Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
April 23, 2019, 09:01:17 pm
News: Please delete your old personal messages.

  Atlas Forum
  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  International Elections (Moderators: Gustaf, Hash, Keyboard Jacobinism)
  DENMARK - 2019 election
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Print
Author Topic: DENMARK - 2019 election  (Read 2334 times)
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2019, 09:24:23 am »

Megafon poll for TV2 of most important issues in the upcoming election. Respondents could choose up to 2 answers

38% Health care
30% Environment and climate
24% Refugees and immigration
17% Elderly care
14% Schools and education
12% Social policy
10% Children and youth
10% Economy
09% Taxation
08% Bureaucracy
05% EU
04% Employment
03% Justice (Law and order, but with a softer term which perhaps reduces its share)
02% Foreign policy
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2019, 06:15:45 am »

While the election hasn't been offically called yet, we will have the first major TV duel on Sunday 21.00 on DR1, the main state broadcasting channel. PM Lars Løkke Rasmussen will meet Social Democrat leader Mette Frederiksen in a debate. The TV programme scheduled there normally lasts 45 minutes, but it hasn't been described yet whether it will be extended for this purpose.
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2019, 09:08:55 am »

The internal problems in the Alternative continue. Today two members of the party board left the party and heavily criticized party leader Uffe Elbæk.  Deputy leader of the party(administrative role) Vilhelm Stamp Nordal Møller says that while being a member of the party board, he experienced several incidents which means that he can no longer be a part of the party. He is particularly tough on Elbæk:"To start and lead a party is a huge responsibility, which gives you a great amount of power. It takes a lot of integrity and professionalism to take on that responsibility, and to use that power in a fair and just manner. Some people grow with that task, while others take advantage of that position to their own benefit. The latter was the case in the Alternative". He says that Elbæk has often negatively called out members or volunteers at gatherings in the party, he has questioned and overriden key parts of the internal party democracy, and that he has used his power in a calculating and self-beneficial way. Critical questions are being rejected with a "no comments" answer and criticism of the questioner.

Most polls continue to show a heavy Red Bloc lead, mostly around 55%-45%
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2019, 12:08:16 pm »

Img


The first major TV debates between Løkke and Frederiksen took place yesterday evening. There is general agreement among commentators that Løkke was the most convincing performer. I haven't seen any polling. There were 533.000 viewers, so a quite big bloc of voters. The 45min debate had three different themes, health care, early retirement and climate. Løkke seemed well on top in the two first issues, while Frederiksen was somewhat better on climate. Frederiksen was especially pressed on the proposed early retirement plan, where she kept on refusing to give clear answers about which groups that would gain this right to early retirement. Clearly, the goal is that as many as possible are to believe that they will be included. While Løkke quite clearly had a better grasp of the policy details and exposed Frederiksen a few times, her policies might at the end of the day simply be more popular, no matter the vagueness of them. On climate, there was a lot of big goals in 2030 and 2050 from both, but on concrete measures (flight tax, meat tax), they both seemed to reject them. Frederiksen had a good attack about the Liberals being to closely aligned with the farmers, which I guess all the Red Bloc parties will refer to often in the campaign. Particularly after some of the government's controversial initiatives that helped farmers without much focus on climate and environment, something which several civil servants in the Ministry of Food and Environment have leaked and briefed heavily against.
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2019, 04:04:46 pm »

Social Liberal leader Morten Østergaard has further increased the tensions between his party and the Social Democrats by stating that he would vote against Mette Frederiksen as PM if the Social Democrats does not change tack in their integration policy. The Social Democrats supported the government + DPP's so-called "paradigm shift" that aims to focus more on sending refugees home than to integrate them. Østergaard is particularly opposed to the fact that the immigration authorities are to put "the least possible weight" on education and work in Denmark when assessing whether a refugee can be sent home. It is probably questionable how little that weight can be once international courts and conventions are taken into account, but the intent is that integration into society should not matter a lot when refugees can be send back to a safe homeland.
Earlier this week, Østergaard, in a protest, swam across the sea from Lindholm, the tiny island which is supposed to house foreign criminals on the deportation list from 2021.

Img
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2019, 04:54:37 pm »

Newspaper Politiken has talked with most of the Greenlandic and Faroese parties regarding their choice of PM.

