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June 18, 2019, 07:50:24 pm
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  Spanish elections and politics II (investiture of Pedro Sánchez)
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Chief Justice windjammer
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« Reply #650 on: May 12, 2019, 05:38:47 am »

Any news about bildu?

If you are looking for government formation news, there are none, and won't be until after the regional/EU elections.

Sánchez doesn't seem all that eager to negotiate with ERC and Bildu so I guess he will just gamble on daring them (and JxCat) to vote against him.

It's easy to see Bildu/ERC caving and abstaining (which would give Sánchez a narrow majority on the 2nd ballot) but of course you then have to wonder how will he be able to pass a budget.

Another thing that has to be brought into the equation is the Basque regional elections. In theory they aren't due until Autumn 2020. However it's easy to see a snap Basque election happening this Autumn or Winter. Premier Urkullu has been unable to pass regional budgets, with Podemos, Bildu and PP voting them down in the regional parliament.

It's just a rumour at this point, but since Sánchez will depend 100% on PNV and possibly on Bildu, it's another thing to add into the equation. As if the regional elections weren't enough.

Galicia is also due for regional elections in 2020 but unlike the Basques Feijoo is certain not to call a snap election, especially because of the bad results for the right in Galicia. Feijoo will certainly overperform, but I think he will carry out a full term, especially since he has an overall majority after all, while next term he will be dependent on Cs, Vox or possibly both.
Well, if the secessionnist remain in prison, the swing voters will be CC. If not, it's going to be Bildu!
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« Reply #651 on: May 13, 2019, 02:56:53 pm »

Former PSOE leader and statesman Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba has died

https://elpais.com/politica/2019/05/10/actualidad/1557464508_194765.html

Gonna miss you, King.
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Chief Justice windjammer
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« Reply #652 on: May 16, 2019, 03:28:17 pm »

So as of now, what is the likeliest coalition for a budget to pass?
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tack50
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« Reply #653 on: May 16, 2019, 06:24:11 pm »

So as of now, what is the likeliest coalition for a budget to pass?

As of now, considering what happened between PSOE and ERC right this week, I think all bridges between the 2 (and Bildu and JxCat) are burnt.

This week, PSOE appointed the leader of their Catalan Branch (Miquel Iceta) as appointed Senator for Catalonia, with the intention of making him the Senate president.

In an unprecedented vote in Spain's democratic history, the Catalan parliament rejected Iceta's appointment as Senator with the votes of ERC, CUP and JxCat (the secessionist parties), with Cs and PP abstaining and Podemos and PSC voting in favor. ERC still claims dialog can continue but honestly if they can't even allow PSOE to appoint a senator, how on Earth are they going to support his budget or his confidence vote?!

There is also another factor, which is the fact that 4 of the Catalan politicians in jail are now duly elected MPs. If none of them, or only one, resign their seats, that means Spain's parliament will only have 346-347 MPs, with the majority going down to 174.

As a reminder, PSOE+UP+"reasonable" regional parties (PNV, PRC, Compromís) are at 173 while PP+Cs+Vox+Secessionists are at 169 once you take out the 4 MPs in jail.

At that point, the kingmakers would be CC and UPN. Neither of them seem happy with supporting a Sánchez government, but they both have things they can get from PSOE and are at least willing to talk I think (which is more than can be said from the Catalans). If Podemos ends up as part the government (with cabinet ministers and all) they will vote against, but they might at least abstain on a PSOE minority government.

From a tactical point of view in particular UPN might be easy to get, as it would be a fairly simple exchange (PSOE supports UPN in Navarra and in Pamplona's mayor race if their numbers add up and UPN does the same in reverse for Sánchez). However that deal involves ousting GBai from the regional government (which is PNV's branch in Navarra, sort of); and it might piss off PNV. While I can't see PNV forcing Spain into a 2nd election, they would definitely be angry

CC is harder to get as PSOE has less to offer to them and while a PSOE-CC deal in the islands wouldn't be something weird; it would still likely involve ousting premier Clavijo and getting a PSOE premier as PSOE seems likely to beat CC in both seat count and votes. However CC is easier to get on paper (they didn't contest the election with PP and Cs; unlike UPN) and would not piss off PNV.

Either way, CC and UPN are the likely kingmakers in my opinion right now; and not ERC/Bildu/JxCat. If no one caves, Spain will end up in another election (yay  Roll Eyes )
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« Reply #654 on: May 16, 2019, 10:45:40 pm »

Catalan nationalists make the f**king SNP bozos look like responsible adults. JFC.
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tack50
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« Reply #655 on: May 17, 2019, 08:41:14 am »

While Spain won't have a general election in a long time most likely; today we got our first general election poll

Simple lógica poll

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While I'd love this to be the case, with PSOE skyrocketing and Vox going down in flames, I seriously doubt this will happen.

Approval ratings

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Velasco
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« Reply #656 on: May 18, 2019, 01:59:45 am »

Catalan nationalists make the f**king SNP bozos look like responsible adults. JFC.

They suck, yes. The major strategic goal of ERC is to become the hegemonic nationalist party, the Catalan version of the SNP. There is a fierce competition between ERC and JxCAT for leadership. ERC has been adopting a pragmatic approach on paper: broadening social base for independence and favouring negotiation over unilateralism. However, pragmatism and long-term strategies turn easily into recklessness when ERC leaders get nervous.They fear being called "traitors" by the "hyperventilating separatists", exactly the same fear that drove Puigdemont to the unilateral declaration of independence in October 2017. There won't be substantive progress until the trial of separatist leaders taking place in Madrid is over.
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mileslunn
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« Reply #657 on: May 18, 2019, 07:55:36 am »

So what is likelihood budget passes and if so any major revisions or just a few bones to regionalist parties?
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Velasco
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« Reply #658 on: May 18, 2019, 02:32:14 pm »

So what is likelihood budget passes and if so any major revisions or just a few bones to regionalist parties?

It's too early and Catalan nationalists are too unpredictable to say. Also, there is an investiture vote first. The veto to the appointment of PSC leader Miquel Iceta as senator proves that Pedro Sánchez was right deeming Catalan parties unreliable. Sánchez replied that move by proposing other two Catalans to top offices: Meritxell Batet as Speaker of the Congress and Manuel Cruz as Speaker of the Senate. Both are PSC members and won their seats on April 28. Batet is currently the minister in charge of regional affairs. There is a PSOE majority in the Senate and the election of Cruz is certain, but Meritxell Batet needs the support of other parties to get elected. Appointing two Catalans is a sign that PSOE is still pursuing dialogue within the limits of the constitution. The elegant reaction of Iceta to the arbitrary veto posed by separatist parties points to the same direction. However separatists are neither reliable nor predictable, despite ERC spokepersons claim they want dialogue and don't want a repetition of elections. The question is whether ERC is willing to abstain in order to allow the appointment of Batet and the investiture of Pedro Sánchez in a second vote (and eventually budget passes). In case of permanent lock, the only way is going to new elections. PSOE's third-un-line José Luis Abalos called Cs and PP to abstain in the investiture vote to ensure stability, as the PSOE did in late 2016 with the opposition of Pedro Sánchez (he was ousted for this reason). PP and Cs won't abstain, obviously.

Another factor: there are local, regional and EP elections around the corner, within 8 days. Major races in Madrid and Barcelona .
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Velasco
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« Reply #659 on: May 20, 2019, 07:36:58 am »

Meritxell Batet and Manuel Cruz candidates for Congress and Senate speaker after the veto of Catalan separatists to Miquel Iceta

https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/05/17/inenglish/1558077622_586730.html

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Following the Catalan parliament’s refusal to appoint Miquel Iceta, the leader of the Catalan Socialists (PSC), as a senator on Thursday, the acting government of Pedro Sánchez has come up with a new candidate to replace him.

Sánchez is now nominating another native of Catalonia, Manuel Cruz, who is also a member of the PSC. The idea is to get him into the Senate, then make him speaker of the upper house. The new vote at the Catalan parliament to confirm his senatorial position will take place on May 21.

The picks are meant to symbolize a renewed desire for dialogue to overcome the territorial crisis

Manuel Cruz, 58, is a philosophy professor at Barcelona University who has lectured at European and US institutions. He has written around 30 books and is a regular contributor to several news organizations, including EL PAÍS. As a politician, he has served as a PSC deputy and a PSOE spokesman in the congressional committee for science, innovation and universities. He is viewed as a moderate who supports dialogue.

For speaker of Congress, Sánchez is proposing Meritxell Batet, who is also Catalan. The choices are meant to symbolize the acting PM’s desire for renewed dialogue to overcome the territorial crisis in the northeastern region.
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Velasco
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« Reply #660 on: May 20, 2019, 08:15:07 am »

Local elections: 40db polls for El País

Madrid: Manuela Carmena is a weak favourite

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Barcelona: complex results with a narrow lead of ERC (Ernest Maragall) over BComú (Ada Colau),  PSC (Jaume Collboni) on the rise and Manuel Valls coming fourth slightly ahead of JxCAT

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Valencia: Joan Ribó (Compromís) is the favourite

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Sevilla: PSOE holds

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Zaragoza: Pilar Alegría (PSOE) could be the next mayor replacing Pedro Santiesteve (Zaragoza en Común), who parted ways with Podemos

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Bilbao: PNV on the edge of winning a majority

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A Coruña: Similarly to Zaragoza, the PSOE could replace the alternative left (Marea Atlántica)

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Velasco
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« Reply #661 on: May 20, 2019, 08:21:44 am »

The Left could win regional elections in Madrid, according to the 40dB poll for El País. Íñigo Errejón (Más Madrid) could be the big surprise

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tack50
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« Reply #662 on: May 20, 2019, 09:43:47 am »

Actually, there have been a ton of polls reciently. I won't go over each and every one of them, but here is my summary by community of all polls published since the general election:

Aragon:
2/3 polls give a majority to the left; the remaining one (older) gives the majority to the right. All polls give a majority to PSOE-Cs-PAR, which could also happen as Lambán is one of the more conservative premiers in PSOE. Seems like Lambán was not Dead on Arrival after all, and is now a modest favourite to hold on for another 4 years

My rating: Lean PSOE

Asturias:
All polls give a majority to the left; a right wing majority would require a big polling miss and I don't think that's happening. Adrián Barbón (PSOE) will replace the incumbent PSOE premier Javier Fernández. No surprise in what's arguably Spain's most left wing community without a regional language.

My rating: Safe PSOE

Balearic Islands:
All polls give a majority to the left, though in some it's within the margin of error. However, even if the left loses its majority, PI is definitely not supporting a right wing government and especially not one propped up by Vox as well. Because of that reason, Francina Armengol (arguably Spain's most left wing premier), is a big favourite for reelection

My rating: Safe PSOE

Canary Islands
All polls give a majority to the left, though some within the margin of error. Again, if Vox makes it in (which is not a certainty by any means), a right wing government becomes a lot less likely as CC has ruled them out. While I would not rule out a PSOE-CC grand coalition, PSOE will very likely get the Canarian premiership 26 years later. However, ASG is rogue enough to screw things up but I think they'll go left this time.

My rating: Likely PSOE

Cantabria
All polls give a majority to the left and a rather broad one. Revilla is populist enough that he can take a lot of right wing voters in a right of center region. He will easily remain as premier; even if the right somehow got a majority I still wouldn't rule out PRC-Cs-PSOE (although that would be unlikely).

My rating: Safe PRC

Castille-Leon
All polls give a majority to the right, and within it a large lead for PP. If PP somehow manages to lose this, they are dead as a national party, full stop. The "culturally Castillian" community, very rural and with a very old population, those are all PP-leaning demographics. The CIS poll predicted a tie, but I don't trust that, though it will be much closer than it has been in ages.

My rating: Safe PP

Castille-La Mancha
All polls predict pretty much a tossup here in terms of left vs right. However, premier Emiliano García-Page is one of the more conservative premiers in Spain, and he is one of the few that could easily get a PSOE-Cs deal. That means that PSOE pretty much has the advantage.

My rating: Lean PSOE

Extremadura
All polls predict pretty much a tossup with an extremely narrow left advantage. Again however, Guillermo Fernández Vara is a conservative PSOE premier so he could also get away with PSOE-Cs. And that means he is favoured for another term

My rating: Lean PSOE

La Rioja
A sociologically similar community to Castille-Leon, but watered down; there should be no reason for PP to lose this. And yet polls are predicting a left wing advantage! While Madrid has seen all the attention for being the huge prize, in my opinion tiny La Rioja will be marquee race of the night and the one I would watch most closely. It's worth noting that this estimate assumes the regional PR+ supports PSOE and not PP. Which is the likeliest scenario, but it's not 100% inconcievable that PR+ supports PP or doesn't make it in.

My Rating: Tossup / Tilt PSOE

Madrid
The race everyone is watching most closely and has seen the most polling; both because of demographics (it is by far the largest community up for grabs) and because of polling which predicts Madrid is a tossup, with PSOE, PP and Cs all having a chance of getting the premiership. However that same polling predicts a tiny advantage for the right. That same polling has also found Cs trailing PP by a small but consistent amount. I will go with a bold prediction here, but I wouldn't be surprised if I got it wrong:

My rating: Lean PP

Murcia
All polls predict an easy right wing victory in Spain's most conservative region. Vox will also get its best results here. There is a possibility of PSOE-Cs, but Murcia's PSOE isn't exactly the most conservative so I don't think that will happen. Fernando López Miras (PP) will easily be reelected.

My rating: Safe PP

Navarra
Another region where polls are predicting a tossup, though the current 4 party government (GBai-Bildu-Podemos-IU) is a clear underdog and seems more likely than not that they will lose their majority. At that point, many possibilities open up, like NA+-PSOE (particularly if that means Sánchez gets 2 extra votes for him nationally) or GBai-PSOE-Podemos-IU (with PSOE or GBai leading). I think GBai is the

My rating: Pure tossup between PSOE, NA+ and Gbai
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Velasco
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« Reply #663 on: May 20, 2019, 10:51:35 am »

I don't think that UPN propping up Pedro Sánchez alongside Podemos and PNV is a serious possibility. Navarrese traditionalists have always sided with the Spanish Right at national level, regardless occasional cooperation between PSOE and UPN at regional level.
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tack50
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« Reply #664 on: May 20, 2019, 12:53:13 pm »

I don't think that UPN propping up Pedro Sánchez alongside Podemos and PNV is a serious possibility. Navarrese traditionalists have always sided with the Spanish Right at national level, regardless occasional cooperation between PSOE and UPN at regional level.

I don't think it's that unrealistic. I believe back on the Zapatero days, UPN propped up Zapatero's government by supporting his budgets, and that's the reason for their split.

An abstention in exchange for money for Navarra and giving NA+ the regional government would probably be a fair deal, especially if a PSOE-led government in Navarra is not a possibility or would require Bildu support.
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Velasco
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« Reply #665 on: May 20, 2019, 03:49:30 pm »

I don't think that UPN propping up Pedro Sánchez alongside Podemos and PNV is a serious possibility. Navarrese traditionalists have always sided with the Spanish Right at national level, regardless occasional cooperation between PSOE and UPN at regional level.

I don't think it's that unrealistic. I believe back on the Zapatero days, UPN propped up Zapatero's government by supporting his budgets, and that's the reason for their split.

An abstention in exchange for money for Navarra and giving NA+ the regional government would probably be a fair deal, especially if a PSOE-led government in Navarra is not a possibility or would require Bildu support.

Oh yes, I forgot that precedent and it's not a bad point. There is a problem with that theory.  As you say, that move led to a split within the Navarrese Right: the regional branch of the PP was refounded after some years merged with the UPN. Leaving aside political contexts are very different, a similar move today would lead to the split of NA+ with PP and Cs breaking away on the UPN's treason. So in neither case there would be a deal between PSOE and NA+, rather one between PSOE and UPN. Another point is that we are no longer in a two-party system, but in a multi-party system with complex coalition building. I think UPN is not compatible with the PSOE's preferential partners: Podemos, PNV and Compromis. However, the complexity of the political context and the high degree of uncertainty prevent me to rule out any possibility. I'll just say it seems very unlikely to me that PSOE manages to deal with Podemos on the one hand and CC or UPN on the other hand. They are like oil and water. Uncompatible.
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« Reply #666 on: May 21, 2019, 09:58:31 am »

What are chances of another election?  Or is it likely PSOE will likely form a coalition.  Also in terms of budget priorities as budget was by recent European standards fairly left leaning how likely is it that things like 22% rise in minimum wage, tax on banks, higher income taxes on those making over 150,000 Euros likely to go through?
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« Reply #667 on: May 21, 2019, 10:23:59 am »

So, how's the public perception about a snap election? seems that in other parliamentary countries, they try to avoid it at all costs (like Sweden a couple of years ago), i understand that this fragmented scenario in spain is new for the political class but making elections every two years doesn't seem to be a good idea...

also, which are the odds for Carmena's reelection in Madrid? 50/50? i thought she was likely to win and popular in general
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« Reply #668 on: May 21, 2019, 06:43:41 pm »
« Edited: May 22, 2019, 12:58:45 am by Velasco »

Inaugural session of the Spanish Congress took lace today

https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/05/21/inenglish/1558449646_847012.html

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The inaugural session of Spanish Congress on Tuesday gave a good indication of what to expect during the new political term inside a house that is more fragmented than ever following the snap election of April 28.

At a tense gathering that lasted slightly under five hours, five Catalan lawmakers who were allowed out of preventive prison to take oath used atypical formulas to swear allegiance to the Constitution they are on trial for allegedly breaking.

Their words were nearly drowned out by shouts from other newly elected deputies, particularly those from the far-right Vox party, which has entered parliament for the first time on a promise to defend Spanish unity. Other opposition leaders said the separatists’ claims about political persecution were an insult to Spanish democracy, and accused the new speaker of the house, Meritxell Batet, of excessive leniency.

Meritxell Batet was elected new speaker of the lower house. Batet is a PSC deputy for Barcelona and a Catalan federalist who was the acting minister Public Administrations, in charge of relations with regional governments. She was elected in a second vote with the support of half of the chamber. The 175 votes in favour came from PSOE, UP, PNV, CC, Compromís and PRC.
Rightwing opposition (PP, Cs and Vox), Catalan separatists and EH Bildu did not support Batet.

This vote shows an initial correlation of forces where the government and its allied parties are one seat short of a majority. The long-term support of CC is questionable: it would depend on the results of regional elections on Sunday and the subsequent coalition talks. This leaves the PSOE and allies with 173 seats, 3 seats short. In this context the attitude of ERC (plus the 0strategic ally' EH Bildu) is key. They have sent signals that could be interpreted as a will to cooperate... or not. Given the political conflict and the procedural situation of ERC leader Oriol Junqueras, trying to predict their future behaviour is risky.

Oriol Junqueras to Pedro Sánchez: "we need to talk"

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One of the most unusual scenes of the day was the handshake and brief exchange of words between acting Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez and Oriol Junqueras, the leader of the Catalan Republican Left (ERC), who is on trial for rebellion over the failed secession attempt of 2017. Junqueras and four other separatist leaders were allowed out of jail to attend the inaugural session of parliament, although they will likely be suspended until the Supreme Court reaches a verdict.


Oriol Junqueras greeted other ministers (including Borrell), the new speaker Meritxell Batet and embraced Pablo Iglesias. Inés Arrimadas greeted the trialed JxCAT deputies Josep Rull (kiss on the cheek) and Jordi Turull (handshake), while Cs leader Albert Rivera just looked at them defiant. Vox deputies woke up early in the morning in order to seat in the row behind Pedro Sánchez and the cabinet members, in an attempt of trolling partially countered by PSC deputy José Zaragoza who sat between party leader Santiago Abascal and Iván Espinosa de los Monteros. Zaragoza later explained Abascal and the other Vox deputies practical details on the functioning of Congress (how to vote and things like that), but couldn't prevent they hit their benches when the separatist deputies took their oaths.

Another star of the inaugural session was the eldest member of the Congress

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he new session of Congress got underway today under the guidance of three deputies-elect: Agustín Javier Zamarrón of the Socialist Party (PSOE), Marta Rosique of the Catalan Republican Left (ERC) and Lucía Muñoz of left-wing Unidas Podemos. The trio made up the so-called “Mesa de Edad,” literally the “Age Committee,” which is composed of the oldest deputy-elect, who acts as president, and the two youngest, who are there as secretaries.

The Mesa de Edad is charged with declaring the session of Congress open, before reading a Royal Decree and the list of deputies who will be taking a seat in the lower house of parliament.

Of the three, Zamarrón caused something of a stir on social media on Tuesday. He had run with the PSOE in Burgos at the last three general elections, but missed out on a seat in 2015 and 2016. Against all forecasts, he was lucky third time around, becoming, at 73, the oldest deputy of Congress.

A retired doctor, his expressions during the opening of Congress today were peppered with medical terms. “We are prone to a thrombosis in the pit,” he said into the microphones today, as the deputies filing through the chamber found that their path was blocked by groups of other parliamentarians. “Honorable deputies, please improve the flow,” was another of his comments.

With his long white beard and glasses, Zamarrón’s likeness to Spanish writer Ramón María del Valle-Inclán did not go unnoticed by users of social media. In fact, the surname “Valle-Inclán” was actually a trending topic on Twitter earlier in the day.
 
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« Reply #669 on: May 21, 2019, 07:26:20 pm »
« Edited: May 21, 2019, 07:30:42 pm by Velasco »

What are chances of another election?  Or is it likely PSOE will likely form a coalition.  Also in terms of budget priorities as budget was by recent European standards fairly left leaning how likely is it that things like 22% rise in minimum wage, tax on banks, higher income taxes on those making over 150,000 Euros likely to go through?

I think nobody wants a new election, but the formation of majorities is extremely complex due to the situation in Catalonia. Today it was the inaugural session in Congress 8See previous post) and there are key local, regional and EP elections on Sunday. The talks between PSOE and UP to reach an agreement (either coalition or confidence and supply) will begin seriously on the following day. Regarding the budget draft, the European Commission didn't raise major objections, aside they considered the income forecast too optimistic (particularly referring to new corporate taxes). Possibly it helped that Minister of Economy Nadia Calviño is very well considered by the Eurocrats, as she was the Director-General for Budget of the EC between 2014 and 2018. Also, the committed Europeism of Pedro Sánchez in times of EU crisis and other factors could strengthen the position of Spain. The main problem with the budget is internal and related to the dependence on the votes of Catalan separatist parties that forced Sánchez to call the last time. The results make the position of Sánchez much better now, but sadly he was 1 to 3 seats short to get a majority without ERC. I don't think Sánchez will be forced to call a snap election with the current parliament, but political instability will last until the trial to Catalan separatist leaders is over and a new election takes place in Catalonia.

So, how's the public perception about a snap election? seems that in other parliamentary countries, they try to avoid it at all costs (like Sweden a couple of years ago), i understand that this fragmented scenario in Spain is new for the political class but making elections every two years doesn't seem to be a good idea...

also, which are the odds for Carmena's reelection in Madrid? 50/50? i thought she was likely to win and popular in general

For the first part, read above. Most of polls say there's a tiny advantage for Manuela Carmena, but it's within the margin of error. The same rules for regional elections in Madrid. Manuela Carmena is an independent left-wing mayor that has made a good management of public funds and implemented measures to make Madrid more human. I think she is popular and appreciated, as well as she is esteemed by middle-class voters not so prone to support radical leftists. Her popularity is the consequence of personal traits and good performance and may help her to win reelection, despite the rightwing parties won on the general election by a 10% margin. It will be a tight contest and I'll be crossing fingers for her and Íñigo Errejón.
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« Reply #670 on: May 22, 2019, 12:31:19 pm »

The new parliament emerged from the recent general election reflects the highest gender parity in the EU. Currently there are 164 women in the Congress of Deputies, representing 46.9% of the 350 members. The following countries in the gender parity ranking are Sweden (46.4%), Finland (41.5%), Norway (40.8%) and France (39.8%)

https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/05/22/inenglish/1558517200_573782.html

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When Spanish deputy Clara Campoamor demanded women’s right to vote in a famous speech made on October 1, 1931, she was just one of three female members of Congress.

Eighty-eight years after women’s suffrage was enacted in Spain, the new Congress that convened on Tuesday has the highest number of female deputies in the country’s history: 166, representing 47.4% of seats. This makes Spanish parliament the EU leader in gender parity, and the fifth in the world according to figures from UN Women.

Spain’s leap to the global forefront of female leadership is also reflected in the fact that a woman, Meritxell Batet, is the new speaker of the lower house, and that she is taking over from another woman, Ana Pastor.

This new reality was reflected in the opening remarks by Batet, who spoke of the need to advance toward “a more feminist Spain” and who addressed the “señoras y señores diputados,” putting the women first instead of using the more traditional formula of “señores y señoras.”
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Velasco
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« Reply #671 on: May 25, 2019, 05:04:30 am »

Manuela Carmena: "The Frugal Leftist Who Shook Up Madrid"

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/24/world/europe/madrid-spain-mayor-carmena.html?ref=nyt-es&mcid=nyt-es&subid=article

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Her conservative rivals demonized her as a heavy spender, a former Communist certain to bust the budget in no time. Yet four years later, Mayor Manuela Carmena of Madrid is the favorite as she faces voters for a second time on Sunday, having cut the city’s multibillion-euro debt by nearly half (...)

Bill de Blasio endorsed Barcelona mayor Ada Colau
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Velasco
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« Reply #672 on: May 25, 2019, 01:26:26 pm »

Just as a reminder, tomorrow key local and regional elections take place in Spain alongside EP elections. Polls suggest the fragmentation seen at the national vote will extend to regions and municipalities. Will April and May votes trigger a new era of coalitions at all levels?

https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/05/24/inenglish/1558708576_117836.html

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The country is still fresh out of a snap general election that gave the highest number of seats to the Socialist Party (PSOE), but yielded a fragmented Congress with no overall majorities. Political leaders are waiting for the outcome of the Sunday vote to start crafting governing pacts, and polls suggest that a similar fragmentation could emerge at the local and regional levels, forcing parties into coalitions or pledges of case-by-case support (...)

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« Reply #673 on: May 25, 2019, 01:52:24 pm »

Are there coalitions in Spain on the local level which can't be imagined on the national or regional level, like PSOE-PP or Podemos-Cs? I think they probably do exist because of local politics being less ideological and having different issues than politics on the "higher" levels, and such local coalitions do exist in other countries...
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Velasco
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« Reply #674 on: May 25, 2019, 02:50:56 pm »
« Edited: May 25, 2019, 02:54:07 pm by Velasco »

Are there coalitions in Spain on the local level which can't be imagined on the national or regional level, like PSOE-PP or Podemos-Cs? I think they probably do exist because of local politics being less ideological and having different issues than politics on the "higher" levels, and such local coalitions do exist in other countries...

Yes, of course. There are all kinds of "atypical" coalitions at local level. I don't know about Podemos-Cs coalitions (that doesn't imply they don't exist), but there are several examples of coalitions and deals vetween PP and PSOE. The most relevant and recent example that comes to my mind is Badalona, the third largest municipality of Catalonia by population. PP came first in the 2015 elections with the vontroversial former mayor Xavier García Albiol, but a coalition between leftist parties gave the mayoralty to the sovereigntist Dolors Sabater. However the local socialists felt mistreated by the new local government and ceased to support Sabater. Xavier García Albiol offered the PP votes to oust the pro-independence mayor and she was replaced by a PSC guy. This example is ideological and related to the conflict on independence, but the PSC has reached deals with nearly everybody in Catalonia from PP and Cs to ERC, the former CiU and of course ICV and the lists backed by Podemos.

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