Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 07, 2019, 11:23:01 am
News: Please delete your old personal messages.

  Atlas Forum
  General Discussion
  History
  Alternative History (Moderator: True Federalist)
  If Zachary Taylor lived on?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: If Zachary Taylor lived on?  (Read 234 times)
President Johnson
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 10,366
Germany


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« on: September 15, 2019, 11:10:48 am »

People often discuss what would have happened if Abe Lincoln, FDR and Jack Kennedy lived on, but what about the 12th President, Zachary Taylor, who died in 1850? Thinking about him living on poses some interesting questions: Would the civil war have started ten years earlier? He was opposed the Compromise of 1850, which would not have been enacted into law if Taylor didn't die. Taylor opposed an expansion of slavery even though he was a slave owner; and he even threatened to hang southerners trying to seccede. Would have have won reelection in 1852? What would have happened to the Whig Party?
Logged
True Federalist
Ernest
Moderator
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37,547
United States


P
WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2019, 01:40:59 pm »

Taylor's ideas of what to do with the Mexican Cession were uniquely his own and never gained traction. Had he lived, he wouldn't have been renominated, let alone reelected in 1852 and that election would have fought over the issue of what to do with the Mexican Cession. That would likely have split apart the Whig Party as happened in real life.
Logged
Cory Booker
olawakandi
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 29,433
United States


Political Matrix
E: -6.84, S: -0.17

P P P
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2019, 12:42:12 pm »

Samuel Chase would have been elected president instead of Lincoln and would have not been assassinated and perhaps Jim Crow, would have not progressed in the Deep South.  As a result, the moderate Whig Party would have been dominant until WWII and Democrats would have taken the flag of Civil Rights in 1964. Poll taxes and women's rights movement and lynching would have still been allowed. 
Logged
Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee
North Carolina Yankee
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 44,093
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2019, 01:15:55 pm »

Taylor's ideas of what to do with the Mexican Cession were uniquely his own and never gained traction. Had he lived, he wouldn't have been renominated, let alone reelected in 1852 and that election would have fought over the issue of what to do with the Mexican Cession. That would likely have split apart the Whig Party as happened in real life.

The Whigs routinely got themselves into trouble because their Presidents/nominees were picked bc of their personal popularity and not adherence to their political principles. Considering how divided the party was this was probably their only real option though.
Logged
Orser67
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 3,826
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2019, 02:13:00 pm »

There's a non-zero chance that him living on could have led to an earlier Civil War. Though a slaveholder himself, by the time of his death his strongest ally in Congress was William Seward, who was generally considered to the leader of the anti-slavery wing of the Whig Party. Taylor's key policy was that California and New Mexico should immediately gain statehood without regard to the status of slavery. This angered Southerners since both were widely expected to become free states, and also because his stance denied the expansive land claims of Texas, which was a slave state.

Irl his policies in part led to the Nashville Convention, which represented the first time since 1815 that major state leaders seriously contemplated secession. A mini-realignment occurred in the South for the 1850 and 1851 election cycles, but the victory of pro-Compromise Democrats and Whigs temporarily ended talk of secession.

If Taylor had lived, its certainly possible that no compromise would have been reached, and that Southern states would have begun to secede during his presidency. Alternatively, the absence of the compromise could have led to further sectional polarization and the outbreak of civil war after the 1852 election.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

© Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, LLC