Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
February 20, 2020, 05:45:30 am
News: 2020 Gubernatorial Predictions are now active.

  Atlas Forum
  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  International Elections (Moderators: Gustaf, Hash, Let the hero born of woman crush the IDP with his heel)
  Spanish elections and politics II (Basque and Galician elections: April 5, 2020)
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 50 51 52 53 54 [55] 56 57 Print
Author Topic: Spanish elections and politics II (Basque and Galician elections: April 5, 2020)  (Read 84310 times)
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1350 on: January 05, 2020, 06:00:27 pm »
« edited: January 05, 2020, 06:47:24 pm by Velasco »

As I said before, she's very vocal against Podemos due to alleged chavista links. The influence of former Canarian emigrants returned from Venezuela is strong in some insular branches of CC.

Keep in mind it's not just old emigrants returned from Venezuela, but young Venezuelans who migrated to Spain and hold Spanish citizenship. But yeah, I'd dare to say most Venezuelan expats in Spain that pay just a modicum of attention to politics don't have a positive image of Podemos, to say the least.

I know most Venezuelan expats are anti- Chavez and don't have a good opinion of Podemos, despite Pablo Iglesias and others began to take distance from the post-Chávez disaster some time ago. In any case, I was referring to the CC membership in Santa Cruz de Tenerife province. Curious fact: it surfaced the not so young Juan Guaido's father was a taxi driver in Tenerife (maybe he's still there). Anyway, the Canary Islands have close ties to Venezuela due to historical emigration. CC has a presence in the country via Canarian emigrants and their offspring (they can vote in our elections if they hold Spanish citizenship). In the case of Ana Oramas, she's from a family of landowners in Tenerife. I ignore if she has some relatives in Venezuela, as nearly everybody in her province. Another fun fact: the grandmother of the Podemos deputy Alberto Rodríguez (an engineer notorious because of his rastaman appearance, curently secretary for organization) was a humble seamstress who made seam works for the Oramas' family and other wealthy families  elin La Laguna.

There were emigrants from Las Palmas province too (case of Quevedo s family), but their influence is not so strong. Personally I have met several Venezuelans from both sides (a majority here is anti-Chávez, but there are exceptions)

I don't want to derail this thread further, but yes, ties to the Canary Islands in Venezuela are common. My father told me my great-grandmother was from there, but good luck trying to prove that now Tongue

I imagine now that the migration rate has exploded, it's more feasible that you meet pro-Chávez Venezuelans. A few years ago, when primarily wealthier folks migrated, that probably would have been more difficult. In the 2012 election, just before he died, Chávez received just under 7% of the vote from Venezuelans living in the Canary Islands: http://www.cne.gob.ve/resultado_presidencial_2012/r/2/reg_992603.html

Granted, turnout was low (I imagine it's because the only voting center for people in the region is in Tenerife so people from the other islands had to travel there to vote), plus there is the fact that there are few Venezuelans registered to vote abroad, not in minor part because chavismo likes to make it difficult for folks like us to vote.

To tie this to the thread, don't think us Venezuelans abroad are right wingers just because most of us hate Chávez and Maduro with a passion. I know for a fact some of my friends here are quite happy with the PSOE winning, even if they probably aren't exactly thrilled with the Podemos deal. After all, Venezuelan politics is vastly dominated by leftist parties. That said, many, if not most, will cringe at the mere prospect of having people with a history of praising chavismo in the government, and will vote accordingly; which in Spain, clearly means voting for the right wing parties.

To be honest, the two or three Chavistas from Venezuela that I that I have met here were old men. A vast majority of Venezuelans I've seen here, old and young, are anti-Chávez.

It's possible to discuss about Venezuela here in relation to Spanish politics, because it's used as a weapon in our political battles. The Spanish Right in particular is very vocal against Maduro. The mainstream leftist parties don't support Maduro and even Podemos leadership takes some distance from him. Pedro Sánchez went further and recognized Guaido, move criticized by Podemos. I think the main difference is that the left favours dialogue and mediation in Venezuela, while the right supports a more aggresive policy in line with US administration. The attempts of mediation made by former socialist PM Zapatero in Venezuela were heavily criticized by the right.

My personal stance on the Venezuelan crisis is not far from my stance on the Catalan conflict. Third way. Equidistante. Let's sit and talk about the weather Wink

Anyway my father's family is,from La Palma and I had some distant relative in Venezuela whom I never met

UP members in next cabinet, providing second vote is successful

Pablo Iglesias (41): Deputy PM
Irene Montero (31): Equality
Yolanda Díaz (Galicia en Común, aged 41): Labour
Manuel Castells (proposed by ECP,  aged 77): Universities
Alberto Garzón (IU leader, aged 34): Consumer Affairs, including the regulation of gambling
That's *the* Manuel Castells, right? Very influential scholar, love his work.

Sociologist and economist. Berkeley
Logged
Grand Wizard Lizard of the Klan
kataak
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1,820
Vatican City State


Political Matrix
E: -4.52, S: 5.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1351 on: January 06, 2020, 07:46:20 am »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?
Logged
Senator tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
tack50
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,954
Spain


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1352 on: January 06, 2020, 08:40:56 am »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?

Yeah you have to go back to September 1936 to find PCE ministers again; after the cabinte reshuffle on the Republican government because of the start of the civil war.

But Garzon will be the first PCE minister during peace time I guess
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1353 on: January 06, 2020, 09:29:22 am »
« Edited: January 07, 2020, 05:32:21 am by Velasco »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?

Good question. There were PCE ministers in the war cabinets between 1936 and 1939

Vicente Uribe (Agriculture) and Jesús Hernández Tomás (Education and Fine Arts) were appointed ministers in the Largo Caballero cabinet, in September 1936

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicente_Uribe

Quote
After the start of the Spanish Civil War Uribe was appointed Minister of Agriculture in the cabinet of Francisco Largo Caballero on 5 September 1936. For tactical reasons the communists supported small businessmen and peasants (...)

On 15 May 1937 Uribe and Hernández caused the collapse of Largo Caballero's government. The trigger was a disagreement in a cabinet meeting over the May Days violence in Barcelona, which the communists blamed on the Anarchist CNT and FAI and the dissident communist POUM.[13] They demanded that the POUM be banned and its leaders arrested as "fascists".[14] Largo Caballero refused to act, and most of the ministers walked out of the meeting.[13] On 17 May 1937 Manuel Azańa dismissed Largo and named Juan Negrín Prime Minister of Spain.[15] Negrín's government included the socialists Indalecio Prieto (War, Navy and Air) and Julián Zugazagoitia (Interior), the communists Hernández Tomás (Education) and Uribe (Agriculture), the Republicans José Giral (Foreign Affairs) and Bernardo Giner de los Ríos (Public Works), the Basque Manuel de Irujo (Justice) and the Catalan Nationalist Jaume Aiguader (Labor).[16] The Higher War Council was reorganized and consisted of Negrín, Giral, Uribe and Prieto.

n the second Negrín cabinet, formed on 5 April 1938, Uribe was the only communist representative.[ According to (Palmiro) Togliatti, the tactic of withdrawing from the government was to "convince English and French public opinion that the Communists are not interested in the conquest of power, not even in Spain, where we could do so with comparative ease. ... In this way, we shall strengthen Anglo-French ties with the Soviets. If Hitler should decide on war he will have to wage it against the USSR and the Western democracies.[19] Uribe remained Minister of Agriculture until 1 February 1939.

During the Second Republic the PCE was a small party with little support (it won a single seat in 1933 elections). The PCE was a member party of the Popular Front in 1936, winning 13 seats in parliament. With the outbreak of the Civil War, the party's popularity and membership rocketed due to the fact that the USSR was the only effective ally of the republican government (France and UK betrayed Spain in that conflict) and the prestige of the communist combat units. After the war, during Franco's dictatorship,  the Communist Party was the most organized clandestine opposition force.

Regarding Manuel Castells, he's very close to Ada Colau (the Barcelona Mayor). I think he's tecnically an idependent proposed by En Comú Podem. His curriculum as a scholar is impressive.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Castells

Quote
Manuel Castells Oliván (born 9 February 1942) is a Spanish sociologist especially associated with research on the information society, communication and globalization.

The 2000–2014 research survey of the Social Sciences Citation Index ranks him as the world's fifth most-cited social science scholar, and the foremost-cited communication scholar.

He was awarded the 2012 Holberg Prize, for having "shaped our understanding of the political dynamics of urban and global economies in the network society." In 2013 he was awarded the Balzan Prize for Sociology.

