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  Making America Whole Again: A Clinton Presidency One-Shot
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Justice Blair
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« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2017, 04:46:51 am »

A great and fascinating TL. I've been thinking about making a Clinton TL for a while; and have generally came to the same conclusion as you did, which is that (as democrats admitted) she would have been an unpopular one-term President, who would have faced a primary from the left in 2020, and then would lose to Marco Rubio/Nikki Haley etc.

The problem was always that the House wasn't going to flip in 2016, and the democrats were going to lose heavily in 2018 (I mean I still think it requires a miracle for them not to lose a Senate Seat in RL in 2018). Clinton was always going to be a place-holder for Obama's legacy
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2017, 03:49:43 pm »
« Edited: October 31, 2017, 12:28:55 am by Ted Bessell »

A great and fascinating TL. I've been thinking about making a Clinton TL for a while; and have generally came to the same conclusion as you did, which is that (as democrats admitted) she would have been an unpopular one-term President, who would have faced a primary from the left in 2020, and then would lose to Marco Rubio/Nikki Haley etc.

The problem was always that the House wasn't going to flip in 2016, and the democrats were going to lose heavily in 2018 (I mean I still think it requires a miracle for them not to lose a Senate Seat in RL in 2018). Clinton was always going to be a place-holder for Obama's legacy

Thanks!

Chapter 5
The 2018 Megapost





United States Elections, 2018



Senate:

Republicans: 58 (+9)
Democrats: 40 (-9)




Nevada:
Sen. Dean Heller: 54%
Fmr. Rep. Steven Horsford: 41%

Arizona:
Sen. Jeff Flake: 56%
David Garcia: 40%

Utah:
Evan McMullin: 47% (I+1)
Fmr. State Rep. Chris Herrod: 36%
Misty Snow: 16%

Montana:
Rep. Ryan Zinke: 53% (R+1)
Sen. Jon Tester: 42%

New Mexico:
Sen. Martin Heinrich: 52%
State Rep. Jason Harper: 46%

North Dakota:
State Sen. Tom Campbell: 54% (R+1)
Sen Heidi Heitkamp: 40%

Missouri:
Fmr. Navy Seal Eric Greitens: 58% (R+1)
Sen. Claire McCaskill: 37%

Wisconsin:
Rep. Sean Duffy: 50% (R+1)
Sen. Tammy Baldwin: 47%

Indiana:
Fmr. Gov. Mike Pence: 53% (R+1)
Sen. Joe Donnelly: 45%

Michigan:
State Rep. Tom Barrett: 48% (R+1)
Sen. Debbie Stabenow: 47%

Florida:
Gov. Rick Scott: 52% (R+1)
Sen. Bill Nelson: 44%

Ohio:
Gov. John Kasich: 50% (R+1)
Sen. Sherrod Brown: 44%

Virginia:
Fmr. Rep. Barbara Comstock: 51% (R+1)
Sen. Gerry Connolly: 46%

Pennsylvania:
Rep. Pat Meehan: 52% (R+1)
Sen. Bob Casey: 46%

New Jersey:
Sen. Bob Menendez: 48%
Comedian Joe Piscopo: 35%

Maine:
Fmr. State Sen. Troy Jackson: 49% (D+1)
State Sen. Eric Brakey: 43%



House:
Retcon: Pete Gallego beats Hurd in 2016.

Republicans: 262 (+26)
Democrats: 173 (-26)



Changes:
CA-07: Andrew Grant def. Ami Bera
CA-16: Johnny Tacherra def. Jim Costa
CA-24: Justin Fareed def. Salud Carbajal
CA-49: Pat Bates def. Doug Applegate
NV-03: Scott Hammond def. Jacky Rosen
NV-04: Cresent Hardy def. Ruben Kihuen
AZ-01: Steve Smith def. Tom O'Halleran
TX-23: Will Hurd def. Pete Gallego
NE-02: Chip Maxwell def. Brad Ashford
MN-01: Carla Nelson def. Tim Walz
MN-02: John Howe def. Angie Craig
MN-07: Tim Miller def. Collin Peterson
MN-08: Pete Stauber def. Rick Nolan
WI-03: Steve Toft def. Ron Kind
IL-10: Jeremy Wynes def. Brad Schneider
IL-17: Mark Kleine def. Cheri Bustos
FL-07: Mike Miller def. Stephanie Murphy
FL-13: Rick Baker def. Charlie Crist
VA-10: Kathleen Murphy def. LuAnn Bennett
PA-17: Matt Connolly def. Matt Cartwright
NJ-05: Steve Lonegan def. Josh Gottheimer
NY-02: Carl Marcellino def. Tom Suozzi
NY-18: Marcus Molinaro def. Sean Patrick Maloney
NY-22: Steve Wells def. Kim Myers
NH-01: Andy Sanborn def. Terence O'Rourke
NH-02: Jack Flanagan def. Ann McLane-Kuster



Gubernatorials:

Republicans: 38 (+7)
Democrats: 12 (-6)



Alaska:
Anchorage Mayor Dan Sullivan: 52%
Gov. Bill Walker: 38%

Oregon:
State Rep. Knute Buehler: 49%
Gov. Kate Brown: 46%

Nevada:
State AG Adam Laxalt: 56%
Businessman Steve Cloobeck: 39%

Arizona:
Gov. Doug Ducey: 59%
State Sen. Steve Farley: 37%

Colorado:
State Treasurer Walker Stapleton: 51%
State Rep. Joe Salazar: 44%

New Mexico:
Rep. Steve Pearce: 37%
Fmr. Gov. Gary Johnson: 36%
Businessman Jerry Apodaca: 25%

Kansas:
State SoS Kris Kobach: 50%
Fmr. Wichita Mayor Carl Brewer: 48%

Minnesota:
Fmr. State GOP Chair Keith Downey: 53%
State Rep. Paul Thissen: 45%

Iowa:
Gov. Kim Reynolds: 56%
Fmr. State Democratic Chair Andy McGuire: 39%

Wisconsin:
Gov. Scott Walker: 54%
State Rep. Dana Wachs: 44%

Illinois:
State Sen. Daniel Biss: 49%
Gov. Bruce Rauner: 47%

Michigan:
State AG Bill Schuette: 52%
Fmr. State Sen. Gretchen Whitmer: 46%

Florida:
State Ag. Commissioner Adam Putnam: 53%
Fmr. Rep. Gwen Graham: 43%

Ohio:
State SoS Jon Husted: 57%
Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley: 41%

Georgia:
State SoS Brian Kemp: 55%
State Rep. Stacey Evans: 42%

Pennsylvania:
Fmr. Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley: 50%
Lt. Gov. Mike Stack: 48%

Maryland:
Fmr. NAACP President Ben Jealous: 48%
Gov. Larry Hogan: 47%

Connecticut:
Trumbull First Selectman Tim Herbst: 51%
Attorney Chris Mattei: 45%

Rhode Island:
Fmr. Cranston Mayor Allan Fung: 40%
Gov. Gina Raimondo: 40%
Bill Nichols: 18%

New Hampshire:
Fmr. State Sen. Frank Edelblut: 50%
Gov. Colin Van Ostern: 45%

Maine:
State House Majority Leader Ken Fredette: 34%
Fmr. State House Speaker Mark Eves: 30%
Businessman Shawn Moody: 17%
State Treasurer Terry Hayes: 17%
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« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2017, 04:26:07 pm »

I think I would actually cry if this happened
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2017, 07:25:06 pm »

Chapter 6
The Aftermath




Results:

The 2018 midterms were, arguably, the worst election for Democrats since the Republican Revolution of 1994. Republicans not only regained the Senate, but shot up to their biggest majority in decades, gaining ten seats (although, due to the strange quirk of a Democratic-aligned Independent being replaced with a Democrat and a Republican being replaced with a Republican-aligned Independent, they technically only gained nine seats) to shoot up to a 59-41 majority -- their largest in the chamber since 1926. In the House, Republicans won their widest advantage since 1930, with a mind-boggling 262 seats. Governorships were even worse, as Republicans took back solidly blue states like Rhode Island and Oregon while holding all but two of the executive mansions they occupied going in. Paul Ryan, Mitch McConnell, and newly minted RGA Chairwoman Kim Reynolds gathered for a press conference that was broadcast live from New York City, proclaiming a new era of conservative policy and eagerly looking ahead to the 2020 elections to finish the job.

Polling suggested that, as is usually the case, there was no definitive cause for the wave. Some people were upset with the stagnant economy. Some decided that it was time for a change, after nearly a decade of Democrats in the White House. Many were concerned with ethical lapses (even though the so-called "Fernandez Memo" was revealed to be a sophisticated forgery). Progressives and minorities across the country stayed home, flustered with the lack of progress on issues like immigration and healthcare, while Republican base voters were motivated to cast ballots out of raw Clinton hatred.

The Post-2018 Hype Train:

Berniecrats made hay over the fact that the only two Democrats to beat incumbent Republicans in big-ticket races were Daniel Biss of Illinois and Ben Jealous of Maryland, both Sanders-like progressives -- the former even going so far as to select a socialist Chicago Alderman as his running mate. This ignored many realities of local politics -- Illinois's economy had taken a nosedive because of squabbling between Bruce Rauner and the powerful State House Speaker Mike Madigan, and Hogan had bombed at a widely watched debate shortly before the election. However, it served to further inflame the division between the Democratic establishment and its left wing -- especially as more centrist candidates like Mike Stack, Gerry Connolly, and Steve Cloobeck blew critical races. Rumors of a left-wing 2020 challenge to the President began to swirl.

Stars were born, as they always seem to be. Biss and Jealous became heroes of the left after their critical victories, as did Maine Senator Troy Jackson and New York Governor-elect Stephanie Miner. Presidential buzz began to swirl once again around Indiana Senator Mike Pence, Ohio Senator John Kasich, and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker (four times in eight years). Other Republican rising stars appeared, such as Michigan Senator Tom Barrett, Ohio Governor Jon Husted, Florida Governor Adam Putnam, and Missouri Senator Eric Greitens.

Clinton's Time Runs Out:

Whatever the specifics of the wave, the facts were this: Republicans held nearly 60% of the seats in both chambers of Congress, and President Clinton had struggled to get her agenda through even with much more favorable numbers. Any progress on her agenda in the next two years was impossible. The friendly faces of Debbie Stabenow and Sherrod Brown had been replaced with hardline conservatives like Tom Barrett and Josh Mandel; Collin Peterson and Heidi Heitkamp (both light critics of the President) were swapped for Tim Miller and Tom Campbell -- both disciples of Paul Ryan, and wholehearted GOP hacks. As Clinton came to terms with the reality of the new Congress, her skyrocketing personal unpopularity, and even her slowly advancing age, she began to lose hope.

On January 2nd, 2019, President Clinton delivered her third and final Oval Office address. In it, she stated her happiness with the progress she had made so far on issues like infrastructure, labor protections, and healthcare. She was also grateful that she had been able to protect Obama's legacy, protecting Obamacare, the CFPB, and the Medicaid Expansion from Republican attacks. However, Clinton said, it was time for a change. She had decided, "after thoughtfully talking it over with [her] family," that she was not going to seek a second term in 2020.
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« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2017, 07:29:48 pm »

A corrupt man with ties to top Russian oligarchs(powerful business allies of Putin) is Secretary of State?

Talk about dystopia!


Was a ~$10-11 minimum wage passed?
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2017, 07:34:57 pm »

A corrupt man with ties to top Russian oligarchs(powerful business allies of Putin) is Secretary of State?

Talk about dystopia!


Was a ~$10-11 minimum wage passed?

If that's dystopia, we may come within 80,000 votes of dystopia in real life, per the reports I based Clinton's Cabinet on.

There haven't been any minimum wage increases beyond Obama-esque stuff for federal contractors -- it came close to passage, but the votes from Senate Republicans have never quite materialized, and aren't likely to anytime soon.
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« Reply #31 on: October 30, 2017, 06:35:39 pm »

When did John Kasich get to the Senate?
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #32 on: October 31, 2017, 12:31:51 am »

When did John Kasich get to the Senate?

2018. The results post should have had him as the victor in Ohio, not Mandel — fixed now. Thanks for pointing that out.
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2017, 06:46:19 pm »

I’ve been busy with school, but I finally have all the 2020 maps/results ready, and should be ready to finish this up over the next few days. Update tomorrow!
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #34 on: November 05, 2017, 03:01:25 pm »

Chapter 7
The Interim






The 116th Congress:
Speaker of the House: Paul Ryan (R-WI)
House Majority Leader: Kevin McCarthy (R-CA)
House Majority Whip: Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA)
Republican Conference Chair: Doug Collins (R-GA)
RCCC Chairman: Steve Stivers (R-FL)
Republican Policy Committee Chairman: Luke Messer (R-IN)

House Minority Leader: Xavier Becerra (D-CA)
House Minority Whip: Joe Crowley (D-NY)
Assistant Minority Leader: Tim Ryan (D-OH)
Democratic Caucus Chairman: Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM)
DCCC Chairman: Seth Moulton
Democratic Steering & Policy Committee Co-Chairs: Mark Pocan (D-WI) / John Yarmuth (D-KY)

Senate Majority Leader: Mitch McConnell (R-KY)
Senate Majority Whip: John Cornyn (R-TX)
Republican Conference Chairman: John Thune (R-SD)
RSCC Chairman: Cory Gardner (R-CO)
Republican Policy Committee Chairman: John Barrasso (R-WY)

Senate Minority Leader: Chuck Schumer (D-NY)
Senate Minority Whip: Dick Durbin (D-NY)
DSCC Chairman: Katie McGinty (D-PA)
Democratic Policy Committee Chair: Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)

The Republican leadership, coming off of a landslide victory, was changed minimally in both houses (what promotions there were were due to Majority Whip Steve Scalise's retirement).

Democrats, on the other hand, were faced with crisis. After liberals were almost bludgeoned out of existence using ads featuring Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer and former President Obama took the extraordinary step of reaching out to both the Minority Leader and her internal rival, Steny Hoyer, and arranging for them both to resign their seats on January 10th. James Clyburn, one of the most influential African-Americans in the history of the House of Representatives, opted not to return to his leadership position. This combined with Clinton's retirement to shock the system -- and provide openings for non-septuagenarians to enter the Democratic hierarchy.



Current Events:

The Republican Congress, emboldened by its massive victory, opted to stand wholly opposed to every initiative that the Clinton Administration put forward. No ifs, ands, ors, or buts. As Clinton's approval ratings hovered in the low thirties, it was clear that the 2020 elections would likely be a referendum on who could stand furthest away from the President -- and since it was clear that she would be blamed for any governmental failures, conservatives had no incentive to cooperate with her.

Clinton had to fill the seats of Supreme Court Justices Anthony Kennedy and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away within a month of each other in late 2018. Confirming a new Justice would require the votes of nine Republicans. Former Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval, a center-right moderate, replaced the similarly inclined Kennedy. Clinton nominated Paul Watford, a relative liberal, to replace Ginsburg, and after a brief period in which he was refused a hearing by Mitch McConnell, he was narrowly confirmed in what would be the Clinton Administration's final real success.

The biggest news of 2019 came in September, when (after years of scrutiny) John Podesta resigned from his post as Secretary of State after being indicted for an array of financial crimes. Most pertained to his complicity Eastern European money laundering. A few were alleged pay-to-play schemes within the State Department. A few leakers in the FBI's investigation implied that the embattled Secretary had indirect connections to Paul Manafort and other lobbyists more loosely associated with the Trump Campaign, sparking many conspiracy theories about a "rigged, one-party system" among the Kyle Kulinskis of the world. In any case (although Podesta was later acquitted of most charges) the media spectacle was a disaster for Clinton. DNI Tom Donilon replaced Podesta as Secretary of State, and former General James Stavridis took his place in turn.



The Race for the Democratic Presidential Nomination:

As Clinton's approval rating continued a slow slide to the bottom, no real A-list Democratic candidates wanted to enter the race to replace her. Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, and Elizabeth Warren all opted out of presidential runs, privately believing that whoever Democrats nominated was doomed.

Two frontrunners emerged as the field took shape. Terry McAuliffe, the former Governor of Virginia, found a lot of support in President Clinton's donor base, but (as a relatively uncharismatic, middle-aged white man) struggled to generate enthusiasm. Russ Feingold, a solid progressive, was the heir apparent to the Bernie wing -- and, despite worries that his extremely left-wing stances could turn off some swing voters, pulled yuge financial support from small donors, and proved to be very popular in the Midwest.

