Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 13, 2019, 08:58:47 pm
News: Please delete your old personal messages.

  Atlas Forum
  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  International Elections (Moderators: Gustaf, Hash, Admiral Lord Horatio D'Ascoyne)
  Spanish elections and politics II (General Elections on November 10)
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 33 34 35 36 37 [38] 39 40 41 Print
Author Topic: Spanish elections and politics II (General Elections on November 10)  (Read 50022 times)
Skye
yeah_93
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,239
Venezuela


Political Matrix
E: 3.29, S: -1.30

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #925 on: September 17, 2019, 01:36:21 pm »

https://elpais.com/politica/2019/09/16/actualidad/1568614552_569307.html

Looks like we're heading for a new election, bois.
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,613
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #926 on: September 17, 2019, 01:40:38 pm »

And unless turnout is low and right wins majority, what exactly would be accomplished by then.  Realize it will happen, but if no party bends after, same problem, so any ideas on whom might bend next time around as doubt people want a fifth election.  Seems like PSOE and Podemos are willing to gamble on this as right while not doing too well in polls now could win, especially if Cs and PP run joint candidates.
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,578
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #927 on: September 17, 2019, 02:11:17 pm »

It's happening
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,613
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #928 on: September 17, 2019, 02:16:32 pm »


Could there be another election after this, or do you think if inconclusive again one party will bend to avoid another election.  At this point it seems only a PSOE majority (next to impossible) or right wing majority (possible but not most likely outcome) only way to allow investiture next time around.
Logged
Sen. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
tack50
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,347
Spain


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #929 on: September 17, 2019, 03:30:43 pm »


Could there be another election after this, or do you think if inconclusive again one party will bend to avoid another election.  At this point it seems only a PSOE majority (next to impossible) or right wing majority (possible but not most likely outcome) only way to allow investiture next time around.

Well, there is another option: someone caves (whether it's PSOE, Cs, PP or Podemos).

In my opinion, the following scenarios are possible:

1) Right wing majority: The right forms a government. Whether that is PP-Cs with Vox outside support or a 3 way, I don't know, but it seems the right would be more responsible. However, I would personally love if the right was also unable to form a government and we went to infinite elections Tongue

2) JxCat as the key vote: This almost definitely guarantees a 3rd round of elections. The only possibility would be a PSOE government propped up by the centre-right, which probably is not happening. If Puigdemont's party ends up as the decisive vote, Spain goes to a third election.

3) Scenario similar to the current one: Probably the most likely scenario, albeit with some variations (PSOE+Cs probably won't have a majority again). Still, basically the entire country gets a big case of Deja Vu. Someone still needs to cave

4) PSOE+moderate nationalists/regionalists gets a majority: Unlike what is thought, PSOE does not technically need a majority to win. Assuming Podemos keeps abstaining after another election, just a small increase of PSOE and decrease of the right would be enough for a PSOE minority. Here's the scenario I'm describing, but with current numbers:

Yes: PSOE+PNV+Compromis+PRC (131)
Abstain: Podemos+ERC+Bildu+CC
No: PP+Cs+Vox+JxCat+NS (156)

So PSOE needs to basically gain around 13 seats or so, while at the same time the right loses just as many. PSOE getting into the low-mid 140 seats while Podemos and the nationalists hold is certainly concievable; just not particularly likely.
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,613
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #930 on: September 17, 2019, 03:55:55 pm »

How likely is a right wing majority.  Polls don't show it, but with low turnout I've heard that tends to favour the right.  Also if right wins won't there be huge re-incriminations on both parties on the left why they blew this when there were so many opportunities to find a way out.  If a repeat of the status quo, I have a tough time not seeing at least one party caving.  My guess is between Cs, UP, and PSOE, whichever party loses most seats will have greatest interest in caving while any party who gains has none.
Logged
Sen. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
tack50
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,347
Spain


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #931 on: September 17, 2019, 04:03:47 pm »

How likely is a right wing majority.  Polls don't show it, but with low turnout I've heard that tends to favour the right.  Also if right wins won't there be huge re-incriminations on both parties on the left why they blew this when there were so many opportunities to find a way out.  If a repeat of the status quo, I have a tough time not seeing at least one party caving.  My guess is between Cs, UP, and PSOE, whichever party loses most seats will have greatest interest in caving while any party who gains has none.

If the math I did a while back is accurate, a right wing majority becomes possible if turnout drops below 66% or so (coincidentally, also the level of turnout in 2016).