In Greenland, Siumut states its support for Mette Frederiksen, but IA seems much more open to Løkke. Current IA MP Aaja Chemnitz Larsen states that "Lars Løkke Rasmussen has been a better PM for Greenland than Helle Thorning-Schmidt. There have been a significant change from a Red government, which we should match ideologically, to a Blue government, which treats us better. This means we are considering what to do".  She mentions bigger investments in Greenland and a larger interest towards the Greenlandic situation from Løkke. The article sadly does not mention Democrats, who were third in the 2018 election and therefore should be the first in line to steal a seat from Siumut or IA. The party has never been represented in Folketinget, and has previously had cooperation with first Conservatives and then Social Liberals. Both the strongly separatist parties Partii Naleraq and Nunatta Qitornai does not commit to either Løkke or Frederiksen, and wants to use an (unlikely) MP to press for more devolution. Current MP Aleqa Hammond, who was elected for Siumut before becoming independent and then Nunatta Qitornai, supports the current government as a part of a deal that made her chair of the Greenland Committee.

In Faroe Island, Javnaðarflokkurin are clear in its support for Frederiksen, while both Sambandsflokkurin and Fólkaflokkurin would support Løkke. However, the fourth major party, the left-wing separatist Tjóðveldi, does not want to commit to any of them, and wants to focus on the candidates' attitude towards Faroese independence. The latest Spyr poll from Faroe Islands regarding the Folketing, shows Sambandsflokkurin at 25.5%, Javnaðarflokkurin at 23.4%, Fólkaflokkurin at 23.0% and Tjóðveldi at 19.7%. Looks like another tight battle for the two seats.
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #31 on: April 05, 2019, 01:20:05 pm »

Polling average for March 2019. Based on Voxmeter (average of their 4 polls), Gallup, Megafon, Epinion, Norstat, YouGov (average of their two polls), Greens. +/- compared to 2015

27.8% (+1.5%) Social Democrats 50 seats (+3)
06.6% (+2.0%) Social Liberals 12 seats (+4)
04.9% (+1.5%) Conservatives 9 seats (+3)
03.4% (new) New Right 6 seats (new)
01.0% (new) Klaus Riskær Pedersen 0 seats (new)
06.6% (+2.4%) SPP 12 seats (+5)
04.4% (-3.1%) Liberal Alliance 8 seats (-5)
00.9% (+0.1%) Christian Democrats 0 seats (=)
14.1% (-7.0%) DPP 25 seats (-12)
17.5% (-2.0%) Liberals 31 seats (-3)
08.9% (+1.1%) Red-Green Alliance 16 seats (+2)
03.7% (-1.1%) Alternative 6 seats (-3)

With the previously mentioned caveats about the whether the blocs will actually unite around Løkke and Frederiksen.
46.1% (-6.2%) Blue Bloc 79 seats (-11)
53.7% (+6.0%) Red Bloc 96 seats (+11)
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #32 on: April 06, 2019, 04:15:28 am »

The Christian Democrats does not stand many chances of getting elected to parliament, but as usual there is some attention to the possibility of the party crossing the threshold by winning a constituency seat in the Western Jutland multi-member constituency. Although, in 2015 they were almost as close to crossing the threshold nationally as getting a seat in the West. Nationally, 70.380 votes were required to cross the treshold, but the party only received 29.077 (41.3%), while they in Western Jutland needed 17.907 votes to win a seat, but only received 7.646 (42.7%). So if they increase their vote proportionally, they will be likely to cross the 2% national threshold at around the same time as winning a Western Jutland seat.

However, there is some hope that they could increase their vote more in Western Jutland. The popular principial at a continuation school, Kristian Andersen, is running in Western Jutland. He is very popular in Ringkøbing-Skjern, where he incresed the party's fortunes to 15.5% in the 2017 local elections, winning the most personal votes (3.618), winning six seats and almost becoming mayor (in the end, the Social Democrats supported the Liberals instead). Furthermore, the very popular local Liberal Esben Lunde Larsen, who personally received 24%(8.622) of all votes in Ringkøbing-Skjern in the 2015 general election, is not running this time, and the Liberals' new candidate in the area is not a local. Therefore Andersen and the Christian Democrats hope they can convince many of his former voters to vote for them. And there seems to be some local support for the idea. The local newspaper focus intensely on the Liberal-KD battle, and a Liberal councillor in Ringkøbing-Skjern, Svend Boye Thomsen, resigned from the Liberals in order to become campaign leader for Andersen.