As the primaries approached, McAuliffe's flagging poll numbers began to turn off donors, and he lost ground to New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. Gillibrand was a gifted political operator (and a longtime ally of the President, having taken her seat in the Senate in 2009), who had positioned herself as an inoffensive third option, between the Clintonesque McAuliffe and the arch-liberal Feingold. Gillibrand was able to pull solid numbers in her native Northeast, and give McAuliffe a run for his money among African-Americans in the South.

Feingold won the Iowa Caucuses by a decisive 33-25-22 margin over his two chief competitors, but lost the critical New Hampshire primary to Gillibrand by less than two points. McAuliffe took South Carolina, Feingold took Nevada. On Super Tuesday, the Wisconsin Senator won big, with Gillibrand taking many of the critical Southern states McAuliffe would need to win the nomination and forcing him to withdraw from the race. Afterwards, Feingold's momentum proved unstoppable, and Gillibrand withdrew from the race in early April after a narrower-than-expected win in her home state of New York.



Democratic Presidential Primaries, 2020:


Sen. Russ Feingold (D-WI)
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Fmr. Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D-VA)
Gov. Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Fmr. Gov. Martin O'Malley (D-MD)
Businessman Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov. Jay Inslee (D-WA)




The Race for the Republican Presidential Nomination:

The Republican primaries, by contrast, drew a number of top-tier candidates. Senator Tom Cotton, although lacking in charisma, had emerged as a leading critic of the Clinton Administration's foreign policy, and seemed to be able to unite what Charles Krauthammer dubbed "The Right Triangle" -- conservatives, Trumpite populists, and establishmentarian moderates. Governor Scott Walker, a conservative favorite from a swingy state in the Midwest, was able to pull significant establishment support, and had an extraordinary conservative resume. Marco Rubio had spent the past four years smoothing out his rehearsed speaking style, and emerged as a key player in Capitol affairs such as the immigration debate and the investigation of Secretary Podesta. Rounding out the top tier was Ben Sasse, an ardent #NeverTrumper who had earned national attention as an articulate critic of the nominations of Merrick Garland and Paul Watford to the Supreme Court.

As the campaign went on, Cotton found himself competing with several other minor candidates for votes in the "Trumpist" lane, and adopted a strikingly populist tone on the trail. This stirred up memories of Donald Trump's landslide loss, and made many -- especially Republican donors -- very uncomfortable. As this went on, Cotton saw much of his support from the party's establishment wing bleed to the other three top candidates. After Scott Walker was arrested after a drunken brawl at a Nashua pub, and Sasse withdrew from the race for family reasons, it became clear that Rubio would gain the lion's share of this bloc.

Cotton wound up splitting the early states with Rubio -- not bad, but a stark departure from the 50-state-sweeps that some pundits had predicted for the young Senator. Then, Rubio managed to eke out wins in the key Super Tuesday states of Texas and Georgia -- and Cotton's momentum never really recovered. The energetic Florida Senator took a lead in national polling after Ohio, and never let it go.



Republican Presidential Primaries, 2020:


Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)
Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR)
Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE)
Rep. Steve King (R-IA)
Gov. Scott Walker (R-WI)
Fmr. Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ)
Gov. Matt Bevin (R-KY)
Fmr. Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA)




Vice Presidential Shortlists, In No Particular Order:

Democrats:
Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Bexar County Judge Julian Castro (D-TX)
Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT)
Sen. Jason Kander (D-MO)
Gov. Ben Jealous (D-MD)
Gov. Steve Bullock (D-MT)

Republicans:
Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR)
Gov. Scott Walker (R-WI)
Sen. John Kasich (R-OH)
Sen. Eric Greitens (R-MO)
Fmr. Gov. Nikki Haley (R-SC)
Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE)
Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA)
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« Reply #35 on: November 05, 2017, 04:24:39 pm »

Out of curiosity, what was Klobuchar's margain in her 2018 senate race? With a GOP gubernatorial win, and losses in all but Ellison and Mccollum's districts, i'd imagine it must be quite close.
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #36 on: November 05, 2017, 06:44:01 pm »

Out of curiosity, what was Klobuchar's margain in her 2018 senate race? With a GOP gubernatorial win, and losses in all but Ellison and Mccollum's districts, i'd imagine it must be quite close.

Klobuchar beats a rando State Representative 57-40.

In 2006, she overperformed the Democratic gubernatorial candidate by about 13%, and in 2012 she overperformed Obama by about the same amount. This would, hypothetically still be her closest Senate race yet.
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #37 on: December 14, 2017, 05:09:04 pm »
« Edited: December 14, 2017, 05:18:42 pm by Ted Bessell »

I was writing an update to finish this off, and then I got evacuated because of the fire. When I got back to my house, I wrote another update, but my computer crashed. So, here goes.

Chapter 8
The End







Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) / Governor Scott Walker (R-WI)
49.14% | 341 EVs

Senator Russ Feingold (D-WI) / Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT)
47.98% | 197 EVs


The fall campaign was an exceedingly brutal one, with Rubio slamming the Clinton Administration's scandals and Feingold attacking the youthful Senator over his aggressive foreign policy. Rubio maintained a substantial lead for most of the election season, but Feingold's enthusiastic campaign combined with a late-breaking corruption scandal involving Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart and several senior Rubio campaign officials to narrow the gap in the final days. Nevertheless, the progressive hero was unable to overcome the unpopularity of the Clinton Administration.

Republican gains downballot were nothing to sneeze at. Gains in Michigan, Minnesota, Virginia, and New Hampshire gave conservatives a 63-35 majority in the upper chamber, and they netted eight seats in the House to go to 270-168. Additionally, they gained control of the executive mansion in Montana, Missouri, Indiana, Washington, and North Carolina (along with countless state legislatures), ensuring that gerrymandering would enshrine their majority for decades to come.

Clinton, who had avoided controversy for the second half of her term, quietly handed over the reins of power to Rubio after staying as far away from the 2020 campaign as DNC Chairman Keith Ellison could keep her. While she left office with approval ratings in the mid-thirties, she had secured her place in the history books as the first female President. Additionally, her tenure in the Oval Office had allowed programs like Obamacare to become so entrenched that they would prove impossible for Rubio to repeal. History would judge her harshly, but she had served a valuable role as the guardian of Obama's legacy.



Supplementals:

List of Presidents of the United States:
43. George W. Bush (2001-2009)
44. Barack Obama (2009-2017)
45. Hillary Clinton (2017-2021)
46. Marco Rubio (2021-2029)
47. Scott Walker (2029-2033)
48. Jason Kander (2033-2041)

The Rubio Administration:
Secretary of State: Nikki Haley
Secretary of the Treasury: John Allison
Secretary of Defense: James Mattis
Attorney General: Pam Bondi
Secretary of the Interior: Richard Pombo
Secretary of Agriculture: Chuck Conner
Secretary of Commerce: Chris Christie
Secretary of Labor: Victoria Lipnic
Secretary of HHS: Seema Verma
Secretary of HUD: Rob Astorino
Secretary of Transportation: Harold Ford Jr.
Secretary of Energy: Myron Ebell
Secretary of Education: Mitch Daniels
Secretary of Veterans' Affairs: Leo MacKay Jr.
Secretary of Homeland Security: Mike McCaul
Director of National Intelligence: Frances Townsend
UN Ambassador: Richard Grenell
OMB Director: Mick Mulvaney
CIA Director: Mike Pompeo
EPA Administrator: Donald Van Der Vaart

Chief of Staff: Trey Gowdy
Deputy Chief of Staff: Sharon Day
National Security Advisor: Robert Zoellick
Press Secretary: Christina Mandreucci
Communications Director: Alex Conant

A Note About #MeToo:

Because Trump is never elected President, it happens a few years later -- Franken loses reelection because of some misconduct allegations, but it doesn't really take off until the Weinstein piece is published in early 2021. The only real change beyond that is that there is less focus on Trump (obviously) and more focus on Harold Ford Jr. (because he's a Cabinet secretary).