However that math made the assumption that no votes would change in the right (it's not impossible to see Cs drop and the electoral system ing them over) and that literally all right wing voters would turn out again, which is probaly unrealistic even if their turnout will hold much better.

Also, your guess is probably right. However it's worth noting that if polling is accurate Cs is the party that is likeliest to lose seats, yet if they lose seats a PSOE+Cs deal becomes unlikely.
Logged
xelas81
Rookie
*
Posts: 38
Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #932 on: September 17, 2019, 04:44:29 pm »


Could there be another election after this, or do you think if inconclusive again one party will bend to avoid another election.  At this point it seems only a PSOE majority (next to impossible) or right wing majority (possible but not most likely outcome) only way to allow investiture next time around.

Well, there is another option: someone caves (whether it's PSOE, Cs, PP or Podemos).

In my opinion, the following scenarios are possible:

1) Right wing majority: The right forms a government. Whether that is PP-Cs with Vox outside support or a 3 way, I don't know, but it seems the right would be more responsible. However, I would personally love if the right was also unable to form a government and we went to infinite elections Tongue

2) JxCat as the key vote: This almost definitely guarantees a 3rd round of elections. The only possibility would be a PSOE government propped up by the centre-right, which probably is not happening. If Puigdemont's party ends up as the decisive vote, Spain goes to a third election.

3) Scenario similar to the current one: Probably the most likely scenario, albeit with some variations (PSOE+Cs probably won't have a majority again). Still, basically the entire country gets a big case of Deja Vu. Someone still needs to cave

4) PSOE+moderate nationalists/regionalists gets a majority: Unlike what is thought, PSOE does not technically need a majority to win. Assuming Podemos keeps abstaining after another election, just a small increase of PSOE and decrease of the right would be enough for a PSOE minority. Here's the scenario I'm describing, but with current numbers:

Yes: PSOE+PNV+Compromis+PRC (131)
Abstain: Podemos+ERC+Bildu+CC
No: PP+Cs+Vox+JxCat+NS (156)

So PSOE needs to basically gain around 13 seats or so, while at the same time the right loses just as many. PSOE getting into the low-mid 140 seats while Podemos and the nationalists hold is certainly concievable; just not particularly likely.

Is there any possibility of getting JxCat to abstain?
Logged
Sen. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
tack50
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,347
Spain


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #933 on: September 17, 2019, 04:47:33 pm »

Is there any possibility of getting JxCat to abstain?

Probably not given that JxCat seems to be now the "tough" party that wants independence at all costs (only slightly less so than CUP) while ERC is now the "moderate" party that wants dialogue and what not.
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,613
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #934 on: September 17, 2019, 07:06:31 pm »

What is amazing here is it seems the left really shot themselves in the foot.  Podemos could have voted for investiture earlier which was a modest coalition, but they wanted more influence.  Likewise Sanchez could have taken the deal of 1 year, but it seems the two had bigger egos.  It will be interesting to see what their parties think if right wins.  My guess is both are fairly confident that won't happen, but even though no post election poll suggests right is anywhere close to a majority things can change during a campaign.
Logged
Hlewagastiz Holtijaz
razze
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,414
Cuba


Political Matrix
E: -6.52, S: -4.96

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #935 on: September 17, 2019, 09:27:25 pm »

Iglesias is going to torpedo his own side just because Sanchez wouldn't give him Haciendas (per my grandmother). Oh well, elections are always fun!
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,578
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #936 on: September 18, 2019, 01:25:29 am »


https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/09/17/inenglish/1568731342_962226.html

Quote
Spain is closer than ever to its fourth general election in as many years, after its political parties failed to reach a governing deal in the wake of the inconclusive April 28 polls. Despite months of negotiations, no agreement has been reached between the Socialist Party (PSOE), which won most seats at the April vote but fell short of a majority, and its most likely partner, left-wing Unidas Podemos. Acting Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez has also been unable to strike any kind of deal with the two other biggest parties on Spain’s political spectrum, the conservative Popular Party (PP) and Ciudadanos (Citizens).

Following established procedure, for the last two days Spain’s King Felipe VI has been meeting with the leaders of parties with a congressional presence to see whether Sánchez had enough support among the deputies in Spain’s lower house of parliament, Congress, to be voted back into office as prime minister.

After the round of meetings concluded, Meritxell Batet, the speaker of Congress, went to meet the king to discuss his conclusions. After that encounter, the Royal Household released an official statement saying that the king would not be presenting a candidate. Felipe VI, the document read, “has concluded that there is no candidate who counts on the necessary support for the Congress of Deputies to lend him its confidence.”

Barring any last-minute surprises, parliament will be dissolved next week and a repeat general election called for November 10.

One last-ditch attempt is, however, still possible. Formally speaking, no deadline has passed today. The last moment that an investiture vote could take place is by midnight on September 23. This means that the king could still propose a candidate should Spain’s political parties inform him that someone has the support for an investiture vote, but they would have to do this deal between Wednesday and Thursday of this week in order to beat the procedural clock.

Pedro Sánchez made a statement yesterday at 21:00 (CET) n which he repeated the word "moderation" 4 or 5 times. It's not difficult to imagine on which axes the acting PM will run his campaign: moderation, stability and turn to the centre. Sánchez also said that, despite signs of economic downturn, his government won't leave the vulnerable behind, Also, Sánchez claimed that he did his best to reach an investiture agreement and mentioned the "five offers" made to UP. In that regard the acting PM sounded fake to me.

The relationship between PSOE and UP is destroyed. A leftist coalition government will never happen and I doubt that Pablo Iglesias or Irene Montero accept a confidence and supply agreement. Rather my impression is that a Portuguese path is discarded, even though IU and other partners in UP would like that option. International context is not favourable to expansionary fiscal policy (German slowdown is not affecting Spain by the moment, but possibly it will).

The last offer made by Albert Rivera seems to be a late and botched attempt to put back on the centrist track. Maybe it's a first step to an approach to PSOE, in case there is not a rightwing majority. Badly and late, Rivera might come closer to the place where Macron, Valls or the Cs 'social liberals' want. But it's possible that Rivera still dreams to become PM some day, even though becoming the leader of the Spanish Right iseems an unattainable goal. Sánchez clearly prefers a deal with Cs, but the approach won't happen before a new election takes place. The reasons are that Sánchez wants to strengthen PSOE and weaken Cs, as well he can't lose votes in the left. On election night, the socialist crowd attending Sánchez's speech chanted "with Rivera NO". Sánchez smiled and said he got the message.   
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,613
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #937 on: September 18, 2019, 03:42:07 am »

So basically unless right wins a majority no government.  I would think if a stalemate someone would cave after or one of the parties would change leaders.  How likely do you think it is the right wins this time?
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,578
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #938 on: September 18, 2019, 05:00:51 am »
« Edited: September 18, 2019, 12:40:32 pm by Velasco »

So basically unless right wins a majority no government.  I would think if a stalemate someone would cave after or one of the parties would change leaders.  How likely do you think it is the right wins this time?

The result is fairly unpredictable, but the chances of a rightwing majority are slim unless PP and Cs run together. Casado proposed a joint list called "España Suma" (similar to the coalition between UPN, PP and Cs operating in Navarre), but Rivera rejected the offer and Vox will run candidates in all constituencies. Running in three separate lists, rightwing parties only have a chance in case of massive abstention in the left. Pedro Sánchez is seeking to improve PSOE results, in order to force opposition parties to cave in and allow him to govern. I think Sánchez expects that Cs results in November are weak and Rivera changes his attitude by then.
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,613
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #939 on: September 18, 2019, 11:42:28 am »

Would that mean a more centrist government say cancelling things like tax hikes for rich and banks, smaller minimum wage increase?  Would be good for EU as Cs and PSOE most pro-EU and removes the Catalonia question.  If UP does bad enough might they like before the last election have a supply and confidence with PSOE without supporting them?  Don't see a coalition between PSOE and UP unless the unthinkable of big UP gains and PSOE losing ground, but that seems unlikely.  Also Sanchez might be hoping election fatigue will get enough abstentions, but then he has to pass a budget which could be a challenge.
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,578
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #940 on: September 18, 2019, 12:30:23 pm »
« Edited: September 18, 2019, 12:36:50 pm by Velasco »

Would that mean a more centrist government say cancelling things like tax hikes for rich and banks, smaller minimum wage increase?  Would be good for EU as Cs and PSOE most pro-EU and removes the Catalonia question.  

Maybe. Certainly Cs stands for indiscriminate tax cuts and PSOE might be tempted to take a more liberal and less socialdemocratic turn. Anyway I don't think that's a good thing. Many people believe the rich and the banks don't pay enough axes and they enjoy much more deductions and tax benefits than salaried workers, whom bear the brunt of the tax burden. On the other hand, the average tax burden in Spain is relatively low if compared to other European countries. Raising minimum wage is necessary to increase the purchasing power and stimulate domestic consumption. Currently Spain is suffering too much temporary employment and too low wages. A deal between PSOE and Cs by no means removes the Catalan question. On the contrary, the Cs radical stance only contributes to set fire to the flames. I broadly concur the approach of the government led by Sánchez was correct. Dialogue and rule of the law. The Catalan question is very complex anyway and Sánchez has stated it will take years to solve it (in case there exists a solution). To be honest, the manic insistence of Cs leader Albert with article 155 (imposition of direct rule in Catalonia) makes me think of Modi's intervention in Kashmir. I hope Rivera will never be in the government, for the good of the country.
Logged
mileslunn
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 2,613
Canada


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #941 on: September 18, 2019, 01:48:32 pm »

I don't see an agreement between C's and PSOE with current leadership, but if Cs do bad enough might be replaced by a new leader.  On tax cuts for the rich, that will only happen if right wins, but another hung parliament might result in status quo as opposed to hikes on rich and banks that Sanchez and Iglesias favour.  As compared to other European countries, Spain's top rates are comparable to Germany, UK, and Italy, but lower than Portugal and France and would still be even with a 4% hike (note both those two appear similar, but Portugal tacks on a 5% solidarity contribution and social security taxes are not capped like in Spain while in France they have a separate social tax of almost 10%).  As for minimum wage, Spain is well below EU average, mind you average salaries in Mediterranean countries tend to be on the low side with only the Eastern European countries havine even lower ones. 

I wonder if Sanchez hopes that he can just get C's + podemos to abstain since as long as PP + Vox don't gain too much having both abstain would get him over the finish line but would be an unstable government.  Either way I think election fatigue will make a 3rd election unlikely and whatever parties gain ground will stand firm and those who lose ground will cave.
Logged
Sen. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
tack50
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,347
Spain


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #942 on: September 19, 2019, 10:47:35 am »
« Edited: September 19, 2019, 10:54:30 am by Sen. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln) »

Apparently memes have invaded our own dimension.

A TV presenter named called Risto Mejide, who presents a program in Spanish TV is going to form his own party and run in the general elections in Madrid.

His party name is "Peor No lo Haremos" (We can't do worse) and his platform allegedly includes taking away the politicians' salaries as long as there is not a government in place, that people found guilty of corruption should return the illegally appropiated money, strengthening separation of powers and eliminating the lifetime salaries some retired politicians get (most notably former PMs). He is also pledging to only run for 1 term.

https://www.lavanguardia.com/television/20190919/47478787551/risto-mejide-candidato-elecciones-generales-10n-partido-politico-pnlh-todo-es-mentira.html



Quote
#PNLH is running in Madrid constituency and we need signatures to run!

Assuming he does end up running for real, he needs 3% of the vote to get in in Madrid. Which is low enough that it should be achievable but who knows.

I could see this going anywhere from Spanish 5Star to Spanish Die PARTEI lol
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,578
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #943 on: September 19, 2019, 11:33:39 am »

PSOE won the April elections from the left, but this time is seeking to win over disgruntled centrist voters

https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/09/19/inenglish/1568878835_465224.html

Quote
The Socialist Party (PSOE), which has been leading a caretaker government since the parliamentary election of April 28, will now try to steal voters away from Ciudadanos (Citizens), a party that gained national prominence on a liberal-progressive agenda but that has lately shifted to the right, crafting alliances with the conservative Popular Party (PP) and the far-right Vox while shunning any deals with the PSOE.

PSOE strategists feel that their party will no longer be able to attract many more voters from the leftist Unidas Podemos group, and they have now set their sights on the more progressive followers of Ciudadanos, who could number around a million people.

Some sources in the PSOE, however, are skeptical about this plan and believe that many disgruntled Ciudadanos voters will simply abstain instead of switching allegiances.

But party leaders believe that there are many opportunities to be found in Catalonia, Ciudadanos’ home region and the place where this party started to grow on an anti-separatist message. “There are a lot of borderline voters there who once voted for us, and we think we can bring them back by defending dialogue [with Catalan nationalist leaders] within the bounds of the Constitution,” said one source in the PSOE leadership.

The PSOE sees itself as an attractive alternative for non-separatist Catalans who oppose Unidas Podemos’s calls for a legal referendum, but who fall short of supporting Ciudadanos’ insistence on reintroducing direct rule by Madrid.  

PP leader Pablo Casado is trying to cultivate a moderate public image, while striving to win back conservative voters that switched to Cs and Vox.

Cs leader Albert Rivera continued his attacks on Pedro Sánchez yesterday. He rejected the electoral coalition offer made by Pablo Casado ("España Suma"), but stated his willingness for coalitions with the conservative party in case they have the numbers on November 11. Rivera chanted his "Sánchez is a public danger" mantra promised he won't repeat the distressing spectacle of the leftwing parties and their fake negotiations.

Unidas Podemos is undecided to whether it should go in attack mode or use moderate rhetoric, given that socialists are the only possible coalition partners.

¨Más Madrid, the party of Íñigo Errejón, is discussing the possibility to run a list in the upcoming general elections. Errejón is focused on building his organization in the region of Madrid, but the MM group in the Madrid City Hall opened the discussion in order to seek representation in Congress. The proposal is running a list for Madrid and seeking alliances with regional forces like Compromís (Mónica Oltra said she would be open to a "paperless marriage"). Former mayor Manuela Carmena ruled out the possibility to be the top candidate of that list, while Errejón and his inner circle are pondering whether to run.

Apparently memes have invaded our own dimension.

A TV presenter named called Risto Mejide, who presents a program in Spanish TV is going to form his own party and run in the general elections in Madrid.

Joke party or populist garbage? The environment is dangerous and this kind of experiments might succeed eventually. I hope it doesn't go anywhere. That Risto Mejide is repellent.
Logged
crals
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 71


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #944 on: September 19, 2019, 11:50:42 am »

Is it at all realistic that PSOE could get a majority without either UP or Cs (with minor parties like PNV)?
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,578
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #945 on: September 19, 2019, 12:03:47 pm »
« Edited: September 20, 2019, 02:46:57 am by Velasco »

Is it at all realistic that PSOE could get a majority without either UP or Cs (with minor parties like PNV)?

There is no chance for a PSOE majority (even with the help of PNV, Compromis and PRC) as current polling place socialists in the low 30s.  Their Portuguese counterparts might have a better chance, but Spanish politics is getting too complicated. The goal of Sánchez is to diminish the size of UP and Cs, in order they become mere satellite parties more "reasonable" and easy to handle

EDIT: another question is that PSOE reaches 35% of the vote or gets more. In that case the chances are much better, providing that PP remains in the low 20s
Logged
Hlewagastiz Holtijaz
razze
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,414
Cuba


Political Matrix
E: -6.52, S: -4.96

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #946 on: September 19, 2019, 12:47:09 pm »

There's an alternate universe out there where Carme Chacón and Inés Arrimadas are leading Spain into a utopian liberal centrist future
Logged
Sen. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
tack50
Atlas Politician
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 4,347
Spain


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #947 on: September 19, 2019, 05:20:15 pm »

There's an alternate universe out there where Carme Chacón and Inés Arrimadas are leading Spain into a utopian liberal centrist future

That alternate universe sounds pretty nice considering the present Tongue

Tbh considering how bad PSOE was doing in the early 2010s, PM Carme Chacón was probably never going to happen (especially considering she retired in 2016 and died in 2017). I can easily see her doing better than Rubalcaba, but 2011 was completely unwinnable for PSOE. If she manages to survive all the way to 2015 she does have a strong chance though, depends on whether she outperforms Sánchez or not. Since she died in 2017, I imagine her death would have been seen as some sort of "national tragedy" I guess.

As for Inés Arrimadas, she still has a future so don't count her out Tongue (though a PM from Cs is not going to happen soon, she is definitely going to end up as Rivera's replacement)
Logged
Velasco
andi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,578
Western Sahara


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #948 on: September 19, 2019, 06:57:44 pm »
« Edited: September 20, 2019, 01:22:04 pm by Velasco »

Carme Chacón was basically the female version of Zapatero and Inés Arrimadas has lost a lot of appeal since she left Catalonia and moved to Madrid. Arrimadas deserves credit for her excellent results in the Catalan elections of 2015 and 2017. But after her electoral success in December 2017 she failed to vindicate herself as a credible alternative to Catalan nationalists, despite she was leading the party that won a plurality of popular vote (she led the largest faction in.the Catalan parliament, couldn't govern because the combined nationalist parties have a majotity). Currently Arrimadas is being overshadowed by the radicalism of the PP spokeswoman in Congress, the controversial Cayetana Álvarez de Toledo.
Logged
Skye
yeah_93
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,239
Venezuela


Political Matrix
E: 3.29, S: -1.30

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #949 on: September 20, 2019, 12:58:38 pm »

https://www.elindependiente.com/politica/2019/09/20/mas-madrid-lanzara-su-candidatura-a-las-generales-en-los-proximos-dias/

Más Madrid is IN for the general elections. Errejón will probably lead the list, as Carmena declined to be a candidate. So far it's unknown where they plan to compete.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 33 34 35 36 37 [38] 39 40 41 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC