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  The Green Thread: Marijuana in the states [legal weed here to stay!]
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Author Topic: The Green Thread: Marijuana in the states [legal weed here to stay!]  (Read 16638 times)
KingSweden
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« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2017, 06:43:36 pm »

Interesting that Tom garrett, from such a conservative district, sponsored that
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Sentor MAINEiac4434 of Lincoln
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« Reply #26 on: March 02, 2017, 09:59:11 pm »

Interesting that Tom garrett, from such a conservative district, sponsored that
He's quite libertarian, no?
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« Reply #27 on: March 11, 2017, 12:48:51 pm »

http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/florida-medical-marijuana-bill-would-outlaw-smokable-and-edible-cannabis-9190847

Quote
Yesterday, Fort Myers Rep. Ray Rodrigues finally unveiled the first medical weed regulations — and they would ban people from smoking marijuana or using edibles. Patients would also be prohibited from vaporizing weed if they aren't terminally ill.

In fact, Rodrigues' bill is more restrictive than the laws that existed before Florida overwhelmingly voted to legalize medical weed.

Quote
The rest of Rodrigues' 61-page bill effectively treats medical marijuana patients as if they're registering to ingest uranium. Lawmakers included rules mandating that a medical cannabis patient submit his or her state driver's license and a second form of ID to obtain approval for medicinal weed. Patients could have their medical-pot licenses suspended if they're charged (not convicted) of any drug offense; the state could also revoke pot licenses once a patient is deemed to be "cured."

This is so disappointing. This goes completely against the spirit of the amendment. They are turning Amendment 2 into basically another sham "Southern-style" medical marijuana bill, where the only thing allowed is low-thc oils. Why can't they just accept the will of the voters here?

Looking at the amendment text, unless I missed something, it may actually be constitutional to limit actual administration methods like this:

http://dos.elections.myflorida.com/initiatives/fulltext/pdf/50438-3.pdf

However, one thing I did notice was that the amendment doesn't really permit the agency from making regulations on the way cannabis may be administered nor the form it can be sold in. So there may be some relief there.

Hopefully they modify this bill before passage to allow what the initiative intended to allow.
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NOVA Green
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« Reply #28 on: March 11, 2017, 07:51:29 pm »

http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/florida-medical-marijuana-bill-would-outlaw-smokable-and-edible-cannabis-9190847

Quote
Yesterday, Fort Myers Rep. Ray Rodrigues finally unveiled the first medical weed regulations — and they would ban people from smoking marijuana or using edibles. Patients would also be prohibited from vaporizing weed if they aren't terminally ill.

In fact, Rodrigues' bill is more restrictive than the laws that existed before Florida overwhelmingly voted to legalize medical weed.

Quote
The rest of Rodrigues' 61-page bill effectively treats medical marijuana patients as if they're registering to ingest uranium. Lawmakers included rules mandating that a medical cannabis patient submit his or her state driver's license and a second form of ID to obtain approval for medicinal weed. Patients could have their medical-pot licenses suspended if they're charged (not convicted) of any drug offense; the state could also revoke pot licenses once a patient is deemed to be "cured."

This is so disappointing. This goes completely against the spirit of the amendment. They are turning Amendment 2 into basically another sham "Southern-style" medical marijuana bill, where the only thing allowed is low-thc oils. Why can't they just accept the will of the voters here?

Looking at the amendment text, unless I missed something, it may actually be constitutional to limit actual administration methods like this:

http://dos.elections.myflorida.com/initiatives/fulltext/pdf/50438-3.pdf

However, one thing I did notice was that the amendment doesn't really permit the agency from making regulations on the way cannabis may be administered nor the form it can be sold in. So there may be some relief there.

Hopefully they modify this bill before passage to allow what the initiative intended to allow.

1.) So what is the chance of something like this making it through the state legislature? 

2.) If so, what are the potential consequences for Floridian Republicans in the State House & Senate for deliberately undermining the intent and will of the voters on this issue?
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sjoyce
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« Reply #29 on: March 11, 2017, 07:58:53 pm »

Whatever the Republicans want to pass through the legislature will get passed and signed. The consequences won't be felt at a state legislative level, but it could be something that so outrages Morgan that he announces his candidacy.
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Virginiá
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« Reply #30 on: March 11, 2017, 09:09:26 pm »

1.) So what is the chance of something like this making it through the state legislature?  

2.) If so, what are the potential consequences for Floridian Republicans in the State House & Senate for deliberately undermining the intent and will of the voters on this issue?

This is probably what I would call a "compounding problem," where it isn't big enough to cause a backlash on its own, but it will nicely augment other issues people have with Republicans to help turn them against the GOP on election day. Amendment 2 hasn't been implemented yet, so there is a lot less political risk to doing something like this.

This should be a big fat warning to anyone pushing complex ballot initiatives on issues like MM - never leave important parts even slightly ambiguous. Never expect the legislature to acquiese and accept that the people wanted this, no matter how much it passes by. This could have passed with 100% of the vote and Republicans would still be doing this for the same reason they are now trying to make initiated amendments require 67% of the vote to be approved (up from 60%) - they don't care what voters want, and the politicians only care what the voters think when they think they may lose power. They believe that because they have a majority in the legislature, that they have a blank check because clearly they were so wise that the people picked them, and when the people voice their displeasure or try to go around them, the first response is to try and remove the voters' ability to do anything, whether it be voter suppression or making initiatives impossible to pass.

I have to say again - I'm really surprised and really disappointed that Morgan missed something as important as this. If this bill passes with these restrictions, then A2 will basically have been a complete waste of time and money.
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NOVA Green
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« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2017, 01:39:19 am »

1.) So what is the chance of something like this making it through the state legislature?  

2.) If so, what are the potential consequences for Floridian Republicans in the State House & Senate for deliberately undermining the intent and will of the voters on this issue?

This is probably what I would call a "compounding problem," where it isn't big enough to cause a backlash on its own, but it will nicely augment other issues people have with Republicans to help turn them against the GOP on election day. Amendment 2 hasn't been implemented yet, so there is a lot less political risk to doing something like this.

This should be a big fat warning to anyone pushing complex ballot initiatives on issues like MM - never leave important parts even slightly ambiguous. Never expect the legislature to acquiese and accept that the people wanted this, no matter how much it passes by. This could have passed with 100% of the vote and Republicans would still be doing this for the same reason they are now trying to make initiated amendments require 67% of the vote to be approved (up from 60%) - they don't care what voters want, and the politicians only care what the voters think when they think they may lose power. They believe that because they have a majority in the legislature, that they have a blank check because clearly they were so wise that the people picked them, and when the people voice their displeasure or try to go around them, the first response is to try and remove the voters' ability to do anything, whether it be voter suppression or making initiatives impossible to pass.

I have to say again - I'm really surprised and really disappointed that Morgan missed something as important as this. If this bill passes with these restrictions, then A2 will basically have been a complete waste of time and money.

Bolded for response...

This is part of the reason that the Oregon Marijuana Legalization initiative passed with such overwhelming support, and there have never been any legal challenges....

The 2014 Oregon Marijuana Legalization initiative was based on the "lessons learned" from both the positives and negatives from the Colorado and Washington initiatives.

Because it was such a carefully crafted piece of legislation, that allowed a significant degree of local (County/City) controls regarding the existence of medical & recreational facilities within local communities, mandatory testing of potential chemical contaminants from suppliers, etc it won in a landslide, even in many traditionally Conservative Republican parts of the state, not to mention the "soccer mom's" of places like Lake Oswego.

Unlike Florida, many Western States allow items to be placed on the ballot relatively easily, and can/will/have flip out in the "ballot box" if they feel that Politicians are unilaterally overturning direct democracy....

So, in the event that the Republican dominated State Government of Florida goes this route, is there a potential that it will dramatically increase turnout among Millennial voters in 2018, and potentially be the type of issue that will dramatically increase turnout among non-regular voters. (Look at how Republicans used the culture war issues of Abortion and Gay Rights in 2004 to turnout voters for example).





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Virginiá
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« Reply #32 on: March 12, 2017, 01:48:55 am »

So, in the event that the Republican dominated State Government of Florida goes this route, is there a potential that it will dramatically increase turnout among Millennial voters in 2018, and potentially be the type of issue that will dramatically increase turnout among non-regular voters. (Look at how Republicans used the culture war issues of Abortion and Gay Rights in 2004 to turnout voters for example).

Probably not. I think the cannabis (medical or recreational) legalization boost is mostly a media construct. There may be some effects, but not really worthy placing emphasis on. Millennials have heavy support for ending prohibition, but I don't think it has the same galvanizing effect as other hot topic issues.

If Millennial participation in 2018 sees a huge jump, I think it'll probably have more to do with Trump than MM.
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Virginiá
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« Reply #33 on: March 22, 2017, 08:17:30 pm »

I'm still skeptical, especially now that Sessions is AG, thus giving lawmakers an excuse as to why they shouldn't do it. The reality is, public support has been there for legalization for some years now but lawmakers, most from older generations, are still stuck in the old way of thinking and in some cases, are too heavily influenced by various special interests. It might be years longer before we see movement on this by state lawmakers. I mean, hell, Vermont shot it down last year and Massachusetts just recently passed a bill delaying implementation of their legalization measure until 2018, which is no surprise because state officials fought that measure tooth and nail. I wouldn't be surprised if they tried to slow it down even more.

I'm just hoping the results of legalization in the states that recently did so, namely California, will finally be the needed push to get the ball moving in state legislatures a couple years from now. As it currently stands, we're starting to run out of viable states where legalization can pass by initiative alone.
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« Reply #34 on: March 22, 2017, 08:32:27 pm »

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-illinois-marijuana-legalization-proposal-met-20170322-story.html

Tiptoeing around the issue in Illinois, as usual.  Two Democrats say they will bring it up for "hearings and feedback" but will not vote on it this year.
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« Reply #35 on: March 23, 2017, 01:28:40 pm »
« Edited: March 23, 2017, 01:30:11 pm by Virginia »

http://www.sevendaysvt.com/OffMessage/archives/2017/03/22/legal-pot-bill-clears-key-committee-in-vermont-house

Quote
A bill that would legalize marijuana in Vermont is headed to the House floor next  week, where leaders expect it will pass.

The House Judiciary Committee voted out the bill, H.170, by an 8-3 vote on Wednesday.

Quote
The bill is similar to a law in Washington, D.C. It would legalize possession of up to an ounce of marijuana for adults, but would not allow sales of the drug in stores or lounges. It would allow Vermonters to possess up to two mature and four immature plants.

I am extremely supportive of legalization but this type of "half-legalization" kind of sucks. Allowing everything but actual sales just increases the profits and power of the black market.

I suppose it might be better than nothing, especially since I think Vermont might be encouraged to allow sales soon after once they begin to realize the tax revenue they are passing up.
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« Reply #36 on: March 23, 2017, 11:05:13 pm »

http://www.sevendaysvt.com/OffMessage/archives/2017/03/22/legal-pot-bill-clears-key-committee-in-vermont-house

Quote
A bill that would legalize marijuana in Vermont is headed to the House floor next  week, where leaders expect it will pass.

The House Judiciary Committee voted out the bill, H.170, by an 8-3 vote on Wednesday.

Quote
The bill is similar to a law in Washington, D.C. It would legalize possession of up to an ounce of marijuana for adults, but would not allow sales of the drug in stores or lounges. It would allow Vermonters to possess up to two mature and four immature plants.

I am extremely supportive of legalization but this type of "half-legalization" kind of sucks. Allowing everything but actual sales just increases the profits and power of the black market.

I suppose it might be better than nothing, especially since I think Vermont might be encouraged to allow sales soon after once they begin to realize the tax revenue they are passing up.

I'm sure they'll will wise up if/when Massachusetts & Maine open up their stores
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Virginiá
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« Reply #37 on: April 02, 2017, 12:16:34 am »

http://norml.org/news/2017/03/02/nevada-lawmakers-moving-forward-with-expedited-plan-for-adult-use-marijuana-sales

Quote
Nevada Department of Taxation spokeswoman Stephanie Klapstein told the Associated Press that the agency is "moving forward" with plans to permit retail cannabis sales by this summer.

Fifty-five percent of voters in November approved Question 2, which legalized the adult use and possession of personal use quantities of marijuana on January 1, 2017. Separate provisions in the voter-initiated law call on regulators to regulate the licensed production and retail sale of cannabis to adults by next year. However, state regulators announced in early February their intention to fast-track retail sales by permitting licensed dispensaries to sell cannabis to non-patients starting July 1.

The move by Nevada officials stands in sharp contrast to those of lawmakers in other states, such as Maine and Massachusetts, where politicians in recent weeks have enacted legislation delaying the implementation of retail cannabis sales. In California, where voters in November passed a similar initiative, lawmakers have also hinted at potentially delaying retail marijuana sales until after the law's intended January 1, 2018 deadline.

Good to see at least one state isn't being dicks about this. Also, regarding California - if the deadline is baked into the statute's text and regulatory agencies are not given the ability to override, which it doesn't seem like they are, then the legislature cannot delay it unless they send a measure back to the voters to approve. CA has strict rules on "legislative tampering" - meaning initiatives can't be modified solely by the state govt.
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jimmie
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« Reply #38 on: April 02, 2017, 09:45:25 am »

I do not have the same hostility to marijuana as I do towards hard drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

I think green is the way to go!

Missouri medical marijuana advocates made blunders for the ballot petition last cycle but hopefully it will get on the ballot in 2018. At this point medical marijuana should pass in Missouri.

It will need 280,000 signatures to qualify I believe,.

http://www.weednews.co/missouri-medical-marijuana-campaign-at-nearly-10000-signatures/

But still we have to keep in mind that marijuana is illegal under federal law and the US Constitution does have the Supremacy Clause.
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« Reply #39 on: April 19, 2017, 04:18:44 pm »
« Edited: April 19, 2017, 04:21:28 pm by Gass3268 »

West Virginia becomes the 29th state to legalize medical marijuana, but the legalization is a bit limited
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Warren Peace🦋
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« Reply #40 on: April 20, 2017, 01:06:50 am »
« Edited: April 20, 2017, 01:08:25 am by Senator Scott »

Happy 4/20.  A Virginia poll was released last week.

Quote
Virginia voters support 59 to 35 percent allowing adults to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use. Opposition is 61 to 34 percent among Republicans and 60 to 33 percent among voters over 65 years old. All other listed groups support legalized marijuana.

By an overwhelming 92 to 6 percent, voters support allowing adults to use marijuana for medical use if a doctor prescribes it.

I expected opposition to be a bit lower for Republicans, seeing as Republican millennials support legalization nationwide at 63%, but 59% is great here.  And that percentage supporting medical marijuana is just plain ridiculous.

As a side, both Northam and Perriello are for decriminalization and medical use.
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« Reply #41 on: April 20, 2017, 07:42:51 pm »

National support at all-time high

88% support medical, 61% support recreational, and 71% oppose a federal crackdown on states that have legalized.
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publicunofficial
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« Reply #42 on: April 20, 2017, 07:51:47 pm »

National support at all-time high

88% support medical, 61% support recreational, and 71% oppose a federal crackdown on states that have legalized.

Our politicians routinely believe and act as if America is more conservative than it actually is.
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Warren Peace🦋
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« Reply #43 on: April 20, 2017, 08:47:36 pm »

National support at all-time high

88% support medical, 61% support recreational, and 71% oppose a federal crackdown on states that have legalized.

Our politicians routinely believe and act as if America is more conservative than it actually is.

Most politicians are old white men, too.  It's not hard to figure out. Tongue
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« Reply #44 on: April 21, 2017, 09:52:06 pm »

Vermont Senate passes the amended legalization bill, sending it back to the House.  It isn't certain whether Phil Scott will sign or veto it if and when it passes, but the Senate has more than enough votes to override a veto.
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« Reply #45 on: April 23, 2017, 09:07:06 am »

National support at all-time high

88% support medical, 61% support recreational, and 71% oppose a federal crackdown on states that have legalized.

Our politicians routinely believe and act as if America is more conservative than it actually is.

Most politicians are old white men, too.  It's not hard to figure out. Tongue

And they all had it drilled into them throughout their school years how dangerous it was. Health classes that covered drug use back in the 60's-80's covered marijuana in the same section as heroin. It's very hard to overcome that deep early training, despite its common use in their college years, even as modern facts emerge.
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« Reply #46 on: April 23, 2017, 03:05:19 pm »

National support at all-time high

88% support medical, 61% support recreational, and 71% oppose a federal crackdown on states that have legalized.

Our politicians routinely believe and act as if America is more conservative than it actually is.

Most politicians are old white men, too.  It's not hard to figure out. Tongue

And they all had it drilled into them throughout their school years how dangerous it was. Health classes that covered drug use back in the 60's-80's covered marijuana in the same section as heroin. It's very hard to overcome that deep early training, despite its common use in their college years, even as modern facts emerge.

Speaking as a high school student from the 80's, I concur.
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« Reply #47 on: April 23, 2017, 03:06:54 pm »

Representatives Tom Garrett (R-VA) and Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) have introduced bipartisan legislation to exclude marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act, thus leaving states the authority to regulate the plant how best they see fit.

Should be interesting to see how many Republicans get behind this.  I'd expect it to get near-unanimous support from state delegations where it's been legalized and possible majority support from the Freedom Caucus.  I don't think every Democrat will vote for it, but I think this has a real chance at getting passed.  Fingers crossed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hastert_Rule
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« Reply #48 on: April 28, 2017, 07:47:44 pm »

Some good news: after meeting with Sessions, Colorado gov thinks AG unlikely to crack down on marijuana

Quote
Following a face-to-face meeting with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said he doesn’t think a federal crackdown is imminent for his state or others that have legalized cannabis.

Hickenlooper shared some details of his meeting this week with Sessions in Washington, D.C. during an appearance Wednesday on MSNBC’s “Meet the Press Daily” with host Chuck Todd and in a follow-up interview Thursday with The Cannabist.

...

“He’s obviously reviewing the Cole (Memo),” Hickenlooper said. “(They’re working on) a version of that that makes sense for this administration. We’ll have to see how far they go.”

...

The Colorado governor extended an invite for the attorney general to get a first-hand look at his state’s regulated marijuana industry. To that, Sessions simply smiled, Hickenlooper said.

In Wednesday’s “MTP Daily” appearance, Hickenlooper said the former Alabama senator and prosecutor made clear his anti-drug stance and his concern about a trend toward more drug consumption.

“But he certainly listened,” Hickenlooper said. “We (in Colorado) haven’t seen a big spike in consumption. We haven’t seen a significant increase in teenage consumption or any of these things.

“And he certainly was very direct and clearly said they’ve got a lot of priorities. And, at one point, he said, ‘Well you haven’t seen us cracking down, have you?’ I said, ‘No.'”
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« Reply #49 on: April 28, 2017, 07:56:55 pm »

National support at all-time high

88% support medical, 61% support recreational, and 71% oppose a federal crackdown on states that have legalized.

Our politicians routinely believe and act as if America is more conservative than it actually is.

Most politicians are old white men, too.  It's not hard to figure out. Tongue

And they all had it drilled into them throughout their school years how dangerous it was. Health classes that covered drug use back in the 60's-80's covered marijuana in the same section as heroin. It's very hard to overcome that deep early training, despite its common use in their college years, even as modern facts emerge.

Speaking as a high school student from the 80's, I concur.

I can sympathize with this to an extent.  But lawmakers are, at least in theory, supposed to be better informed and up-to-date about these things than the average voter.  They should be willing to change their beliefs in the face of new evidence, as plenty of medical experts have in recent years.

But for people like Sessions, I think this is clearly seen as a moral issue more than a medical issue, though it's also generational and that's why I think we'll see more marijuana-friendly legislation from Congress and the states as older politicians from both parties are steadily replaced by younger ones.  I think eventually this won't be a partisan issue.

Representatives Tom Garrett (R-VA) and Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) have introduced bipartisan legislation to exclude marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act, thus leaving states the authority to regulate the plant how best they see fit.

Should be interesting to see how many Republicans get behind this.  I'd expect it to get near-unanimous support from state delegations where it's been legalized and possible majority support from the Freedom Caucus. I don't think every Democrat will vote for it, but I think this has a real chance at getting passed. Fingers crossed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hastert_Rule

A slowly dying tradition.
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