Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
February 21, 2020, 06:20:32 am
News: Please delete your old personal messages.

  Atlas Forum
  General Politics
  Political Geography & Demographics (Moderator: muon2)
  Are Irish Americans in New York City fiscally and social conservative?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Are Irish Americans in New York City fiscally and social conservative?  (Read 1443 times)
bronz4141
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 9,374
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« on: January 30, 2017, 11:32:00 pm »

Are Irish Americans in New York City fiscally and socially conservative, or are they fiscally conservative on some issues, and socially conservative on some issues?
Logged
Thunderbird is the word
Zen Lunatic
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,028


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2017, 11:48:47 pm »
« Edited: January 31, 2017, 12:22:19 am by Thunderbird is the word »

I really don't think New York Irish-Americans in 2016 are any kind of a unified bloc politically and many aren't even native New Yorkers.
Logged
Torie
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 38,043
Samoa


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2017, 06:44:47 am »

Yeah, the Irish are pretty assimilated these days.
Logged
Cаквояжник
CELTICEMPIRE
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,743
Botswana


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2017, 08:38:57 am »

Yeah, the Irish are pretty assimilated these days.

I've always wondered when did anti-Irish prejudice in America end? 
Logged
Torie
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 38,043
Samoa


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2017, 12:00:40 pm »

Yeah, the Irish are pretty assimilated these days.

I've always wondered when did anti-Irish prejudice in America end? 

When the tensions between mainline Protestants and Catholics ended, as the Civil Rights revolution heated up. These days, the two groups from a religious standpoint on anything that matters are not very different at all (putting aside the abortion issue).
Logged
Thunderbird is the word
Zen Lunatic
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,028


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2017, 02:30:08 pm »

Yeah, the Irish are pretty assimilated these days.

I've always wondered when did anti-Irish prejudice in America end? 

When the tensions between mainline Protestants and Catholics ended, as the Civil Rights revolution heated up. These days, the two groups from a religious standpoint on anything that matters are not very different at all (putting aside the abortion issue).

I think that both groups are more divided politically then religiously with liberal Protestants and Catholics having more in common then either do with there more conservative brethren. Though on issues like abortion and birth control there's admittedly more cognitive dissonance for left-leaning Catholics since they actually are in the same church as the right-wing opus dei types whereas UCC Christians don't have to share the pews with evangelicals.
Logged
Tetro Kornbluth
Gully Foyle
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 12,812
Ireland, Republic of


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2017, 03:13:11 pm »

lol no
Logged
DavidB.
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 11,964
Finland


Political Matrix
E: 0.97, S: 5.30


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2017, 03:19:44 pm »

Can we stop making this type of threads.
Logged
King of Kensington
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,588


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2017, 08:38:29 pm »
« Edited: January 31, 2017, 08:44:06 pm by King of Kensington »

Are there any Irish neighborhoods in NYC anymore?  There are probably as many assimilated people with some Irish ancestry in Manhattan/Brownstone Brooklyn as there are Irish New Yorkers in working class outer borough neighborhoods now.
Logged
bronz4141
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 9,374
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2017, 08:46:01 pm »

Are there any Irish neighborhoods in NYC anymore?  There are probably as many assimilated people with some Irish ancestry in Manhattan/Brownstone Brooklyn as there are Irish New Yorkers in working class outer borough neighborhoods now.

Yes. Woodlawn. Bay Ridge. Whitestone. Bayside. Glendale. Middle Village. South Shore, Staten Island.
Logged
King of Kensington
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,588


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2017, 08:50:50 pm »

Many of those neighborhoods are more Italian than Irish.  Woodlawn I know has an Irish immigrant presence.
Logged
Thunderbird is the word
Zen Lunatic
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,028


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2017, 09:05:15 pm »

Woodlawn is about as Irish as you can get.
Logged
bronz4141
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 9,374
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2017, 10:51:12 pm »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.
Logged
Intell
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 6,075
Nepal


Political Matrix
E: -6.71, S: -1.24

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2017, 11:25:24 pm »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.