Additional questions are welcome -- I'm stuck at home for the next few days, and it isn't like I have anything more exciting to do. Tongue
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« Reply #38 on: December 16, 2017, 12:00:56 am »

How does Ted Cruz who was the runner up of the nomination last time and won almost as many votes as Romney did in the 2012 republican primary not win the nomination against Rubio who won only one state and couldn't even win in his own home state of Florida?
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« Reply #39 on: December 16, 2017, 03:57:47 pm »

How does Ted Cruz who was the runner up of the nomination last time and won almost as many votes as Romney did in the 2012 republican primary not win the nomination against Rubio who won only one state and couldn't even win in his own home state of Florida?
Because tedbessell wrote the TL and he made it happen that way
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« Reply #40 on: December 16, 2017, 08:44:17 pm »

How does Ted Cruz who was the runner up of the nomination last time and won almost as many votes as Romney did in the 2012 republican primary not win the nomination against Rubio who won only one state and couldn't even win in his own home state of Florida?
Because tedbessell wrote the TL and he made it happen that way

This. Also, Ted Cruz did not run for President in 2020 ITL.
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« Reply #41 on: December 16, 2017, 10:25:05 pm »

Clinton promised a gender equal cabinet in 2016, following Trudeau’s footsteps.

Did Clinton’s presidency hurt women in politics? Because female representation in politics plummeted in your timeline tremendously.
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« Reply #42 on: December 16, 2017, 11:26:18 pm »

Clinton promised a gender equal cabinet in 2016, following Trudeau’s footsteps.

Did Clinton’s presidency hurt women in politics? Because female representation in politics plummeted in your timeline tremendously.

I am aware of this -- by my cursory count, the Secretary-level jobs in Clinton's cabinet are close enough that a generous definition of what counts as a "cabinet member" could explain it away. IRL, though, I just based her cabinet off of what was purportedly a leaked memo outlining her choices for the positions, and it kind of turned out that way.

And yes, the drop-off of female involvement in politics was intentional. ITL, women were kindasorta discouraged, because the first female President seemed to be doing such a crappy job (and, although this is a #hottake, the fact that the first female President seemed to be doing such a crappy job touched some hidden nerves among male voters in primary/general elections).
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Solid4096
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« Reply #43 on: December 23, 2017, 04:59:50 pm »



I bothered to make a Congressional District presidential results map for your 2016 election based on your premise of a 6% uniform swing.
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Medal506
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« Reply #44 on: December 23, 2017, 06:25:47 pm »

How does Ted Cruz who was the runner up of the nomination last time and won almost as many votes as Romney did in the 2012 republican primary not win the nomination against Rubio who won only one state and couldn't even win in his own home state of Florida?
Because tedbessell wrote the TL and he made it happen that way

This. Also, Ted Cruz did not run for President in 2020 ITL.

Fair enough
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #45 on: December 23, 2017, 06:35:06 pm »



I bothered to make a Congressional District presidential results map for your 2016 election based on your premise of a 6% uniform swing.

Beautiful! Thanks!
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Solid4096
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« Reply #46 on: December 24, 2017, 11:28:04 am »



I bothered to make a Congressional District presidential results map for your 2016 election based on your premise of a 6% uniform swing.

Beautiful! Thanks!

The funny thing is that there are 21 Districts Trump won by less than 6%.

However, there is a 10 District cluster of Districts Trump won by between 6% and 7%.

So a slight increase in the number you based the tl on would have a large impact on the CD shift.
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Ted Bessell
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« Reply #47 on: December 25, 2017, 12:12:38 am »



I bothered to make a Congressional District presidential results map for your 2016 election based on your premise of a 6% uniform swing.

Beautiful! Thanks!

The funny thing is that there are 21 Districts Trump won by less than 6%.

However, there is a 10 District cluster of Districts Trump won by between 6% and 7%.

So a slight increase in the number you based the tl on would have a large impact on the CD shift.

Yeah, it’s quite interesting (although I based the ITL elections on individual race margins, not Presidential results). In a way, it’s an effect of gerrymandering — the blending of Republican and Democratic areas that’s used in states like Michigan and Pennsylvania sacrifices safer Republican seats to create a bunch of medium-level Republican districts.

https://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/10/17/1248193/-Economic-Populist-The-Gerrymander-Wave-Election-Floodplains

Hopefully 2018 IRL will be a good enough year for us to pick those off. Wink
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wxtransit
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« Reply #48 on: December 25, 2017, 12:22:44 am »
« Edited: December 25, 2017, 12:25:41 am by Rep.-elect wxtransit »

I think I would actually cry tears of joy if this (the Republican wave) happened

FTFY
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