The chances still seem quite low. Andersen will need to do really well locally as well as the party doing respectively in big towns in the constituency like Viborg, Silkeborg, Skive and Struer, where they won less than 2% in 2015. And there might not be a lot of people in these towns, who knows Andersen (or their local KD candidate). It would probably have helped if the party had made him national leader, but they for some reason continue with the hapless non-entity Stig Grenov, who won 80 personal votes in the 2017 local elections in Hørsholm in Northern Zealand.
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #33 on: April 14, 2019, 02:42:28 pm »

In recent months, Rasmus Paludan from the party Stram Kurs(Tough Line) has travelled around Denmark with his Quran shows. Paludan is a fairly well-known Youtuber, particularly among young people, who travels around and makes very negative speeches about islam and immigration while burning, throwing around or tearing out pages from physical Quarans. He usually holds these shows as close as possible to the most immigration-heavy areas, but the reactions vary a lot. In some of the provincial towns with better integrated immigrants, the areas have held parties/sports events on the days of his shows and largely ignored him while in the bigger cities, with a significant amount of criminal immigrants, radical islamists and violent "anti-fascists" there have been attacks towards him and therefore a massive police presence. Today was the biggest reaction so far in Nørrebro, Copenhagen with attacks on Paludan, the police and whatever happened to be in the area. So far three arrested, but the number is expected to rise.

Img


Img


Img


Img


Stram Kurs is currently the party closest to getting on the ballot with 5 526 signatures, but 20 109 signatures are needed and the election is soon, so the party will not make it.
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #34 on: April 14, 2019, 03:52:57 pm »

The Alternative down at 2.4% in this Epinion poll! Other polls still have them higher, but the trend is downwards. Their vote is so concentrated in urban areas, that they have great chances of a Copenhagen multi-member constituency seat (and thereby 3-4 seats in total), even if at 1.9% nationally. If it looks like they will be in problems, I think a few other left wingers would lend them a vote. Nevertheless, it would be exciting with some threshold/wasted votes headache on the left as well Wink

Img


Logged
rob in cal
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,697
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #35 on: April 14, 2019, 06:02:38 pm »

  Diouf, I always get irritated when in a PR election with a threshold there is an ideological imbalance of which type of parties are wasting votes and missing the threshold. I believe Poland 1993 was one of the worst examples of this.
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #36 on: April 15, 2019, 09:42:50 am »

23 persons were arrested as violence and arson continued. The police registered 70 fires and encountered plenty of different objects thrown at them. The police have invoked a "double punishment zone", where crimes will result in twice as big a sentence as normal, in areas of Copenhagen, as it is feared to continue. Paludan will have another Quran show in Alberstlund, a immigrant heavy suburb, today, and another one in central Copenhagen during the week.

Img


Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #37 on: April 15, 2019, 10:05:45 am »

  Diouf, I always get irritated when in a PR election with a threshold there is an ideological imbalance of which type of parties are wasting votes and missing the threshold. I believe Poland 1993 was one of the worst examples of this.

Yeah, these situations are quite annoying. I think the worst case in Denmark was in 1988, where four left-wing/far-left parties (Common Course, Greens, Communist Party, Left Socialists) won 4.9%, but none of them ended up in parliament. That was one of the primary triggers for the creation of the Unity List/Red-Green Alliance.

In 1971, four parties (Christian People's Party, Left Socialists, Communist Party, Justice Party) won 6.7%, but neither crossed the threshold. The parties sued the Interior Ministry as they argued the 2% threshold was too high and unconstitutional because the Constitution states that elections should "ensure an equitable representation of the voters' views". However, the Supreme Court ruled in favour of the Ministry as it argued that since electoral laws with tougher thresholds had been approved in 1915 and 1953 by the same parliaments that approved the revised Constitutions, then the constitutional approvers did not intent for a supertight interpretation of the relevant passage of the Constitution.
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2019, 09:06:55 am »

For those interested in a deeper dig into what happened at the last Danish general election, and in this term, then here are some relevant Atlas links:

General election, 18 June 2015: https://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=204244.0
The whole thread is relevant. The election is called on p.11

Great Nordic thread, 2015-2019: https://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=150978.500
I have linked to p.21, where the current term starts. Several posts on policy and politics developments.

Referendum on converting EU justice opt-out to opt-in, 3 December 2015: https://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=217895.0

Local and Regional Elections, 21 Nov 2017: https://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=275982.0
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #39 on: April 16, 2019, 03:28:39 pm »

Altinget.dk is running a series with the 100 most important events during the term.
Several of them are mentioned in more detail in the threads in the previous post, but here are the first 25 events. In the article below, there are some paragraphs and photos.

