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Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee
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« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2009, 09:07:31 pm »

I've read several predictions for the House elections in 2010 and they seem to ignore the fact that the Republicans are making asses of themselves and alienating the woman/black/hispanic/miscellaneous vote.

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.
MS-01, NM-02 are actually both more than a little unlikely unless we get something of a wave rebound (in which case both are goners). CO-4 and VA-5 depend on how their new Reps settle in and who challenges them, but are definitely not to be ruled out at any point unless we're past the primary and the opposition is 3rd tier. There are some more seats of similar calibre (AL-02 anyone?)
Walt Minnick is on borrowed time and his best bet would probably be a rematch against Sali... which is certainly not off the cards.

I'd look closer at recently lost suburban seats, frankly. Rural seats have a way of sticking with Representatives they like.


I couldn't remember which Alabama seat we lost so I put MS-01 up there instead. Its still highly red territory and and we have yet to try someone different. We need to stop running the same guy in the general if he loses in the special, that killed us there. I was just trying to geive some examples of the types of seats we likely regain and how few they are. It seems that the originator of this thread is finding predictions of us regaining the House or something, which is quite impossible till at least 2014 and thats only if we win back at least 25 seats in 2010 and lose only a hanfull in 2012, and those are the best case scenario estimates of course.   

I dont know about MS-01.  Its not like Childers barely eked out a win there.  He won the seat by a clean 10 point margin even as Obama was only getting 38% of the vote.  Its not like AL-02 and VA-05 where the Dems only squeezed by with around 50%. 

Well what I do know is that the guy who ran in the general and lost also lost the special earlier in the year. Its a regional thing Southaven(Davis) vs Tupelo(Childers). Southaven is growing faster then the rest of the district meaning after redistring it the district will have eithe less of Southaven in it or Southaven will comprise more of the the district's total votes. If Davis had run in 2012 he would have had an easier time winning. So in 2010 our candidate should definately come from the right region of the district, Tupelo.
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« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2009, 01:16:01 pm »

The "miscellaneous" vote? No, that's not offensive or anything.
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« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2009, 11:06:21 pm »
« Edited: July 09, 2009, 11:21:06 pm by Kevinstat »

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.

The Republicans would win a House majority before they knocked off Chellie Pingree next year.  She won an open seat in 2008 by 9.80% (54.90% to 45.10%) against an opponent, 2004 nominee, 1994 primary candidate and 1990-1994 State Senator Charlie Summers, who was definitely not a wingnut (the person he defeated in the primary could have been spun as one, although I don't think he was although he was an unappologetic conservative).  It doesn't matter (in terms of gauging Pingree's vulnerability going forward) that Summers was probably grossly underfunded.  She won by 10% (the "mainstream media" coverage will almost certainly round the percentages in her last election to the nearest percent) and will be running as an incumbent in a district Obama got 61% in (really only 60.52% but again the mainstream media will likely round up).  Yeah she's a liberal who will probably vote for almost every if not every Democratic bill that the party whips its members on that would not be popular even in this district (I live in ME-01, a couple towns away from the nearest town in ME-02), but most voters won't have that in their mind (if they've ever been aware of it) when they go to vote on November 2, 2010 or earlier by absentee ballot.  Whoever challenges her (I haven't heard of any challengers to her so far, while Mike Michaud actually does have a challenger, although he seems like an "I'm a superior person" ass (see second post) without the je ne sais quoi of Michaud's 2008 opponent that made that worthwhile for a spectator of the race) will likely have even less money than Summers did last year while Pingree will be loaded with cash (she was dating a hedge fund manager who has been a major contributer to her and to the Maine Democratic Party in 2008 - a reporter for a local alternative weekly followed her on the state primary election night to help break the story - and I haven't heard anything about them splitting up).  I'm not saying she could never be unseated (Maine's first district tossed out a four-term Democratic incumbent in 1974), but there's too much of a new car smell for that to happen next year.
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Dan the Roman
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« Reply #28 on: July 11, 2009, 07:28:30 am »

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.

