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  1988: back to the future
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WalterMitty
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« on: May 01, 2006, 07:58:51 pm »

as the political season began to heat up in late 1987, president reagan's approval numbers were slowly itching back up after the iran-contra scandal.

a slight majority of americans said in polls that they would like a reagan third term.  conventional wisdom was, of course, that vice president george bush would run for president and promise a third 'reagan term'

however, in december of 1987, after campaigning for most of the year, vice president bush shocked political observers by announcing he would not run for president, reportedly due to barbara bush's desire to go retire to maine.

several republicans were already running even prior to bush's bombshell....senator bob dole, jack kemp, former governor pete dupont, pat robertson, howard baker and al haig.

senator dole jump out to a comanding lead after bush's withdrawl.  in fact, it was rumored that in january of 88, even before the first primary ballot had been cast, the dole camp was in serious discussions about what person they should select as dole's running mate.

privately, many high ranking republicans began to worry about dole's prospects in the general election.  they felt he was boring, sometimes mean and that he lack the 'star power'.

in a secret trip, several republican congressmen flew to dallas to try to persuade eccentric billionaire, h. ross perot to enter the republican primaries as a 'stop dole' candidate.  perot refused, citing dole's war record and his record involving mia/pow issues while in the senate.

in a front page ny times article two weeks prior to the new hampshire primary, it was reported that former senator and presidential candidate barry goldwater had flown to california to try to talk former president gerald ford into the race.


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Keystone Phil
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« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2006, 08:15:03 pm »

Seems very interesting but one thing really stick out: The whole Ford thing is odd because he'd be 75 in '88.
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WalterMitty
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« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2006, 08:17:05 pm »

Seems very interesting but one thing really stick out: The whole Ford thing is odd because he'd be 75 in '88.

yes, but keep in mind, dole was something like 73 in 1996.
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Lincoln Republican
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2006, 11:20:37 am »

One must not forget everyone's favorite perennial candidate, 81 year old Harold Stassen, who also sought the GOP nomination, again, in 1988.
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WalterMitty
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« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2006, 08:33:33 pm »

former president ford formally enters the contest a week prior to the nh primary (which was after the iowa caucuses, which dole trounced the also rans, though robertson finished in a surprisingly strong second place).

ford also shocks people by reporting that he will do very little campaigning, and instead leave it up to surrogates in each state.  furthermore, his name wont appear on any primary ballots.  he will ask a high level office holder in each state to place their name on the ballot as a favorite son and surrender the delagates to ford at the convention.  this is similar to the tactic that lbj used in 1964, but had not been tried in the modern primary era.

conservative fundamentalist pat robertson immediately attacked ford for hiding in california and refusing to debate the issues of the day.  he also strongly suggested to his conservative supporters that ford may be pro-choice.

a day after ford's entry into the race, frontrunner bob dole stunned the nation by announcing his departure from the race.  he stated that he could not run against ford.  after all, it was president ford who plucked dole out of relative obscurity in 1976 to run on the republican ticket.

next up: the democrats.
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WalterMitty
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« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2006, 08:52:47 pm »

after an 8 year drought, there were many democrats lining up to run for the white house in 1988.

the frontrunner was colorado senator, gary hart, who came out of nowhere and nearly defeated walter mondale in 1984.

other democrats running, or considering a run were rep. dick gephardt (who expected to do well in iowa), sen joe biden, az gov, bruce babbitt, ma governor mike dukakis, civil rights activist, jesse jackson and young senator albert gore jr. of tennessee.

as the campaign began to heat up in 1987, hart was far ahead of the pack in terms of popular support and fund raising.  however, rumors persisted about his womanizing.  finally, some pictures were released of the married hart with donna rice.

after a futile effort of damage control, hart drops out of the race.  there is no clear front runner in a field of mainly second tier candidates.

many democrats worry that their white house losing streak is in real danger of being extended, especially when former president gerald ford enters the race on the republican side.

popular anchor man, tom brokaw of nbc news, strongly considers jumping into the race.  several senators and congressman openly endorse a possible brokaw candidacy.  however, after a long consideration, brokaw issues a press release announcing he will never be a candidate for national office.

on a meet the press appearance in feb of 88, georgia senator sam nunn openly suggests having former president jimmy carter jump into the race.  jimmy carter immediately expresses interest (some say the nunn suggestion was coordinated with jimmy carter, instead of being an offhand remark).

on march 2, 1988, in an annoncement in atlanta, former president carter announces he will indeed seek the democrat nomination for president.
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adam
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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2006, 10:42:54 am »

Perot as a Republican? I find that hard to believe, considering that he supported tax hikes, environmental regulation of business, and held a fairly liberal stance on minor social issues. It would have been intresting had he accepted though. I doubt he would have beat Bush in the primary, but hemay have gotten a VP spot. Anyone would have been better than Dan Quayle. I honestly belive that Bush chose him to give him an "impeachment-proof" status.
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WalterMitty
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« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2006, 06:43:00 pm »

both carter and ford easily locked up their nominations after super tuesday.

the talk immediately turned to running mates.  since both carter and ford would be constitutionally limited to one term, the vp spot was a highly sought after prize.  many politicians were lobbying behind the scenes for the job.

privately, gerald ford's short list consisted of two names:  former ford chief of staff and sec of defense don rumsfeld, and wyoming congressman and also former ford chief of staff dick cheney.

many of ford's advisors worried that the selection of either man would send the wrong message...that ford was stuck in yesterday. 

one man that was lobbying hard for the job and who most ford advisors had a high opinion of was governor george deukmejian of california.

carter liked the idea of having georgia senator sam nunn on the ticket.  however, since carter was also from georgia, nunn was not an option.

carter was shown welcoming mass gov. mike dukakis and arkansas senator dale bumpers to his peanut farm for face to face interviews.  however, according to sources, both men failed to impress the former president.

3 weeks prior to the democrat convention, carter hires former new orleans mayor and HUD sec moon landrieu to oversee his running mate search.
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WalterMitty
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« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2006, 08:36:50 pm »

ok im interested on how others would add to this story.

each poster should add on to the story line.
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jokerman
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« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2006, 05:55:20 pm »

I was actually interested to see where you were going with this, particularly on the VP picks.  I think you're doing a fine job already, Walter.
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Lincoln Republican
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« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2006, 08:16:18 pm »
« Edited: June 06, 2006, 08:18:26 pm by Winfield »

July 5, at the Carter farm, Moon Landrieu, JimmyCarter's VP selection guru, sits down with Carter, for some serious discussion.

"Jimmy," says Moon, "none of the potential candidates we have interviewed particularily impress me.  Sam Nunn would be a great choice.  Too bad he's from Georgia.  Bumpers is solid, but I think we have to look outside the south.  Dukakis lacks any charm or charisma whatsoever.  In my opinion, Jimmy, we have to make an imaginative and original selection.  We have to get a jump on Ford.  We have to set your candidacy apart as someone bold and forward thinking."

"I agree," replies Carter.  "Do you have anyone in particular in mind?"

"I do," replies Landrieu.  You're from the south.  We need someone from the north.  You're more moderate, we need someone more liberal, to help solidify the base."

"You're not talking about Mondale, are you?"  asks Carter.  "No, not hardly," comes the reply. 

July 11, Jimmy Carter, Democratic Presidential nominee, holds a press conference from his farm. 

"Ladies and gentlemen, my fellow Americans," says Carter, "I am pleased and proud to introduce my choice for Vice President, an individual of uncommon courage, a champion of the less fortunate, an advocate of equality and justice, the next Vice President of the United States, Elizabeth Holtzman of New York."

Liz Holtzman, 47 years old, Jewish, Congresswoman 1973-81, one of the driving forces behind the impeachment hearings for Richard Nixon, currently District Attorney in Brooklyn.

"Thank you, Mr. President," says Holtzman.  "I am deeply humbled and honored to have this opportunity to campaign alongside a great American, a great humanitarian, President Jimmy Carter.  I look forward to the campaign, to the weeks and months ahead, to present our ideals and our policies for change and progress to Americans, and I look forward to the return of Jimmy Carter to the White House."                 

       
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J. J.
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« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2006, 09:29:48 pm »

Seems very interesting but one thing really stick out: The whole Ford thing is odd because he'd be 75 in '88.

yes, but keep in mind, dole was something like 73 in 1996.

Dole was 65, GHW Bush was 64.  Dole's age hurt him in 1996.

Dole gets the GOP nomination that year, and possibly chooses Kemp.

Ford was well out of step with the GOP in 1988; the party had drifted much further to the right since 1976.
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Lincoln Republican
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« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2006, 03:17:34 pm »
« Edited: June 07, 2006, 03:27:31 pm by Winfield »

July 18, Gerald Ford, with the Republican nomination in hand, turns to his old friend and confidante, Bill Saxbe of Ohio, former Senator and former Attorney General, for advice on the VP nomination.

"Bill," says Ford, "I want someone who is going to light a fire under this campaign.  Someone who can get the attention of the public, someone who isn't afraid to say what they believe, someone who can make the public understand just what kind of a left wing radical Liz Holtzman really is."

Two weeks later, August 1, Saxbe meets with Ford at his home in California.  "Gerry," says Saxbe, "as you know, Carter made a bold selection in choosing the first woman, and the first person of the Jewish faith, to run as a VP candidate on a major party ticket.  The individual I have in mind is certainly capable of getting the attention of the electorate.  He will take the VP nomination if asked."

The two discuss the presumptive nominee at some length.  "Fascinating," says Ford.  "Arrange a meeting for August 3."

August 3, bright and early, Ford and Saxbe meet together with the prospective candidate.  The meeting goes to noon, they break for lunch, and resume discussions, which take them until dinner time.  They break for dinner, and continue discussions, which last well into the evening.  Talks resume the next morning, August 4, and last until noon.

That afternoon, with Ford and Saxbe meeting one on one, the decision is made.  "We have resolved most concerns I have," says Ford.  "No candidate is going to be everyone's ideal.  Get in touch with him, and we'll hold a press conference August 8."

August 8, Washington, DC, with the Lincoln memorial in the background, Ford welcomes the press and the nation to the press conference.

"My friends, my fellow Americans," says Ford, I welcome you here today, as a Ford in the shadow of a Lincoln," laughter.  "I am pleased to present to the nation the Republican candidate for Vice President, a man of deep rooted family values, a man of courage and conviction, a great American, the next Vice Pesident of the United States, Pat Buchanan of Virginia."

"Thank you, thank you, Mr. President," says Buchanan.  "I am honored beyond anything I can say for the confidence President Ford has shown in me.  This nation is on the right course.  It is not the time to turn back the clock to the days of the "malaize" of the Carter administration, nor is it the time to be making an all out assault on the American family.  I call on Americans everywhere, in all parts of this great country of ours, to help President Ford and I put Gerald Ford back in the White House."

Pat Buchanan, 50 years old, speech writer for President Richard Nixon and for President Gerald Ford, White House Communications Director for the Reagan administration 1985-1987, and nationally known syndicated political columnist, and renowned for his appearances as a host and commentator on various nationally brodacast television public affairs programs.

The election was about to be engaged, two former, and aging, Presidents, who both had some successes and some major failures and criticisms during their administrations, were about to meet on the political battle fields one final time. 

Two young, and controversial, Vice Presidential nominees, were about to meet in the heat of political battle, Pat Buchanan, the conservative lightning rod, and defender of conservative values and opponent of activist judges, would go toe to toe with Liz Holtzman, the liberal fire brand, and advocate of the ERA and liberal causes.

     

       


   
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Lincoln Republican
Winfield
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« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2006, 03:34:00 pm »

Others please pick up from here.

Thanks.
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Lincoln Republican
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« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2006, 07:51:28 pm »
« Edited: June 11, 2006, 07:54:03 pm by Winfield »

On July 26, after the Democratic convention, and before the Republican convention, a watershed event in the 1988 campaign takes place.

NBC Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw, whose name had been tossed around in journalistic and political circles for the past two months as someone who would be a credible presidential candidate, appeared on 20/20, for an indepth discussion of his life and career, with hostess Barbara Walters. 

"Welcome to the show, Tom."  "Thank you Barbara, it's great to be here."

After considerable conversation about his early life, and his career in journalism, the discussion turns to politics. 

"You have been mentioned as a potential candidate for President.  How do you feel about that?"  "Well, in some ways, I am flattered that people would actually be looking at me in that light." 

"I'll get right to the point.  If you felt you had the support for a credible run for the Presidency, would you become a candidate?"  "Barbara, there are so many things to consider for an undertaking of this magnitude.  I love my country, and I love to be of service to my country.  However, for anyone to make a credible run for President, they would have to be well financed, might I say, very well financed.  They would have to be on the ballot in all 50 states and DC.  They would have to have at least some indication of public support.  They would have to make the commitment to dedicate their full time to the campaign, and, this is most important, they would have to have the full support of their family."

"If I were to make a run for President,  I would have to be satisfied that all these conditions have been met."

"Thank you for spending the time with us tonight, Tom.  It has been most enlightning."

"Thank you, Barbara."         

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Lincoln Republican
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« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2006, 10:26:03 pm »
« Edited: June 17, 2006, 10:34:33 pm by Winfield »

The day after Tom Brokaw's appearance on 20/20 with Barbara Walters, the Brokaw for President movement began to take shape.  Americans across the country, it seems, took Brokaw's answers to Walter's questions as a positive response that he was interested in running for President.

Brokaw for President organizations began forming across America.  A "Brokaw For President Central" was set up in Washington, DC, to direct the national effort.  The organization was headed by some of Brokaw's old media friends and associates, who knew all too well the power and influence the media could wield, and how it worked.

Donations were solicited, via television, the press, and the internet, and money started rolling into the national headquarters.

The prospective candidate, Tom Brokaw, however, still had not indicated that he was actually running for President.  On August 2, Brokaw released a statement, thanking everyone for their support and enthusiasm, and that he would have a "definitive answer" August 9.  This was 6 days before the Republican National Convention was to take place.

Following this statement from Brokaw, support and enthusiasm for a Brokaw candidacy seemed to gain momentum.  Clearly, there was a significant percentage of the population who were not happy with having to choose between two senior, former, Presidents.

Four polls were conducted on August 3, that asked

"If the election for President were held today, between Gerald Ford, Republican, Jimmy Carter, Democrat, and Tom Brokaw, Independent, who would you vote for?"

CNN/USA Today, Carter 29%, Ford 27%, Brokaw 24%, Undecided 20%
Gallup, Carter 28%, Ford 28%, Brokaw 26%, Undecided 18%
Zogby, Ford 31%, Carter 29%, Brokaw 27%, Undecided 13%
CBS, Brokaw 30%, Carter 28%, Ford 27%, Undecided 15%     

The poll results were released on August 5, and all showed remarkably similar trends.  The race, at this point, is tight, too close to call, there is room for movement, and the undecided would be crucial.  One other crucial finding, at least at this point in the campaign, that all the pollsters agree on, the electorate is willing to look at, and take seriously, a third party challenge. 

Brokaw, and those close to him, know at this point, he either had to seize the moment, or lose it, probably forever.

As scheduled, August 9, Brokaw holds a press conference to announce his intentions.  The pressure to run and the building momentum for his candidacy require a definitive answer from the prospective candidate.

"Members of the press, my friends, my fellow Americans, thank you for joining myself and my family here today.  Words cannot express the appreciation my family and I have for all those millions across this great nation of ours who have shown their support for me in these past few weeks." 

"Ladies and gentlemen, friends, my fellow Americans, to me, this election campaign Americans are about to witness and participate in, should be about the future of America, not the past.  Let me be clear, I admire and respect both President Ford and President Carter, and thank them both for their many years of dedicated service to this great nation."

"At the same time, I believe we must look beyond the missteps and failures of the past, and look forward to the future with hope, optimism, and NEW LEADERSHIP.  It is in that light that I today announce my candidacy for the PRESIDENCY OF THE UNITED STATES, and ask Americans across this great land to join with me in this cause.  The road ahead will be tough and winding, with many obstacles strewn in our path, but we must never lose sight or our ultimate goal, the future of our great nation..   God bless America."

On August 12, moving with speed and precision, Presidential candidate Brokaw announced what was his first and most important decision to date as a candidate, his Vice Presidential pick.

"Ladies and gentlemen, friends, my fellow Americans, it is my pleasure and honor today to introduce our candidate for Vice President of the United States.  An individual in whom I have the utmost confidence, an individual of upstanding character and phenomonal courage, an individual who has shown leadership and who is capable of leadership, one of the foremost authorities in the field of foreign policy in America today, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Dr. Jeane Kirkpatrick."

"Thank you Tom for that introduction.  My friends, my fellow Americans, it is my distinct privilege to stand before you today as the Vice Presidential candidate on the Tom Brokaw Presidential ticket.  I am indeed honored to have been asked to take on this responsibility, which I accept in all humility, and pledge to you, my fellow Americans, my service and my unyielding dedication to the defense of freedom for America and Americans everywhere."

So the 1984 campaign takes on a new dimension. 

An aging former Republican President, a moderate, and a conservative lightning rod Vice Presidential nominee.

An aging, though less so, former Democratic President, a moderate, and a liberal fire brand Vice Presidential nominee.

A young, dynamic, nationally known media personality making his first bid for public office, and an experienced diplomat, one of the nation's foremost authorities on foreign policy, Vice Presidential nominee. 

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WalterMitty
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« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2006, 11:19:41 am »

the republican convention: trouble in new orleans.

the republicans limped into new orleans to begin their mid-august nominating convention.  the ford campaign had been caught totally off-guard by the entry of tom brokaw into the race.  in comparison to the young, telegenic brokaw, the ford campaigned seemed old and tired and void of any new ideas.

many delegates were already grumbling about ford's selection of pat buchanan as his running mate.  sure, most delegates agreed with buchanan's rigid right-wing social views, but many, particularly the pro-business republicans, were troubled by buchanan's protectionist views.

there was much talk behind the scenes of placing the name of a free-trader into consideration for vp.  some of the names being mentioned were former delaware governor pete dupont, new hampshire senator warren rudman and california senator pete wilson (though it was unclear whether ford's official residence was in california or michigan).

meanwhile, even during the publicity of the republican convention, brokaw continued to climb in the polls.  his campaign coffers were being flooded by small donations from ordinary people looking for a refreshing change of leadership.
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« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2006, 04:58:46 pm »

The Republican National Convention opened amidst an air of bitterness and reprisals.

Many delegates were openly critical that the party had actually nominated 75 year old former President Gerald Ford.  "What were we thinking?" was the common question delegates began asking each other.  Many delegagtes were of the opinion that Ford's part term as President was uninspiring at best. 

Besides, all recent polls were showing Brokaw gaining momentum, Carter holding more of less steady, and Ford dropping precipitously.   

As well, a bitter floor fight was about to ensue over the Vice Presidential nomination.  Delegates had made a motion that they would be nominating a Vice Presidential pick from the floor.  Of the three favorites of the delegates who wanted Pat Buchanan replaced, California Governor Pete Wilson said he was not interested.  He let it be known that he was going to complete his term in the Senate.  Privately, he intended to run for Governor of California after his Senate term, and he wanted no part on a ticket that he believed was headed for defeat.  New Hampshire Senator Warren Rudman said he would not accept the nomination if offered, as he was going to return to private life after his Senate term expired.  Former Delaware Governor Pete du Pont did give delegates permission to present his name to the convention, and that he would accept the Vice Presidential nomination if chosen.

Assessing the deteriorating situation in the campaign and at the convention from his hotel suite, Gerald Ford himself took the unusual step of addressing the delegates on day two of the convention, to try to create cohesion out of chaos.  Ford stunned the convention, and the nation, by stating that, even though he had won the nomination, that he was withdrawing, "for the sake of unity, in this party, and in this nation."

With this stunning announcement by Ford, the whole convention format was now changed, as delegates would now have to nominate candidates for President from the floor, and they would vote until one candidate had received a majority of delegate votes.   

With Pat Buchanan's approval, his backers swung into action immediately, lobbying delegates to support Ford's VP pick to become the convention's Presidential choice.  As they had expected Buchanan to become the VP nominee, his backers were already well organized.

What was supposed to have been the predictable and expected nomination of Ford and Buchanan, had now turned into a completely unpredictable, and potentially explosive, situation for the Republicans.

Would the Republicans be able to reverse their falling fortunes with their choices made at the convention?

That was the question the party, and the nation, were now asking themselves.
         


       
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« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2006, 05:26:41 pm »

After the first round, Buchanan captured 35% of the delegates, while surprise second place finisher Kansas Senator Bob Dole got a whopping 30%.  By the seventh vote, Dole has successfully captured the nomination.  For Vice-President, Dole casts Betty Ford for Vice-President.  In order to get former Ford supporters on his side, Dole had to make this move, which was actually supproted by Gerald Ford himself.  Betty Ford has been known for her commitment to socially conservative causes and her anti-drug programs.

Meanwhile, at the Democratic convention, Carter sat idly by while he gained from the Republican confusion.  However, the first day of the convention, while watching it from his hotel room, Carter collapses.  He has had a heart attack from all the stress of the campaign, as the doctors say.  Carter lives, but he can no longer run for President.  The Democrats also have to deal with balloting issues and picking their own candidate at the convention.  Carter's VP choice comes in third on the first ballot, as she is seen as too liberal.  Instead, the delegates go with the establishment candidate and 1984 nominee, Walter Mondale.  Meanwhile, Mondale, like Dole, was also forced to appease Carter.  In order to do this, he selected Carter's son, who had been interested in politics for years, John "Jack" Carter, as VP.  Carter had been involved with a number of charitable causes.

The 1976 VP candidates are now facing off in a presidential election of their own.

So the election was set:

Mondale/Carter for the Democrats
Dole/Ford for the Republicans
Brokaw/Kirkpatrick as Independents
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« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2006, 08:37:04 pm »
« Edited: June 22, 2006, 08:41:00 pm by Winfield »

No sooner had Betty Ford been nominated as the Republican Vice Presidential candidate, then rumblings began to be heard in the party and in the country, especially among conservatives. 

The fact that Betty Ford had undergone psychiatric treatment came again to the forefront.  "We cannot afford to have a Vice Presidential candidate with potential psychiatric issues," became a common topic of conversation in the country, particularly in the large Republican conservative areas, areas the Republicans could not afford to alienate.  The mere fact that George Romney had only said he had been "brainwashed" doomed his candidacy in 1968, and the revelation of Democrat Tom Eagleton's earlier treatments for physical and nervous exhaustion forced his withdrawa from the 1972 Democratic ticket.

Republicans as well began making an issue of the fact that Betty Ford was pro-choice and was a supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment.  Besides, many Republicans started to state openly, Betty Ford was hardly qualified to be Vice President, let alone President.

The pressure on Bob Dole became intense.  On August 26, Betty Ford met with Bob Dole and gladly withdrew her candidacy.  "I never wanted this nomination in the first place.  I am relieved to be free of this burden."

Dole moved quickly to fill the vacancy, on August 27, naming former Congressman and former Delaware Governor Pete du Pont, who had indicated at the convention that he would accept the Vice Presidential nomination if offered.  The selection of du Pont was unaminously approved by the Republican National Committee the same day.       
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« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2006, 11:24:45 pm »

Betty Ford had saved Bob Dole from having to drop her from the ticket by her voluntary withdrawal.  One week later, after Dole's selection of Pete du Pont as the Republican Vice Presidential nominee, public opinion polls started showing a levelling off of Brokaw's rise in the polls, a decline in support for the Democratic ticket, and a sharp rise for the Republican ticket.

A turning point in the campaign occurs after a speech delivered September 6 by Republican Vice Presidential nominee Pete du Pont, in Kansas City, wherein he says

"Who could take seriously a ticket comprised of one of the biggest losers, and for good reason, in Presidential election history,  Walter Mondale, and the inexperienced son, Jack Carter, of one of the most incompetent Presidents in history?  Who could take seriously a Presidential candidate, Mondale, who would not hesitate to raise your taxes?  Who could take seriously a Presidential candidate, Mondale, who was forced by a former President to pick his son as the Vice Presidential candidate?  Who could take seriously a Pesidential candidate, Mondale, who doesn't even have the guts to stand up and say, "I'll nominate who I believe will be the best Vice Presidential candidate," instead of being told by Jimmy Carter, a failed President, to nominate his, that is, Carter's, son?  Who would Mondale appoint Secretary of State, Amy?  Why should Americans believe Mondale has the courage to lead this nation?"

"My friends, America does have a courageous leader ready, willing, and able to lead this nation, a man who will show REAL leadership, and his name is Bob Dole."

This speech seemed to strike a chord with America, and the fortunes of the Democratic ticket began a free fall. 

Mondale had been marginalized, and the real race was now between Bob Dole and Tom Brokaw.       
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« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2006, 07:44:16 pm »

It is time to end this story.

No one else has come forward, so I will issue the "official" election results.

Mondale and the Democrats rallied somewhat and were able to make a better than expected showing, however, placing third.

Final results

Republican-Dole/du Pont                209
Independent-Brokaw/Kirkpatrick    178
Democrat-Mondale/Carter              151



As there is no majority, the election for President goes to the House, to choose from the top two candidates, Dole and Brokaw.  The election for Vice President goes to the Senate, to choose from the top three candidates, du Pont, Kirkpatrick and Carter.

The new House consists of 221 Democrats and 214 Republicans, with the Democrats controlling 52 state delegations and the Republicans controlling 48 state delegations.  Democrat Mondale failed to finish in the top two for President.  Therefore, the choice was between Republican Dole and Independent Brokaw.  The Democrats decided not to put a Republican in the Oval Office.  On a party line vote, the Democrats took a bold step, and a big chance, and elected politically inexperienced Tom Brokaw as President, who becomes the first third party candidate elected to the Presidency.  Republicans argued Brokaw's inexperience could lead to major problems. 

The New Senate consists of 52 Republicans and 48 Democrats.  Even most Democrats would not countenance putting Jack Carter into the Vice Presidential office, and most of them, but not all, supported Jeane Kirkpatrick for Vice President.  The other Democrats split their votes between du Pont and Carter.  With the support of the Republican majority, and with some Democratic votes, the Senate elected Republican Pete du Pont as Vice President by a substantial margin of 64 du Pont, 32 Kirkpatrick, and 4 Carter.   

Therefore, Independent President Tom Brokaw has experienced Republican Pete du Pont as Vice President for four years.  The Independent Brokaw administration will be working with a Democrat controlled House and a Republican controlled Senate.  The inexperienced new President will be treading a fine line.

One of the first things President Brokaw must now decide is how much authority and which responsibilities to give to his Vice President, Pete du Pont.   
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CPT MikeyMike
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« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2006, 07:58:58 pm »

Walter and Winfiedl,

Nice story guys!

I don't agree with Pennsylvania and New Jersey going to Mondale. I think Brokaw would have gotten it.

Since the title was back to the future, how do you guys think it would have turned out has Brokaw didn't run and the race was Jerry Ford vs. Jimmy Carter? My thought would be Ford would win.
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« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2006, 11:06:55 pm »
« Edited: June 28, 2006, 11:08:52 pm by Winfield »

Gerald Ford vs Jimmy Carter Scenario

Gerald Ford/Pat Buchanan          269
Jimmy Carter/Liz Holtzman          269



No electoral majority.  A tie in the Electoral College.

The election for President goes to the House.  The election for Vice President goes to the Senate.

The new House consists of 221 Democrts and 214 Republicans, with the Democrats controlling 52 state delegations and the Republicans controlling 48 state delegations.

On a party line vote, the House elects Jimmy Carter President by a vote of 52 state delegations to 48 state delegations.

The new Senate consists of 52 Republicans and 48 Democrats.

(I am going to very mean to President Carter and saddle him for four years with Pat Buchanan as Vice President)

On a party line vote, the Senate elects Pat Buchanan Vice President by a vote of 52 to 48.

Carter and Buchanan do not trust each other, but they have to work together. 

If anything, ANYTHING, should happen to Carter, Buchanan would become President. 
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« Reply #24 on: June 29, 2006, 10:47:02 am »

It is time to end this story.

No one else has come forward, so I will issue the "official" election results.

Mondale and the Democrats rallied somewhat and were able to make a better than expected showing, however, placing third.

Final results

Republican-Dole/du Pont                209
Independent-Brokaw/Kirkpatrick    178
Democrat-Mondale/Carter              151



As there is no majority, the election for President goes to the House, to choose from the top two candidates, Dole and Brokaw.  The election for Vice President goes to the Senate, to choose from the top three candidates, du Pont, Kirkpatrick and Carter.

The new House consists of 221 Democrats and 214 Republicans, with the Democrats controlling 52 state delegations and the Republicans controlling 48 state delegations.  Democrat Mondale failed to finish in the top two for President.  Therefore, the choice was between Republican Dole and Independent Brokaw.  The Democrats decided not to put a Republican in the Oval Office.  On a party line vote, the Democrats took a bold step, and a big chance, and elected politically inexperienced Tom Brokaw as President, who becomes the first third party candidate elected to the Presidency.  Republicans argued Brokaw's inexperience could lead to major problems. 

The New Senate consists of 52 Republicans and 48 Democrats.  Even most Democrats would not countenance putting Jack Carter into the Vice Presidential office, and most of them, but not all, supported Jeane Kirkpatrick for Vice President.  The other Democrats split their votes between du Pont and Carter.  With the support of the Republican majority, and with some Democratic votes, the Senate elected Republican Pete du Pont as Vice President by a substantial margin of 64 du Pont, 32 Kirkpatrick, and 4 Carter.   

Therefore, Independent President Tom Brokaw has experienced Republican Pete du Pont as Vice President for four years.  The Independent Brokaw administration will be working with a Democrat controlled House and a Republican controlled Senate.  The inexperienced new President will be treading a fine line.

One of the first things President Brokaw must now decide is how much authority and which responsibilities to give to his Vice President, Pete du Pont.   

There's a couple problems with your story.  First, the top three finishers for President go to the House, and the top two VPs go to the Senate.  Second of all, there are 50 states, not 100.
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