1. Blue Bloc majority at 2015 election. Thorning-Schmidt resigns as PM and Social Democrat leader.
2. Løkke presents his new Liberal-only government. The government with the fewest seats since 1973.
3. One day into its existence, the new government agrees on a deal to re-introduce a "house improvement deductible" with DPP, Alternative, SPP and Conservatives.
4. Blue Bloc parties agree a reduction in the benefit level for non-EU immigrants.
5. Former DPP leader, Pia Kjærsgaard, becomes Speaker of Parliament.
6. Government+DPP makes deal with Social Democrats + Social Liberals to always vote through a government's economic framework deal with the municipalities. This was necessary for the government to get its deal through, as Conservatives had rejected it because it allowed several municipalities to raise land taxes.
7. Government abolishes Iraq and Afghanistan Commission. The Commission was set down to investigate the Danish participation in these wars by the previous government. The Liberals rejected is as political pointscoring, and vowed to spend the money on veterans instead.
8. Migrant crisis. The massive number of migrants/refugees reaches Denmark. Many try to get through the country to get to Sweden, some by walking on the highways, but there is also a significant rise in asylum seekers in Denmark.
9. The Immigration Ministry publishes ads in Lebanese newspapers about the tightened immigration policies and lowered benefits to make Denmark less attrative for migrants.
10. The first minor reshuffle. Defence Minister Carl Holst resigns after scandals around his time as leader of Southern Denmark region (high renumeration after qutting, getting his spin doctor hired as a normal civil servant but de facto functioning as spin doctor) as well as showing an embarrassing lack of knowledge about his new brief. Peter Christensen, a Løkke loyalist who failed to get elected a MP among huge Liberal losses at the election, replaces him.
11. The big de-centralization. The government presents its plan to move 3.900 state jobs from Copenhagen to other parts of the country.
12. DPP fraud cases emerge. DPP MEP Rikke Karlsson leaves the party in protest against DPP MEP leader Morten Messerschmidt, who she claims has committed fraud with EU funds.
13. Government makes deal on unemployment benefits with DPP, and Social Democrats. The deal slightly increases the costs of the system (40 million euro a year) by increasing flexibility for using and re-earning the right to benefits. Reduces benefits for graduates.
14. Blue Bloc + Social Democrats agree to build a new Police Academy and almost double the number of police officers trained a year (from 380 to 680)
15. Danes vote no in a referendum to converting the EU justice opt-out to an opt-in. See the thread in the previous post for more.
16. In Paris, the government agrees to the COP21 deal to combat climate change.
17. DPP forces government to re-open the agreed 2016 budget and eliminate the pensioners housing benefit cap after receiving severe criticism.
18. Government ignores non-binding resolution to roll back savings on foreign aid. The resolution was adopted as Conservatives voted blank.
19. Government introduces temporary border control.
20. Thorning-Schmidt leaves her job as MP and Deputy Speaker to become CEO in Save the Children International.
21. Blue Bloc + Social Democrats agree proposal to confiscate money + valuables above 10.000 DKK (1 300 euro) found on asylum seekers.
22. The second minor reshuffle. Minister of Food and Agriculture, Eva Kjer Hansen, is forced to resign after Conservatives declare no-confidence in her after accusations of misleading enviromental impact numbers in the Agriculture deal, which the Conservatives vote through along with the other Blue Bloc parties anyway.
23. Former Social Democratic PM (1972-1973 & 1975-1982), Anker Jørgensen, dies, age 93.
24. Pernille Skipper replaces Johanne Schmidt-Nielsen as political spokesperson (de facto leader) for the Red-Green Alliance. Schmidt-Nielsen cannot run at the next election due to the party's rotation principles, so she leaves the post to Skipper, who can do just that.
25. Government, Social Democrats, DPP, Liberal Alliance and Social Liberals agree to purchase 27 F-35 fighters. Conservatives find it too low, while the left-wing parties find it too high.

https://www.altinget.dk/artikel/husker-du-her-er-100-begivenheder-fra-valgperioden
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #40 on: April 21, 2019, 12:01:11 pm »

Second part of the 100 events of this term.