The Republicans would win a House majority before they knocked off Chellie Pingree next year.  She won an open seat in 2008 by 9.80% (54.90% to 45.10%) against an opponent, 2004 nominee, 1994 primary candidate and 1990-1994 State Senator Charlie Summers, who was definitely not a wingnut (the person he defeated in the primary could have been spun as one, although I don't think he was although he was an unappologetic conservative).  It doesn't matter (in terms of gauging Pingree's vulnerability going forward) that Summers was probably grossly underfunded.  She won by 10% (the "mainstream media" coverage will almost certainly round the percentages in her last election to the nearest percent) and will be running as an incumbent in a district Obama got 61% in (really only 60.52% but again the mainstream media will likely round up).  Yeah she's a liberal who will probably vote for almost every if not every Democratic bill that the party whips its members on that would not be popular even in this district (I live in ME-01, a couple towns away from the nearest town in ME-02), but most voters won't have that in their mind (if they've ever been aware of it) when they go to vote on November 2, 2010 or earlier by absentee ballot.  Whoever challenges her (I haven't heard of any challengers to her so far, while Mike Michaud actually does have a challenger, although he seems like an "I'm a superior person" ass (see second post) without the je ne sais quoi of Michaud's 2008 opponent that made that worthwhile for a spectator of the race) will likely have even less money than Summers did last year while Pingree will be loaded with cash (she was dating a hedge fund manager who has been a major contributer to her and to the Maine Democratic Party in 2008 - a reporter for a local alternative weekly followed her on the state primary election night to help break the story - and I haven't heard anything about them splitting up).  I'm not saying she could never be unseated (Maine's first district tossed out a four-term Democratic incumbent in 1974), but there's too much of a new car smell for that to happen next year.

This seems to be based on the assumption that she is safe because she won't face a strong candidate, though if she did she would be vulnerable. I tend to be wary of this, not least because term-limits ensures she will face a half-decent foe a number of times. Secondly, there are decent people looking at the race, ones who could easily outraise Summers(who was rightly not a joke, but was a has-been).
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« Reply #29 on: July 11, 2009, 09:40:52 am »

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.

The Republicans would win a House majority before they knocked off Chellie Pingree next year.  She won an open seat in 2008 by 9.80% (54.90% to 45.10%) against an opponent, 2004 nominee, 1994 primary candidate and 1990-1994 State Senator Charlie Summers, who was definitely not a wingnut (the person he defeated in the primary could have been spun as one, although I don't think he was although he was an unappologetic conservative).  It doesn't matter (in terms of gauging Pingree's vulnerability going forward) that Summers was probably grossly underfunded.  She won by 10% (the "mainstream media" coverage will almost certainly round the percentages in her last election to the nearest percent) and will be running as an incumbent in a district Obama got 61% in (really only 60.52% but again the mainstream media will likely round up).  Yeah she's a liberal who will probably vote for almost every if not every Democratic bill that the party whips its members on that would not be popular even in this district (I live in ME-01, a couple towns away from the nearest town in ME-02), but most voters won't have that in their mind (if they've ever been aware of it) when they go to vote on November 2, 2010 or earlier by absentee ballot.  Whoever challenges her (I haven't heard of any challengers to her so far, while Mike Michaud actually does have a challenger, although he seems like an "I'm a superior person" ass (see second post) without the je ne sais quoi of Michaud's 2008 opponent that made that worthwhile for a spectator of the race) will likely have even less money than Summers did last year while Pingree will be loaded with cash (she was dating a hedge fund manager who has been a major contributer to her and to the Maine Democratic Party in 2008 - a reporter for a local alternative weekly followed her on the state primary election night to help break the story - and I haven't heard anything about them splitting up).  I'm not saying she could never be unseated (Maine's first district tossed out a four-term Democratic incumbent in 1974), but there's too much of a new car smell for that to happen next year.

This seems to be based on the assumption that she is safe because she won't face a strong candidate, though if she did she would be vulnerable. I tend to be wary of this, not least because term-limits ensures she will face a half-decent foe a number of times. Secondly, there are decent people looking at the race, ones who could easily outraise Summers(who was rightly not a joke, but was a has-been).

Do you think Charlie Cook was right to rate LA-04 (where Republican John C. Flemming, Jr., defeated Democrat Paul J. Carmouche by 350 votes (0.38%)) as a tossup for 2010 in the immediate aftermath of that delayed general election?  I know you're not saying ME-01 is a tossup but ME-01 wasn't as close in the last election and I think the same dynamic is at play.  You can't turn back time.

Also, Tom Allen's greatest percentage margin of victory (29.52%, the second greatest being 27.61% in 2002 against a challenger with no major (if any) political experience) and his second greatest percentage of the vote (60.84%, compared to 63.81% in 2002) was in 2006 against a moderate third-term State Representative (who had been a lead supporter of the well publicised "Tina's Law" cracking down on those driving with a suspended license) with the only other candidate in the race being an anti-war Independent running to Allen's left.

I'll take back my statement that the Republicans would win a House majority before they defeated Chellie Pingree next year, but I think they would have a better chance of picking up or holding enough other seats (worded that way so as not to include LA-02 Smiley ) that if they won all of them they would have a majority.
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Dan the Roman
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« Reply #30 on: July 11, 2009, 11:39:36 am »

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.

The Republicans would win a House majority before they knocked off Chellie Pingree next year.  She won an open seat in 2008 by 9.80% (54.90% to 45.10%) against an opponent, 2004 nominee, 1994 primary candidate and 1990-1994 State Senator Charlie Summers, who was definitely not a wingnut (the person he defeated in the primary could have been spun as one, although I don't think he was although he was an unappologetic conservative).  It doesn't matter (in terms of gauging Pingree's vulnerability going forward) that Summers was probably grossly underfunded.  She won by 10% (the "mainstream media" coverage will almost certainly round the percentages in her last election to the nearest percent) and will be running as an incumbent in a district Obama got 61% in (really only 60.52% but again the mainstream media will likely round up).  Yeah she's a liberal who will probably vote for almost every if not every Democratic bill that the party whips its members on that would not be popular even in this district (I live in ME-01, a couple towns away from the nearest town in ME-02), but most voters won't have that in their mind (if they've ever been aware of it) when they go to vote on November 2, 2010 or earlier by absentee ballot.  Whoever challenges her (I haven't heard of any challengers to her so far, while Mike Michaud actually does have a challenger, although he seems like an "I'm a superior person" ass (see second post) without the je ne sais quoi of Michaud's 2008 opponent that made that worthwhile for a spectator of the race) will likely have even less money than Summers did last year while Pingree will be loaded with cash (she was dating a hedge fund manager who has been a major contributer to her and to the Maine Democratic Party in 2008 - a reporter for a local alternative weekly followed her on the state primary election night to help break the story - and I haven't heard anything about them splitting up).  I'm not saying she could never be unseated (Maine's first district tossed out a four-term Democratic incumbent in 1974), but there's too much of a new car smell for that to happen next year.

This seems to be based on the assumption that she is safe because she won't face a strong candidate, though if she did she would be vulnerable. I tend to be wary of this, not least because term-limits ensures she will face a half-decent foe a number of times. Secondly, there are decent people looking at the race, ones who could easily outraise Summers(who was rightly not a joke, but was a has-been).

Do you think Charlie Cook was right to rate LA-04 (where Republican John C. Flemming, Jr., defeated Democrat Paul J. Carmouche by 350 votes (0.38%)) as a tossup for 2010 in the immediate aftermath of that delayed general election?  I know you're not saying ME-01 is a tossup but ME-01 wasn't as close in the last election and I think the same dynamic is at play.  You can't turn back time.

Also, Tom Allen's greatest percentage margin of victory (29.52%, the second greatest being 27.61% in 2002 against a challenger with no major (if any) political experience) and his second greatest percentage of the vote (60.84%, compared to 63.81% in 2002) was in 2006 against a moderate third-term State Representative (who had been a lead supporter of the well publicised "Tina's Law" cracking down on those driving with a suspended license) with the only other candidate in the race being an anti-war Independent running to Allen's left.

I'll take back my statement that the Republicans would win a House majority before they defeated Chellie Pingree next year, but I think they would have a better chance of picking up or holding enough other seats (worded that way so as not to include LA-02 Smiley ) that if they won all of them they would have a majority.
'

I think Charlie Cook made the right decision in rating LA-4 because it is a traditionally Republican seat with an incumbent who has done nothing wrong. Had alternatively Frank Harris won MD-1 instead of lost it by 1000 votes, and had McCain won the election and now had his approval ratings heading south fast, I would probably agree with a decision to keep that see vulnerable not because of the nature of the district but because Frank Harris would keep that seat competitive. Ditto for the decision to keep a focus on Sali in 2008.

That said this is not an argument for Pingree being imminently vulnerable. It is an argument that she is just the sort of incumbent in just the sort of seat that is likely to be in trouble in a 1994 type situation. There are obviously a dozen and probably two dozen Democrats in more vulnerable seats, but she is far more vulnerable than a Heath Shuler, or I would argue a Brad Ellsworth despite them being in much worse districts.

Right now I would have the seat labeled as likely democrat. If Steve Abbott or maybe even Peter Cianchette got in that would change fast.
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« Reply #31 on: July 11, 2009, 04:41:01 pm »

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.

The Republicans would win a House majority before they knocked off Chellie Pingree next year.  She won an open seat in 2008 by 9.80% (54.90% to 45.10%) against an opponent, 2004 nominee, 1994 primary candidate and 1990-1994 State Senator Charlie Summers, who was definitely not a wingnut (the person he defeated in the primary could have been spun as one, although I don't think he was although he was an unappologetic conservative).  It doesn't matter (in terms of gauging Pingree's vulnerability going forward) that Summers was probably grossly underfunded.  She won by 10% (the "mainstream media" coverage will almost certainly round the percentages in her last election to the nearest percent) and will be running as an incumbent in a district Obama got 61% in (really only 60.52% but again the mainstream media will likely round up).  Yeah she's a liberal who will probably vote for almost every if not every Democratic bill that the party whips its members on that would not be popular even in this district (I live in ME-01, a couple towns away from the nearest town in ME-02), but most voters won't have that in their mind (if they've ever been aware of it) when they go to vote on November 2, 2010 or earlier by absentee ballot.  Whoever challenges her (I haven't heard of any challengers to her so far, while Mike Michaud actually does have a challenger, although he seems like an "I'm a superior person" ass (see second post) without the je ne sais quoi of Michaud's 2008 opponent that made that worthwhile for a spectator of the race) will likely have even less money than Summers did last year while Pingree will be loaded with cash (she was dating a hedge fund manager who has been a major contributer to her and to the Maine Democratic Party in 2008 - a reporter for a local alternative weekly followed her on the state primary election night to help break the story - and I haven't heard anything about them splitting up).  I'm not saying she could never be unseated (Maine's first district tossed out a four-term Democratic incumbent in 1974), but there's too much of a new car smell for that to happen next year.

This seems to be based on the assumption that she is safe because she won't face a strong candidate, though if she did she would be vulnerable. I tend to be wary of this, not least because term-limits ensures she will face a half-decent foe a number of times. Secondly, there are decent people looking at the race, ones who could easily outraise Summers(who was rightly not a joke, but was a has-been).

Do you think Charlie Cook was right to rate LA-04 (where Republican John C. Flemming, Jr., defeated Democrat Paul J. Carmouche by 350 votes (0.38%)) as a tossup for 2010 in the immediate aftermath of that delayed general election?  I know you're not saying ME-01 is a tossup but ME-01 wasn't as close in the last election and I think the same dynamic is at play.  You can't turn back time.

Also, Tom Allen's greatest percentage margin of victory (29.52%, the second greatest being 27.61% in 2002 against a challenger with no major (if any) political experience) and his second greatest percentage of the vote (60.84%, compared to 63.81% in 2002) was in 2006 against a moderate third-term State Representative (who had been a lead supporter of the well publicised "Tina's Law" cracking down on those driving with a suspended license) with the only other candidate in the race being an anti-war Independent running to Allen's left.

I'll take back my statement that the Republicans would win a House majority before they defeated Chellie Pingree next year, but I think they would have a better chance of picking up or holding enough other seats (worded that way so as not to include LA-02 Smiley ) that if they won all of them they would have a majority.
'

I think Charlie Cook made the right decision in rating LA-4 because it is a traditionally Republican seat with an incumbent who has done nothing wrong. Had alternatively Frank Harris won MD-1 instead of lost it by 1000 votes, and had McCain won the election and now had his approval ratings heading south fast, I would probably agree with a decision to keep that see vulnerable not because of the nature of the district but because Frank Harris would keep that seat competitive. Ditto for the decision to keep a focus on Sali in 2008.

That said this is not an argument for Pingree being imminently vulnerable. It is an argument that she is just the sort of incumbent in just the sort of seat that is likely to be in trouble in a 1994 type situation. There are obviously a dozen and probably two dozen Democrats in more vulnerable seats, but she is far more vulnerable than a Heath Shuler, or I would argue a Brad Ellsworth despite them being in much worse districts.

Right now I would have the seat labeled as likely democrat. If Steve Abbott or maybe even Peter Cianchette got in that would change fast.

Pingree isnt going anywhere, even in a 1994 style environment.  This is a seat that even John freakin Kerry won by 55%-43%.  If a Republican did manage to win it, they would likely lose it again in 2012 due to the drag of the Presidental ticket(like they did in 1996).
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« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2009, 05:44:46 pm »

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.

The Republicans would win a House majority before they knocked off Chellie Pingree next year.  She won an open seat in 2008 by 9.80% (54.90% to 45.10%) against an opponent, 2004 nominee, 1994 primary candidate and 1990-1994 State Senator Charlie Summers, who was definitely not a wingnut (the person he defeated in the primary could have been spun as one, although I don't think he was although he was an unappologetic conservative).  It doesn't matter (in terms of gauging Pingree's vulnerability going forward) that Summers was probably grossly underfunded.  She won by 10% (the "mainstream media" coverage will almost certainly round the percentages in her last election to the nearest percent) and will be running as an incumbent in a district Obama got 61% in (really only 60.52% but again the mainstream media will likely round up).  Yeah she's a liberal who will probably vote for almost every if not every Democratic bill that the party whips its members on that would not be popular even in this district (I live in ME-01, a couple towns away from the nearest town in ME-02), but most voters won't have that in their mind (if they've ever been aware of it) when they go to vote on November 2, 2010 or earlier by absentee ballot.  Whoever challenges her (I haven't heard of any challengers to her so far, while Mike Michaud actually does have a challenger, although he seems like an "I'm a superior person" ass (see second post) without the je ne sais quoi of Michaud's 2008 opponent that made that worthwhile for a spectator of the race) will likely have even less money than Summers did last year while Pingree will be loaded with cash (she was dating a hedge fund manager who has been a major contributer to her and to the Maine Democratic Party in 2008 - a reporter for a local alternative weekly followed her on the state primary election night to help break the story - and I haven't heard anything about them splitting up).  I'm not saying she could never be unseated (Maine's first district tossed out a four-term Democratic incumbent in 1974), but there's too much of a new car smell for that to happen next year.

This seems to be based on the assumption that she is safe because she won't face a strong candidate, though if she did she would be vulnerable. I tend to be wary of this, not least because term-limits ensures she will face a half-decent foe a number of times. Secondly, there are decent people looking at the race, ones who could easily outraise Summers(who was rightly not a joke, but was a has-been).

Do you think Charlie Cook was right to rate LA-04 (where Republican John C. Flemming, Jr., defeated Democrat Paul J. Carmouche by 350 votes (0.38%)) as a tossup for 2010 in the immediate aftermath of that delayed general election?  I know you're not saying ME-01 is a tossup but ME-01 wasn't as close in the last election and I think the same dynamic is at play.  You can't turn back time.

Also, Tom Allen's greatest percentage margin of victory (29.52%, the second greatest being 27.61% in 2002 against a challenger with no major (if any) political experience) and his second greatest percentage of the vote (60.84%, compared to 63.81% in 2002) was in 2006 against a moderate third-term State Representative (who had been a lead supporter of the well publicised "Tina's Law" cracking down on those driving with a suspended license) with the only other candidate in the race being an anti-war Independent running to Allen's left.

I'll take back my statement that the Republicans would win a House majority before they defeated Chellie Pingree next year, but I think they would have a better chance of picking up or holding enough other seats (worded that way so as not to include LA-02 Smiley ) that if they won all of them they would have a majority.
'

I think Charlie Cook made the right decision in rating LA-4 because it is a traditionally Republican seat with an incumbent who has done nothing wrong. Had alternatively Frank Harris won MD-1 instead of lost it by 1000 votes, and had McCain won the election and now had his approval ratings heading south fast, I would probably agree with a decision to keep that see vulnerable not because of the nature of the district but because Frank Harris would keep that seat competitive. Ditto for the decision to keep a focus on Sali in 2008.

That said this is not an argument for Pingree being imminently vulnerable. It is an argument that she is just the sort of incumbent in just the sort of seat that is likely to be in trouble in a 1994 type situation. There are obviously a dozen and probably two dozen Democrats in more vulnerable seats, but she is far more vulnerable than a Heath Shuler, or I would argue a Brad Ellsworth despite them being in much worse districts.

Right now I would have the seat labeled as likely democrat. If Steve Abbott or maybe even Peter Cianchette got in that would change fast.

Pingree isnt going anywhere, even in a 1994 style environment.  This is a seat that even John freakin Kerry won by 55%-43%.  If a Republican did manage to win it, they would likely lose it again in 2012 due to the drag of the Presidental ticket(like they did in 1996).

Well, a Republican did win the open 1st district in 1994 but got trounced by Tom Allen (then the mayor of Portland) in 1996.

Regardless, I agree with your assessment. Open seats are almost always more competitive than elections with incumbents, so Pingree will probably settle into the 60% area that Allen got in all of his re-election bids. It's like the open seat in Hawaii -- if Charles Djou picks it up, it means the Democrats are getting run out on a rail anyway.
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« Reply #33 on: July 11, 2009, 06:14:06 pm »

The only predictions I have seen are the GOP gaining 5 to 10 seats from some of the Highly GOP territory they lost like ID-01, CO-04, MS-01, VA-05, NM seat held by Pearce(Hispanics would be important here.) and maybe 1 or 2 suprises like ME-01.

The Republicans would win a House majority before they knocked off Chellie Pingree next year.  She won an open seat in 2008 by 9.80% (54.90% to 45.10%) against an opponent, 2004 nominee, 1994 primary candidate and 1990-1994 State Senator Charlie Summers, who was definitely not a wingnut (the person he defeated in the primary could have been spun as one, although I don't think he was although he was an unappologetic conservative).  It doesn't matter (in terms of gauging Pingree's vulnerability going forward) that Summers was probably grossly underfunded.  She won by 10% (the "mainstream media" coverage will almost certainly round the percentages in her last election to the nearest percent) and will be running as an incumbent in a district Obama got 61% in (really only 60.52% but again the mainstream media will likely round up).  Yeah she's a liberal who will probably vote for almost every if not every Democratic bill that the party whips its members on that would not be popular even in this district (I live in ME-01, a couple towns away from the nearest town in ME-02), but most voters won't have that in their mind (if they've ever been aware of it) when they go to vote on November 2, 2010 or earlier by absentee ballot.  Whoever challenges her (I haven't heard of any challengers to her so far, while Mike Michaud actually does have a challenger, although he seems like an "I'm a superior person" ass (see second post) without the je ne sais quoi of Michaud's 2008 opponent that made that worthwhile for a spectator of the race) will likely have even less money than Summers did last year while Pingree will be loaded with cash (she was dating a hedge fund manager who has been a major contributer to her and to the Maine Democratic Party in 2008 - a reporter for a local alternative weekly followed her on the state primary election night to help break the story - and I haven't heard anything about them splitting up).  I'm not saying she could never be unseated (Maine's first district tossed out a four-term Democratic incumbent in 1974), but there's too much of a new car smell for that to happen next year.

This seems to be based on the assumption that she is safe because she won't face a strong candidate, though if she did she would be vulnerable. I tend to be wary of this, not least because term-limits ensures she will face a half-decent foe a number of times. Secondly, there are decent people looking at the race, ones who could easily outraise Summers(who was rightly not a joke, but was a has-been).

Do you think Charlie Cook was right to rate LA-04 (where Republican John C. Flemming, Jr., defeated Democrat Paul J. Carmouche by 350 votes (0.38%)) as a tossup for 2010 in the immediate aftermath of that delayed general election?  I know you're not saying ME-01 is a tossup but ME-01 wasn't as close in the last election and I think the same dynamic is at play.  You can't turn back time.

Also, Tom Allen's greatest percentage margin of victory (29.52%, the second greatest being 27.61% in 2002 against a challenger with no major (if any) political experience) and his second greatest percentage of the vote (60.84%, compared to 63.81% in 2002) was in 2006 against a moderate third-term State Representative (who had been a lead supporter of the well publicised "Tina's Law" cracking down on those driving with a suspended license) with the only other candidate in the race being an anti-war Independent running to Allen's left.

I'll take back my statement that the Republicans would win a House majority before they defeated Chellie Pingree next year, but I think they would have a better chance of picking up or holding enough other seats (worded that way so as not to include LA-02 Smiley ) that if they won all of them they would have a majority.
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I think Charlie Cook made the right decision in rating LA-4 because it is a traditionally Republican seat with an incumbent who has done nothing wrong. Had alternatively Frank Harris won MD-1 instead of lost it by 1000 votes, and had McCain won the election and now had his approval ratings heading south fast, I would probably agree with a decision to keep that see vulnerable not because of the nature of the district but because Frank Harris would keep that seat competitive. Ditto for the decision to keep a focus on Sali in 2008.

That said this is not an argument for Pingree being imminently vulnerable. It is an argument that she is just the sort of incumbent in just the sort of seat that is likely to be in trouble in a 1994 type situation. There are obviously a dozen and probably two dozen Democrats in more vulnerable seats, but she is far more vulnerable than a Heath Shuler, or I would argue a Brad Ellsworth despite them being in much worse districts.

Right now I would have the seat labeled as likely democrat. If Steve Abbott or maybe even Peter Cianchette got in that would change fast.

Pingree isnt going anywhere, even in a 1994 style environment.  This is a seat that even John freakin Kerry won by 55%-43%.  If a Republican did manage to win it, they would likely lose it again in 2012 due to the drag of the Presidental ticket(like they did in 1996).

Well, a Republican did win the open 1st district in 1994 but got trounced by Tom Allen (then the mayor of Portland) in 1996.

Regardless, I agree with your assessment. Open seats are almost always more competitive than elections with incumbents, so Pingree will probably settle into the 60% area that Allen got in all of his re-election bids. It's like the open seat in Hawaii -- if Charles Djou picks it up, it means the Democrats are getting run out on a rail anyway.

It depends on the GOP candidate, there fundrasing strength, and the national environment. However I think with the right mix of the first two and provided Pinegree leaves a sour taste in enough peoples mouth, I think you could see here face a tough reelection bid. She did trail the top of the ticket so people are definately not thrilled with her. Her performance then will have a big impact. I only suggested it as a possible surprise on election night, no where near definatively set to happen like some of you appearently missinterepreted me as saying.
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Kevinstat
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« Reply #34 on: July 11, 2009, 09:24:12 pm »
« Edited: July 11, 2009, 09:32:14 pm by Kevinstat »

I think Charlie Cook made the right decision in rating LA-4 because it is a traditionally Republican seat with an incumbent who has done nothing wrong.

Just as I thought.  Charlie Cook rates LA-02 as likely D in 2010.


I have to complain about him rating LA-04 as tossup, though.  Boo.

Yeah, that's ridiculous. Carmouche was the only Dem who had a shot at the seat. Even if he runs again, it's still likely Republican.

Right now I would have the seat labeled as likely democrat. If Steve Abbott or maybe even Peter Cianchette got in that would change fast.

You're right that Steve Abbot has been spoken of as a possible candidate and he would be a credible one.  Cianchette, on the other hand, didn't do himself any favors with his in-and-out routine in the 2006 Governor's race in 2005, which made his last-minute decision in 2000 not to run for the State Senate after muscling aside other credible prospective Republican candidates who, according to political satirist Al Diamon, had moved onto other pursuits by the time Cianchette dropped out, leaving the Republicans scrambling to find a candidate and winding up with sub-par one who lost in a district that had been Republican for decades (although it's a fairly safe Democratic seat now) in an election that resulted in a Senate became split 17-17 with one Independent (a Republican Senator from a Democratic-leaning district died in early 2002 and the Democrats won the special election and a sore GOP primary loser later switched parties making the Senate 19-15-1), ... it made that seem among Republican activists like part of a pattern.
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