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| |-+  U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderator: Torie)
| | |-+  How did Catholic women vote in 1928 and earlier?
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Author Topic: How did Catholic women vote in 1928 and earlier?  (Read 257 times)
darklordoftech
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« on: September 19, 2018, 12:45:44 am »

I get the impression that the GOP was more anti-Catholic, but more feminist.
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AMB1996
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« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2018, 01:15:03 am »

Tough to say for sure, but I'd imagine they were Republican-leaning. Since women weren't guaranteed the vote until 1920, I'd say they went Republican given how heavily Republican the North (where almost all Catholics lived) was from 1920-28.

The Republican Party was the broadly more anti-Catholic party from roughly its founding until 1910, but Southern-fried Democrats like Woodrow Wilson and Hugo Black gave them a run for their money after the rebirth of the KKK. In fact, there may be at least certain senses in which the Democratic Party was the more Catholic and the more anti-Catholic party during the period in question.

P.S. I know you're keeping this to a very narrow period, but even in earlier decades, nativism/anti-Catholicism wasn't a one-party issue. In 1854 it was said of the NYS Assembly, "Know Nothings are sprinkled miscellaneously among Whigs, Hards and Softs [referring to the two wings of the state Democrats]; and exactly how many there are of these gentry in the Assembly Nobody Knows."

I also think that much of our understanding of anti-Catholic prejudice during the Civil War era is obscured by confounding political interests. New York and Boston were already Democratic strongholds in otherwise Yankee Republican states. It's hard to detangle anti-Catholicism within the Republican Party during the period from pure nativism and nationalist wartime sentiment. We tend to think of anti-Catholicism during that time through the extremely-local Gangs of New York lens, and I have to wonder how much that sentiment really mattered to national politicians.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 01:19:45 am by AMB1996 »Logged

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« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2018, 09:16:33 pm »

Tough to say for sure, but I'd imagine they were Republican-leaning. Since women weren't guaranteed the vote until 1920, I'd say they went Republican given how heavily Republican the North (where almost all Catholics lived) was from 1920-28.

The Republican Party was the broadly more anti-Catholic party from roughly its founding until 1910, but Southern-fried Democrats like Woodrow Wilson and Hugo Black gave them a run for their money after the rebirth of the KKK. In fact, there may be at least certain senses in which the Democratic Party was the more Catholic and the more anti-Catholic party during the period in question.

P.S. I know you're keeping this to a very narrow period, but even in earlier decades, nativism/anti-Catholicism wasn't a one-party issue. In 1854 it was said of the NYS Assembly, "Know Nothings are sprinkled miscellaneously among Whigs, Hards and Softs [referring to the two wings of the state Democrats]; and exactly how many there are of these gentry in the Assembly Nobody Knows."

I also think that much of our understanding of anti-Catholic prejudice during the Civil War era is obscured by confounding political interests. New York and Boston were already Democratic strongholds in otherwise Yankee Republican states. It's hard to detangle anti-Catholicism within the Republican Party during the period from pure nativism and nationalist wartime sentiment. We tend to think of anti-Catholicism during that time through the extremely-local Gangs of New York lens, and I have to wonder how much that sentiment really mattered to national politicians.

State by state, tribalism played a very big role in political alignments. So what applies to one state or period, may not apply to another.
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"A majority held in restraint by constitutional checks and limitations, and always changing easily with deliberate changes of popular opinions and sentiments, is the only true sovereign of a free people." - Lincoln's First Inaugural Address, emphasis mine.
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