26. DPP announces that they are ready to enter a government. Thulelsen Dahl states that if the Blue Bloc regains power and DPP again received around 1/5 of the votes, the party would likely go into government.
27. Løkke refuses to face parliamentary committee. After the heavy criticism around the handling of the agriculture package and the resignation of the Minister Eva Kjer Hansen, the opposition targets the PM. He is accused of having knowledge of Kjer Hansen's supposed misinformation of parliament, but Løkke refuses to be dragged into the case by facing the Agricultural Committee.
28. Brexit. Løkke calls it a sad day, and hopes that UK will seek a close relationsship with EU. Underlined the importance of Danish EU membership.
29. Liberal Alliance leader Anders Samuelsen intensifies his demands for a 5% top tax cut. He claims that if Løkke fails to deliver it, he will take down the government.
30. Messerschmidt reported to the police. Former DPP MEP Rikke Karlsson reports Messerschmidt to the police due to accussations that he had signed her up as board member of EU parties MELD & FELD without her knowledge. Messerschmidt resigns as DPP EP group leader.
31. Huge reform of taxation authority. After several scandals regarding the tax authority, Minister of Taxation Karsten Lauritzen puts forward a plan to hire 1 000 extra employees and split the authority up into seven distrinct agencies, placed decentralized in the country. Current head of the authority sacked.
32. The government proposes its 2025 reform plan. The plan includes tax cuts for low earners, as well as incomes between 0.5 and 1 million DKK (but not the top tax cut wanted by Samuelsen), cutting energy tariffs and taxes for business, raising the retirement age with six months, and changing half of the education grant into a loan. However, LA is not satisfied, and red parties + DPP attacks it for being unfair.
33. Arne Melchior dies. A co-founder of the Centre Democrats in 1973 along with a number of others from the right wing of the Social Democrats. Represented the party in parliament from 1973-1975, and 1977-2001. Minister of Transport 1982-1986 in a centre-right government (where he was key in getting through the Storebælt bridge between Funen and Zealand), and Minister of Tourism 1993-1994 in a centre-left one. As a jew, he fled to Sweden during WWII and that experience was part of his pro-refugee advocacy. A staunch supporter of Israel, which in the end caused a break with the party as Melchior defended Israeli human rights violations against detainees. This was in 2001 and caused further unrest in the dismantling party, that failed to get elected in that year's general election.
34. New Right is eligible for the next general election. The party has received the necessary 20 109 signatures to secure its place on the ballot. The party is led by former Conservative parliamentary candidate Pernille Vermund
35. A tense debate to open the parliamentary year. The government's 2025 plan is heavily debated, and four Blue Bloc MPs are thrown out of the chamber for protesting the lack of action in Syria.
36. Revelations about the Danish Security and Intelligence Service. Its former leader Jakob Scharf wants to publish a book about his time, but the Service gets a court order against it. The centre-left daily Politiken publishes it anyway. Scharf was later sentenced to four months in prison, and the newspaper faced a heavy fine.
37. Former SPP leader and Foreign Minister, Villy Søvndal, announces his comeback to Danish politics. He will stand in the regional elections in Southern Denmark, and try to turn the traditionally Blue area Red.
38. EU's anti-fraud agency OLAF enters the DPP/Messerschmidt case to investigate a possible misuse of EU funds.
39. Trump wins the presidential election.
40. Blue Bloc, Social Democrats, Social Liberals + SPP agree to reduce energy tariffs (which will primarily help energy-intensive production). This is financed by reducing general business support funds, a slight income tax increase, and lowering the costs of wind turbines by moving them closer to/onto land instead of in the sea.
41. 2017 Budget agreed. The Blue Bloc parties agree a budget for 2017. There is increased funds for eldery care and cancer treatment, lower car taxes, a one-year housing tax freeze, as well as increased sentences and tougher immigration laws.
42. A new government is formed. After facing increasing difficulties in dealing with Liberal Alliance, and in particular LA's bad relationship with DPP, Løkke decides to invite Conservatives and Liberal Alliance to join the government. The main argument is that it will give a more manageable parliamentary position, and a return to the stable 2001-2011 situation where a centre-right government only has to deal with DPP (the 2007-2011 term saw several defections back and forward, so at some times the majority also depended on independents/small parties). It also allows the Liberal Alliance a way to climb down from its tough top tax cut demands without having to take down the government.
43. Mogens Camre dies. He was a MP for the Social Democrats from 1968-1987. He was a part of the, mostly young and left-wing, Eurosceptics in the party who opposed membership in the 1972 EEC referendum. He became political spokesperson for the party in 1981, but soon after the party lost power and he never had the chance to advance to a position as minister. In the late nineties, he left Social Democrats and joined DPP, symbolizing the significant voter movement of socially conservative and eurosceptic Social Democrats towards DPP. He was a MEP for DPP from 1999 to 2009, and is often mentioned by Morten Messerschmidt as an important mentor.
44. The Parlimentary Ombudsman heavily criticizes Minister of Immigration Inger Støjberg, who demanded that the immigration authorities separated all asylum seeker couples with one under-18 person. Such a general order was made despite knowledge that this was illegal under Danish law (due to ECHR).
45. A new taxi reform between the government, DPP, Social Democrats, Social Liberals and SPP is seen as a humiliation of Liberal Alliance as rules are updated and manifested so that its "favourite company" Uber can't continue its Danish operations. The reform removes the cap on taxi licenses while tightening the safety and technological standards.
46. Minister of Immigration Inger Støjberg causes a lot of attention as she publicly celebrates immigration tightening no 50 with a giant birthday cake with the number 50 on.
47. The prosecution decides not to charge former Defence Minister Carl Holst with misuse of power in his time as Regional Chairman.
48. The official portrait of former PM Helle Thorning-Schmidt in parliament is revealed.
49. A manifestation of the closer bonds between Social Democrats and DPP as Frederiksen and Thulelsen Dahl holds a common "debate" in the giant Circus Building in Copenhagen, where they announce a common alliance against further raises in the retirement age.
50. Niels Helveg Petersen dies. He was a key kingmaker in Danish politics for decades with his central position in the Social Liberals. He was MP 1966-1974, 1977-1993 and 1994-2011. He led the Social Liberals from 1978-1990, and was Minister of Economy in a centre-right government 1988-1990 and Foreign Minister in a centre-left government from 1993-2000. In 1982 when Social Democratic Anker Jørgensen resigned as PM, Helveg Petersen preferred to make Conservative Poul Schlütter PM over the Liberal Henning Christoffersen. He stayed supportive of the centre-right government as the Social Democrats was seen as having moved too far to the left. Therefore, he supported Poul Nyrup Rasmussen leadership challenge to Social Democrat leader Svend Auken in 1992, despite Helveg being closely related to Auken and the godfather of one of Auken's children. After Nyrup's triumph, Helveg was happy for the Social Liberals to make Nyrup PM, which became a reality shortly after.