Not because it's Irish though. Woodland is as democratic as you can get, and the republican there are probably Italians.
Logged
Tintrlvr
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,226
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2017, 12:52:15 pm »
« Edited: February 01, 2017, 12:54:20 pm by Tintrlvr »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.

Not because it's Irish though. Woodland is as democratic as you can get, and the republican there are probably Italians.

What? No. Woodlawn Heights (the Irish area of Woodlawn) is very Republican, the most Republican neighborhood in the Bronx (doesn't sound like it's saying much, but there are a few pockets of Republicanism even there), and has been for quite some time. On the other hand, most recent Irish immigrants there are not citizens and not eligible to vote, so you're talking more longer-term residents. The Italian presence in Woodlawn is minimal.

Agreed that Bayside is irrelevant to the discussion. It's not an Irish neighborhood. Woodlawn Heights is the only neighborhood in NYC that can validly be described as "Irish".
Logged
Heisenberg
SecureAmerica
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,097
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2017, 04:20:04 pm »

Some are, some aren't. They're so assimilated they aren't a monolithic voting block.
Logged
King of Kensington
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,588


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2017, 06:16:05 pm »

Even in hyper-ethnic NYC only 35% of those reporting Irish ancestry are solely of Irish ancestry (the comparative figure for Italians is 62%). 
Logged
jimrtex
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 9,399
Marshall Islands


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2017, 02:09:38 pm »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.

Not because it's Irish though. Woodland is as democratic as you can get, and the republican there are probably Italians.

What? No. Woodlawn Heights (the Irish area of Woodlawn) is very Republican, the most Republican neighborhood in the Bronx (doesn't sound like it's saying much, but there are a few pockets of Republicanism even there), and has been for quite some time. On the other hand, most recent Irish immigrants there are not citizens and not eligible to vote, so you're talking more longer-term residents. The Italian presence in Woodlawn is minimal.

Agreed that Bayside is irrelevant to the discussion. It's not an Irish neighborhood. Woodlawn Heights is the only neighborhood in NYC that can validly be described as "Irish".
What brand of Republicanism? Irish(AOH) or American(GOP)?
Logged
bronz4141
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 9,374
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2017, 02:44:49 pm »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.

Not because it's Irish though. Woodland is as democratic as you can get, and the republican there are probably Italians.

What? No. Woodlawn Heights (the Irish area of Woodlawn) is very Republican, the most Republican neighborhood in the Bronx (doesn't sound like it's saying much, but there are a few pockets of Republicanism even there), and has been for quite some time. On the other hand, most recent Irish immigrants there are not citizens and not eligible to vote, so you're talking more longer-term residents. The Italian presence in Woodlawn is minimal.

Agreed that Bayside is irrelevant to the discussion. It's not an Irish neighborhood. Woodlawn Heights is the only neighborhood in NYC that can validly be described as "Irish".
What brand of Republicanism? Irish(AOH) or American(GOP)?

A mix of both. But Bayside and Douglaston is Irish. The LIRR Douglaston station, has a lot of beautiful Irish pubs. It's definitely Trump country in some areas. De Blasio won some areas there against Republican Joe Lhota in 2013.
Logged
Lamar Alexander is a Coward
independentTX
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 9,451


Political Matrix
E: 0.52, S: -3.48

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2017, 01:11:33 am »

Yeah, the Irish are pretty assimilated these days.

I've always wondered when did anti-Irish prejudice in America end? 

When they stopped immigrating here in large numbers. Immigration to the US in general was severely restricted after 1925. By the 1930s, it has morphed into a generic, less overt anti-Catholic prejudice, which in turn stopped being a significant factor in American society after the 1960s.
Logged
Smash255
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 14,937


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2017, 12:10:52 am »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.

Not because it's Irish though. Woodland is as democratic as you can get, and the republican there are probably Italians.

What? No. Woodlawn Heights (the Irish area of Woodlawn) is very Republican, the most Republican neighborhood in the Bronx (doesn't sound like it's saying much, but there are a few pockets of Republicanism even there), and has been for quite some time. On the other hand, most recent Irish immigrants there are not citizens and not eligible to vote, so you're talking more longer-term residents. The Italian presence in Woodlawn is minimal.

