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  Spanish elections and politics II (Apocalypse Now, 2020: PSOE-UP cabinet sworn)
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Author Topic: Spanish elections and politics II (Apocalypse Now, 2020: PSOE-UP cabinet sworn)  (Read 78717 times)
Velasco
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« Reply #1350 on: January 05, 2020, 06:00:27 pm »
« edited: January 05, 2020, 06:47:24 pm by Velasco »

As I said before, she's very vocal against Podemos due to alleged chavista links. The influence of former Canarian emigrants returned from Venezuela is strong in some insular branches of CC.

Keep in mind it's not just old emigrants returned from Venezuela, but young Venezuelans who migrated to Spain and hold Spanish citizenship. But yeah, I'd dare to say most Venezuelan expats in Spain that pay just a modicum of attention to politics don't have a positive image of Podemos, to say the least.

I know most Venezuelan expats are anti- Chavez and don't have a good opinion of Podemos, despite Pablo Iglesias and others began to take distance from the post-Chávez disaster some time ago. In any case, I was referring to the CC membership in Santa Cruz de Tenerife province. Curious fact: it surfaced the not so young Juan Guaido's father was a taxi driver in Tenerife (maybe he's still there). Anyway, the Canary Islands have close ties to Venezuela due to historical emigration. CC has a presence in the country via Canarian emigrants and their offspring (they can vote in our elections if they hold Spanish citizenship). In the case of Ana Oramas, she's from a family of landowners in Tenerife. I ignore if she has some relatives in Venezuela, as nearly everybody in her province. Another fun fact: the grandmother of the Podemos deputy Alberto Rodríguez (an engineer notorious because of his rastaman appearance, curently secretary for organization) was a humble seamstress who made seam works for the Oramas' family and other wealthy families  elin La Laguna.

There were emigrants from Las Palmas province too (case of Quevedo s family), but their influence is not so strong. Personally I have met several Venezuelans from both sides (a majority here is anti-Chávez, but there are exceptions)

I don't want to derail this thread further, but yes, ties to the Canary Islands in Venezuela are common. My father told me my great-grandmother was from there, but good luck trying to prove that now Tongue

I imagine now that the migration rate has exploded, it's more feasible that you meet pro-Chávez Venezuelans. A few years ago, when primarily wealthier folks migrated, that probably would have been more difficult. In the 2012 election, just before he died, Chávez received just under 7% of the vote from Venezuelans living in the Canary Islands: http://www.cne.gob.ve/resultado_presidencial_2012/r/2/reg_992603.html

Granted, turnout was low (I imagine it's because the only voting center for people in the region is in Tenerife so people from the other islands had to travel there to vote), plus there is the fact that there are few Venezuelans registered to vote abroad, not in minor part because chavismo likes to make it difficult for folks like us to vote.

To tie this to the thread, don't think us Venezuelans abroad are right wingers just because most of us hate Chávez and Maduro with a passion. I know for a fact some of my friends here are quite happy with the PSOE winning, even if they probably aren't exactly thrilled with the Podemos deal. After all, Venezuelan politics is vastly dominated by leftist parties. That said, many, if not most, will cringe at the mere prospect of having people with a history of praising chavismo in the government, and will vote accordingly; which in Spain, clearly means voting for the right wing parties.

To be honest, the two or three Chavistas from Venezuela that I that I have met here were old men. A vast majority of Venezuelans I've seen here, old and young, are anti-Chávez.

It's possible to discuss about Venezuela here in relation to Spanish politics, because it's used as a weapon in our political battles. The Spanish Right in particular is very vocal against Maduro. The mainstream leftist parties don't support Maduro and even Podemos leadership takes some distance from him. Pedro Sánchez went further and recognized Guaido, move criticized by Podemos. I think the main difference is that the left favours dialogue and mediation in Venezuela, while the right supports a more aggresive policy in line with US administration. The attempts of mediation made by former socialist PM Zapatero in Venezuela were heavily criticized by the right.

My personal stance on the Venezuelan crisis is not far from my stance on the Catalan conflict. Third way. Equidistante. Let's sit and talk about the weather Wink

Anyway my father's family is,from La Palma and I had some distant relative in Venezuela whom I never met

UP members in next cabinet, providing second vote is successful

Pablo Iglesias (41): Deputy PM
Irene Montero (31): Equality
Yolanda Díaz (Galicia en Común, aged 41): Labour
Manuel Castells (proposed by ECP,  aged 77): Universities
Alberto Garzón (IU leader, aged 34): Consumer Affairs, including the regulation of gambling
That's *the* Manuel Castells, right? Very influential scholar, love his work.

Sociologist and economist. Berkeley
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« Reply #1351 on: January 06, 2020, 07:46:20 am »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?
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Rep. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
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« Reply #1352 on: January 06, 2020, 08:40:56 am »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?

Yeah you have to go back to September 1936 to find PCE ministers again; after the cabinte reshuffle on the Republican government because of the start of the civil war.

But Garzon will be the first PCE minister during peace time I guess
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Velasco
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« Reply #1353 on: January 06, 2020, 09:29:22 am »
« Edited: January 07, 2020, 05:32:21 am by Velasco »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?

Good question. There were PCE ministers in the war cabinets between 1936 and 1939

Vicente Uribe (Agriculture) and Jesús Hernández Tomás (Education and Fine Arts) were appointed ministers in the Largo Caballero cabinet, in September 1936

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicente_Uribe

Quote
After the start of the Spanish Civil War Uribe was appointed Minister of Agriculture in the cabinet of Francisco Largo Caballero on 5 September 1936. For tactical reasons the communists supported small businessmen and peasants (...)

On 15 May 1937 Uribe and Hernández caused the collapse of Largo Caballero's government. The trigger was a disagreement in a cabinet meeting over the May Days violence in Barcelona, which the communists blamed on the Anarchist CNT and FAI and the dissident communist POUM.[13] They demanded that the POUM be banned and its leaders arrested as "fascists".[14] Largo Caballero refused to act, and most of the ministers walked out of the meeting.[13] On 17 May 1937 Manuel Azańa dismissed Largo and named Juan Negrín Prime Minister of Spain.[15] Negrín's government included the socialists Indalecio Prieto (War, Navy and Air) and Julián Zugazagoitia (Interior), the communists Hernández Tomás (Education) and Uribe (Agriculture), the Republicans José Giral (Foreign Affairs) and Bernardo Giner de los Ríos (Public Works), the Basque Manuel de Irujo (Justice) and the Catalan Nationalist Jaume Aiguader (Labor).[16] The Higher War Council was reorganized and consisted of Negrín, Giral, Uribe and Prieto.

n the second Negrín cabinet, formed on 5 April 1938, Uribe was the only communist representative.[ According to (Palmiro) Togliatti, the tactic of withdrawing from the government was to "convince English and French public opinion that the Communists are not interested in the conquest of power, not even in Spain, where we could do so with comparative ease. ... In this way, we shall strengthen Anglo-French ties with the Soviets. If Hitler should decide on war he will have to wage it against the USSR and the Western democracies.[19] Uribe remained Minister of Agriculture until 1 February 1939.

During the Second Republic the PCE was a small party with little support (it won a single seat in 1933 elections). The PCE was a member party of the Popular Front in 1936, winning 13 seats in parliament. With the outbreak of the Civil War, the party's popularity and membership rocketed due to the fact that the USSR was the only effective ally of the republican government (France and UK betrayed Spain in that conflict) and the prestige of the communist combat units. After the war, during Franco's dictatorship,  the Communist Party was the most organized clandestine opposition force.

Regarding Manuel Castells, he's very close to Ada Colau (the Barcelona Mayor). I think he's tecnically an idependent proposed by En Comú Podem. His curriculum as a scholar is impressive.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Castells

Quote
Manuel Castells Oliván (born 9 February 1942) is a Spanish sociologist especially associated with research on the information society, communication and globalization.

The 2000–2014 research survey of the Social Sciences Citation Index ranks him as the world's fifth most-cited social science scholar, and the foremost-cited communication scholar.

He was awarded the 2012 Holberg Prize, for having "shaped our understanding of the political dynamics of urban and global economies in the network society." In 2013 he was awarded the Balzan Prize for Sociology.

"Spain’s Socialist Party on high alert ahead of tight investiture vote"

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/06/inenglish/1578298498_582670.html

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A day after Spain’s caretaker Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez lost the first round of a congressional vote to get confirmed in office, alarm bells have gone off in the Socialist Party (PSOE) ahead of a second vote that is expected to be very tight..



  
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Velasco
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« Reply #1354 on: January 07, 2020, 05:24:19 am »

The closest investiture vote of Spain's democracy

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/07/inenglish/1578384836_555446.html

Quote
Spain is in for a congressional cliffhanger today, as lawmakers assemble for the second round of the investiture vote to confirm the caretaker prime minister, Pedro Sánchez of the Socialist Party (PSOE), in his post.

 Never before in the history of Spanish democracy have the margins been so tight: Sánchez is expected to win by a simple majority of just two more “yes” than “no” votes. His Socialist predecessor José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero was confirmed in office by a lead of 11 votes in 2008, and in 1989 Felipe González won by 12 votes. 

 If Sánchez passes the investiture, he will head the first coalition government since the Second Republic
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« Reply #1355 on: January 07, 2020, 08:39:32 am »

Sanchez has passed the investiture vote by the expected margin.

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Velasco
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« Reply #1356 on: January 07, 2020, 01:37:51 pm »

Pedro Sánchez has succeed at last and Spain gets a new PM. However, given the arithmetic in Congress and the aggressiveness of opposition, he is going to face problems from the start

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/07/inenglish/1578410052_201884.html

Quote
His term in office is likely to come under all kinds of threats, right from the first days. The two-part investiture debate that took place over the weekend and concluded today has only confirmed fears of a highly charged atmosphere in Spain’s lower house of parliament going forward.

Many analysts point that we are at the beginning of a new era of extreme polarization, with the opposition parties challenging the legitimacy of the government and allegations of treason. Likewise the ERC folks are risking being branded traitors by the most radical elements of the independence movement. There is an abyss between the PSOE and ERC on the territorial question, but the horror of the worst version of Spanish nationalism unites them. The foundations of the new coalition government are very fragile, as well the unborn negotiation to find a way out from the Catalan labyrinth. All the players involved will need loads of luck and political intelligence.

Elections in basque Country and Galicia are scheduled in 2020, as well a snap election in Catalonia is likely.
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« Reply #1357 on: January 07, 2020, 02:38:47 pm »

Pedro Sánchez has succeed at last and Spain gets a new PM. However, given the arithmetic in Congress and the aggressiveness of opposition, he is going to face problems from the start

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/07/inenglish/1578410052_201884.html

Quote
His term in office is likely to come under all kinds of threats, right from the first days. The two-part investiture debate that took place over the weekend and concluded today has only confirmed fears of a highly charged atmosphere in Spain’s lower house of parliament going forward.

Many analysts point that we are at the beginning of a new era of extreme polarization, with the opposition parties challenging the legitimacy of the government and allegations of treason. Likewise the ERC folks are risking being branded traitors by the most radical elements of the independence movement. There is an abyss between the PSOE and ERC on the territorial question, but the horror of the worst version of Spanish nationalism unites them. The foundations of the new coalition government are very fragile, as well the unborn negotiation to find a way out from the Catalan labyrinth. All the players involved will need loads of luck and political intelligence.

Elections in basque Country and Galicia are scheduled in 2020, as well a snap election in Catalonia is likely.
Well, elections in Euskadi and Galicia are good news for the PSOE (and the coalition). The right wing presence in the basque country is bleeding. And in the case of Galicia, this community is one of the few that the PP's move to the right decreased the party's support without benefiting Cs nor Vox.

It would be worse for the government in communities like Extremadura/Asturias.
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brucejoel99
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« Reply #1358 on: January 07, 2020, 03:05:27 pm »

So, with Garzón as potential minister I would like to ask: was there at any point in the past PCE minister in the government? Maybe in the 30s?

Yeah you have to go back to September 1936 to find PCE ministers again; after the cabinte reshuffle on the Republican government because of the start of the civil war.

But Garzon will be the first PCE minister during peace time I guess

Funnily enough, this is the most left-wing government that Spain has seen since 1936, & the most right-wing opposition that Spain has seen since (you guessed it) 1936.

Let's reeeeeally hope that history doesn't repeat itself any further.
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« Reply #1359 on: January 09, 2020, 01:15:00 am »

When will the budget be brought down as I figure the sooner that is done better the chances of it passing are.  If that fails then doesn't that mean more elections?
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Velasco
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« Reply #1360 on: January 09, 2020, 08:36:33 am »

Pedro Sánchez is completing a renovation of the second level of government. The full composition of his cabinet will be known next week. Today it was revealed that Environment minister Teresa Ribera will be upgraded to Deputy PM, focused on Ecologic Transition and Demographic Challenge. There will be four Deputy PMs in the government: Carmen Calvo (taking on Historical Memory and Secularism), Pablo Iglesias (Social Rights and 2030 Agenda), Nadia Calvińo (Economy and Digital Transformation) and the aforementioned Ribera.

María Jesús Montero will continue as Finance minister and could be the new government spokeswoman.

The ministers proposed by UP (Irene Montero, Yolanda Díaz, Manuel Castells and Alberto Garzón) have been confirmed.

By the way, there will be two communists in the government. The next Labor minister Yolanda Diaz is also a PCE member.
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Velasco
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« Reply #1361 on: January 13, 2020, 09:06:54 pm »

Spain's new cabinet sworn yesterday

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/13/inenglish/1578924634_936158.html

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The four deputy prime ministers and 18 ministers in the new government of Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez were sworn in today before Spain’s King Felipe VI at the Zarzuela Palace. The monarch congratulated the lawmakers and wished them luck. The first Cabinet meeting is due to take place on Tuesday.

Composition of the 'Sánchez II Government (Pedro 2.0)'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1nchez_II_Government

Prime Minister: Pedro Sánchez (PSOE)
    
First Deputy Prime Minister - Minister of the Presidency, Relations with the Cortes and Democratic Memory: Carmen Calvo (PSOE)
   
Second Deputy Prime Minister - Minister of Social Rights and 2030 Agenda: Pablo Iglesias (Podemos)   

Third Deputy Prime Minister - Minister of Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation: Nadia Calvińo (Independent)

Fourth Deputy Prime Minister - Minister for the Ecological Transition and Demographic Challenge: Teresa Ribera (PSOE)   

Minister of Foreign Affairs, European Union and Cooperation: Arancha González Laya (Independent)    

Minister of Justice: Juan Carlos Campo (Independent)

Minister of Defence : Margarita Robles (Independent)

Minister of Finance - Spokesperson of the Government: María Jesús Montero (PSOE)    

Minister of the Interior: Fernando Grande-Marlaska (Independent)

Minister of Transports, Mobility and Urban Agenda: José Luis Ábalos (PSOE)

Minister of Education and Vocational Training:n: Isabel Celaá (PSOE)
   
Minister of Labour and Social Economy: Yolanda Díaz (IU)
   
Minister of Industry, Trade and Tourism : Reyes Maroto (PSOE)    
   
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food: Luis Planas (PSOE)

Minister of Territorial Policy and Civil Service: Carolina Darias (PSOE)

Minister of Culture and Sports: José Manuel Rodríguez Uribes (PSOE)
   
Minister of Health: Salvador Illa (PSC)
   
Minister of Science and Innovation :Pedro Duque (Independent)

Minister of Equality: Irene Montero (Podemos)
    
Minister of Consumer Affairs:    Alberto Garzón (IU)

Minister of Inclusion, Social Security and Migration: José Luis Escrivá (Independent)

Minister of Universities: Manuel Castells (Independent, proposed by En Comú Podem)    

All independents except Manuel Castells are personal picks made by Pedro Sánchez. Many of them have a technocratic profile (Nadia Calvinńo, Arancha onzález Laya, José Luis Escrivá).


A controversial appointment

Quote
Meanwhile, there was controversy today among the political opposition in reaction to news that Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez had proposed Dolores Delgado as the new attorney general. Delgado was appointed by Sánchez as justice minister in June 2018.

Since Spain returned to democracy in the late 1970s, there has only been one other occasion when a minister has become attorney general, and that was back in 1986 under PSOE Prime Minister Felipe González.

Delgado arrived in government as an independent – judges and prosecutors are barred from joining political parties under Spanish law – but in recent months she has consolidated her political role thanks to harsh clashes with the opposition and she has also campaigned for the PSOE. She was voted in as a deputy at the last elections. 

Vox stages marches against "traitor" Pedro Sánchez

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/01/13/inenglish/1578905060_772427.html
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« Reply #1362 on: January 13, 2020, 09:49:28 pm »

Well good job Sanchez for wasting 9 months and making his government more precarious than it could have been under the previous election results. Now that that exercise in pointlessness is complete, maybe he can get around to actually governing for a while (not that he'll last long).
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« Reply #1363 on: January 13, 2020, 11:50:31 pm »

How likely is it that the budget passes?  With narrow numbers I think there is still a risk it fails which I believe would trigger another election.  If it passes my understanding is Sanchez is safe until next year unless there is a standalone non-confidence.
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« Reply #1364 on: January 14, 2020, 06:12:53 am »

Well good job Sanchez for wasting 9 months and making his government more precarious than it could have been under the previous election results. Now that that exercise in pointlessness is complete, maybe he can get around to actually governing for a while (not that he'll last long).

And giving a huge leg up to the far right in the process. Apart from that, great job.
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Velasco
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« Reply #1365 on: January 15, 2020, 03:50:29 pm »

Well good job Sanchez for wasting 9 months and making his government more precarious than it could have been under the previous election results. Now that that exercise in pointlessness is complete, maybe he can get around to actually governing for a while (not that he'll last long).

The repetition of elections was pointless and a huge tactical fiasco. Said this, don't understimate Sánchez. He's a hardened survivor, the embodiment of resilience. Personally I'm fed up with our political battles, but I guess they can be fascinating for informed outsiders. Horror is my motivation right now. We wil be much better under the 'Red Leviathan', so I hope Sánchez endures for a while (providing that ERC stays in a pragmatic line, in the midst of the Catalan blender, allowing to pass a budget). Fatalism is one of the greatest malaises of contemporary societies and I refuse to fall, at least not straightaway.
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xelas81
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« Reply #1366 on: January 17, 2020, 05:33:46 pm »
« Edited: January 17, 2020, 06:31:23 pm by xelas81 »

Any updates on what is Mas Pais doing?
Is their goal to overtake Podemos and then PSOE?
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« Reply #1367 on: January 17, 2020, 05:43:50 pm »

When is the budget supposed to come down?  Any chance it might trigger another election.
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