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Lumine
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« on: July 26, 2018, 03:15:53 am »

1791: The Third Year
January 1st to December 31st, 1791

A Founding Father leaves the stage

In the News!

The rise of partisanship
States begin to identify with factions, Democratic-Republicans increasingly upstaged

Westsylvania crisis contained?
Hamilton restores order in Pennsylvania, but will the crisis find a proper resolution?

Economic crisis averted
Madison government manages to start raising revenue, debt crisis still on the horizon

Indicators:

Economic Prosperity:

Low (High debt, finally collecting revenue)

Faction Popularity:
(meant to reflect areas in which the faction exists)

Western: Highly Popular
Patriot: Popular
Hamiltonian: Popular
Whig: Moderate
Democratic Republican: Unpopular
Radical: Unpopular
Tory: Very Unpopular

1.- Turn: This turn lasts across the whole year or 1791, following the same model as the previous turn. As always, you're free to organize your factions, publish in the press, fight in the National Assembly, pursue intrigue and try and influence the course of events.

Benjamin Franklin dead at age 85
Founding Father mourned as a hero across Pennsylvania, mixed record after Westsylvania


PHILADELPHIA - For years he had stood, tall as a tower above most Americans on account of his unique character and skill. For years, he stood as a living symbol of what the abstract idea of America could come to embody, even if not all Americans would share the strong opinions Dr. Benjamin Franklin would always put on the table. His record on America's new democracy was not devoid of controversy and scandal on account of his direct confrontation with First Secretary Madison and the Westsylvania Triumvirate over the Westsylvanian Rebellion, and up to the first days of 1791 a most curious situation had developed in which Pennsylvania hailed Franklin as the only hero who would speak up against "seccession and the Madisonian tyranny", but most of the South and large parts of New England would denounce the man they had once admired for his handling of the situation.

It was amidst this controversy that death came for Mr. Franklin and gave him its embrace during a calm winter night. Having gone to sleep after reading the latest news from the National Assembly, the Radical Leader would peacefully pass away during the night, the news of his death - at the advanced age of 85 and shortly after his birthday - sending shockwaves across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and indeed, the nation. Some 30,000 people were thought to attend his funeral as the people of Philadelphia flooded the streets - and loudly jeered many of the deputies they considered hostile towards Pennsylvania -, not wanting to miss the chance to lose the senior Founding Father after the earlier departure of General Washington. What the political leaders and the rest of the nation will make of the death of Franklin remains to be seen.

Two new states request statehood!
Cumberland and Vermont formally petition, North Carolina offers territories to the National Assembly


BURLINGTON, JONESBOROUGH - Despite fears that the Westsylvania Rebellion would have eliminated the interest of several areas from becoming new states, it appears enthusiasm for statehood remains more or less strong along areas in the north and south. Having finally closed down negotiations with the State of New York, and despite a strong pro-British element pushing for application to become a British colony, the Republic of Vermont chose by majority vote to send a statehood petition to the National Assembly. An equally curious development also took place in the eastern areas of North Carolina, which had come to envision their future as a separate state under the name of Franklin. With sabotage no longer in the cards, the citizens of the region reorganized themselves and prepared for their own petition, a last minute decision replacing the name of Franklin - disliked in the area over his behavior on Westsylvania - for the region-based one of Cumberland.

An interesting event has also taken place between Cumberland and North Carolina, as even if the older state has consented to statehood by the Cumberland residents it has managed to inflict one more harm upon the smaller state. With William Blount's suggestion that the "Franklin" borders be extended all the way to the Mississippi were enthusiastically received by the local population - hailing Blount as a local hero -, but considered a threat by the North Carolina government. As a result, while Cumberland has been able to extend the areas it can claim (OOC: Roughly half of modern Tennessee), the remaining territories have been given to First Secretary Madison by the North Carolina government with the request of being traded in return for the forgiveness of the outstanding state debt.

What Madison will do with these vast territories remains to be seen.