Agreed that Bayside is irrelevant to the discussion. It's not an Irish neighborhood. Woodlawn Heights is the only neighborhood in NYC that can validly be described as "Irish".
What brand of Republicanism? Irish(AOH) or American(GOP)?

A mix of both. But Bayside and Douglaston is Irish. The LIRR Douglaston station, has a lot of beautiful Irish pubs. It's definitely Trump country in some areas. De Blasio won some areas there against Republican Joe Lhota in 2013.

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/numbers/clinton-trump-president-vice-president-every-neighborhood-map-election-results-voting-general-primary-nyc
Logged
Tintrlvr
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,226
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2017, 11:15:22 am »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.

Not because it's Irish though. Woodland is as democratic as you can get, and the republican there are probably Italians.

What? No. Woodlawn Heights (the Irish area of Woodlawn) is very Republican, the most Republican neighborhood in the Bronx (doesn't sound like it's saying much, but there are a few pockets of Republicanism even there), and has been for quite some time. On the other hand, most recent Irish immigrants there are not citizens and not eligible to vote, so you're talking more longer-term residents. The Italian presence in Woodlawn is minimal.

Agreed that Bayside is irrelevant to the discussion. It's not an Irish neighborhood. Woodlawn Heights is the only neighborhood in NYC that can validly be described as "Irish".
What brand of Republicanism? Irish(AOH) or American(GOP)?

A mix of both. But Bayside and Douglaston is Irish. The LIRR Douglaston station, has a lot of beautiful Irish pubs. It's definitely Trump country in some areas. De Blasio won some areas there against Republican Joe Lhota in 2013.

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/numbers/clinton-trump-president-vice-president-every-neighborhood-map-election-results-voting-general-primary-nyc

Interesting that Woodlawn Heights was mostly Clinton! It was definitely a Romney/McCain type of area but maybe the more international bent due to lots of Irish immigrants made it anti-Trump.
Logged
DPKdebator
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,544
United States


Political Matrix
E: 1.03, S: 2.61


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #22 on: February 13, 2017, 01:37:25 pm »


Bayside as well. Travel around Bayside, it's Trump country.

Not because it's Irish though. Woodland is as democratic as you can get, and the republican there are probably Italians.

What? No. Woodlawn Heights (the Irish area of Woodlawn) is very Republican, the most Republican neighborhood in the Bronx (doesn't sound like it's saying much, but there are a few pockets of Republicanism even there), and has been for quite some time. On the other hand, most recent Irish immigrants there are not citizens and not eligible to vote, so you're talking more longer-term residents. The Italian presence in Woodlawn is minimal.

Agreed that Bayside is irrelevant to the discussion. It's not an Irish neighborhood. Woodlawn Heights is the only neighborhood in NYC that can validly be described as "Irish".
What brand of Republicanism? Irish(AOH) or American(GOP)?

A mix of both. But Bayside and Douglaston is Irish. The LIRR Douglaston station, has a lot of beautiful Irish pubs. It's definitely Trump country in some areas. De Blasio won some areas there against Republican Joe Lhota in 2013.

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/numbers/clinton-trump-president-vice-president-every-neighborhood-map-election-results-voting-general-primary-nyc

Interesting that Woodlawn Heights was mostly Clinton! It was definitely a Romney/McCain type of area but maybe the more international bent due to lots of Irish immigrants made it anti-Trump.

The Irish have a special fondness for the Clintons because of the Good Friday Agreement (and I know this for a fact since I have family there), which stopped The Troubles in the north of Ireland. It might be a little bit of an explanation for the MA swing for Clinton as the heavily Irish areas (Plymouth, Norfolk) swung D while western MA (lots of Irish but not as many, also the population is much lower) and Bristol (lots of Portuguese) swung R. Irish people in Ireland don't really care about our politics too much, though obviously the immigrants that live here care about it more. Irish immigrants voting for Clinton is hardly unanimous, since plenty of my family in Ireland love Trump (which I may be partially responsible for with all my political talk... Tongue).
Logged
King of Kensington
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,588


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2017, 01:57:58 pm »

Irish is probably the most common ancestry among fourth generation+ New Yorkers, which is obviously a small group citywide.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC