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Author Topic: Indiana  (Read 10051 times)
struct310
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« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2004, 10:15:27 pm »

A lot of people say that Indiana is conservative/Republican because of its rural-ness, but actually many states are more rural and less Republican than Indiana (including Midwestern states such as Minn., Iowa, and Wisc.)

Perhaps Indiana is Republican because it has relatively few ethnic whites, Hispanics, or Asians.

Actually there are a ton of Hispanics in Indianapolis and the city is becoming Little Mexico.  A street I frequented as a kid turned from vintage 50s style to the ugly and beaten down Hispanic shops like we have here in Arizona in the ghetto parts of town.  And I wouldnt assume Asians are very democratic, it depends on where they are at.  The vote swings either way with Asians.  You are right about ethnic whites, unless you count the Amish, who vote republican.
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MN-Troy
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« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2004, 11:57:55 pm »

Indiana = Illinois minus Chicago.

The reason Indiana is heavily Republican is due to the absense of urban areas.
Indianapolis and Gary are easily outvoted by the suburbs, small towns are rural areas.

The only reason Illinois is heavily Democratic is because of Chicago.

If the Chicago suburbs voted heavily Republican like their Indianapolis surbubs do, then the Chicago effect would be negated. Other than that, your analysis is spot on.
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Bandit3 the Worker
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« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2004, 12:02:51 am »

I used to live in Indiana and one reason might be that the people like things simple in the state.

Yes, conservatives have simple minds.
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Bandit3 the Worker
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« Reply #28 on: September 14, 2004, 12:05:02 am »

Get off this board troll

Make them.
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« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2004, 12:31:21 am »

Indiana voted for the Democratic candidate in the presidential elections of 1876, 1884 and 1892. Note that Indiana thus voted for the losing Samuel Tilden. It remained a swing state hovering about the national average for many decades and voted for Wilson in 1916.
Samuel Tilden didn't really "lose".
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English
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« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2004, 04:11:03 am »

A lot of people say that Indiana is conservative/Republican because of its rural-ness, but actually many states are more rural and less Republican than Indiana (including Midwestern states such as Minn., Iowa, and Wisc.)

Perhaps Indiana is Republican because it has relatively few ethnic whites, Hispanics, or Asians.

Minnesota has the twin cities and the Duluth/Northeast area, all of which are heavily Democratic. These can and do outvote the rural and suburban regions
Iowa has Des Moines and blue collar cities such as Davenport and Iowa City.
Wisconsin has the liberal bastion of Madison, plus Milwaukee.
Indiana basically just has a small, but very deprived city, Gary, and urban Indianapolis.
WI & MN are not quite as rural in that there is a large liberal urban element in both. IA is probably as rural as Indiana, however it has a smattering of industrial, blue collar towns, which Indiana doesn't have. Basically the Democratic elements in Indiana are massively outvoted. I'm sure if Indianapolis doubled in size the state would be safely Democrat.
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Nym90
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« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2004, 08:56:49 am »



Bloomington doesn't really fit anywhere...

The nicest (?) thing I can say about Bloomington is that my ex lives there.  hahaha . . . outside of that, the campus of Indiana University is quite beautiful.  With that being the issue, the town is relatively dead for 3 months of the year, along with the economy.  However, there is a modern business sector forming right on the interstate.  Last time I was there, I counted about 8 4+ story office buildings being built, as well as a decent commercial sector.  I will say in about 10 years, Bloomington will be a MAJOR business hub in the region.

Bloomington doesn't actually have an Interstate highway nearby, but your point is still taken. Smiley
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MODU
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« Reply #32 on: September 14, 2004, 09:00:40 am »


hahaha . . . well, it was a 6-laned road.  Thought it was an interstate (wasn't driving).  Smiley
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2004, 12:29:44 pm »

What makes Indiana unique (most of it's political regions are spill-overs from other states, the Indiana Coalfield is very like the Illinois Coalfield, the Ohio Valley spans several states and has similer politics all over, as does the Cornbelt) is the ultra-GOP suburbs of Indianapolis
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Democratic Hawk
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« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2004, 12:37:56 pm »

Both Indiana senators Lugar (R) and Bayh (D), despite a partisan divide, seem to be very popular incumbents, who command much bipartisan support.

Dave
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ilikeverin
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« Reply #35 on: September 14, 2004, 04:14:01 pm »

Indiana basically just has a small, but very deprived city, Gary, and urban Indianapolis.

Indiana city populations:

1 Indianapolis-781,870
2 Fort Wayne-205,727
3 Evansville-121,582
4 South Bend-107,789
5 Gary-102,746

However... (Indiana county populations):

1 Marion (Indianapolis) 860,454
2 Lake (Gary) 484,564
3  Allen  (Fort Wayne)  331,849
4 St. Joseph (South Bend)  265,559
5 Elkhart  (Elkhart)  182,791
...
7 Vanderburgh (Evansville) 171,922
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Gustaf
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« Reply #36 on: September 14, 2004, 04:29:10 pm »

Indiana voted for the Democratic candidate in the presidential elections of 1876, 1884 and 1892. Note that Indiana thus voted for the losing Samuel Tilden. It remained a swing state hovering about the national average for many decades and voted for Wilson in 1916.
Samuel Tilden didn't really "lose".

Well...he lost in the sense that he did not become president. But, yes, he was out-cheated by the Republicans, if that's what you mean... Smiley
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bejkuy
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« Reply #37 on: September 14, 2004, 05:34:33 pm »

I spent some time in Downtown Indianapolis 2 years ago while attending a conference.  I was amazed at the conservative feel of the downtown area (compared to any other big city downtown I have been to.)

I saw very little:

-anarchist type people
-evidence of a strong gay community.
-public indecency
-alternative lifestyle/weird hippy stuff.  You know the shops, street vendors, etc..

And a lot of:

-churches
-families
-clean streets.


As a lifelong west coaster (spent most of childhood in Portland and Eugene) it was stange for me to see a city this large with such a conservative feel.

No wonder the state is so conservative.

Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

It's just a conservative state.
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ilikeverin
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« Reply #38 on: September 14, 2004, 08:08:19 pm »

But it's a nice white-picket-fence-and-nicely-mowed-lawns conservative place, not a guns-and-low-laxes-let's-kill-the-poor place.

And the locals are all so friendly Smiley

*obsession is fun! Wink*
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12th Doctor
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« Reply #39 on: September 14, 2004, 08:40:35 pm »

When i was in Indianapolis i discovered that the state language is American!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thats why i love the way when you say to Americans that your counry is Imperialistic they scream outrage.

Well, I wouldn't say that I speak "American", but a legit point could be made that American English might be distinct enough from British English to almost be considered a different language.  Dutch, German and Swiss are all very similar as are , but are differnt languages none the less.  Perhapes, given 20-50 years there will be enough differences for distict seperation.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2004, 06:12:58 am »

Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

Ft. Wayne is (for historical reasons mostly) Republican (though some blue collar/ethnic parts of the City lean Dem. The suburbs are ultra-Republican) and "Middletown" proper leans Dem (though the county it's in swings about a lot)
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« Reply #41 on: September 15, 2004, 06:33:06 am »

Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

Ft. Wayne is (for historical reasons mostly) Republican (though some blue collar/ethnic parts of the City lean Dem. The suburbs are ultra-Republican) and "Middletown" proper leans Dem (though the county it's in swings about a lot)
Muncie's also got a pretty liberal uni, don't know how large it is. Once met a professor from there.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #42 on: September 15, 2004, 06:46:50 am »

Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

Ft. Wayne is (for historical reasons mostly) Republican (though some blue collar/ethnic parts of the City lean Dem. The suburbs are ultra-Republican) and "Middletown" proper leans Dem (though the county it's in swings about a lot)
Muncie's also got a pretty liberal uni, don't know how large it is. Once met a professor from there.

Ball State Uni IIRC
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Lewis Trondheim
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« Reply #43 on: September 15, 2004, 06:51:42 am »

I forgot the name.
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