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  IN-AG 2020: Who can defeat the tainted AG Curtis Hill?
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Author Topic: IN-AG 2020: Who can defeat the tainted AG Curtis Hill?  (Read 1115 times)
bronz4141
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« on: April 22, 2019, 12:57:52 pm »

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill, a black Republican, one of the GOP's rising stars, is embroiled in a sexual assault scandal, in which his fellow Republicans, whites, have called on him to resign or have distanced from him.

I think this is a prime Indiana Democratic pickup for statewide offices.

Who can beat AG Hill?
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SnowLabrador
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2019, 01:02:20 pm »

Nobody, because Joe Donnelly could not win as an incumbent. Indiana is just too red.
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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2019, 01:35:53 pm »

Nobody, because Joe Donnelly could not win as an incumbent. Indiana is just too red.
#ButtigiegWouldHaveWon
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2019, 02:47:34 pm »

A primary opponent
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2019, 02:57:46 pm »

Downballot races, especially non governor ones are not that polarized

But there are exactly four Democrats who can win in Indiana: Joe Donnelly, John R. Gregg, Brad Ellsworth, Baron Hill


Look for Donnelly to make a comeback

But someone like Messer could always make a comeback with a primary challenge, could also see some state legislators take a crack at primarying Hill

If IN Dems are smart, they’ll run Donnelly, who can definitely win this race, especially if a crazy primaries Hill, this looks a lot like IN-SEN 2012, incumbent vulnerable to a primary challenge from a nut, but unlike Lugar, Hill, himself, is quite weak
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SunriseAroundTheWorld
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2019, 03:45:24 pm »

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill, a black Republican, one of the GOP's rising stars, is embroiled in a sexual assault scandal, in which his fellow Republicans, whites, have called on him to resign or have distanced from him.

I think this is a prime Indiana Democratic pickup for statewide offices.

Who can beat AG Hill?

Why are these necessary pieces of commentary in your view? It is completely irrelevant to anything in this situation.
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bronz4141
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2019, 03:58:44 pm »

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill, a black Republican, one of the GOP's rising stars, is embroiled in a sexual assault scandal, in which his fellow Republicans, whites, have called on him to resign or have distanced from him.

I think this is a prime Indiana Democratic pickup for statewide offices.

Who can beat AG Hill?

Why are these necessary pieces of commentary in your view? It is completely irrelevant to anything in this situation.

Because a lot of Democrats see black Republicans are tokens, etc.
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LoneStarDem
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2019, 03:58:54 pm »

Big question is whether Hill can survive these scandals & win reelection ? Has the IN GOP tried to pressure him into retirement ?
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Joshua
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2019, 04:19:04 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
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Former President Weatherboy1102
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« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2019, 05:03:58 pm »

isn't this the guy who does some weird ass elvis impression?
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DaWN
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« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2019, 05:10:39 pm »

isn't this the guy who does some weird ass elvis impression?

This is the kind of thing that reminds me why I decided to follow American politics
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Unconditional Surrender Truman
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« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2019, 06:01:12 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.
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bronz4141
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« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2019, 06:50:14 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.

You're from Indiana, explain why.
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Vosem
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« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2019, 07:24:54 pm »

Rokita and Messer (who, amusingly, both have JDs) ought to blow each other up again and let Hill come up through the middle.
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standwrand
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« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2019, 12:55:27 pm »

A primary opponent

Also like no one cares about that anymore. Sexual assault is sooo 2018.
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Unconditional Surrender Truman
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« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2019, 01:05:03 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.

You're from Indiana, explain why.
In simplest terms, because Indiana Democrats are losing ground everywhere except the suburbs, and demographic change is not rapid enough to make up for the collapse in the Southern part of the state. Those rural Southern counties are what allowed Joe Donnelly to win and John Gregg to nearly defeat Mike Pence in 2012. In 2018, they voted overwhelmingly for Braun—and Donnelly was much better funded, better known, more experienced running a statewide campaign, and benefitted from more media attention on his race than whoever the party ends up running against Curtis Hill in 2020. For whatever reason, these areas are no longer willing to vote for a Blue Dog candidate the way they were even ten years ago; chalk it up to Trump, or generational change, or the state GOP being mostly competent and disinclined to flights of conservative fantasy legislating compared to their counterparts in Kansas or Wisconsin: it comes to the same thing. Hill might lose to a challenger at the State Convention, but he'll win reelection in the fall if he doesn't, even if the margin of this race is somewhat narrower than Holcomb's reelection likely will be.

Partly, this comes down to what Joshua said: most people aren't following this scandal closely enough for it to change their vote. I'd be surprised if a majority of Hoosiers could independently name the Attorney General or, vice versa, tell you exactly who Curtis Hill is or describe the allegations against him with any degree of specificity. That being the case, it's hard to see where the fuel for a "Republicans for [insert Dem nominee here]" campaign is going to come from. Glenda Ritz managed to pull off a win in the 2012 Superintendent race—in an environment much more favorable to Democrats than 2020 is likely to be—thanks to the support of teachers' unions and parents upset over the Common Core. Who are the anti-Hill Republicans who are going to bring the same degree of passion and commitment to this race next year? Unlike the SoPI, the State Attorney General doesn't have a direct impact on most people's lives. We've already seen that politicians and voters are willing to ignore sexual harassment charges as it suits their narrative. Especially considering the charges were originally made two years before the election, I doubt this will be a burning issue in most voters' minds—except maybe for those who were never going to vote for Hill anyways.

Finally, the state Democratic party is an organizational wreck and is unlikely to have the funds to mount a serious challenge to Hill, especially with a popular incumbent like Holcomb leading the opposing slate.
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Unconditional Surrender Truman
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« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2019, 01:08:45 pm »

A primary opponent

Also like no one cares about that anymore. Sexual assault is sooo 2018.
Also worth noting that apart from Governor and U.S. Senate, candidates for statewide office are chosen at party conventions, not in the primary: so this would have to be a decision by the leadership to dump Hill, not a grassroots campaign such as toppled Lugar in 2012.
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Hoosier_Nick
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« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2019, 03:10:32 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.

You're from Indiana, explain why.
In simplest terms, because Indiana Democrats are losing ground everywhere except the suburbs, and demographic change is not rapid enough to make up for the collapse in the Southern part of the state. Those rural Southern counties are what allowed Joe Donnelly to win and John Gregg to nearly defeat Mike Pence in 2012. In 2018, they voted overwhelmingly for Braun—and Donnelly was much better funded, better known, more experienced running a statewide campaign, and benefitted from more media attention on his race than whoever the party ends up running against Curtis Hill in 2020. For whatever reason, these areas are no longer willing to vote for a Blue Dog candidate the way they were even ten years ago; chalk it up to Trump, or generational change, or the state GOP being mostly competent and disinclined to flights of conservative fantasy legislating compared to their counterparts in Kansas or Wisconsin: it comes to the same thing. Hill might lose to a challenger at the State Convention, but he'll win reelection in the fall if he doesn't, even if the margin of this race is somewhat narrower than Holcomb's reelection likely will be.

Partly, this comes down to what Joshua said: most people aren't following this scandal closely enough for it to change their vote. I'd be surprised if a majority of Hoosiers could independently name the Attorney General or, vice versa, tell you exactly who Curtis Hill is or describe the allegations against him with any degree of specificity. That being the case, it's hard to see where the fuel for a "Republicans for [insert Dem nominee here]" campaign is going to come from. Glenda Ritz managed to pull off a win in the 2012 Superintendent race—in an environment much more favorable to Democrats than 2020 is likely to be—thanks to the support of teachers' unions and parents upset over the Common Core. Who are the anti-Hill Republicans who are going to bring the same degree of passion and commitment to this race next year? Unlike the SoPI, the State Attorney General doesn't have a direct impact on most people's lives. We've already seen that politicians and voters are willing to ignore sexual harassment charges as it suits their narrative. Especially considering the charges were originally made two years before the election, I doubt this will be a burning issue in most voters' minds—except maybe for those who were never going to vote for Hill anyways.

Finally, the state Democratic party is an organizational wreck and is unlikely to have the funds to mount a serious challenge to Hill, especially with a popular incumbent like Holcomb leading the opposing slate.

This. It would take a Democratic landslide nationwide to take down Hill, especially considering Holcomb will likely wipe the floor with his opponent.
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« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2019, 07:23:25 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.

You're from Indiana, explain why.
In simplest terms, because Indiana Democrats are losing ground everywhere except the suburbs, and demographic change is not rapid enough to make up for the collapse in the Southern part of the state. Those rural Southern counties are what allowed Joe Donnelly to win and John Gregg to nearly defeat Mike Pence in 2012. In 2018, they voted overwhelmingly for Braun—and Donnelly was much better funded, better known, more experienced running a statewide campaign, and benefitted from more media attention on his race than whoever the party ends up running against Curtis Hill in 2020. For whatever reason, these areas are no longer willing to vote for a Blue Dog candidate the way they were even ten years ago; chalk it up to Trump, or generational change, or the state GOP being mostly competent and disinclined to flights of conservative fantasy legislating compared to their counterparts in Kansas or Wisconsin: it comes to the same thing. Hill might lose to a challenger at the State Convention, but he'll win reelection in the fall if he doesn't, even if the margin of this race is somewhat narrower than Holcomb's reelection likely will be.

Partly, this comes down to what Joshua said: most people aren't following this scandal closely enough for it to change their vote. I'd be surprised if a majority of Hoosiers could independently name the Attorney General or, vice versa, tell you exactly who Curtis Hill is or describe the allegations against him with any degree of specificity. That being the case, it's hard to see where the fuel for a "Republicans for [insert Dem nominee here]" campaign is going to come from. Glenda Ritz managed to pull off a win in the 2012 Superintendent race—in an environment much more favorable to Democrats than 2020 is likely to be—thanks to the support of teachers' unions and parents upset over the Common Core. Who are the anti-Hill Republicans who are going to bring the same degree of passion and commitment to this race next year? Unlike the SoPI, the State Attorney General doesn't have a direct impact on most people's lives. We've already seen that politicians and voters are willing to ignore sexual harassment charges as it suits their narrative. Especially considering the charges were originally made two years before the election, I doubt this will be a burning issue in most voters' minds—except maybe for those who were never going to vote for Hill anyways.

Finally, the state Democratic party is an organizational wreck and is unlikely to have the funds to mount a serious challenge to Hill, especially with a popular incumbent like Holcomb leading the opposing slate.

This. It would take a Democratic landslide nationwide to take down Hill, especially considering Holcomb will likely wipe the floor with his opponent.

Holcomb literally only won by 6 in a Republican tilting national environment, no more than the amount that Donnelly lost by in a Democratic leaning national environment. He is not Safe.
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Hoosier_Nick
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« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2019, 09:17:41 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.

You're from Indiana, explain why.
In simplest terms, because Indiana Democrats are losing ground everywhere except the suburbs, and demographic change is not rapid enough to make up for the collapse in the Southern part of the state. Those rural Southern counties are what allowed Joe Donnelly to win and John Gregg to nearly defeat Mike Pence in 2012. In 2018, they voted overwhelmingly for Braun—and Donnelly was much better funded, better known, more experienced running a statewide campaign, and benefitted from more media attention on his race than whoever the party ends up running against Curtis Hill in 2020. For whatever reason, these areas are no longer willing to vote for a Blue Dog candidate the way they were even ten years ago; chalk it up to Trump, or generational change, or the state GOP being mostly competent and disinclined to flights of conservative fantasy legislating compared to their counterparts in Kansas or Wisconsin: it comes to the same thing. Hill might lose to a challenger at the State Convention, but he'll win reelection in the fall if he doesn't, even if the margin of this race is somewhat narrower than Holcomb's reelection likely will be.

Partly, this comes down to what Joshua said: most people aren't following this scandal closely enough for it to change their vote. I'd be surprised if a majority of Hoosiers could independently name the Attorney General or, vice versa, tell you exactly who Curtis Hill is or describe the allegations against him with any degree of specificity. That being the case, it's hard to see where the fuel for a "Republicans for [insert Dem nominee here]" campaign is going to come from. Glenda Ritz managed to pull off a win in the 2012 Superintendent race—in an environment much more favorable to Democrats than 2020 is likely to be—thanks to the support of teachers' unions and parents upset over the Common Core. Who are the anti-Hill Republicans who are going to bring the same degree of passion and commitment to this race next year? Unlike the SoPI, the State Attorney General doesn't have a direct impact on most people's lives. We've already seen that politicians and voters are willing to ignore sexual harassment charges as it suits their narrative. Especially considering the charges were originally made two years before the election, I doubt this will be a burning issue in most voters' minds—except maybe for those who were never going to vote for Hill anyways.

Finally, the state Democratic party is an organizational wreck and is unlikely to have the funds to mount a serious challenge to Hill, especially with a popular incumbent like Holcomb leading the opposing slate.

This. It would take a Democratic landslide nationwide to take down Hill, especially considering Holcomb will likely wipe the floor with his opponent.

Holcomb literally only won by 6 in a Republican tilting national environment, no more than the amount that Donnelly lost by in a Democratic leaning national environment. He is not Safe.

Yeah, but now he's an incumbent rather than being a tainted nominee because of Pence. He also won't be running against John Gregg, who outraised him and was popular across the state. Democrats have also lost a lot of ground in the rural parts of the state as previously mentioned that Holcomb will win this time.
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Roll Roons
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« Reply #20 on: April 24, 2019, 11:42:41 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.

You're from Indiana, explain why.
In simplest terms, because Indiana Democrats are losing ground everywhere except the suburbs, and demographic change is not rapid enough to make up for the collapse in the Southern part of the state. Those rural Southern counties are what allowed Joe Donnelly to win and John Gregg to nearly defeat Mike Pence in 2012. In 2018, they voted overwhelmingly for Braun—and Donnelly was much better funded, better known, more experienced running a statewide campaign, and benefitted from more media attention on his race than whoever the party ends up running against Curtis Hill in 2020. For whatever reason, these areas are no longer willing to vote for a Blue Dog candidate the way they were even ten years ago; chalk it up to Trump, or generational change, or the state GOP being mostly competent and disinclined to flights of conservative fantasy legislating compared to their counterparts in Kansas or Wisconsin: it comes to the same thing. Hill might lose to a challenger at the State Convention, but he'll win reelection in the fall if he doesn't, even if the margin of this race is somewhat narrower than Holcomb's reelection likely will be.

Partly, this comes down to what Joshua said: most people aren't following this scandal closely enough for it to change their vote. I'd be surprised if a majority of Hoosiers could independently name the Attorney General or, vice versa, tell you exactly who Curtis Hill is or describe the allegations against him with any degree of specificity. That being the case, it's hard to see where the fuel for a "Republicans for [insert Dem nominee here]" campaign is going to come from. Glenda Ritz managed to pull off a win in the 2012 Superintendent race—in an environment much more favorable to Democrats than 2020 is likely to be—thanks to the support of teachers' unions and parents upset over the Common Core. Who are the anti-Hill Republicans who are going to bring the same degree of passion and commitment to this race next year? Unlike the SoPI, the State Attorney General doesn't have a direct impact on most people's lives. We've already seen that politicians and voters are willing to ignore sexual harassment charges as it suits their narrative. Especially considering the charges were originally made two years before the election, I doubt this will be a burning issue in most voters' minds—except maybe for those who were never going to vote for Hill anyways.

Finally, the state Democratic party is an organizational wreck and is unlikely to have the funds to mount a serious challenge to Hill, especially with a popular incumbent like Holcomb leading the opposing slate.

This. It would take a Democratic landslide nationwide to take down Hill, especially considering Holcomb will likely wipe the floor with his opponent.

Holcomb literally only won by 6 in a Republican tilting national environment, no more than the amount that Donnelly lost by in a Democratic leaning national environment. He is not Safe.

Note that Charlie Baker won by 2 with a plurality in very R-friendly 2014, and got almost 2/3 of the vote in D-friendly 2018. Just like him, Holcomb has become very popular, and will win easily.
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Frenchrepublican
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« Reply #21 on: April 26, 2019, 05:20:28 pm »

Besides a GOP primary opponent... no one.

The average voter in Indiana has no idea that Curtis Hill is a Weak Incumbent™.
*ding ding ding*

This race has IN-9 written all over it: vulnerable to a Democratic challenge under conventional wisdom, which is increasingly shown to be worth very little as Indiana settles comfortably in the Republican column down ballot.

You're from Indiana, explain why.
In simplest terms, because Indiana Democrats are losing ground everywhere except the suburbs, and demographic change is not rapid enough to make up for the collapse in the Southern part of the state. Those rural Southern counties are what allowed Joe Donnelly to win and John Gregg to nearly defeat Mike Pence in 2012. In 2018, they voted overwhelmingly for Braun—and Donnelly was much better funded, better known, more experienced running a statewide campaign, and benefitted from more media attention on his race than whoever the party ends up running against Curtis Hill in 2020. For whatever reason, these areas are no longer willing to vote for a Blue Dog candidate the way they were even ten years ago; chalk it up to Trump, or generational change, or the state GOP being mostly competent and disinclined to flights of conservative fantasy legislating compared to their counterparts in Kansas or Wisconsin: it comes to the same thing. Hill might lose to a challenger at the State Convention, but he'll win reelection in the fall if he doesn't, even if the margin of this race is somewhat narrower than Holcomb's reelection likely will be.

Partly, this comes down to what Joshua said: most people aren't following this scandal closely enough for it to change their vote. I'd be surprised if a majority of Hoosiers could independently name the Attorney General or, vice versa, tell you exactly who Curtis Hill is or describe the allegations against him with any degree of specificity. That being the case, it's hard to see where the fuel for a "Republicans for [insert Dem nominee here]" campaign is going to come from. Glenda Ritz managed to pull off a win in the 2012 Superintendent race—in an environment much more favorable to Democrats than 2020 is likely to be—thanks to the support of teachers' unions and parents upset over the Common Core. Who are the anti-Hill Republicans who are going to bring the same degree of passion and commitment to this race next year? Unlike the SoPI, the State Attorney General doesn't have a direct impact on most people's lives. We've already seen that politicians and voters are willing to ignore sexual harassment charges as it suits their narrative. Especially considering the charges were originally made two years before the election, I doubt this will be a burning issue in most voters' minds—except maybe for those who were never going to vote for Hill anyways.

Finally, the state Democratic party is an organizational wreck and is unlikely to have the funds to mount a serious challenge to Hill, especially with a popular incumbent like Holcomb leading the opposing slate.

This. It would take a Democratic landslide nationwide to take down Hill, especially considering Holcomb will likely wipe the floor with his opponent.

Holcomb literally only won by 6 in a Republican tilting national environment, no more than the amount that Donnelly lost by in a Democratic leaning national environment. He is not Safe.

Probably the dumbest comment of the month.
The democratic sacrificial lamb will be lucky to win 36% of the vote
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libertpaulian
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« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2019, 08:12:08 am »
« Edited: April 30, 2019, 08:16:39 am by libertpaulian »

No one.  

The Indiana Democratic bench is completely decimated, and their only "star" candidate, Christina Hale, is likely to challenge Susan Brooks for IN-05.  Plus, Hale can't run for AG anyway because she doesn't have a law degree and thus isn't a member of the Indiana Bar.
 
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Wolverine22
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« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2019, 12:28:27 pm »

Curtis Hill deserves to burn for what he did to the Elkhart 4.
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LoneStarDem
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« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2019, 07:57:20 pm »

Curtis Hill deserves to burn for what he did to the Elkhart 4.

What exactly did he do to them ?
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