https://www.altinget.dk/artikel/husker-du-her-er-de-100-vigtigste-begivenheder-fra-valgperioden
Logged
Ex-Assemblyman Steelers
Steelers
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 292
Serbia and Montenegro


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #41 on: April 21, 2019, 11:19:39 pm »

Here, I am only interested of JSN and Q. I expected they will keep and strong their 4th place...for now ❤️
Logged
Diouf
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,452
Denmark
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #42 on: April 22, 2019, 03:04:10 am »

Here, I am only interested of JSN and Q. I expected they will keep and strong their 4th place...for now ❤️

I guess JSN is Johanne Schmidt-Nielsen, but she is not running again due to the Red-Green rotation principle. Not sure who/what Q is supposed to mean.
On the current projection of 16 seats, they will likely get a new batch of young MPs elected.
Victoria Velásquez is very likely to become the first Red-Green MP with an immigrant background (a parent not being a Danish citizen). Her mother is from Nicaragua. The 27-year old is the lead candidate in Funen, and will certainly elect a Red-Green MP. And since the party uses semi-closed lists, it would be a shock if she does not come in. Like many other Red-Greens, she has a background in DGS (Danish Gymnasium Student Association) as well as a university degree from Roskilde University (started in 1972 and inspired by the youth revolt, and largely seen as the most left-leaning university, although many of the others seem to be catching up).
Img

Mai Villadsen is lead candidate in Northern Zealand, and the 27-year old should also be very certain to get a seat. She is a former DGS President, has studied at Roskilde University and is currently a political advisor for the party in parliament as well as host for the party's weekly podcast.
Img

Sinem Demir would just be elected, according to the current polls as the 2nd candidate on the list in Northern Jutland. The 27-year old only became a Danish citizen last year. Her parents are Turkish immigrants, who came to Denmark to work in the 1980es. She is a waiter and trade union representative, who is studying Middle Eastern studies. She also keenly follows Turkish politics, and is a spokesperson/representative for HDP in Denmark.
Img

If the party gain further ground, then 27-year old ecological farmer Rasmus Vestergaard Madsen and/or 30-year old social worker student Anne Hegelund are among the next in line to win a seat.
Img

Img
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC