reagan’s liberal counterpart within the party, just said: “Let us look into the future with optimism rather than fear and let Mr. Nixon now find his peace and personal luck. I wish him well.” Both Reagan and Rockefeller are considered strong contenders for the 1972 presidential race.

 

November 17, 1968: Vice President Humphrey announces retirement, honored with Medal of Freedom

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During a White House dinner hosted in his honor, Vice President Hubert Humphrey announced his retirement from politics. However, he also added that he wants “to leave the door open” for future political involvement. His remarks shut down rumors that President Johnson planned to appoint him to another office in his administration. During the ceremony, President Johnson awarded his outgoing second-in-command with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Political analysts expressed their assumption that Mr. Humphrey would run for president in 1972. Possibly battling vice president-elect Bobby Kennedy for the nomination.


Gallup polls, released November 30, 1968

After his reelection, President Johnson’s approval ratings soared to two year high. After the election, Gallup asked some more questions (see below).

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 39%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's recent actions at the world stage?
Approve: 58%
Disapprove: 31%
Unsure: 11%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the Vietnam War?
Approve: 42%
Disapprove: 49%
Unsure: 9%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 60%
Disapprove: 31%
Unsure: 9%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling civil rights?
Approve: 66%
Disapprove: 27%
Unsure: 7%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Vice President Humphrey's tenure in office?
Approve: 56%
Disapprove: 38%
Unsure: 6%

Question: How do you regard Robert Kennedy's election as vice president?
Positive: 55%
Negative: 35%
Unsure: 10%


Next: The president’s trip to Moscow, conclusion of the year 1968... stay tuned!
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President Johnson
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« Reply #42 on: September 21, 2017, 04:52:23 am »

President Lyndon B. Johnson's state visit to the USSR; December 2 – 4, 1968

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On the afternoon of December 1, President Johnson, joined by his wife Lady Bird Johnson, Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford, National Security Advisor Walt Rostow and other foreign policy experts, went on board Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Space outside D.C. and flew to Moscow. After the Soviets agreed to allow American journalists to come, CBS Anchor Walter Cronkite was invited by the president to join. President Johnson is the first sitting American head of state to visit Moscow. This is somewhat surprising for history books, since LBJ is a president who is more focused on domestic than foreign policy. In June 1967, he first hold face-to-face discussions with Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin and Foreign Minister Gromyko. In Moscow, he will also meet Secretary General Leonid Brezhnev.

After the president’s plane landed in Moscow on the afternoon of December 2, Premier Kosygin welcomed his guest and immediately offered him a road trip through the Soviet capital, was LBJ accepted. The pictures of Lyndon Johnson in a coat walking over the Red Square went around the world. Later the day, the Premier hosted a dinner with Soviet officials and the U.S. Ambassador in the Kremlin. Kosygin thanked Johnson for the visit and congratulated him on his reelection the previous month. As it looked like, they enjoyed drinking vodka together.

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President Johnson and Premier Kosygin during their first meeting after the arrival


December 3 was the most important day of the visit. The president and his team met Secretary General Leonid Brezhnev for the first time. While Secretary Clifford had various discussions with Foreign minister Gromyko and Premier Kosygin, the president sat down with the Secretary General. Their translators only joined them. The meeting was scheduled for one hour, but – as American reporters were already waiting – lasted for more than two and a half hours. After leaving their room, both leaders only stated that they made some progress in the talks. When asked for further details, President Johnson answered that a final announcement will be made the next day. In the afternoon, discussions with their respective teams continued. They lasted until the evening. After the discussions, President Johnson, his wife and his team were invited to the Russian opera, which is considered a high honor for any foreign leader.

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Secretary General Brezhnev after his meeting with President Johnson


For the next day, December 4, a joint statement by both sides was announced for noon. Throughout the morning, both sided worked out the text for the statement. At 1 p.m., President Johnson and Premier Kosygin, joined by other leaders of both countries, went before the press and announced the results of the discussions. A handout was also given to reporters that reads as follows:

– One of the most pressuring problems is the war in Vietnam. The United States committed to withdraw 50,000 troops until May 31, 1969. Additional 75,000 troops will leave Vietnam by the end of 1969. In return, the USSR will cut in half its aid in military equipment for North Vietnam within the next ten months.

– The Soviet leadership assured that they would increase diplomatic pressure on North Vietnam and Red China in return for the bombing halt.

– President Johnson proposed a fund for post-war humanitarian aid and reconstruction of destroyed areas. The USSR was open to the idea and ready to pay a portion, but demanded that the lion’s share would go to the North because their casualties and damage were much higher. However, LBJ insisted that both Vietnams would each get 50%. Both sided agreed to continue negotiating on this topic.

– Both sides agreed to start negotiations on arms reduction. No details were discussed other than Foreign Minister Gromyko would soon visit Washington to begin preparation talks with his American counterpart. President Johnson then invited him to his inauguration. The Soviets accepted the invitation.

– Kosygin proposed a troops reduction in Europe, mainly Germany. However, no terms could be agreed on, as President Johnson rejected to withdraw the same number of soldiers from West Germany. The president felt that the Communist side already had a geographical advantage in Europe and that such a move would not be received well in the United States.
 
Overall, some important points were agreed on. Nevertheless, the reduction is Russian military aid for Ho Chi Minh would not be decisive for the war itself. It is already known that the lion’s share of North Vietnamese military equipment comes from China and not the USSR. China is, behind the scenes, even accused by the Soviet Union to steal some equipment on its way through their country.

On his way back to Washington, the president also made a brief visit in West Germany to meet with Chancellor Kurt Georg Kiesinger and other European leaders for informal talks. Abroad Air Force One, the president talked to reporters and told them that was now more optimistic than ever that the war in Vietnam would be ended for America by the middle of his next term.

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President Johnson talks to journalists abroad Air Force One on his way back to the United States


Back at the homefront, the president received mixed reactions, but mainly positive responses. The press largely covered his visit positively. The Washington Post noted that the president has significantly “corrected his course on Vietnam since March 31”. Vice President-elect Robert F. Kennedy issued a statement that he “fully supports President Johnson in his efforts” and that the president has exceeded his own expectations. Other Democratic officeholders applauded LBJ as well. Eugene McCarthy noted that the president was moving in the right direction, by “far too slow”. Moderate support came from Republican Senate Leader Everett Dirksen. Barry Goldwater, who Johnson defeated in a landslide in the 1964 election and who was again elected to senate this year, spoke of an “appeasement policy towards a murder regime”. As did Governor Ronald Reagan of California, who accused the administration of “selling out principals to Russia”.
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Sir Mohamed
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« Reply #43 on: September 21, 2017, 05:20:43 pm »

This timeline has emerged as one of my favorites, too.

I always wondered why Johnson in real life didn't use the Chennault thing to hurt Nixon in the election. He definitely knew about it before through wiretapping.
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« Reply #44 on: September 22, 2017, 05:46:54 am »

This timeline has emerged as one of my favorites, too.

I always wondered why Johnson in real life didn't use the Chennault thing to hurt Nixon in the election. He definitely knew about it before through wiretapping.

Thanks.

I think that LBJ in the end didn't want Humphrey to win, because he believed that Nixon would better continue his foreign policy with regard to Vietnam. On the other hand, he also knew that Nixon would not dismantle the Great Society (according to Robert Dallek, LBJ actually wanted Rocky as his successor).
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« Reply #45 on: September 23, 2017, 06:30:18 am »

Key events until the inauguration


December 20, 1968: President Johnson formally orders troop reduction in Vietnam, announces program for homecoming soldiers

Shortly before the Christmas holiday, President Johnson signed an order that the said 50,000 troops will return to America by May 31, 1969, as agreed to in the Memorandum of Moscow. However, still more than 400,000 U.S. soldiers are fighting in Vietnam. Nevertheless, casualties declined substantially since October. The president also issued a statement, calling on the Chinese leadership to “reduce delivery of weaponry and other military aid for North Vietnam”.

The president further announced the implementation of a program for homecoming soldiers, that helps them, if necessary, to master the way back to civilian life. The program is a proposal by vice president-elect Kennedy, who presented the idea to the administration earlier the month. President Johnson endorsed the plan and authorized Mr. Kennedy to work out specific plans and present them to the cabinet and the congress. The president announced that his administration will submit legislation by spring or summer and, were possible, use his executive powers for the matter. Political commentators expressed their surprise that LBJ already approved one of RFK's plans and gave him the responsibility to work details out.

Gallup polls, released December 31, 1968

More good news for President Johnson: Following his Moscow visit his approval rating saw a further increase.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 58%
Disapprove: 36%



January 7, 1969: Justice Department indicts Anna Chenault and Nixon campaign officials

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Attorney General Ramsey Clark during a cabinet meeting

Rumors have been around since November that Justice Department was reviewing allegations of sabotage in the Paris Peace Talks from various sides. According to some sources, the president himself ordered the steps to be taken, but the White House refused to comment any ongoing investigations. As Attorney General Ramsey Clark stated, there is enough evidence that Ms. Anna Chennault, U.S. resident and confidant of South Vietnamese President Thieu, was in direct contact with the Nixon campaign and recommended the South Vietnamese government to "hold on" until after the presidential election. Among the indicted Nixon confidants is Mr. John Haldeman, who was in contact with Chennault. The Attorney General also said that he was currently no evidence that Richard Nixon himself was actively engaged in the matter, but that the investigation is still not finished. First interrogations are set for February.


January 15, 1969: South Vietnamese President Thieu announces review of peace talk efforts

After a telephone conservation with President Johnson, South Vietnamese President Thieu announced his willingness to review the current decision to participate in the Paris Peace talks. He wants to come up with a major decision within six weeks.

American newspapers interpreted this a sign that after the South Vietnamese leadership is now compelled to find the best possible solution with the Johnson Administration after their hope for a Nixon Administration was shattered on November 5, 1968.


January 17, 1969: Robert F. Kennedy resigns from Senate, Governor Rockefeller appoints successor

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Newly appointed senator Charles Goodell (R-NY)

Three days before his inauguration as vice president, Bobby Kennedy officially resigned his seat in the United States Senate, that he won in 1964. With Mr. Kennedy’s departure from the upper congressional chamber, the Democrats lose one seat. However, they still hold a 59-41 majority over the Republicans. As prescribed in the constitution, it was up to New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller to fill the vacancy. Rockefeller appointed fellow liberal Republican Charles Goodell to the senate. Goodell will remain in office until the next regular election in November 1970.


January 19, 1969: Final preparations for the inauguration


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The Inaugural Committee
requests the honor of your presence
to attend and participate in the Inauguration of


Lyndon Baines Johnson
as President of the United States of America

and


Robert Francis Kennedy
as Vice President of the United States of America

on Monday, the twentieth of January
one thousand nine hundred and sixty nine
in the City of Washington

Michael J. Mansfield,
Chairman


Next: The Inaugurtion and following events... stay tuned and feel free to comment!
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« Reply #46 on: September 23, 2017, 06:31:42 am »

Great updates! I'm really enjoying this TL!
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« Reply #47 on: September 23, 2017, 08:32:53 am »

Just caught up to it, awesome TL! I loved election night, and the recent events.
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« Reply #48 on: September 26, 2017, 02:16:33 pm »

uuhhhhhhhhhh bump
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« Reply #49 on: September 30, 2017, 05:59:00 am »
« Edited: September 30, 2017, 06:03:19 am by President Johnson »

Chapter 2: All the way with LBJ – four more years

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Inauguration Day – Monday, January 20, 1969

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Lyndon Baines Johnson, 36th President of the United States




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Robert Francis Kennedy, 39th Vice President of the United States

More than one million people assembled before the Capitol to witness the swearing-in. It was a sunny but cold day in Washington. At 11.30 a.m., President Lyndon B. Johnson with his family were escorted to the Capitol. In a second limousine, Vice President-elect Robert F. Kennedy with his family, joined by outgoing Vice President Hubert Humphrey and his wife Muriel, followed the president. After a brief welcome ceremony inside the Capitol by congressional leaders, the president and both the incoming and outgoing vice presidents walked down the steps from the capitol to the inaugural platform. Among the special guests were many congressional leaders of both parties, civil rights activists, Hollywood actors and some foreign representatives including Foreign Minister Gromyko of the USSR. Losing presidential candidate Richard Nixon also took a seat next to his wife Pat and New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller.

The first speaker was Senator and Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT), who formally presided over the ceremony. At 11.55 a.m. Robert Kennedy stood up and went before Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. The incoming vice president requested to be sworn in by the first African American judge,who was appointed by President Johnson in 1967.

JUDGE MARSHALL: “Senator Kennedy, are you prepared to be sworn in as vice president?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “I am”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “Please raise your right and repeat after me. I, Robert Francis Kennedy, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic”

SENATOR KENNEDY:” I, Robert Francis Kennedy, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “And that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God”.

SENATOR KENNEDY: “And that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God”.

JUDGE MARSHALL: “I congratulate you, Mr. Vice President”.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: “Thank you very much, Sir”.


[Huge applause at the podium and among the crowd]
 

SENATOR MANSFIELD: “Now, the Chief Justice of the United States, Homer Thornberry, will administer the oath of office to the President of the United States of America”.

President Johnson stands up and takes his position before Chief Justice Thornberry.

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CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Mr. President, are you prepared to the take the oath of office?”

THE PRESIDENT: “Yes, Sir”.

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Please raise your right and repeat after me. I, Lyndon Baines Johnson, do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States”

THE PRESIDENT: “I, Lyndon Baines Johnson, do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States”
 
CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “And that I will to the best of my ability”

THE PRESIDENT: “And that I will to the best of my ability”

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States”

THE PRESIDENT: “Preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States”

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “So help me God”

THE PRESIDENT: “So help me God”.

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Congratulations, Mr. President”

THE PRESIDENT: “Thank you”.

[Salute shots]

[Hail to the Chief plays]

[Crowd applauds]

The president turns to the podium for his speech.

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THE PRESIDENT: “Chief Justice Thornberry, Vice President Humphrey, Vice President Kennedy, Vice President Nixon, Chairman Mansfield, members of congress and the cabinet, my fellow countrymen:

I thank you all for the great support you have expressed to me. Today we are gathered here not to celebrate victory of a person or a party, but we are here to celebrate to triumph of democracy. The triumph of the American system, which is bound together by all Americans. Americans from the North, the South, the West and the East. Americans of every race and color, who are striving towards a better future. A future in freedom, democracy, equality and social justice. It is these goals that my administration was pursuing since I assumed this office five years ago, and these goals will continue to be the guide of the American government. […]

My administration, meaning the president, the vice president and all others, will tirelessly work to bring opportunity to every citizen of this great nation. Our first and most important goal is and will always be to ensure that no American must live poverty, that every American has access to affordable healthcare, that every girl and boy can fulfill her or his potential and can get all the education possible, that every senior in this country can age in decency, that every American has the same chance for a good life. Black, White, Old, Young, Northern and Southern alike. Let us together work towards this future. Much has been achieved in the past eight years, but much more remains to be done. I can assure everyone that I will do everything I can to make the Great Society a reality. And I will not rest until discrimination, social injustice and crime are defeated.

And while we are still at a bloody war in South East Asia, recent months showed that the toil and suffering can soon be ended. It will be ended. I am now more confidant than ever that we can bring this peace about. As we have taken steps to make the world a more peaceful one. It means not selling out our values of democracy, freedom and justice out to our advisories. America is and remains the greatest power in the world and stands ready to defend these values and our allies, but at the same time we have to make clear, that we do not seek war. We seek a peaceful world, where free people can find their own way of life.

Now, let us stand together to fight for the future we all deserve. Today, we once again celebrate the celebration of democracy. And tomorrow, we will back at work to bring these changes about. I thank you from the bottom of my heart and I’m deeply honored to serve as your president for the next four years. Eight years ago, President John F. Kennedy told his fellow citizens: Let us begin! Now I say: Let us continue!”

[Massive applause]

After his speech, the president and his new second-in-command went back to the White House. He then signed some ceremonial proclamations. This evening, the traditional inaugural ball was hosted in the Capitol.

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Newly inaugurated president and vice president at the inaugural party on January 20, 1969


This January 20 was celebration day. The next day, the Johnson Administration is back at work. Stay tuned!
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