Chaos in the Northwest Territory!
Settlements in Ohio razed by Indians, settlers killed


OHIO - While the chaotic events in Pennsylvania took most of the nation's attention - and all efforts by the nascent military were focused there -, a new crisis had been slowly developing in the Northwest Territory. Those vast lands had been in theory awarded to the United States as their territory after the Revolutionary War, but they were filled with increasingly organized Indian tribes unwilling to abandon the land and influenced by remaining British outposts and companies which had no problems with either funding or supplying the Indians to deflect attacks on their own positions. As the flow of American colonists in the Ohio area increased so did tensions, and finally a number of tribesmen decided to act: identifying several isolated colonist outposts near Pennsylvania and Virginia, they struck coordinated raids during the course of a week at the beginning of January.

Taking the colonists by surprise, they won most of the engagements as dozens of Americans perished in the struggle, an open act of defiance to the government in Philadelphia. A new dilemma has been opened for the First Secretary and the factions who support him as a standing army does not yet exist, and the only decently-sized force is that of General Hamilton in Pennsylvania itself. A prolonged conflict with the Indians could be costly and hard to fight without a proper military force, and on the other hand, the expulsion of the colonists could mean expanded British influence in the Northwest Territory and the ruin of several colonist companies run from New England.

The Flight to Varennes!
Louis XVI attempts to escape France, monarchy delivered a crippling blow


PARIS - That Louis XVI was increasingly unhappy and disaffected with the rapid rise of the revolutionary spirit across France was well-known by those versed in politics - not so much to the average citizen -, and yet it was an immense shock to many when it became known the King had suddenly abandoned Paris in disguise. Panic ran across the capital and the Constituent National Assembly as the thread of civil war became clear, and moderates like Lafayette had to resort to increasingly convoluted justifications of the King's disappearance - claiming kidnapping - to support the King's commitment towards France and the ongoing political process.

Louis and his family were eventually identified near the town of Varennes attempting to link with royalist forces, and surrounded by revolutionary troops the King was forced to return to Paris under the stunned silence of the crowds. King Louis, initially seen as well-meaning, was now seen with the outmost suspicion and even as an enemy by the rising Republican movement, which demanded the abolition of the monarchy and war against reactionary powers such as Austria. Events continue to take a dramatic turn towards escalation as Emperor Joseph II has smashed the attempted revolution in the Austrian Netherlands, and has pledged to keep is sister and brother-in-law safe from any harm...

Patriot Star v. Pennsylvania!
High Constitutional Court rules in favor of Patriots, strikes down treason law


NEW YORK CITY - Initially expecting to see months without a significant case, the five-member High Constitutional Court had their first chance to interpret the Constitution as members of the Patriot faction issued a lawsuit against the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania over the so called "Westsylvania Treason law", which made advocating for secession an act of treason punishable by death. Contending that said law went against the new Amendments to the Constitution, they sought to bring it down as pro-Pennsylvanian forces demanded the bill be considered constitutional. After a few days of deliberations, the Court gave its first verdict ever via Chief Justice George Clinton on January 1791, outlining that the bill passed by Pennsylvania was to be considered unconstitutional and therefore no longer being valid.
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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2018, 08:58:55 pm »


March 1791

Adams and Nicholas Gilman agree to join their political fortunes, following several meetings between the two men in 1790 and early 1791. Adams remarks it with satisfaction a fitting partnership of two "good Whigs," both stout friends of the Constitution and fierce advocates for the rights of New England, and welcomes Gilman's allies into the Whig fold with open arms; away from the capitol, his surrogates work to integrate pro-Gilman Independents and former Radicals into local Whig organizations.
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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2018, 09:53:25 pm »

Changes within National Assembly
Government obtains a new majority, new Leader of the Opposition elected


NATIONAL ASSEMBLY:

Hamiltonian: 17 (+2)
Democratic Republican: 15
Patriot: 11 (one unable to enter Pennsylvania)
Whig: 11 (+2)
Western: 9
Tory: 2
Radical: 1 (Franklin's seat vacant)

Government Majority: +5 (35 out of 65 seats currently filled)

PHILADELPHIA - The past two years have been intense on the National Assembly, and given the loose nature of political factions several deputies have already switched their support to a given leader or faction over some of the dramatic events of the past few months. As 1791 begins to take form the numbers have shifted yet again, both giving some necessary respite to First Secretary Madison while also featuring important developments for the official Opposition to the coalition government. The first noteworthy development was that of the former New Hampshire Radicals choosing to join the Whig faction and being followed by virtually all former or current Radicals within the state, a key turn of events which significantly increases Samuel Adams's political influence by surpassing the Westerners and inching towards just four seats less than the Democratic-Republicans.

In the Opposition matters began to change as well, as Alexander Hamilton's sudden departure - which has nonetheless seen his popularity soar after his intervention Westsylvania Rebellion - from the National Assembly left the Hamiltonians in need for a new leader. After a couple of months with Acting Leader Charles Pinckney staying on as a caretaker, the Hamiltonians deputies chose former Tory deputy Gouverneur Morris to lead them, turning him into the country's second Leader of the Opposition. Mr. Morris's leadership may signal a new era for the Hamiltonians as the independent deputies in South and North Carolina made the decision to formally return to the faction, turning the Hamiltonians into the largest single group within the Assembly.

The effect of this has been a noteworthy shift in numbers within the Assembly itself, as the inclusion of the Gilman Radicals into the Whigs, the death of Benjamin Franklin and the continued exile of General Jackson in Georgia - lest he be arrested and tried for murder in Pennsylvania - have left First Secretary Madison as the head of a temporarily majority government, holding 35 of the 65 seats currently filled on his favor. Whether this will remain the case after coming elections in Pennsylvania and possibly Vermont and Cumberland remains to be seen.
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« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2018, 12:49:47 pm »

James Gunn's 1791 Scheadule

Winter 1791

During the winter months of 1791, James Gunn was touring Georgia preparing for his governor's run. He mainly was in Savannah where just two years ago, the Democrat-Republicans put up a good fight for the deputy seat. Gunn did try and meet with local leaders like mayors and he started to meet with some state legislatures but during the spring was mainly the time Gunn met with the state legislatures. The only time, Gunn left Georgia was at the very beginning of winter to go to Benjamin Franklin's funeral and memorial.

Spring 1791

In Spring of 1791, Gunn put in a lot of effort into meeting with state legislatures and winning over their support before they choose the next governor. Gunn also took an east coast tour of the south through South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland to build support for Patriot candidates and for his proposed moving of the capital. After Gunn toured the south-east coast, he was back in Philidelphia to vote on important bills and during this time Gunn proposed his capital move act.

Summer 1791

Gunn spent a majority of his time in the summer in Maryland, meeting with state legislatures hoping that the Patriots can pick up the Maryland governorship. During this time, Gunn started writing newspaper editorials around the country in support of local Patriot candidates, especially in Maryland and Georgia. Gunn did spend some time in Philidelphia to vote on important bills.

Fall 1791

Starting off fall 1791, Gunn spent his time in Philidelphia but he didn't stay long. After Philidelphia, Gunn traveled along the western part of the nation meeting with state legislatures in proposed Westlyvainia, Kentucky and proposed Cumberland. To those state legislatures, he talked about preserving slavery in their state or if their area becomes a state. By the end of the fall, Gunn was back in Georgia to meet again with state legislatures in hope of their support for his run for governor.
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« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2018, 11:49:25 pm »

A new defection
Democratic Republican Frederick Muhlenberg switches affiliation to independent


NATIONAL ASSEMBLY:

Hamiltonian: 17
Democratic Republican: 14 (-1)
Patriot: 11 (one unable to enter Pennsylvania)
Whig: 11
Western: 9
Tory: 2
Radical: 1 (Franklin's seat vacant)
Independent: 1 (+1)

Government Majority: +3 (34 out of 65 seats currently filled)