"Spain’s Socialist Party on high alert ahead of tight investiture vote"

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/06/inenglish/1578298498_582670.html

Quote
A day after Spain’s caretaker Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez lost the first round of a congressional vote to get confirmed in office, alarm bells have gone off in the Socialist Party (PSOE) ahead of a second vote that is expected to be very tight..



  
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1354 on: January 07, 2020, 05:24:19 am »

The closest investiture vote of Spain's democracy

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/07/inenglish/1578384836_555446.html

Quote
Spain is in for a congressional cliffhanger today, as lawmakers assemble for the second round of the investiture vote to confirm the caretaker prime minister, Pedro Sánchez of the Socialist Party (PSOE), in his post.

 Never before in the history of Spanish democracy have the margins been so tight: Sánchez is expected to win by a simple majority of just two more “yes” than “no” votes. His Socialist predecessor José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero was confirmed in office by a lead of 11 votes in 2008, and in 1989 Felipe González won by 12 votes. 

 If Sánchez passes the investiture, he will head the first coalition government since the Second Republic
Logged
bigic
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 368
Serbia and Montenegro
Political Matrix
E: 2.32, S: -7.30


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1355 on: January 07, 2020, 08:39:32 am »

Sanchez has passed the investiture vote by the expected margin.

Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1356 on: January 07, 2020, 01:37:51 pm »

Pedro Sánchez has succeed at last and Spain gets a new PM. However, given the arithmetic in Congress and the aggressiveness of opposition, he is going to face problems from the start

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/07/inenglish/1578410052_201884.html

Quote
His term in office is likely to come under all kinds of threats, right from the first days. The two-part investiture debate that took place over the weekend and concluded today has only confirmed fears of a highly charged atmosphere in Spain’s lower house of parliament going forward.

Many analysts point that we are at the beginning of a new era of extreme polarization, with the opposition parties challenging the legitimacy of the government and allegations of treason. Likewise the ERC folks are risking being branded traitors by the most radical elements of the independence movement. There is an abyss between the PSOE and ERC on the territorial question, but the horror of the worst version of Spanish nationalism unites them. The foundations of the new coalition government are very fragile, as well the unborn negotiation to find a way out from the Catalan labyrinth. All the players involved will need loads of luck and political intelligence.

Elections in basque Country and Galicia are scheduled in 2020, as well a snap election in Catalonia is likely.
Logged
seb_pard
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 526
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1357 on: January 07, 2020, 02:38:47 pm »

Pedro Sánchez has succeed at last and Spain gets a new PM. However, given the arithmetic in Congress and the aggressiveness of opposition, he is going to face problems from the start

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/07/inenglish/1578410052_201884.html

Quote
His term in office is likely to come under all kinds of threats, right from the first days. The two-part investiture debate that took place over the weekend and concluded today has only confirmed fears of a highly charged atmosphere in Spain’s lower house of parliament going forward.

Many analysts point that we are at the beginning of a new era of extreme polarization, with the opposition parties challenging the legitimacy of the government and allegations of treason. Likewise the ERC folks are risking being branded traitors by the most radical elements of the independence movement. There is an abyss between the PSOE and ERC on the territorial question, but the horror of the worst version of Spanish nationalism unites them. The foundations of the new coalition government are very fragile, as well the unborn negotiation to find a way out from the Catalan labyrinth. All the players involved will need loads of luck and political intelligence.

Elections in basque Country and Galicia are scheduled in 2020, as well a snap election in Catalonia is likely.
Well, elections in Euskadi and Galicia are good news for the PSOE (and the coalition). The right wing presence in the basque country is bleeding. And in the case of Galicia, this community is one of the few that the PP's move to the right decreased the party's support without benefiting Cs nor Vox.

It would be worse for the government in communities like Extremadura/Asturias.
Logged
brucejoel99
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 5,070
United States


Political Matrix
E: -3.48, S: -3.30

P

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1358 on: January 07, 2020, 03:05:27 pm »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?

Yeah you have to go back to September 1936 to find PCE ministers again; after the cabinte reshuffle on the Republican government because of the start of the civil war.

But Garzon will be the first PCE minister during peace time I guess

Funnily enough, this is the most left-wing government that Spain has seen since 1936, & the most right-wing opposition that Spain has seen since (you guessed it) 1936.

Let's reeeeeally hope that history doesn't repeat itself any further.
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,751
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1359 on: January 09, 2020, 01:15:00 am »

When will the budget be brought down as I figure the sooner that is done better the chances of it passing are.  If that fails then doesn't that mean more elections?
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1360 on: January 09, 2020, 08:36:33 am »

Pedro Sánchez is completing a renovation of the second level of government. The full composition of his cabinet will be known next week. Today it was revealed that Environment minister Teresa Ribera will be upgraded to Deputy PM, focused on Ecologic Transition and Demographic Challenge. There will be four Deputy PMs in the government: Carmen Calvo (taking on Historical Memory and Secularism), Pablo Iglesias (Social Rights and 2030 Agenda), Nadia Calvińo (Economy and Digital Transformation) and the aforementioned Ribera.

María Jesús Montero will continue as Finance minister and could be the new government spokeswoman.

The ministers proposed by UP (Irene Montero, Yolanda Díaz, Manuel Castells and Alberto Garzón) have been confirmed.

By the way, there will be two communists in the government. The next Labor minister Yolanda Diaz is also a PCE member.
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1361 on: January 13, 2020, 09:06:54 pm »

Spain's new cabinet sworn yesterday

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/13/inenglish/1578924634_936158.html

Quote
The four deputy prime ministers and 18 ministers in the new government of Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez were sworn in today before Spain’s King Felipe VI at the Zarzuela Palace. The monarch congratulated the lawmakers and wished them luck. The first Cabinet meeting is due to take place on Tuesday.

Composition of the 'Sánchez II Government (Pedro 2.0)'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1nchez_II_Government

Prime Minister: Pedro Sánchez (PSOE)
    
First Deputy Prime Minister - Minister of the Presidency, Relations with the Cortes and Democratic Memory: Carmen Calvo (PSOE)
   
Second Deputy Prime Minister - Minister of Social Rights and 2030 Agenda: Pablo Iglesias (Podemos)   

Third Deputy Prime Minister - Minister of Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation: Nadia Calvińo (Independent)

Fourth Deputy Prime Minister - Minister for the Ecological Transition and Demographic Challenge: Teresa Ribera (PSOE)   

Minister of Foreign Affairs, European Union and Cooperation: Arancha González Laya (Independent)    

Minister of Justice: Juan Carlos Campo (Independent)

Minister of Defence : Margarita Robles (Independent)

Minister of Finance - Spokesperson of the Government: María Jesús Montero (PSOE)    

Minister of the Interior: Fernando Grande-Marlaska (Independent)

Minister of Transports, Mobility and Urban Agenda: José Luis Ábalos (PSOE)

Minister of Education and Vocational Training:n: Isabel Celaá (PSOE)
   
Minister of Labour and Social Economy: Yolanda Díaz (IU)
   
Minister of Industry, Trade and Tourism : Reyes Maroto (PSOE)    
   
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food: Luis Planas (PSOE)

Minister of Territorial Policy and Civil Service: Carolina Darias (PSOE)

Minister of Culture and Sports: José Manuel Rodríguez Uribes (PSOE)
   
Minister of Health: Salvador Illa (PSC)
   
Minister of Science and Innovation :Pedro Duque (Independent)

Minister of Equality: Irene Montero (Podemos)
    
Minister of Consumer Affairs:    Alberto Garzón (IU)

Minister of Inclusion, Social Security and Migration: José Luis Escrivá (Independent)

Minister of Universities: Manuel Castells (Independent, proposed by En Comú Podem)    

All independents except Manuel Castells are personal picks made by Pedro Sánchez. Many of them have a technocratic profile (Nadia Calvinńo, Arancha onzález Laya, José Luis Escrivá).


A controversial appointment

Quote
Meanwhile, there was controversy today among the political opposition in reaction to news that Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez had proposed Dolores Delgado as the new attorney general. Delgado was appointed by Sánchez as justice minister in June 2018.

Since Spain returned to democracy in the late 1970s, there has only been one other occasion when a minister has become attorney general, and that was back in 1986 under PSOE Prime Minister Felipe González.

Delgado arrived in government as an independent – judges and prosecutors are barred from joining political parties under Spanish law – but in recent months she has consolidated her political role thanks to harsh clashes with the opposition and she has also campaigned for the PSOE. She was voted in as a deputy at the last elections. 

Vox stages marches against "traitor" Pedro Sánchez

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/13/inenglish/1578905060_772427.html
Logged
Trends are real, and I f**king hate it
Antonio V
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 51,266
United States


Political Matrix
E: -7.87, S: -3.83


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1362 on: January 13, 2020, 09:49:28 pm »

Well good job Sanchez for wasting 9 months and making his government more precarious than it could have been under the previous election results. Now that that exercise in pointlessness is complete, maybe he can get around to actually governing for a while (not that he'll last long).
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,751
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1363 on: January 13, 2020, 11:50:31 pm »

How likely is it that the budget passes?  With narrow numbers I think there is still a risk it fails which I believe would trigger another election.  If it passes my understanding is Sanchez is safe until next year unless there is a standalone non-confidence.
Logged
CumbrianLeftie
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 987
United Kingdom


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1364 on: January 14, 2020, 06:12:53 am »

Well good job Sanchez for wasting 9 months and making his government more precarious than it could have been under the previous election results. Now that that exercise in pointlessness is complete, maybe he can get around to actually governing for a while (not that he'll last long).

And giving a huge leg up to the far right in the process. Apart from that, great job.
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1365 on: January 15, 2020, 03:50:29 pm »

Well good job Sanchez for wasting 9 months and making his government more precarious than it could have been under the previous election results. Now that that exercise in pointlessness is complete, maybe he can get around to actually governing for a while (not that he'll last long).

The repetition of elections was pointless and a huge tactical fiasco. Said this, don't understimate Sánchez. He's a hardened survivor, the embodiment of resilience. Personally I'm fed up with our political battles, but I guess they can be fascinating for informed outsiders. Horror is my motivation right now. We wil be much better under the 'Red Leviathan', so I hope Sánchez endures for a while (providing that ERC stays in a pragmatic line, in the midst of the Catalan blender, allowing to pass a budget). Fatalism is one of the greatest malaises of contemporary societies and I refuse to fall, at least not straightaway.
Logged
xelas81
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 53
Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1366 on: January 17, 2020, 05:33:46 pm »
« Edited: January 17, 2020, 06:31:23 pm by xelas81 »

Any updates on what is Mas Pais doing?
Is their goal to overtake Podemos and then PSOE?
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,751
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1367 on: January 17, 2020, 05:43:50 pm »

When is the budget supposed to come down?  Any chance it might trigger another election.
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1368 on: January 20, 2020, 07:40:04 pm »

Vox is on 'cultural battle' mode. Pablo Casado buys the parental veto'

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/20/inenglish/1579513966_679777.html

Quote
A policy from the far-right Spanish political party Vox is causing heated debate over education and the rights of children. Dubbed by Vox as the “parental pin,” the policy gives parents the right to stop their children from attending complementary workshops organized during school hours. The measure means that schools will need to ask for parents’ permission to give “talks, workshops or activities with an ideological or moral leaning against their convictions,” according to the text of policy. This includes talks on sex education and LGBTQ+ rights.  

A couple of personal observations

1) The parents are not the owners of their sons or daughters. In order to illustrate my point of view, I'll resort to a poem by the Lebanese Khalil Gibran entitled 'On Children'

     Your children are not your children.
     They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself.
     They come through you but not from you,
     And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.

     You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
     For they have their own thoughts.
     You may house their bodies but not their souls,
     For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you
     cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
     You may strive to be like them, but seek not to make them
     like you.


 2) This is an obvious attack against our public education system

In other news, our government will declare climate emergency tomorrow. So Bolivarian...

Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1369 on: January 23, 2020, 02:35:20 am »
« Edited: January 23, 2020, 04:33:09 am by Velasco »

Pedro Sánchez announced a meeting with Catalan premier Quim Torra next month and promised to have a new budget passed by summer

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/21/inenglish/1579598106_545045.html

Quote
Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez will meet with Catalan premier Quim Torra the first week of February in Barcelona to discuss issues relating to Catalonia. The meeting is part of the agreement the leader of the Socialist Party (PSOE) made with the separatist Catalan Republican Left (ERC) in order to ensure he could be sworn back into office by Congress. The ERC agreed to abstain from Sánchez’s investiture bid on the condition that the PSOE commit to negotiations about the political situation in Catalonia and the future of the region

Also, the government is planning a reform of the criminal code. The crimes of rebellion and sedition could be modified, with the latter being punished by shorter prison sentences. Such reform is in an embryonic phase and will concern a broader range of crimes. In case of being implemented and the crime of sedition is modified, Oriol Junqueras and the other jailed Catalan politicians could be released earlier. It's worth noting that the charge of sedition has no equivalent in the legislation of most European countries. There are voices within the judiciary in favour of reforming both crimes (in the case of rebellion, not to reduce prison sentences but to adapt it to present times). The rightwing opposition claims the reform would be "a covert pardon"

Labour minister Yolanda Diaz negotiated a first increase of the minimum wage with representatives from employers and trade unions-

The government declared the state of climate emergency on Tuesday and committed to submit a draft law on Climate Change within 100 days
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,751
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1370 on: January 23, 2020, 01:21:44 pm »

Pedro Sánchez announced a meeting with Catalan premier Quim Torra next month and promised to have a new budget passed by summer

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/21/inenglish/1579598106_545045.html

Quote
Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez will meet with Catalan premier Quim Torra the first week of February in Barcelona to discuss issues relating to Catalonia. The meeting is part of the agreement the leader of the Socialist Party (PSOE) made with the separatist Catalan Republican Left (ERC) in order to ensure he could be sworn back into office by Congress. The ERC agreed to abstain from Sánchez’s investiture bid on the condition that the PSOE commit to negotiations about the political situation in Catalonia and the future of the region

Also, the government is planning a reform of the criminal code. The crimes of rebellion and sedition could be modified, with the latter being punished by shorter prison sentences. Such reform is in an embryonic phase and will concern a broader range of crimes. In case of being implemented and the crime of sedition is modified, Oriol Junqueras and the other jailed Catalan politicians could be released earlier. It's worth noting that the charge of sedition has no equivalent in the legislation of most European countries. There are voices within the judiciary in favour of reforming both crimes (in the case of rebellion, not to reduce prison sentences but to adapt it to present times). The rightwing opposition claims the reform would be "a covert pardon"

Labour minister Yolanda Diaz negotiated a first increase of the minimum wage with representatives from employers and trade unions-

The government declared the state of climate emergency on Tuesday and committed to submit a draft law on Climate Change within 100 days

When does the budget come down?  Any chance government falls or will it likely pass?
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1371 on: January 23, 2020, 02:01:11 pm »
« Edited: January 23, 2020, 03:27:29 pm by Velasco »

When does the budget come down?  Any chance government falls or will it likely pass?

Read the news I linked before

Quote
The negotiations are also key to ensuring that the PSOE and anti-austerity Unidas Podemos coalition is able to pass a new budget. The government, which lacks an absolute majority in Spain’s lower house of parliament, needs the ERC to abstain from the vote in order to push through its financial plans in Congress. But without talks, “there will be no political term,” warned ERC congressional spokesman Gabriel Rufián during the investiture debate to swear in Sánchez. The prime minister’s earlier failure to secure approval for his 2019 budget blueprint led to early elections in April of last year, followed by a repeat vote of November. The prime minister, however, said he is confident that he can have a new budget approved ''before the end of summer” in September

It depends on the progress of negotiations and on ERC's willingness, given that party holds the key with the current composition of parliament. I can't tell how likely is that the government falls, because  the bilateral commission between governments has not yet begun to work.

ERC and PNV would be willing to negotiate the reform of the criminal code in Congress, including lowering sedition sentences and possible changes on the crimes of rebellion and sexual assault

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/23/inenglish/1579776759_701357.html

Quote
Spain’s coalition government is planning on reforming the country’s criminal code to lower the sentence for sedition, a crime that came into the spotlight following last year’s Supreme Court ruling on the Catalan separatist leaders involved with the 2017 breakaway bid in the northeastern region. Spain’s top court found nine of the defendants guilty of offenses including sedition and handed down lengthy prison sentences, sparking mass protests and disturbances in Catalonia.  

Personally I think the reform is alright, but it has been poorly communicated by Sánchez

Otoh, UP scored a point with the negotiation of the minimum wage rise conducted by Yolanda Diaz and Pablo Iglesias


Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,751
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1372 on: January 23, 2020, 04:47:05 pm »

Is ERC likely to abstain on budget or could they vote it down triggering a fall election?  Also would budget apply retroactively or would it only kick in for 2021 if passed.
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1373 on: January 23, 2020, 06:27:24 pm »
« Edited: January 24, 2020, 02:54:35 am by Velasco »

Is ERC likely to abstain on budget or could they vote it down triggering a fall election?  Also would budget apply retroactively or would it only kick in for 2021 if passed.

The political situation in Catalonia is too complicated to make predictions. ERC will be under pressure from the inside and the outside, in order to support the government or let it fall. On the one hand, there is a fierce competition within the Catalan independence movement for hegemony (ERC vs JxCAt, Junqueras vs Puigdemont). Since the imprisonment of Oriol Junqueras after the events in autumn 2017, ERC is supporting pragmatic stances and discarding unilateral path to ondependence. On the contrary, the faction supporting Puigdemont (who lives in Belgium, fugitive from justice) is suporting more radical stances and is seconded by civil associations (ANC, Omnium) and the far-left CUP. All 'intransigent' sectors, the radicalized grassroots or the buzz in social networks are elements that push ERC against the deal. Also, there are certain maneuvres from within the 'deep state' or the judiciary that try to make a PSOE-ERC deal fail (see the decision of the Electoral Court disqualifying Quim Torra just before the investiture of Sánchez). Divisions within the governing coalition in Catalonia (JxCAT-ERC), the lack of a majority to pass a budget and the legal situation of premier Torra may trigger new elections and perhaps a new balance of power. On the other hand, Sánchez has cards to play in order to convince ERC (either the bilateral commission or the reform of the penal code). The scenario is highly unpredictable.

I don't know how a budget can be applied retroactively, tbh. I guess budget extension is in force until the new budget is passed, and so on... I know the government is planning to submit the draft in March, in order to have it passed before September
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,735
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1374 on: January 26, 2020, 12:16:58 am »
« Edited: January 26, 2020, 12:43:45 am by Velasco »

Little political storm this week concerning Venezuela. On the one hand, there has been controversy over the visit of opposition leader and "president in charge" Juan Guaidó. Pedro Sánchez decided not holding a meeting with Guaidó, whom met with Foreign Affairs minister instead. Obviously this has raised harsh criticism from the opposition, whose leader Pablo Casado held a brief meeting with the Venezuelan leader. Guaidó was also greeted by local and regional authorities in Madrid (governed by a PP-Cs coalition) as well attended a demonstration of Venezuelan expats against Maduro. The decision of Sánchez also exposed a rift between former socialist PMs José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero and Felipe González, with the latter unconditionally aligning with the Venezuelan opposition and the former advocating a negotiation that leads to democratic elections. On the other hand, a brief meeting between Transport minister José Luis Äbalos and the Venezuelan vice-president Delcy Rodríguez at Madrid airport generated considerable buzz in the media, with allegations of "secret talks"

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/24/inenglish/1579861959_005340.html

Quote
Opposition parties in Spain are calling on the transportation minister, José Luis Ábalos, to confirm whether or not he met in secret with the Venezuelan vice-president, Delcy Rodríguez, in the early hours of Monday morning at Madrid’s Adolfo Suárez-Barajas airport. European Union sanctions prevent Rodríguez from entering the bloc’s airspace.

According to a story published on Spanish news website Vozpopuli, Ábalos held a meeting with President Nicolás Maduro’s second-in-command inside a private plane owned by the company Sky Valet, taking advantage of a technical stop in Spain on the way to Turkey.

The story also stated that Rodríguez and six of her traveling companions, including her chief of staff, entered one of the VIP lounges in Barajas. Vozpopuli reported that Ábalos denied having met with the Venezuelan lawmaker.

Ábalos, of the Socialist Party (PSOE), has told EL PAÍS that he was at the airport on private business, to meet the Venezuelan tourism minister, Félix Plasencia, with whom he has been friends for several years and who was traveling on the same plane as the Venezuelan vice-president.

Plasencia, who is a Spanish citizen, according to the minister, arrived in Madrid as the head of the Venezuelan delegation attending the Fitur tourism fair, currently taking place in the Spanish capital.

Ábalos told EL PAÍS that he did not have any formal contact with the Venezuelan vice-president and that a meeting with her was not his intention when he traveled to the airport. He added that in recent months he has had a number of meetings with members of the Venezuelan opposition, including the acting president, Juan Guiadó

But by Friday afternoon, police sources were telling a different story. According to their version of events, Ábalos was called to the scene given Rodríguez’s insistence that she be allowed to disembark from the aircraft. The minister is alleged to have boarded the plane to convince her not to step onto Spanish soil, given that such an action would cause a diplomatic incident (...)


Yet another communication error made by Sánchez and Ábalos
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 50 51 52 53 54 [55] 56 57 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC