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  What is your opinion of Christianity?
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Author Topic: What is your opinion of Christianity?  (Read 1769 times)
Eastern Kentucky Demosaur fighting the long defeat
Nathan
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« Reply #50 on: January 11, 2020, 11:24:11 am »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.
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Cath
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« Reply #51 on: January 12, 2020, 04:38:11 pm »

It's too soon to tell.
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PSOL
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« Reply #52 on: January 12, 2020, 07:16:23 pm »

Is around 1970 years of existence Not enough time for you?
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Eastern Kentucky Demosaur fighting the long defeat
Nathan
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« Reply #53 on: January 12, 2020, 07:27:57 pm »

Is around 1970 years of existence Not enough time for you?

Quote from: Kurt Vonnegut, "The Sirens of Titan"
In the year Ten Million, according to Koradubian, there would be a tremendous house-cleaning. All records relating to the period between the death of Christ and the year One Million A.D. would be hauled to the dumps and burned. This would be done, said Koradubian, because museums and archives would be crowding the living right off the Earth. The million-year period to which the burned junk related would be summed up in history books in one sentence, according to Koradubian: Following the death of Jesus Christ, there was a period of readjustment that lasted for approximately one million years.
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PR
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« Reply #54 on: January 14, 2020, 03:29:38 pm »

Depends on what you mean by the term.

More specifically: I have a much higher opinion of Jesus of Nazareth
than I do of the thousands-year old human institution(s) of Christianity, in all of their manifestations.

But then again, as a Christian, I would and should say that. Smiley
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Rep. tack50 (Lab-Lincoln)
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« Reply #55 on: January 14, 2020, 06:20:13 pm »

Not a great fan of organized religions, but Christianity seems to be one of the best ones out there (or the least evil depending on your point of view).
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DC Al Fine
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« Reply #56 on: January 15, 2020, 01:47:37 pm »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.
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Eastern Kentucky Demosaur fighting the long defeat
Nathan
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« Reply #57 on: January 15, 2020, 02:09:30 pm »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.

Yeah, no argument there.
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Cokeland Saxton
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« Reply #58 on: January 15, 2020, 02:16:46 pm »

Outdated, bigoted, and a threat to humanity
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Cory Booker
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« Reply #59 on: January 19, 2020, 05:57:45 pm »

Church is a place to socialize and for a place for worship. That's why they have multiethnic churches and monolithic churches. Joel Osteen is a televangelist that's not partisan and for people that dont go the church often, they can look at him
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S**tposting is a Human Right
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« Reply #60 on: January 20, 2020, 12:10:48 pm »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.

I've never understood the 'edgelord' meme about atheists, probably because I don't actually know any religious people IRL. If I'd wanted to be edgy in secular California, I would've become an Evangelical.
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L.D. Smith
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« Reply #61 on: January 21, 2020, 07:37:03 pm »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.

I've never understood the 'edgelord' meme about atheists, probably because I don't actually know any religious people IRL. If I'd wanted to be edgy in secular California, I would've become an Evangelical.

That's rather remarkable consider you go to a town with almost as many churches per block as a typical Olde Southerne Town. The only differences is that those churches can vary from Catholic to Jewish Temples/Synagogues, from Buddhist Temples to Quaker Meetinghouses, to say nothing of the Temple Hill area over in Oakland.
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S**tposting is a Human Right
John Dule
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« Reply #62 on: January 21, 2020, 07:54:16 pm »
« Edited: January 21, 2020, 07:58:56 pm by S**tposting is a Human Right »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.

I've never understood the 'edgelord' meme about atheists, probably because I don't actually know any religious people IRL. If I'd wanted to be edgy in secular California, I would've become an Evangelical.

That's rather remarkable consider you go to a town with almost as many churches per block as a typical Olde Southerne Town. The only differences is that those churches can vary from Catholic to Jewish Temples/Synagogues, from Buddhist Temples to Quaker Meetinghouses, to say nothing of the Temple Hill area over in Oakland.

There are certainly religious people in the Bay Area, but I wouldn't say that I *know* any religious people; I'm just vaguely aware of their existence. My dad went to Catholic school and that turned him into an atheist at a young age. My mom was raised religious but was already an atheist by the time I was born. None of my friends are religious, and none of their parents are religious either. The only religious person in my extended family is a Christian Scientist whose abhorrent beliefs and evangelical attitude have alienated her from everyone else. My godfather, my cousins, even my grandparents-- all atheists. My girlfriend is an atheist. My teachers (as far as I know) have all been atheists. I had one friend in high school (briefly) who was a true-believing protestant, but he also believed in Alex Jones conspiracy theories and thought the Earth was flat, so I stopped spending time with him. My hippie aunt might believe in Buddhism or some crap like that, but I don't take her seriously at all due to her views on zodiac signs.

So while there are definitely religious people around me (hell, one of them handed me a pamphlet today on the street), I wouldn't say I know any religious people personally. And the "spiritual" or "religious" people with whom I've interacted on a regular basis have invariably also been borderline psychotic, mentally unstable conspiracy theorists. Hence why I don't see atheism as "edgy" in any way whatsoever. The more I hear people talk about religion, the more I come to understand that atheism is actually the default mindset of humanity. And regardless of how many religious institutions you can name in California, it's definitely the default mindset here as well.
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Eastern Kentucky Demosaur fighting the long defeat
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« Reply #63 on: January 22, 2020, 12:46:48 am »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.

I've never understood the 'edgelord' meme about atheists, probably because I don't actually know any religious people IRL. If I'd wanted to be edgy in secular California, I would've become an Evangelical.

That's rather remarkable consider you go to a town with almost as many churches per block as a typical Olde Southerne Town. The only differences is that those churches can vary from Catholic to Jewish Temples/Synagogues, from Buddhist Temples to Quaker Meetinghouses, to say nothing of the Temple Hill area over in Oakland.

There are certainly religious people in the Bay Area, but I wouldn't say that I *know* any religious people;

Am I a joke to you?!
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DC Al Fine
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« Reply #64 on: January 22, 2020, 06:39:18 am »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.

I've never understood the 'edgelord' meme about atheists, probably because I don't actually know any religious people IRL. If I'd wanted to be edgy in secular California, I would've become an Evangelical.

That's rather remarkable consider you go to a town with almost as many churches per block as a typical Olde Southerne Town. The only differences is that those churches can vary from Catholic to Jewish Temples/Synagogues, from Buddhist Temples to Quaker Meetinghouses, to say nothing of the Temple Hill area over in Oakland.

Scott Alexander made an interesting point about this. He noted that he didn't know a single Young Earth Creationist, but given how YECism polled in his state, the odds of him not knowing a single creationist by random chance was something like one in a trillion. He concluded that he had created an extremely strong social bubble entirely by accident.

Dule appears to have done something similar.
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Ye Olde Europe
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« Reply #65 on: January 22, 2020, 08:03:09 am »

Throughout history, some good things and some bad things happened in the name Christianity. Some denominations and churches are better than others. And some Christians are good people, while others are not.

Compared to the relative fluidity, flexibility, and ambiguity of many of the "philosophizing" Asian religions I believe I find the concept of monotheism a bit silly in general. Comes across as hubris to claim certain knowledge of the existence and precise nature of God.

Then again, I did attend some church servives out of curiosity and found the general atmosphere and sense of community very pleasing, so it has that going for it.
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S**tposting is a Human Right
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« Reply #66 on: January 22, 2020, 10:39:38 am »
« Edited: January 22, 2020, 11:00:15 am by S**tposting is a Human Right »

What John is suggesting is a pretty common sociology/religious studies view of how religions form. As he says, whether it's inherently a bad thing or not is obviously going to depend on the religious preconceptions of the person assessing the concept, but suggesting that it's the case isn't necessarily a euphoric edgelord thing.

Sure that's not necessarily wrong. The edgelordy part is jumping between the academic definition of cult and the popular pejorative one.

I've never understood the 'edgelord' meme about atheists, probably because I don't actually know any religious people IRL. If I'd wanted to be edgy in secular California, I would've become an Evangelical.

That's rather remarkable consider you go to a town with almost as many churches per block as a typical Olde Southerne Town. The only differences is that those churches can vary from Catholic to Jewish Temples/Synagogues, from Buddhist Temples to Quaker Meetinghouses, to say nothing of the Temple Hill area over in Oakland.

Scott Alexander made an interesting point about this. He noted that he didn't know a single Young Earth Creationist, but given how YECism polled in his state, the odds of him not knowing a single creationist by random chance was something like one in a trillion. He concluded that he had created an extremely strong social bubble entirely by accident.

Dule appears to have done something similar.

You have very obviously never been to Marin County if you think it takes a "strong social bubble" to avoid Young Earth Creationists here. A healthy majority of the county identifies with 'no religion,' and those who do are generally non-practicing. However, I should note that it's entirely reasonable to avoid YECs socially, and that even if I had the option of interacting with them, I would choose not to.
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DC Al Fine
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« Reply #67 on: January 22, 2020, 12:35:37 pm »

Whoosh
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S**tposting is a Human Right
John Dule
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« Reply #68 on: January 22, 2020, 12:39:00 pm »


You said "given how well it polled in his state." Creationism-- and religion in general-- polls horribly where I live. They're two very different samples.
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