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  The American Montfort (1812–13 election)
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Poll
Question: Vote ONCE for president and ONCE for House
#1President: James Madison (Democratic—National Republican, Virginia)  
#2President: John Marshall (Federalist, Virginia)  
#3President: Unpledged Ultra-Federalist electors  
#4House: Democratic Republican (Henry Clay)  
#5House: National Republican (Albert Gallatin)  
#6House: Radical Republican (John Randolph)  
#7House: Federalist (Rufus King)  
#8House: Ultra-Federalist (Essex Junto)  
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Partisan results

Total Voters: 25

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Author Topic: The American Montfort (1812–13 election)  (Read 217 times)
Harry S Truman
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« on: March 25, 2019, 09:14:38 pm »
« edited: March 25, 2019, 09:43:13 pm by Harry S Truman »

Though his Independent Republicans were by far the largest party in the House at the start of the Eighth Congress, the result of the 1809 elections left Clay still twelve votes short of an overall majority, forcing the new prime minister to appeal to his predecessor, Albert Gallatin, who still sat as the member for his Pennsylvania district, for the support of the regular Republicans to form a government. The resultant coalition government—the first of its kind in American history—saw Clay assume the Treasury Department and the title of prime minister, Independent Republicans James Monroe and William Lowndes named respectively Secretary of War and Secretary of the Navy, while Gallatin became Secretary of State and John Quincy Adams—a moderate Federalist turned Gallatin Republican—took over as Attorney General. Gallatin additionally secured assurance from Clay that he would not seek a declaration of war against Britain without further provocation—a proviso Clay considered fulfilled by the Battle of Tippecanoe. The narrow failure of a bill to recharter the Bank of the United States rounded out 1811, and in a special session of Congress, the House narrowly voted for war on New Year's Day, 1812.

War has split the parties along factional lines, as Clay seeks to form a majority government in the next Congress whilst his opponents compete to expand their influence. Clay and his party, now calling themselves “Democratic Republicans,” stand for their first election as the party of government demanding the full-throated prosecution of the war against Britain—including seizure of Britain’s remaining colonial holdings on the North American mainland—while mostly ignoring internal divisions over the tariff and the Bank. In the odd netherworld between government and opposition are the National Republicans, led by Gallatin in what many expect to be his last national campaign. Largely admitting the necessity of war in the face of British aggressions, the Nationals nevertheless contend for seeking an honorable peace at the first opportunity. They stand by Gallatin’s nationalist economic policies, favoring a Second National Bank, internal improvements, and a moderate tariff for revenue purposes. A splinter faction of Radical Republicans, or Quids, led by John Randolph also presents itself. Active mainly in Virginia and the Carolinas, they oppose both the war and Gallatin’s nationalist economic programs, favoring a strict and limiting interpretation of Congressional authority. Occupying the center-right is what remains of the Federalist party, led by Rufus King following Pickering’s defeat in the last election. Uniformly anti-war, they favor strong commercial ties with Britain and neutrality in European conflicts, and voted to a man to extend the charter of the National Bank. Finally, there are the Ultra-Federalists, comprising the so-called Essex Junto. The most fervently anti-war of the arrayed parties, they draw the majority of their support from New England, where some of their leaders have called for secession in hopes of striking a separate peace with Britain.

Also on the ballot is the presidency. The government parties have united in support of the incumbent Madison, who has agreed with reluctance to stand for a second term. He is opposed by Representative John Marshall, a cousin of former President Jefferson, standing for the Federalists, and by a slate of unpledged Ultra-Federalist electors.

Two-days.

e: The Ultra-Federalists are capped at 35 seats, 25% of the total.
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shua
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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2019, 10:40:53 pm »

Madison / Quids
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HenryWallaceVP
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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2019, 11:04:36 pm »

Marshall/Democratic-Republicans. I know it might seem contradictory, but I really like Clay and Marshall and could never convince myself to vote for villains like Madison or Gallatin.
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sjoyce
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2019, 11:20:16 pm »

Democratic-Republican / unpledged Ultra-Federalist electors
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Let Dogs Survive
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« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2019, 12:06:59 am »

Federalists.
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tack50
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« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2019, 05:58:58 am »

Straight ultra-federalist

And I thought I was a Republican hack lol
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Kingpoleon
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« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2019, 11:36:44 am »

Madison/National Republicans. If you vote against Madison, you vote for a moderate Federalist - a nice, if stupid, man. If you vote against Clay and Gallatin, you vote as a traitor.
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shua
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« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2019, 12:28:40 pm »

Madison/National Republicans. If you vote against Madison, you vote for a moderate Federalist - a nice, if stupid, man. If you vote against Clay and Gallatin, you vote as a traitor.

??
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Harry S Truman
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« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2019, 10:24:18 pm »

The 1812–13 United States general election
War split the House and the country along sectional lines on the eve of the 1812 general election, the resulting Congress reflecting the deep divisions which President Madison privately feared would tear the Union apart. In the South and West, where the war was popular, Clay and his 'Democratic' Republicans were the victors of the day, carrying the delegations Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Georgia en masse along with the single district of the new state of Louisiana. Elsewhere, the battle was close and vicious. The government was obliterated north of the Mason-Dixon line, carrying two of New York's twenty-seven districts and none in Maryland and Pennsylvania, where the Federalists made huge gains. Gallatin's 'National' Republicans managed to hold Pennsylvania and compensated for losses in Virginia and the Carolinas with small gains in New England, where the bulk of the plunder went to the Ultra-Federalists and the Essex Junto. Meanwhile, competition between Democratic, National, and Radical Republicans allowed the Federalists to bring in a small harvest of coastal constituencies in Virginia, North and South Carolina which they carried by pluralities. The end sum was a Congress hopelessly divided, with the two largest factions forty-odd seats short of a majority. Republican disunity and anti-war sentiment likewise bled over into the presidential race, allowing John Marshall to oust the incumbent Madison in a rout, the first Federalist to win the office in the party's history, while Madison became the first president to leave office otherwise than by his own volition.

Img

Federalist (Rufus King) 56 seats (+20), 26.9% popular votes
Democratic Republican (Henry Clay) 53 seats (-7), 26.9% popular votes
National Republican (Albert Gallatin) 39 seats (-7), 23.1% popular votes
Ultra-Federalist (Essex Junto) 27 seats (New), 19.2% popular votes
Radical Republican (John Randolph) 6 seats (New), 3.8% popular votes

Img

U.S. Representative John Marshall (Federalist, Virginia) 137 electors, 58.3% popular votes
President James Madison (Republican, Virginia) 59 electors, 29.2% popular votes
Timothy Pickering (Ultra-Federalist, Massachusetts) 22 electors, 12.5% popular votes
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shua
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« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2019, 12:14:30 am »

Clay / Marshall voters are an interesting bunch.
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