PHILADELPHIA - Following the success that meant the fusion of the New Hampshire Radicals into the Whig faction, the Government was hit today with a curious problem as another Deputy in the National Assembly made his departure from the Democratic-Republican faction official: Mr. Frederick Muhlenberg, influential Pennsylvanian - and one of the highest profile German Americans in the Assembly - declared his intention to run for Governor of Pennsylvania as an independent, affiliation which he also extended to his stance on the National Assembly. Mr. Muhlenberg's defection cuts down the government majority to three, and leaves only three other Democratic-Republican deputies in New England. The motivations behind Mr. Muhlenberg's independent turn as not as of yet known, but it had been a subject of speculation that his affiliation to the Democratic-Republicans all but assured Mr. Muhlenberg of defeat in the next General Election and this switch could, in theory, improve his chances at the Governorship.
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« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2018, 01:23:20 am »

The Schedule of Gouverneur Morris


The Southern Strategy:
Given efforts in the previous year to bolster support and local organization for the Hamiltonians in the Nation's northern states, the Hon. Morris will be traveling Southward in 1791 to see the party reach voters in every corner of the nation.

As in the north, Hamiltonian offices shall be constructed on a district and state level, with the most competitive districts (as determined by party leaders) targeted as areas of first priority. Local supporters will be identified as sponsors and managers of these offices, and they shall be given minimum levels of training on distributing party information and reaching voters (specifically printing party lists of candidates to be used at the ballot boxes).

Mr. Morris shall personally visit Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, Cumberland, and Maryland to mingle among the townspeople, quench himself at the pubs, and help guide party strategy.

The Northern Strategy:
Morris will also visit areas farther north, and previous infrastructure building efforts from 1790 shall continue there to bolster party support. Vermont shall be visited, as shall Westsylvania.

Gouverneur and the Governors:
For all states that have legislative votes for Governor, the Hon. Morris shall attempt visits with legislative leaders to discuss politics, drink fine ales, and talk up the Hamiltonians. In Pennsylvania, Morris' home state, a statewide tour shall be conducted before the election to drum up support for the Hamiltonians.
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2018, 04:24:49 pm »

Riots in Boston and Philadelphia!
Angry reaction to National Assembly proposals, Maine seccessionism given crucial boost


BOSTON and PHILADELPHIA - That the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania was beginning to harbor inmense resentment and anger towards the federal government was a known fact, leading to much tension within Philadelphia and outward hostility of many local citizens towards the deputies as crowds gathered daily to jeer at the proceedings of the Assembly. The response of the deputies - led by the Patriots and Westerners - was to change the permanent capital to a new zone in Maryland and change the location of the Assembly towards Baltimore at the beginning of 1792, a move passed with Pennsylvanian deputies forming most of the votes against and which threw further combustible material into the fire. The passing of the Act to Move South of 1791 led to huge disturbances within Pennsylvania which turned into a riot as troops - with the state still under martial law - tried to contain the protesters. Gunfire echoed across the night of August 1st, 1791, and as a new day dawned and several terrified deputies dared to look outside the window of their hotels, a handful of soldiers and a couple dozen citizens were dead on the streets. With a gubernatorial election just around the corner and with only martial law keeping the state together, Pennsylvania is a powder keg about to explode.

Another dramatic event took place up in New England, sparked by a tremendously controversial measure promoted by Tory Leader John Jay regarding Maine statehood, which almost passed the Assembly were it not for the intervention of the Whigs - an act which doubtlessly spared them from being victims of what was to follow -, who swayed the Assembly against it. Despite the resounding defeat of the measure Mr. Jay's efforts came as an unexpected, dramatic boom to the Maine statehood supporters within the area, dormant following continued rejection from Massachusetts to the idea of statehood. With Jay turned into a local hero, several citizens have begun to organize to petition for statehood as the idea gains further strength and popularity. In Massachusetts itself, though, the news had the opposite effect. The combination of knowing that the measure had come close to passing, and the fear that another Westsylvania situation would arise separating Maine from Massachusetts sparked separate riots within Boston, in which effigies of John Jay were burned amidst cheers and the handful of Tory supporters that could be found insulted, beaten, and in some cases even feathered and tarred.

Bitter war in the frontier!
Hamilton manages a victory at Fort Washington, but the Indian war turns bloody and harsh


OHIO - Perhaps aware of the enormous trouble posed by the war against the Indians, General Hamilton set to work across the first half of 1791 recruiting a few veterans from the Independence War - although volunteers were few -, setting up a rotation system to prevent the exhaustion of his troops, and conducting a series of light raids himself to provoke the Indians into battle. For the first few months the Indian tribes declined the challenge of a large battle as raids from both sides took place, killing dozens of colonists, indians and soldiers as large areas within Ohio ended up sacked and burnt to the ground. It was the Indians, however, who suffered far larger losses and by June they were prepared to meet Hamilton's challenge. Under the skilled leadership of Blue Jacket (the most prominent leader of the Indian resistance) and Little Turtle (a chieftain who has begun to prove his military skill), the Indian massed a large host and identified the main body of Hamilton's armies.

Moving across the night they prepared to launch a night raid to send the American troops into disarray, ambush which was only narrowly discovered before the full raid took place. A pitched battle took place across the confusion of the night as Little Turtle and Hamilton tried to fight their way into overpowering the other side, a struggle which took place until the early morning when dawn allowed the American militias to use their firearms to hold the Indians back. After several hours of combat Little Turtle and the Indians withdrew in order but leaving a few hundred dead behind them, Hamilton's men winning the Battle of Fort Washington despite over two-hundred casualties of their own. An awkward situation has developed as Hamilton finds himself unable to continue the offensive due to the lack of men and supplies, having to keep most of his force to guard Pennsylvania and having too few militiamen - who have begun to march home - to form the sort of professional force required to win the war.

Foreign crisis on the horizon
Massacres in France, first British Minister to the US, slave revolt in Saint Domingue


LONDON, PARIS and PORT-AU-PRINCE - Due to the intensity of the current events in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and the Indian frontier most Americans have not taken a keen interest to foreign events, but a series of dramatic and historic developments continue to take place in a manner which may soon affect the United States of America directly. On the lighter side of the news, His Majesty King George III has made the fateful decision to send the first British Minister of the United States in the person of young (but experienced) diplomat George Hammond, who arrived in Philadelphia on September 1791 to present his credentials to President Hancock and First Secretary Madison. Whether Hammond's presence can mean a less hostile relationship between the United Kingdom and the United States remains to be seen.

Far more concerning have been the events taking place in France as public hostility to King Louis XVI continues to grow. With the National Constituent Assembly having decided to keep Louis on the throne as a constitutional monarch following the Flight to Varennes, the Republican forces reacted with anger and prepared a petition to remove the King, gathering by the tens of thousands in the Champ the Mars in Paris and growing in strenght to the point that Mayor Bailly saw it fit to send Lafayette and the National Guard to disperse the crowd while declaring martial law. While Lafayette was initially successful in dispersing the crowds peacefully, an even larger group returned under the leadership of radicals like Brissot, Danton and Desmoulins, leading to the troops firing into the crowd and killing dozens. While for the time being the Republicans have been dispersed, Lafayette's reputation has taken an enormous blow.

The ongoing strife in France had even larger effects on the colonies, as efforts to restrict slavery by Louis XVI and the Constituent National Assembly were ignored by the planters and the French elite in Saint Domingue and, in turn, word spread across the slaves that the King had actually granted them their freedom by decree. Thousands upon thousands - some say over 100,000 - of slaves rose in revolt in August and promptly captured almost a fifth of the island, killing whites by the hundreds while releasing themselves from slavery. Having reorganized after this blow, the Frenchmen within Saint Domingue have formed their own milita units and started fighting back, killing thousands of slaves through superior discipline and firepower.
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2018, 05:59:52 pm »

FS Madison's Schedule
for 1791



During the later months of 1791, FS Madison was left with much time on his hands, so he decided to continue to enrich the Republican cause up and down the Atlantic. Doubling down on his earlier efforts to build up the Republican party in Virginia and Maryland during the gubernatorial campaigns, Madison spent much time in both states greeting local citizens and spreading the Republican cause. He helped to create multiple new party offices in each state, as to serve as campaign headquarters for each region and centers for distribution of party literature. Focusing on building up the Republican brand, Madison went on a stagecoach ride through every town he could find on his way south, as to build a personal relationship with the local citizens and to improve the standing of the Republican party.

Heading onwards to North Carolina, Madison continued to grow the local Republican parties and build up the Republican brand. There, he branded the Republicans as "the only party willing to fight for North Carolinian values. The Hamiltonians are abolitionists from the North who care nothing about our values, and the Patriots are too focused on Georgia to care for any other state. In fact, the Republicans and the Patriots share the same values, but there is a key difference. Who do you see out on these roads fighting for your vote? It's not the Patriots." He continued to Charlotte, where he made an impassioned speech before a large crowd, touting the accomplishments of the Madison Government, and the Republicans' commitment to North Carolina.

In South Carolina, Madison did encounter resistance due to the fact that the state, unlike North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland, favored the Patriots, but nonetheless he trudged on into the cities and the villages, fighting for the Republican cause and contrasting the Republicans and their government credentials to the Patriots and their fractured nature and unproven credentials. He reached out to every South Carolinian he could, knowing that even a single person he could win over could make a difference. Madison also made sure to set up even more party institutions in the state, so that the Republicans could grow their presence.

After a return to the National Assembly for a few months to vote on bills and to deal with matters of his office, Madison dared to go into even the Patriot stronghold of Georgia. While he encountered considerable resistance, he continued to attempt to carve out a base, touting his government's accomplishments and protections for states' rights, including the Declaration of Rights, a key accomplishment for the Madison Government, and contrasting it with the lack of Patriot accomplishments. He also set up party offices in the state of Georgia, as to leave no region without a source of Republican influence.

After yet another break to vote on bills and attend to Assembly duties, Madison headed up north to expand the Republican party in New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, where he toured each state for a period of a few weeks, creating a rapport with local citizens and expanding the party's influence. Madison also increased the number of party offices in each state and distributed party literature, hoping to improve the standing of his party in each state and to increase competitiveness.
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« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2018, 10:27:28 pm »

CALENDAR OF SAMUEL ADAMS
FOR THE YEAR 1781 A.D.

Winter
Having passed the last weeks of December in Boston and Middlesex, worshiping, attending to his personal affairs, and meeting with his most important allies and constituents, Adams sets out for Philadelphia the second week of January. Traveling through western Massachusetts, he turns northward to Vermont, passing a few days at Westminster and Manchester, and a week at Castleton, where he dines with leading citizens and representatives of the Vermont government. His visit serves to encourage stronger ties between Massachusetts and Vermont, and between Vermont's leading lights and Adams' political network; and Adams takes the opportunity to emphasize the benefits of Whig Administration in Vermont, and to encourage the burgeoning Whig organizations and presses there. To members of the Vermont legislature, Adams offers to personally sponsor Vermont's petition for admission to the Union, before resuming his journey to the capital.

Passing south, Adams stops briefly in Bennington, Albany, and New York City—in each town dining with prominent citizens and tradesmen and leaders of the local Whig organization. Arriving in Philadelphia toward the end of February, his first weeks in the capital are spent arranging his affairs, attending to his correspondence, and looking after his responsibilities as Foreign Secretary. In March, Adams and his faction join forces with Nicholas Gilman's New Hampshire Radicals ahead of the spring gubernatorial elections.

Spring
When not in the National Assembly, Adams attends to his extensive correspondence with allies in New England, his frequent contributions to the press, and his growing commitments as Foreign Secretary and leader of the Whigs in the National Assembly. No small effort is put toward building up  local Whig organizations in New England, and the Middle States secondarily. In April and May, Adams departs the city for a brief sojourn through New England in support of Whig candidates for governor in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts.

Summer
Returning to Philadelphia in early June, Adams attends to his official duties and to his responsibilities as faction leader. Through his contributions in the press and correspondence with his allies in all corners of the country, Adams encourages the growth of Whig organizations and the Whig press. In New England, his surrogates work to establish their faction as the main opposition to the Tories and Hamiltonians, using the former as pitch to blacken the latter.

Fall
With by-elections for the National Assembly on the horizon, Adams travels to Vermont, where he stumps on behalf of the Whig candidates. He then continues on to Boston, where he meets with the Governor and Executive Council to discuss the Maine separatists, before returning to the capital for the close of the 1791 session.
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« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2018, 02:42:57 pm »

Westsylvania votes for statehood!
New state formed, controversy over assumption of Pennsylvanian debt


WESTSYLVANIA REFERENDUM:

Yes: 78.59%
No: 21.41%

PITTSBURG - After a brief but intense campaign across the separate Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania counties included in the Westsylvania Referendum, results began to arrive slowly but surely: with an overwhelming margin of almost 80% the residents of the counties had voted for seccession and the formation of their own state. Seccession passed easily in most counties, support being highest in Western Pennsylvania, somewhat lower in Western Virginia, and at its lowest - but still a strong majority - in Maryland. With the compromise between the Federal Government and the Pennsylvanian Government having secured acceptance for the results of the referendum, assent was granted for the creation of Westsylvania as the so called Triumvirate formed a provisional government and drafted a constitution, preparing for full elections in early 1792 given the time required to organize the state. Pennsylvania would also face a crucial decision as well, for the departure of Westsylvania and the use of At-Large districts would require all of its deputies to the National Assembly to undergo a new by-election.

With martial law starting to be suspended the Madison government wasted no time in claiming victory, and indeed many across the nation saw it as a significant victory for the government despite the enormous price involved - which, further empowering Patriots and Hamiltonians, hasn't exactly made Madison popular in Pennsylvania itself -, and a sign that the Democratic-Republican faction was indeed overcoming the rigors of government. However, the resolution of the crisis itself has opened the doors to a new controversy across America: the assumption of state debts. While the announcement that the Federal Government would assume the full debt of Pennsylvania (some $3m) was popular in Pennsylvania itself (and seen as a huge bonus to Radical leader Bache and Governor Brackenridge), it has sparked immediate reactions as several states who have either reduced or payed most of its debts have protested what they see as favoritism, while other states deeply indebted have begun demanding their debts be assumed by the Federal Government as well lest Pennsylvania be the only one to recieve preferential treatment.

Already by the closing weeks of 1791 state legislators in the states of South Carolina, Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island and Connecticut have begun to lobby their respective legislatures and Governors to formally petition for the assumption of their state debt.
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« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2018, 03:15:15 pm »


Activites of James Jackson for January-December of 1791

January-September 1791:  Throughout 1791 Mr. Jackson continued to send letters to Patriot organizations throughout Southern states, as well as Westsylvania.  In these letters Mr. Jackson urged the local organizations to continue forming state level organizations and infrastructure, as well as urging preparation for future elections, particularly in Westsylvania and Cumberland. 

October-December 1791:  With Westslyvania's successful ascension to statehood, Mr. Jackson sends letters to Patriot organizations within the new state, congratulating them on the state's birth, as well as urging preparation for the coming elections in 1792. 

In addition, Mr. Jackson himself heads to Cumberland in order to campaign for the Patriot faction in the State.  While campaigning for Patriot Candidates for the state legislature and Governor's office, Mr. Jackson fully denounces the madness of William Blount and his monarchic ideas, stating that he has been fully expelled from the Patriot Faction.   He goes on to urge supporters of the Patriots to vote for their new candidate rather than this madman.  While campaigning for Patriot Candidates, Mr. Jackson speaks of the Patriots' opposition to the National Bank legislation and their opposition to the National Mint, stating that together they are a Hamiltonian proposal for the destruction of our nation's principles of self-government and state's rights.
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