Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
June 15, 2019, 11:34:33 pm
News: 2019 Gubernatorial Predictions are now active

  Atlas Forum
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  Presidential Election Process (Moderator: muon2)
  When will Paul Ryan run for POTUS?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Poll
Question: I doubt his political career is over yet.
#12020  
#22024  
#32028  
#42032  
#52036 or later  
#6He'll never run  
Show Pie Chart
Partisan results

Total Voters: 32

Author Topic: When will Paul Ryan run for POTUS?  (Read 479 times)
Dangerous Communist Andrew Yang
Glowfish
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 422


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« on: May 21, 2019, 11:34:51 pm »
« edited: May 21, 2019, 11:43:06 pm by Glowfish »

I'm voting 2028

Edit: can someone please move this to trends?
Logged
Olawakandi
olawakandi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 24,966
United States


Political Matrix
E: -6.84, S: -0.17

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2019, 11:10:57 am »

He came close in 2012, and ran with unpopular Romney as Veep, who won't become the GOP nominee for Prez
Logged
Del Tachi
Republican95
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 5,975
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2019, 11:00:23 am »

Never.  Becoming SOTH invariably torpedoes any credible presidential aspirations, and Ryan knew that when he took the job.
Logged
KYWildman
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 362
United States


Political Matrix
E: -2.97, S: -5.74

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2019, 11:53:21 pm »

Never.  Becoming SOTH invariably torpedoes any credible presidential aspirations, and Ryan knew that when he took the job.

Sometimes I wonder if that would still be the case if Henry Clay had won any of his multiple failed campaigns. I know Polk won, but he was Speaker for a much shorter time and to this day he is the only Speaker to become president. Seems strange that the person who’s second-in-line to the presidency and arguably the second-most powerful person in the government is so rarely considered for the job. I guess they take a lot of flak nationally (certainly Pelosi has), but this has been the case since long before our current age of national polarization and mass media. It almost seems like tradition at this point that SOTH just never runs for president. And maybe those who take the job are less likely to have presidential aspirations, and that’s either a cause or an effect of said tradition.

In any case I think the reason Ryan will never run has less to do with having been Speaker and more to do with the fact that there’s a lot more money and a lot less orange ass-kissing involved in the private sector. Will be much easier for him to live out his Randian fantasies there.
Logged
timewalker102
Newbie
*
Posts: 17


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2019, 12:36:55 am »

He'll probably become Wisconsin Senator in 2022 and then run in 2024 or 2028
Logged
Both Sides™
Kalwejt
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 52,997


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2019, 03:15:22 pm »

Never.  Becoming SOTH invariably torpedoes any credible presidential aspirations, and Ryan knew that when he took the job.

Sometimes I wonder if that would still be the case if Henry Clay had won any of his multiple failed campaigns. I know Polk won, but he was Speaker for a much shorter time and to this day he is the only Speaker to become president. Seems strange that the person who’s second-in-line to the presidency and arguably the second-most powerful person in the government is so rarely considered for the job. I guess they take a lot of flak nationally (certainly Pelosi has), but this has been the case since long before our current age of national polarization and mass media. It almost seems like tradition at this point that SOTH just never runs for president. And maybe those who take the job are less likely to have presidential aspirations, and that’s either a cause or an effect of said tradition.

The last Speaker, I believe, to make a presidential run was John Nance Garner in 1932. Until that it wasn't really that uncommon for them to run, just to name Champ Clark.
Logged
NyIndy
Full Member
***
Posts: 238


Political Matrix
E: 0.25, S: -3.15

P
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2019, 08:07:21 pm »

Never.  Becoming SOTH invariably torpedoes any credible presidential aspirations, and Ryan knew that when he took the job.

Sometimes I wonder if that would still be the case if Henry Clay had won any of his multiple failed campaigns. I know Polk won, but he was Speaker for a much shorter time and to this day he is the only Speaker to become president. Seems strange that the person who’s second-in-line to the presidency and arguably the second-most powerful person in the government is so rarely considered for the job. I guess they take a lot of flak nationally (certainly Pelosi has), but this has been the case since long before our current age of national polarization and mass media. It almost seems like tradition at this point that SOTH just never runs for president. And maybe those who take the job are less likely to have presidential aspirations, and that’s either a cause or an effect of said tradition.

The last Speaker, I believe, to make a presidential run was John Nance Garner in 1932. Until that it wasn't really that uncommon for them to run, just to name Champ Clark.
What about Gingrich and Gephardt?
Logged
Both Sides™
Kalwejt
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 52,997


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2019, 07:08:21 pm »

Never.  Becoming SOTH invariably torpedoes any credible presidential aspirations, and Ryan knew that when he took the job.

Sometimes I wonder if that would still be the case if Henry Clay had won any of his multiple failed campaigns. I know Polk won, but he was Speaker for a much shorter time and to this day he is the only Speaker to become president. Seems strange that the person who’s second-in-line to the presidency and arguably the second-most powerful person in the government is so rarely considered for the job. I guess they take a lot of flak nationally (certainly Pelosi has), but this has been the case since long before our current age of national polarization and mass media. It almost seems like tradition at this point that SOTH just never runs for president. And maybe those who take the job are less likely to have presidential aspirations, and that’s either a cause or an effect of said tradition.

The last Speaker, I believe, to make a presidential run was John Nance Garner in 1932. Until that it wasn't really that uncommon for them to run, just to name Champ Clark.
What about Gingrich and Gephardt?

I've omitted Gingrich because he ran after his Speakership, but you're right, given Ryan is already out of that post.

Gephardt was the Majority/Minority Leader, never a Speaker.
Logged
Sounds
Newbie
*
Posts: 16
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2019, 09:11:25 pm »

He could pull a Newt Gingrich and run over a decade after leaving the House
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC